User: flenvcenter Topic: Biodiversity-National
Category: Specific Organisms :: Plants
Last updated: Apr 25 2015 10:37 IST RSS 2.0
 
1 to 20 of 2,916    
Shorter showers? Nine more ways the state has to change its water ways 25.4.2015 LA Times: Commentary
Heading into the fourth summer of drought, water agencies are looking for ways to get Californians to conserve at home. Tear out lawns. Install low-flow toilets. Irrigate with gray water. But what should the whole state be doing? Opinion asked nine water experts what needs to change about how California...
Also found in: [+]
Los Angeles Launches #BioDiversifyLA to Protect Region's Rare Biodiversity 25.4.2015 Switchboard, from NRDC
Damon Nagami, Senior Attorney, Santa Monica: (Photo credit: Office of Los Angeles City Councilmember Paul Koretz, CD-5) How did you celebrate Earth Day on Wednesday? I rang in the 45th anniversary of our planetary celebration in a sunny corner of Los Angeles City Hall's native...
Also found in: [+]
Common Insecticide Affects Bees Like Cigarettes Affect Humans, Studies Find 23.4.2015 Green on HuffingtonPost.com
Bees may be getting buzzed on a harmful insecticide contributing to their massive decline, researchers reported Wednesday. Two studies released by the journal Nature found that neonicotinoids, a common type of insecticide chemically related to nicotine , are both harmful and attractive to bees, much like cigarettes are to humans. “What I think is happening is that neonicotinoids are essentially having a pharmacological effect on the neurons in the bees’ brains,” study author Geraldine Wright said at a press conference, Take Part reported. “Like nicotine, they’re essentially amplifying the rewarding qualities of the sucrose solution. The bees think it’s more rewarding so they go back to that tube to drink more of it ... As soon as it gets into their blood, they are getting a ‘buzz.’ ” The other study echoed findings from past research that indicate insecticides may be contributing to bee decline, known as colony collapse disorder. Researchers compared 16 rapeseed fields, eight treated with neonicotinoids ...
Also found in: [+]
Gardening with Deb Babcock: A Steamboat garden is where I want to bee 22.4.2015 Steamboat Pilot
The best honey I’ve ever tasted comes from bee keepers right here in Steamboat. Pat Scokes provides honey to Rising Sun Ranch, which then infuses it with lavender buds. And Merry Lester's honey is buttery enough to spread on your toast. Whether or not it’s doctored up with a little additional flavor or aroma, like the lavender honey I enjoy, all honey will take on the aroma and flavor of the plant on which the bees feed. One of the best honey bee attractors in my garden is salvia. This bed of flowers buzzes merrily throughout the summer … and the bees are so busy with the plants that they've never had time or inclination to sting me as I sit nearby watching them or even when I reach in to pull weeds or deadhead spent flowers. A single honey bee will visit 50 to 100 flowers per trip from the hive. According to a report from the United Nations, at least 70 of the top 100 crops that provide 90 percent of the world's food are dependent upon pollination by bees. Honey bees are considered a keystone indicator ...
Also found in: [+]
The Sage Grouse is NOT getting Endangered Species Act protection 22.4.2015 Environmental News Network
The U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service today abandoned its plan to give Endangered Species Act protection to Mono Basin sage grouse, a small and isolated population of prairie birds in Nevada and California that remain under threat from grazing, habitat loss and mining development. The agency’s decision ignores scientific recommendations for reversing the birds’ steep decline and relies on unproven conservation agreements with state and local communities.The Mono Basin greater sage grouse population, located in eastern California and western Nevada and also known as the “bi-state” population, is fragmented and geographically isolated from all other greater sage grouse populations. 
Also found in: [+]
Making Every Bite Count 22.4.2015 ENN Network News - ENN
(WINSTON-SALEM, NC) – Wake Forest University recently launched the Make Every Bite Count campaign that calls on colleges and universities to make a commitment to preserving and celebrating agricultural biodiversity in their own regions.
Also found in: [+]
Students, campuses in state add saving water to college life 22.4.2015 LA Times: Environment
In a residence hall at UCLA, 84 students share a floor dedicated to cutting waste and preserving the environment: They take five-minute showers, they compost and recycle, they goad each other to turn out the lights and, through a grant, they purchased reusable plastic and bamboo dishes and utensils...
Also found in: [+]
Sage grouse won’t get federal protection in Nevada, California 22.4.2015 Washington Post
In a decision that could reverberate across the West, the Obama administration announced Tuesday that it will not designate a small population of greater sage grouse in Nevada and California as endangered.Read full article >>
Also found in: [+]
Drought is making fake lawns into a real moneymaker 21.4.2015 SFGate: Business & Technology
[...] instead of water-guzzling grass, they unfurled a verdant expanse of artificial turf, paying a contractor $8,000 to install 1,000 square feet. Across a drought-plagued state whose leaders chant the mantra “brown is the new green,” more and more homeowners are choosing artificial turf so they can have a lawn and conserve water, too. Critics charge that it’s environmentally suspect because it doesn’t cool the air like plants, doesn’t provide habitats for bugs, birds and animals, and eventually is destined for landfill. [...] workers remove a 4-inch layer of dirt and grass. Workers stretch 15-foot-wide rolls of turf over the area, tucking in the edges and securing them with nails or screws. Once installed, it carries higher maintenance costs — water, plant food and weed removal, for instance — than fake grass. “Before (artificial turf) was a luxury; now it’s becoming a necessity,” said Mike O’Neill, owner of Forever Greens in Livermore, who is adding salespeople to handle a deluge of inquiries. ...
Also found in: [+]
Decreasing biodiversity affects productivity of remaining plants 21.4.2015 Environmental News Network
When plant biodiversity declines, the remaining plants face diminishing productivity, say scientists in study published April 20 in the journal Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences. "The loss of biodiversity is threatening ecosystem productivity and services worldwide, spurring efforts to quantify its effects on the functioning of natural ecosystems," said lead author Jingjing Liang, a forest ecologist from West Virginia University.
Also found in: [+]
Healthy profit for Kenyan women selling aloe to UK cosmetics firm: TRFN 21.4.2015 Yahoo: Top Stories
By Leopold Obi NANYUKI, Kenya (Thomson Reuters Foundation) - Women herders in Kenya's semi-arid Laikipia County have broken with tradition to export the leaves of a desert plant to Europe, boosting their incomes. Drought-prone El Poloi lies to the northwest of snow-capped Mount Kenya in the Great Rift Valley. According to the Kenya Meteorological Department, the area receives less than 400 mm (16 inches) of rainfall annually. The community's women say their men used to journey miles to Mount Kenya in the dry season seeking grazing for their herds, while the women and children stayed behind without enough ...
The Triumph of Seeds: Our huge debt to tiny marvels 19.4.2015 New Scientist: News
Human culture might have been very different if it wasn't for the extraordinary survival strategies of seeds, finds a book by Thor ...
Also found in: [+]
Species loss linked to unstable production of grassland ecosystem 17.4.2015 Environmental News Network
Losing plant species is directly linked to long-term declines in the stable productivity of grasslands, a new study has shown. The study demonstrates for the first time that for every decrease in plant biodiversity there is a proportional decrease in the stable production of plant biomass through time of grassland ecosystems. Over the long-term, factors such as rising levels of carbon dioxide, nitrogen, more frequent grazing, or drought, only affect ecosystem stability in as much as they affect biodiversity.
Also found in: [+]
Workshop kicks off to plot Pullman monument's future 17.4.2015 Chicago Tribune: Nation
In the two months since President Barack Obama named the Pullman factory district the city's first national monument, Chicagoans have been left to ponder what that designation will ...
Also found in: [+]
Volunteers to plant 22,000 seedlings at Flight 93 memorial 17.4.2015 Philly.com News
SHANKSVILLE, Pa. (AP) - Hundreds of volunteers are joining state forestry officials in a massive tree-planting project at the Flight 93 National Memorial.
Volunteers to plant 22,000 seedlings at Flight 93 memorial 17.4.2015 Yahoo: US National
SHANKSVILLE, Pa. (AP) — Hundreds of volunteers are joining state forestry officials in a massive tree-planting project at the Flight 93 National Memorial.
Volunteers to plant 22,000 seedlings at Flight 93 memorial in effort to reforest strip mine 17.4.2015 Star Tribune: Nation
Study: For stable grasslands, maintain plant diversity 17.4.2015 Minnesota Public Radio: News
A study published in the journal Science combined the effects of human influences and biodiversity to help researchers learn about what makes for a stable ecosystem over time.
Also found in: [+]
250 Native Elk Die Inside Fenced-in Area at Point Reyes National Seashore 16.4.2015 Commondreams.org Newswire
Also found in: [+]
A guide to rebates on drought-tolerant landscaping 16.4.2015 LA Times: Commentary
Weeks after Gov. Jerry Brown called for the removal 50 million square feet of lawn in the state, water agencies say that they are well on their way to meeting the goal.
Also found in: [+]
1 to 20 of 2,916