User: flenvcenter Topic: Biodiversity-National
Category: Specific Organisms :: Plants
Last updated: Dec 08 2016 09:55 IST RSS 2.0
 
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Giraffes, rarer than elephants, put on extinction watch list 8.12.2016 Seattle Times: Top stories

WASHINGTON (AP) — The giraffe, the tallest land animal, is now at risk of extinction, biologists say. Because the giraffe population has shrunk nearly 40 percent in just 30 years, scientists put it on the official watch list of threatened and endangered species worldwide, calling it “vulnerable.” That’s two steps up the danger ladder from […]
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Giraffes, rarer than elephants, put on extinction watch list 8.12.2016 AP Top News
WASHINGTON (AP) -- The giraffe, the tallest land animal, is now at risk of extinction, biologists say....
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Drought-Stricken Southern Madagascar Teeters On The Edge Of Famine 5.12.2016 NPR News
Fighting extreme poverty and failing crops caused by a three-year drought, United Nations food agencies are struggling to keep the region's population from succumbing to starvation.
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Thousands of Alaska caribou are dying — and scientists don’t know why 29.11.2016 Seattle Times: Local

A herd of caribou in Alaska numbered 50,000 in 2013. Now just 22,000 remain.
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Alaska biologists research mystery of declining caribou herd 29.11.2016 AP National
JUNEAU, Alaska (AP) -- The size of a large caribou herd in Alaska's Arctic region has dropped by more 50 percent over the last three years, and researchers who have tentatively ruled out hunting and predation as significant factors for the decline are trying to determine why....
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How You Can Help Save The Bees -- Even In Winter 25.11.2016 Green on HuffingtonPost.com
America’s bees haven’t had the best year. Last month, seven species of Hawaiian bees were declared endangered in the United States — a first for the insect. There are fears that the rusty-patched bumble bee , endemic to North America, is also nearing extinction. Researchers discovered earlier this year that U.S. beekeepers had lost more than 42 percent of their honeybee colonies since 2015. “What we’re seeing with this bee problem is just a loud signal that there’s some bad things happening with our agro-ecosystems,” said study co-author Keith Delaplane in May. Bees are vital to our food supply. About 65 percent of plant species rely on the creatures for pollination. “A world without bees would be almost impossible to contemplate ,” wrote entomologist Mark Winston in his 2014 book Bee Time. Worryingly, however, in the past decade, there’s been a “precipitous drop” in bee populations around the world, Winston said. The insects are under threat from a range of perils, including pesticides and other ...
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What's the best way to improve bee habitats? 24.11.2016 Energy & Climate | Greenbiz.com
There’s more to making pollinators happy than planting lots of flowers.
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22 ideas for the foodie on your holiday gift list 21.11.2016 L.A. Times - Food & Dining

Whether you’re staying at home, or close to it, this year or traveling far afield, it can be fun to do your gift shopping locally. So this year we’ve curated our gift guide with our home state in mind, picking up a few things — olive oils and jams, chocolates and earthenware pots — that have been...

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What's the Best Way to Improve Bee Habitat? 20.11.2016 Truthout.com
Each morning last summer, Michael Roswell walked through restored meadows and abandoned New Jersey farm fields, where leggy grasses and weeds grew unchecked and thick patches of bee balm, black-eyed Susans, mountain mints, goldenrod and purple-loosestrife added shots of magenta, yellow, and white. Each time a bee landed, Roswell would swing his sweep net, capturing the insect so he could identify it by species. A doctoral student at Rutgers University, he was trying to answer a seemingly simple question: What kinds of flowers do bees like? The answer may be complicated. A  recent analysis  by researchers at the US Geological Survey detected genetic material from more than 260 different flowering plant groups in the pollen of North Dakota honeybees. And honeybees are just one species: All told, the  US Department of Agriculture estimates  there are  more than 4,000 bee species  in the United States alone. A field bursting with blooms is a bee's delight. Researchers are working to identify how to optimize ...
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Friday's Morning Email: Trump Picks National Security Adviser And Attorney General 18.11.2016 Politics on HuffingtonPost.com
TOP STORIES TRUMP OFFERS RETIRED GENERAL MIKE FLYNN POSITION AS NATIONAL SECURITY ADVISER The job means that Flynn would be Trump’s safeguard in final decisions about encounters in the South China Sea or flyovers with Russia . Take a look at the retired three-star general’s controversial remarks during the campaign, which included defending the Muslim ban proposal and waterboarding . Trump has also offered Alabama Sen. Jeff Sessions the position of attorney general , the nation’s top law enforcement officer.  John Bolton and Mitt Romney are the top contenders for secretary of state. [ Marina Fang, HuffPost ] TRUMP CLAIMS CREDIT FOR KEEPING FORD PLANT FROM CLOSING IN KENTUCKY Only problem? The plant was never closing. [ Arthur Delaney, HuffPost ] JAPANESE-AMERICAN LAWMAKERS CALL ON TRUMP TO DENOUNCE INTERNMENT CAMP COMMENTS FROM SUPPORTER And to condemn the suggestion to return to “one of the darkest chapters in American history.” [ Carla Herreria, HuffPost ] THE NORTH POLE IS 36 DEGREES WARMER THAN IT ...
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Saving seeds in the North Pole 18.11.2016 Business Operations | GreenBiz.com
With American climate policy now highly uncertain, the founder of the Svalbard Global Seed Vault talks about his efforts to protect our agricultural future.
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Reward offered in shooting of 5 elk near Ellensburg 17.11.2016 Seattle Times: Local

Two nonprofit groups have contributed $4,000 as a reward for information on the killings of five elk.
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Scientists try bacteria to halt invasive cheatgrass overwhelming the West 13.11.2016 LA Times: Commentary

It sounds like science fiction: An unstoppable invader is taking over the West, and the best hope to stop its relentless advance is a small team of anonymous scientists.

But that's what is happening in southwest Idaho, where experiments are underway to determine whether soil bacteria can halt the...

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Here’s how you protect vulnerable plants during the cold winter weather 10.11.2016 Seattle Times: Top stories

The first step is to apply a protective layer of mulch over the roots of tender plants. And if the weather dips into the 20s, you’ll want to cover them.
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Trilobites: After Dinosaur Extinction, Some Insects Recovered More Quickly 8.11.2016 NY Times: Science
Researchers studied fossilized leaves from the Patagonia region to conclude it took about 4 million years for insects to recover following the Chicxulub asteroid.
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Arup designs a living wall scaffold for London renovation 4.11.2016 TreeHugger
It looks a lot better than the usual kind, cleans the air and absorbs noise.
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Feds release plan to protect Western sagebrush country 1.11.2016 Seattle Times: Top stories

BOISE, Idaho (AP) — Federal officials on Monday released an ambitious wildfire-fighting and restoration plan to protect a wide swath of sagebrush country in the intermountain West that supports cattle ranching and is home to an imperiled bird. The 139-page plan is essentially a how-to guide that follows Interior Secretary Sally Jewell’s five-page order in […]
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Their mission: save Minnesota's rare orchids before it's too late 31.10.2016 Minnesota Public Radio: News
Researchers are tromping across the state gathering microscopic seeds from Minnesota's 48 rare orchid species, part of a nationwide effort to conserve the threatened flowers. Here's a look at what they found in the woods.
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In California, a $350 million social experiment over lawns 31.10.2016 AP National
SANTA ROSA, Calif. (AP) -- California water agencies that spent more than $350 million in the last two years of drought to pay property owners to rip out water-slurping lawns are now trying to answer whether the nation's biggest lawn removal experiment was all worth the cost....
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In California, a $350 million social experiment over lawns 31.10.2016 Seattle Times: Local

SANTA ROSA, Calif. (AP) — California water agencies that spent more than $350 million in the last two years of drought to pay property owners to rip out water-slurping lawns are now trying to answer whether the nation’s biggest lawn removal experiment was all worth the cost. Around the state, water experts and water-district employees […]
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