User: flenvcenter Topic: Biodiversity-National
Category: Specific Organisms :: Plants
Last updated: Mar 26 2015 10:39 IST RSS 2.0
 
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State-by-state glance from new report on New England plants 26.3.2015 AP National
A state-by-state look at examples of rare and endangered plants, highlighted by the New England Wild Flower Society in a report being released on Thursday:...
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Report: Diversity of New England plant life is threatened 26.3.2015 Yahoo: US National
BOSTON (AP) — From picturesque coastal estuaries of Cape Cod to the soaring White Mountains, much of New England's rich native flora is fighting for survival against increasing odds, according to what conservationists call the most comprehensive accounting ever made of the region's plant life.
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State-by-state glance from new report on New England plants 26.3.2015 Yahoo: US National
A state-by-state look at examples of rare and endangered plants, highlighted by the New England Wild Flower Society in a report being released on Thursday:
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Study of New England plant life finds many species are threatened, in decline or endangered 26.3.2015 Star Tribune: Nation
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State-by-state glance from new report on New England plants 26.3.2015 Star Tribune: Nation
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Report: Diversity of New England plant life is threatened 26.3.2015 AP Top News
BOSTON (AP) -- From picturesque coastal estuaries of Cape Cod to the soaring White Mountains, much of New England's rich native flora is fighting for survival against increasing odds, according to what conservationists call the most comprehensive accounting ever made of the region's plant life....
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MPCA seeks lake-by-lake plan to protect wild rice 25.3.2015 Minnesota Public Radio: Politics
The old sulfate standard poses a problem for mining, and the MPCA says it isn't the best way to protect wild rice.
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Bighorn Sheep Die-Off Prompts End Of Hunting Season In Montana 24.3.2015 Green on HuffingtonPost.com
By Laura Zuckerman March 23 (Reuters) - The die-off of bighorn sheep from pneumonia led Montana wildlife managers on Monday to take the unusual step of abruptly closing a hunting season tied to a wild herd near Yellowstone National Park whose seasonal mating rituals attract scores of wildlife watchers. The emergency closure came after state biologists estimated that pneumonia had claimed nearly 40 percent of a herd near Gardiner, Montana, whose numbers fell to 55 this month from 89 last year, state wildlife managers said on Monday. Such pneumonia outbreaks have been linked to contact between wild sheep and domestic ones that graze on public allotments and private lands across the Rocky Mountain West. More than 1 million bighorns once roamed the region but their numbers had fallen to just tens of thousands in the first decades of the 20th century because of unregulated hunting and disease, according to the Wild Sheep Foundation. Wildlife managers in Montana and other Western states have ...
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Lawsuit Launched Over EPA's Approval of a New Insecticide 24.3.2015 Truthout.com
Federal approval of a new insecticide as an alternative to neonicotinoids draws the ire of organizations concerned about impacts on bees and endangered wildlife. (Photo: Martin LaBar / Flickr )A group of environmental and food safety organizations will sue the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency over its approval of an insecticide that the groups say will harm threatened and endangered wildlife. The Center for Biological Diversity, the Center for Food Safety and the Defenders of Wildlife  sent a formal notice of intent to sue  to EPA Administrator Gina McCarthy this week claiming that by approving the insecticide flupyradifurone in January the agency is in violation of the Endangered Species Act. "EPA's registration of flupyradifurone - and its approval of three products containing flupyradifurone - will likely jeopardize federally-listed species and adversely modifies the critical habitat of listed species," the letter said. The EPA has 60 days to respond to the groups' claims or the matter goes to ...
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Draft Pollution Permits for Dunkirk Plant Confirm that Plan is to Keep Burning Coal 24.3.2015 Commondreams.org Newswire
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Czechs deploy wild horses from Britain to save biodiversity 23.3.2015 Yahoo: Top Stories
MILOVICE, Czech Republic (AP) — Twenty-five years ago it was a military zone where occupying Soviet troops held exercises. Today it's a sanctuary inhabited by wild animals that scientists hope will improve biodiversity among local plants as well as save endangered ...
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Is It Time To Take Green Sea Turtles Off Threatened Species List? 21.3.2015 Green on HuffingtonPost.com
HONOLULU (AP) -- Hawaii's green sea turtles should continue to be classified as threatened because its population is small and nearly all of them nest at the same low-lying atoll, federal wildlife agencies said Friday. The Association of Hawaiian Civic Clubs petitioned the government in 2012 to study whether Hawaii's green sea turtles might have recovered to the point where they no longer need Endangered Species Act protections. But Patrick Opay, the endangered species branch chief of NOAA's Fisheries Pacific Islands Regional Office, said Hawaii has fewer than 4,000 nesting green sea turtles, and 96 percent of them nest at French Frigate Shoals in the Northwestern Hawaiian Islands. This makes them vulnerable to outbreaks of disease, rising sea levels and other threats, Opay said. "You have all of your eggs in one basket, so to speak," he said. Green sea turtles nest on beaches and feed in the ocean, eating mostly seagrass and algae. Adult females return to the same beaches where they were born every two ...
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Celebrating #WorldWaterDay 21.3.2015 Green on HuffingtonPost.com
March 22nd, World Water Day, is a day to celebrate one of the planet's most precious resources, fresh water. But that resource is being rapidly depleted. "The world is thirsty because it is hungry," reports the U.N. Food and Agriculture Organization (FAO). Forty-seven percent of the global population could be living under severe water stress by 2050, according to the Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development (OECD). Agriculture is a major user of both ground and surface water for irrigation -- accounting for about 70 percent of water withdrawal worldwide. As water supplies face growing pressures from a growing population, climate change, and an already troubled food system, water security has become even more important. Unfortunately, we are way behind in our efforts to protect both the quantity and quality of the water our growing world needs today. Irrigation causes excessive water depletion from aquifers, erosion, and soil degradation, but more sustainable irrigation practices, including ...
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Wood Bison, North America's Largest Land Mammal, Will Soon Return To Alaskan Wilderness 20.3.2015 Green on HuffingtonPost.com
ANCHORAGE, Alaska (AP) — Alaska wildlife officials are preparing to release North America's largest land mammal into its native U.S. habitat for the first time in more than a century. The Alaska Department of Fish and Game on Sunday plans to begin moving wood bison from a conservation center south of Anchorage to the village of Shageluk, the staging area for the animals' release into the Innoko Flats about 350 miles southwest of Fairbanks. A hundred wood bison will be released after they're acclimated in a few weeks. "This has been an incredibly long project — 23 years in the making," biologist Cathie Harms said. "To say we're excited is an understatement." Wood bison are the larger of two subspecies of American bison but did not roam in Lower 48 states. The smaller subspecies are plains bison, which were not native to Alaska but were introduced to the state in 1928, where they have thrived. Bull wood bison weigh 2,000 pounds and stand 6-feet-tall at the shoulder. They feed on grasses, sedges and forbs ...
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GMO Science Deniers: Monsanto and the USDA 20.3.2015 Green on HuffingtonPost.com
Perhaps no group of science deniers has been more ridiculed than those who deny the science of evolution. What you may not know is that Monsanto and our United States Department of Agriculture (USDA) are among them. That's right: for decades, Monsanto and its enablers inside the USDA have denied the central tenets of evolutionary biology, namely natural selection and adaptation. And this denial of basic science by the company and our government threatens the future viability of American agriculture. Third Grade Science Let's start with interrelated concepts of natural selection and adaptation. This is elementary school science. In fact, in Washington D.C. it is part of the basic third grade science curriculum . As we all remember from biology class, when an environment changes, trait variation in a species could allow some in that species to adapt to that new environment and survive. Others will die out. The survivors are then able to reproduce and even thrive under the new environmental conditions. For ...
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No, California won't run out of water in a year 20.3.2015 LA Times: Opinion
Lawmakers are proposing emergency legislation, state officials are clamping down on watering lawns and, as California enters a fourth year of drought, some are worried that the state could run out of water.
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New rooftops in France to go green 20.3.2015 Yahoo: Politics
Rooftops on new buildings built in commercial zones in France must either be partially covered in plants or solar panels, under a law approved on Thursday. Green roofs have an isolating effect, helping reduce the amount of energy needed to heat a building in winter and cool it in summer. The law approved by parliament was more limited in scope than initial calls by French environmental activists to make green roofs that cover the entire surface mandatory on all new buildings. The Socialist government convinced activists to limit the scope of the law to commercial ...
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Three Key Lessons from São Paulo's Water Crisis 19.3.2015 Green on HuffingtonPost.com
São Paulo faces a crisis: The Brazilian city is running out of water. Citizens are growing increasingly concerned, even drilling through their basement floors in hopes of finding groundwater. An impending ration mandate could leave residents with access to water only two days a week. Scientific projections suggest the city's water supplies could run dry by year's end. São Paulo's rapid growth has outpaced its water supply's ability to replenish, and current drought conditions further exacerbate the issue. Solving São Paulo's water crisis will require drastic short-term actions. But for other cities in which growth is out of sync with water supplies, one relatively simple strategy can go a long way toward avoiding a similar crisis: employing nature as an ally. Cities that invest in protecting their watersheds can achieve three goals: 1. Improve water quality and quantity. Protecting existing forests and restoring logged areas can often improve cities' water quality and sometimes increase the availability ...
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This Spanish Pig-Slaughtering Tradition Is Rooted In Sustainability 19.3.2015 NPR News
In Spanish villages, townspeople gather at dawn to collectively slaughter a pig, then prepare every last bit as food, even the ears. The ancient ritual, called matanza, is now drawing foodie tourists.
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Ferret Camp 18.3.2015 Green on HuffingtonPost.com
Black-footed ferret (Mustela nigripes), Photo credit: Randy Matchett When senior U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service biologist Randy Matchett invited me to visit Ferret Camp this past July during the Rediscover the Prairie expedition , I expected summer camp. Instead of campers, I found prairie dogs. Instead of log cabins, I saw dozens of little metal cages. Instead of a lice check, the field crew was checking for plague. The study underway at the UL Bend Wilderness Area in Northeastern Montana is part of a national effort to curb the occurrence of plague in prairie dog colonies and federally-endangered Black-footed ferret populations. The disease and loss of habitat have decimated both species. During the 20-year effort to reintroduce Black-footed ferrets to the region, the population has peaked and plummeted in a saw-tooth pattern. In the better years, their population has hovered around 90. Currently, six known ferrets inhabit UL Bend. Black-tailed prairie dogs (Cynomys ludovicianus) Black-footed ferrets ...
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