User: flenvcenter Topic: Biodiversity-National
Category: Specific Organisms :: Plants
Last updated: Apr 28 2016 03:41 IST RSS 2.0
 
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Islands and their biodiversity 28.4.2016 The Earth Times Online Newspaper - Environment News
A new theory on why we have such biodiverse islands, while some are literally desert has been long in coming, but it’s here.
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Mobile "half-plant, half-machine" cybernetic geodesic garden preserves native plant species 26.4.2016 TreeHugger
A cybernetically enhanced garden that is able to move on its own, to fulfill its mission of protecting local plant species.
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Museum enlists volunteers in search for creepy crawlies 14.4.2016 AP National
LOS ANGELES (AP) -- Long before Southern California was paved over with freeways and covered with cars and millions of people, it was teeming with snakes, slugs, spiders, snails and uncounted other slimy, creepy, crawly creatures....
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Climate Change Alters Genes of a Mustard Plant 14.4.2016 Green on HuffingtonPost.com
California got a bit more rain and snow this year thanks to El Niño, but is still suffering the effects of many years of drought. This drought is one example of the many extreme events, including storms and fires, that are increasing in frequency as the global climate continues to change. Not only does the drought in California affect the lives of millions of people, but it also has major impacts on many other living things. While some species are declining or going extinct as a result of climatic changes, others may be able to adapt. Understanding how they do so is profoundly important for conservation. Furthermore, examining how climate change alters species gives us the opportunity to increase our understanding of the process of evolution, particularly when we can catch them in the act of evolving. In an article my collaborators and I recently published in the journal Molecular Ecology , we examined how a drought that occurred in southern California between 1997 and 2004 influenced genetic changes in ...
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LA museum enlists volunteers in search for bugs, plants 14.4.2016 Seattle Times: Local

LOS ANGELES (AP) — Long before Southern California was paved over with freeways and covered with cars and millions of people, it was teeming with snakes, slugs, spiders, snails and uncounted other slimy, creepy, crawly creatures. And it still is, say scientists at the Los Angeles County Natural History Museum who are intent on building […]
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LA museum enlists volunteers in search for bugs, plants 14.4.2016 AP National
LOS ANGELES (AP) -- Long before Southern California was paved over with freeways and covered with cars and millions of people, it was teeming with snakes, slugs, spiders, snails and uncounted other slimy, creepy, crawly creatures....
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How Do We Get Our Drinking Water In The U.S.? 14.4.2016 NPR News
Clean, safe drinking water is essential to life. To get that water, however, requires a sludge of chemicals, countless testings — and different treatment processes depending on where you live.
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5 ways to connect with nature this spring 13.4.2016 TreeHugger
Spring has sprung so get outside, get dirty and connect with the nature you love!
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This Is What Dessert Would Look Like Without Bees 13.4.2016 Politics on HuffingtonPost.com
Slide the bar over the image above to reveal what the dessert counter would look like without pollinators. Bad news for those with a sweet tooth: the absence of pollinators such as bees and butterflies would signal the end of dessert as we know it. Whole Foods Market recently removed all products from an area of the supermarket reliant on the creatures, mirroring past initiatives in the diary aisle and the produce section . The results, seen above in the bakery department for the company's Share the Buzz campaign, are dramatic. Without pollinators , 95 percent of dessert items the grocery chain stocks would either disappear completely or need to be drastically altered. Pollinators including hummingbirds, flies, beetles and moths help in the production of nearly 75 percent of crops and an equal proportion of flowering plants. Foods like chocolate , vanilla, coffee , almonds and berries wouldn't be available without them. Even dairy products used in desserts like cheesecake and creme brulee would be harder ...
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Ortho to drop chemicals linked to bee declines 12.4.2016 Seattle Times: Local

DENVER (AP) — Garden-care giant Ortho said Tuesday it will stop using a class of chemicals widely believed to harm bees. The company plans to phase out neonicotinoids by 2021 in eight products used to control garden pests and diseases. Ortho will change three products for roses, flowers, trees and shrubs by 2017 and other […]
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APNewsBreak: Ortho to drop chemicals linked to bee declines 12.4.2016 AP National
DENVER (AP) -- Garden-care giant Ortho said Tuesday it will stop using a class of chemicals widely believed to harm bees....
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APNewsBreak: Ortho to drop chemicals linked to bee declines 12.4.2016 Seattle Times: Business & Technology

DENVER (AP) — Garden-care giant Ortho said Tuesday it will stop using a class of chemicals widely believed to harm bees. The company plans to phase out neonicotinoids by 2021 in eight products used to control garden pests and diseases. Ortho will change three products for roses, flowers, trees and shrubs by 2017 and other […]
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Why You Should Plant Milkweed Right Now 12.4.2016 Green on HuffingtonPost.com
I don't usually tell people what to do (probably because very few people would do what I say anyway), but I'm going to tell you what to do... plant some milkweed! Spring is here, and it's time to plant milkweed (if you haven't already). If you're planting your garden... plant some milkweed too. If you're planting flowers... plant some milkweed too. If you aren't planting anything, plant some milkweed anyway! At this point, you may be wondering, what is milkweed, and what's my obsession with it? You might not be familiar with milkweed, but you're probably familiar with the iconic orange and black Monarch butterfly. Milkweed (a weed) is the ONLY plant the Monarch caterpillar can eat, and thus is it's only food source. Unfortunately, today in the US there is a lot less milkweed, which means there are a lot fewer Monarch butterflies. In fact, the population of Monarch butterflies has dropped so much in the past twenty years, it is possible that the Monarch butterfly could face quasi-extinction in our ...
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These Photos Capture The Startling Effect Of Shrinking Bee Populations 7.4.2016 Green on HuffingtonPost.com
In parts of rural China, humans are doing the work bees once did.  Striking new photos show farm workers in Hanyuan county, in China's Sichuan province, painstakingly applying pollen to flowers by hand.  Hanyuan county is known as the "world's pear capital." But pesticide use has led to a  drastic reduction in the area's bee population, threatening the fruit crop. Workers now pollinate fruit trees artificially, carefully transferring pollen from male flowers to female flowers to fertilize them. For photographer Kevin Frayer, the images of human pollinators tell a story of both loss and human creativity.  "On the one hand it's a story about the human toll on the environment, while on the other it shows our ability to be more efficient in spite of it all," Frayer told The Huffington Post.  Bee populations are declining worldwide, according to a February report from the United Nations. Shrinking numbers of bees could result in the loss of "hundreds of billions of dollars" worth of crops every year. But in ...
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Monarch butterflies face substantial risk of extinction 7.4.2016 rabble.ca - News for the rest of us
Thursday, April 7, 2016 Like this article? rabble is reader-supported journalism. Chip in to keep stories like these coming. Preventing monarch extinction will require active intervention by humans on a variety of fronts. It's an opportunity for those of us who believe that abundant nature enhances the quality of our ...
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Got milkweed? Monarchs still need your help 6.4.2016 rabble.ca - News for the rest of us
Like this article? rabble is reader-supported journalism. Chip in to keep stories like these coming. Three years ago, the eastern monarch butterfly population plummeted to 35 million , a drop of more than 95 per cent since the 1990s. More than a billion milkweed plants, which monarchs depend on for survival, had been lost throughout the butterfly's migratory range -- from overwintering sites in Mexico to summer habitat in ...
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Cortez kids plant White House garden with Michelle Obama 6.4.2016 Durango Herald
Five fourth-graders from Kemper Elementary in Cortez helped first lady Michelle Obama plant her White House kitchen garden on Tuesday.Students Miles Frost, Gael Garcia, Christian Rebaza, Cecelia Thom and Trenity Tillahash spent 45 minutes on Tuesday planting cabbage, lettuce, turnips and other vegetables on the South Lawn of the White...
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A delta tunnel project's lofty ambitions have been scaled back 4.4.2016 LA Times: Science

A dog trotted down the middle of a levee road as red-winged blackbirds darted in and out of the reeds. A few fishermen dangled their baited lines into the muddy brown water.

Only a close look at the Middle River revealed anything amiss in this part of the Sacramento-San Joaquin Delta. Instead of...

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Calls for Billions of People to Plant Billions of Trees 31.3.2016 Green on HuffingtonPost.com
"At first, I thought I was fighting to save rubber trees, then I thought I was fighting to save the Amazon rainforest. Now I realize I am fighting for humanity." -- Chico Mendes, Martyred Brazilian environmentalist (Right to left), Mary Evelyn Tucker, co-director of the Forum on Religion and Ecology at Yale University, Diana Beresford-Kroeger, botanist and forest activist, Joanne Campell, Graton Rancheria Tribal Council, and Wendy Johnson, ordained lay dharma teacher. Photo 2016 by Elizabeth Fenwick for Point Reyes Books. Diana Beresford-Kroeger appears to be following the dictum, "Make no little plans." The 71-year-old self-described "renegade scientist" has a plan to put everyone on Earth to work planting trees. Her "Bioplan" calls on every able-bodied person to plant a tree a year for six years to bring back the world's lost forests. Her work was the inspiration for a recent day-long, " Call of the Forest: Water, Climate, Spirit " conference attended by more than 200 people in the Northern California ...
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Pitching in to rescue a 'slice of heaven' 29.3.2016 Philly.com News
Newton Lake "is our slice of heaven," says Melissa Martell. "We can just come down to the dock, look at the lake, and forget our troubles," the Oaklyn resident adds.
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