User: flenvcenter Topic: Biodiversity-National
Category: Specific Organisms :: Plants
Last updated: May 30 2016 12:11 IST RSS 2.0
 
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Boy rescued after gorilla is shot at zoo 30.5.2016 Durango Herald
CINCINNATI – Panicked zoo visitors watched helplessly and shouted, “Stay calm!” while one woman yelled, “Mommy loves you!” as a 400-pound-plus gorilla loomed over a 4-year-old boy who had fallen into a shallow moat Saturday at the Cincinnati Zoo.The boy sat still in the water, looking up at the gorilla...
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The best landscape designs don’t require hours of watering and maintenance 27.5.2016 Washington Post
The best landscape designs don’t require hours of watering and maintenance
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Bees, butterflies to get better habitat along Interstate 35 27.5.2016 Seattle Times: Nation & World

DES MOINES, Iowa (AP) — Soon, passengers zipping along Interstate 35 will see a lusher refuge and more food for bees and butterflies in the hopes of helping the insects boost their declining populations, six states and the Federal Highway Administration announced Thursday. That 1,500-mile stretch of road from northern Minnesota to southern Texas is […]
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To Survive The Bust Cycle, Farmers Go Back To Business-School Basics 26.5.2016 NPR: Morning Edition
Farming is entering its third year on the bust side of the cycle. Major crop prices are low while expenses like seed, fertilizer and land remain high. That means getting creative to succeed.
Climate Change This Week: Hot Spiral, Big Oil Cleaning, and More! 25.5.2016 Green on HuffingtonPost.com
Today, the Earth got a little hotter, and a little more crowded. Bizarre Biodiversity in the Boreal are wood frogs that freeze in winter, thaw in spring - another reason to help preserve these important carbon storing systems. Source LATimes Forests: the cheapest way to store carbon Boreal Circle of Fire - a wildfire emitted many tons of climate-changing carbon emissions as it burned Fort McMurray, Canada, which helps produce climate-changing fossil fuels that, when burned, help warm and dry out boreal forests. Both fires and fossil fuels up the chances for... more carbon-emitting wildfires. This wildfire is just the latest in a growing lineage of early northern wildfires, indicating climate change. OO Global Warming Spurs Wildfires Increase In Boreal Forest - worldwide, scientists have warned for decades, as rising temperatures, drying trees and earlier melting of snow spur increasing wildfires. Large-scale loss of boreal forest could help speed climate change, since their destruction releases vast ...
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Prairie gardening: Tips and tricks 24.5.2016 Minnesota Public Radio: News
Only 2 percent of Minnesota's original prairies remain, but gardeners can create spaces for native plants and species in their own backyards.
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Top 10 new species include a bizarre array of wonders 24.5.2016 TreeHugger
From a spectacularly weird anglerfish to the largest carnivorous sundew plant seen in the New World, this list of novel new species gives hope that all isn't lost.
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Meet some amazing animals and plants that are new to science 23.5.2016 LA Times: Science
Life on Earth can be found in the most surprising places, from the deep sea to pitch-black caves to just off the main road of a Gabonese National Park. Each year, about 18,000 species are discovered and described by scientists in thousands of academic publications, where regular folks may never...
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10 magical places saved by endangered species 20.5.2016 TreeHugger
In our efforts to save animals at risk of extinction, we've saved some extraordinary places as well.
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'Biting' plants discovered with teeth like ours! 19.5.2016 TreeHugger
For the first time, researchers have found calcium phosphate in the structure of plants – in this case, used to harden the needle-like hairs used to defend against predators.
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How do trees sleep? 18.5.2016 Wildlife and Habitat Conservation News - ENN
Most living organisms adapt their behavior to the rhythm of day and night. Plants are no exception: flowers open in the morning, some tree leaves close during the night. Researchers have been studying the day and night cycle in plants for a long time: Linnaeus observed that flowers in a dark cellar continued to open and close, and Darwin recorded the overnight movement of plant leaves and stalks and called it "sleep". But even to this day, such studies have only been done with small plants grown in pots, and nobody knew whether trees sleep as well. Now, a team of researchers from Austria, Finland and Hungary measured the sleep movement of fully grown trees using a time series of laser scanning point clouds consisting of millions of points each.
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Save the butterflies with DIY milkweed seed bombs 17.5.2016 TreeHugger
Munitions to love! It's time to carpet the country with milkweed to give struggling monarchs a chance.
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More evidence: Solar farms can increase biodiversity 13.5.2016 TreeHugger
From wildflowers to birds, many species make their home on a solar farm. But how the land is managed will have a big impact.
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20 Percent of Plant Species Could Go Extinct 12.5.2016 Mother Jones
One out of every five plant species on Earth is now threatened with extinction. That's the disturbing conclusion of a major report released this week by scientists at Britain's Royal Botanic Gardens Kew. The planet's vegetation—from grasslands to deserts to tropical rainforests—is being hit hard by human activity. And deforestation, pollution, agriculture, and climate change are all playing a role. The sliver of good news, though, is that some researchers are hopeful that people will be able to act in time to avert the worst of the impending crisis. "I am reasonably optimistic," said Kathy Willis, Kew's science director, in an interview with our partners at the Guardian . "Once you know [about a problem], you can do something about it. The biggest problem is not knowing." But others take a darker view. "Regardless of what humans do to the climate, there will still be a rock orbiting the sun," said University of Hawaii scientist Hope Jahren in a recent interview with Indre Viskotas on the Inquiring Minds ...
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Not hosing down your sidewalk to help the drought? It won't amount to a hill of beans 12.5.2016 LA Times: Commentary

Gov. Jerry Brown wants to forbid you from hosing down the driveway. And he is really cranky about lawn watering.

But corporate agriculture is free to plant all the water-gulping nut orchards it desires, even in a semi-desert.

This is the essence of the governor’s new long-term drought policy that...

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Stop Congress's Attack on Wildlife Protections 11.5.2016 Main Feed - Environmental Defense
Stop Congress's Attack on Wildlife Protections
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'On Borrowed Time': Human Activity Puts One in Five Plant Species at Risk of Extinction 10.5.2016 CommonDreams.org Headlines
Deirdre Fulton, staff writer

Human activity, from the razing of forests to the spewing of carbon, has imperiled large swaths of the plant kingdom, according to a landmark survey of the world's flora published Tuesday.

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First report of all the world's plants finds 1 in 5 species facing extinction 10.5.2016 Washington Post
First report of all the world's plants finds 1 in 5 species facing extinction
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Royal Botanical Gardens: Mixed report on the world’s plants 10.5.2016 Washington Post: World
A report billed as the first comprehensive look at world’s plants finds a planet slowly being ravaged by changing land use, mostly conversion of forests to agriculture to feed a growing population, and climate change.
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A Pinelands preserve grows; home to the barred owl and the pine snake 9.5.2016 Philly.com News
The seemingly endless woods flanking Route 72 might seem just "trees, trees, trees" to most motorists whizzing to and from the Jersey Shore.
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