User: flenvcenter Topic: Biodiversity-National
Category: Specific Organisms :: Plants
Last updated: Jun 28 2016 02:35 IST RSS 2.0
 
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How to plant a pollinator-friendly garden 28.6.2016 Minnesota Public Radio: Law & Justice
"People are really understanding that the key to helping all of the bees and monarchs is getting more flowers in the ground," said Marla Spivak, a professor of entomology at the U of M.
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Why Plants Are This Summer's "Coolest" Diet 24.6.2016 Green on HuffingtonPost.com
Image Credit: Huffington Post While the summer heats up, and the layers come off, eating plants will keep you "cool" in a myriad of ways. The World Health Organization , the United Nations and a number of scientific publications advocate for and recommend eating a mostly plant-based diet for health reasons, obesity-prevention and weight-management, and for the environment. 1) Amazingly good for your health! If nothing else, the number one reason to eat plants is that they are amazingly good for your health! They are paramount. Our ancestors ate a primarily whole-food, unprocessed, plant-based diet (hereinafter plant-based diet). Meat was consumed only on rare occasions and in small doses, as an accompaniment. A plant-based diet contains nearly all the nutrients, fiber, and the vitamins and minerals we need for good health. The nutrient density of plant-based foods is unparalleled. Moreover, the nutrients in plants that we don't even know about yet, contribute to our overall good health, well-being, and ...
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Mission Monarch: Saving butterflies and other wildlife in urban Philly 24.6.2016 Philly.com News
Tucked between sleek urban office buildings and the historic red brick in Center City is now a taste of wildlife.
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Rain-barrel law helps educate about water conservation in the West 23.6.2016 Durango Herald
It’s not rocket-science, and it’s not really all that controversial. But it was illegal in Colorado until last month, and it could have landed violators a $500 fine.The crime: catching rain in a barrel.In May, Gov. John Hickenlooper signed a bill that passed both chambers of the Colorado Legislature allowing a...
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Routt, Moffat counties 'launch' assault against noxious invader on Yampa River 18.6.2016 Steamboat Pilot
A flotilla of brightly colored river rafts carrying elected officials and experts in the field of noxious weeds set out June 16 for a “three hour cruise” on the Yampa River and found a monster in disguise amidst views of healthy cottonwood galleries where bald eagles watched stoically from the branches. Deer and elk, sandhill cranes and great blue herons made cameo appearances on Thursday. But the reason behind the otherwise idyllic float on the Yampa was to plot the demise of an invader. The noxious weed known as leafy spurge threatens to undermine the lush pastures and hay meadows that stretch from Hayden to Craig, as well as the natural community of plants and animals along the river. “Leafy Spurge is aggressively crowding out other plants, and it has amazing survival strategies,” retired Bureau of Land Management field manager John Husband told the group. If public and private land managers believe they can simply cut the plant down to be rid of it, leafy spurge only sends its roots 20 feet deeper ...
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Routt, Moffat counties launch naval assault against noxious invader on Yampa River 18.6.2016 Steamboat Pilot
A flotilla of brightly colored river rafts carrying elected officials and noxious weeds experts set out June 16 for a “three-hour cruise” on the Yampa River and found a monster in disguise amidst views of healthy cottonwood galleries where bald eagles watched stoically from the branches. Deer and elk, sandhill cranes and great blue herons made cameo appearances on Thursday. But the reason behind the otherwise idyllic float on the Yampa was to plot the demise of an invader. A noxious weed known as leafy spurge threatens to undermine the lush pastures and hay meadows that stretch from Hayden to Craig, as well as the natural community of plants and animals along the river. “Leafy spurge is aggressively crowding out other plants, and it has amazing survival strategies,” retired Bureau of Land Management field manager John Husband told the group. Public and private land managers cannot simply cut the plant down to be rid of it, because leafy spurge only sends its roots 20 feet deeper into the ground and ...
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This Australian rodent is likely first mammal species claimed by man-made climate change, report says 15.6.2016 Washington Post
This Australian rodent is likely first mammal species claimed by man-made climate change, report says
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A map of where your food originated may surprise you 13.6.2016 Minnesota Public Radio: News
A new study reveals the full extent of globalization in our food supply. More than two-thirds of the crops that underpin national diets originally came from somewhere else -- often far away.
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6 easy ways you can help save the bees 4.6.2016 LA Times: Commentary

Busy as a bee is an accurate statement.

 

According to the Xerces Society, a nonprofit organization working to protect bees, 75% of the world’s food crop depends on at least one pollinator, such as the honeybee. (California’s pollinator-dependent crop value is about $12 billion a year.)

That’s...

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To tame a 'wave' of invasive bugs, Park Service introduces predator beetles 2.6.2016 Minnesota Public Radio: News
The forest at Great Smoky Mountains National Park is sick, infected by invasive aphid-like bugs. To help save the trees, the park's vegetation crew uses pesticides as well as a tiny beetle from Asia.
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Police stop truck carrying 2 tiger skins from Thai temple 2.6.2016 Seattle Times: Nation & World

BANGKOK (AP) — Thai police say they stopped a truck carrying two tiger skins and other animal parts as it was leaving a Buddhist temple where monks have been accused of being involved in illegal wildlife trafficking. Police Col. Bandith Meungsukhum said Thursday that two temple staff members in the truck were arrested and charged […]
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40 Dead Tiger Cubs Found In Freezer At Thai Buddhist Temple 1.6.2016 NPR News
Thai authorities raided the temple, which operated as a zoo, after it was accused of illegal wildlife trafficking. Parks officials have been moving the temple's adult tigers to shelters elsewhere.
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Can planting more milkweed save monarch butterflies? It's complicated 31.5.2016 Minnesota Public Radio: Law & Justice
Conservationists have long blamed farmers' use of pesticides for decimating the milkweed that monarch caterpillars like to eat. But scientists say simply planting more milkweed isn't the answer.
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Can Planting More Milkweed Save Monarch Butterflies? It's Complicated 31.5.2016 NPR Health Science
Conservationists have long blamed farmers' use of pesticides for decimating the milkweed that monarch caterpillars like to eat. But scientists say simply planting more milkweed isn't the answer.
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Boy rescued after gorilla is shot at zoo 30.5.2016 Durango Herald
CINCINNATI – Panicked zoo visitors watched helplessly and shouted, “Stay calm!” while one woman yelled, “Mommy loves you!” as a 400-pound-plus gorilla loomed over a 4-year-old boy who had fallen into a shallow moat Saturday at the Cincinnati Zoo.The boy sat still in the water, looking up at the gorilla...
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The best landscape designs don’t require hours of watering and maintenance 27.5.2016 Washington Post
The best landscape designs don’t require hours of watering and maintenance
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Bees, butterflies to get better habitat along Interstate 35 27.5.2016 Seattle Times: Nation & World

DES MOINES, Iowa (AP) — Soon, passengers zipping along Interstate 35 will see a lusher refuge and more food for bees and butterflies in the hopes of helping the insects boost their declining populations, six states and the Federal Highway Administration announced Thursday. That 1,500-mile stretch of road from northern Minnesota to southern Texas is […]
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To Survive The Bust Cycle, Farmers Go Back To Business-School Basics 26.5.2016 NPR: Morning Edition
Farming is entering its third year on the bust side of the cycle. Major crop prices are low while expenses like seed, fertilizer and land remain high. That means getting creative to succeed.
Climate Change This Week: Hot Spiral, Big Oil Cleaning, and More! 25.5.2016 Green on HuffingtonPost.com
Today, the Earth got a little hotter, and a little more crowded. Bizarre Biodiversity in the Boreal are wood frogs that freeze in winter, thaw in spring - another reason to help preserve these important carbon storing systems. Source LATimes Forests: the cheapest way to store carbon Boreal Circle of Fire - a wildfire emitted many tons of climate-changing carbon emissions as it burned Fort McMurray, Canada, which helps produce climate-changing fossil fuels that, when burned, help warm and dry out boreal forests. Both fires and fossil fuels up the chances for... more carbon-emitting wildfires. This wildfire is just the latest in a growing lineage of early northern wildfires, indicating climate change. OO Global Warming Spurs Wildfires Increase In Boreal Forest - worldwide, scientists have warned for decades, as rising temperatures, drying trees and earlier melting of snow spur increasing wildfires. Large-scale loss of boreal forest could help speed climate change, since their destruction releases vast ...
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Prairie gardening: Tips and tricks 24.5.2016 Minnesota Public Radio: News
Only 2 percent of Minnesota's original prairies remain, but gardeners can create spaces for native plants and species in their own backyards.
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