User: flenvcenter Topic: Biodiversity-National
Category: Specific Organisms :: Plants
Last updated: Aug 07 2017 19:45 IST RSS 2.0
 
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Kilauea is still spewing lava, but there are rarer sights at Hawaii Volcanoes National Park 7.8.2017 LA Times: Commentary

That big, bubbling Kīlauea Volcano isn’t the only thing to see at Hawaii Volcanoes National Park on the Big Island these days. Scientists are particularly proud of two plants – the Kau silversword and Pele lobeliad – brought back from the brink of extinction after two decades.

These and other plants...

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Planting Resilience to Climate Change 6.8.2017 Truthout - All Articles
Aurelia Arzú inspects the cocoplum patch and reaches in to pluck the ripest fruits. It’s early in the year, and the season is just beginning, so the bush is loaded with edible, plum-sized fruit ripening from yellow to pink in the unrelenting afternoon sun. Arzú bites into the cocoplum, quite literally eating the fruits of her labor. Together with other local Garifuna women, she planted cocoplum, seagrape, and other native coastal plants on and around the sand dunes in an effort to halt their advance and prevent further displacement of Santa Rosa de Aguán community residents. Aurelia Arzú inspects a cocoplum bush planted by local Garifuna women, selecting the ripest fruit to eat. (Photo: Sandra Cuffe) "It fills me with pride to see this and to know that the women helped protect our community," says Arzú, looking out at the burgeoning vegetation. Arzú's footprints crisscross the sandy expanse, tracing a path from the Caribbean Sea lapping at the northern coast of Honduras to the dunes now dotted with ...
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Connecting the dots on biodiversity and agriculture 3.8.2017 Resource Efficiency | GreenBiz.com
Tasting a termite inspires hope that farming can align better with ecosystems.
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How indoor plants can give city-slickers a literal breath of fresh air 3.8.2017 Planet Ark News
Making time for nature can be a hard ask for people living in metropolitan areas, but new research has found that even inner-city apartment dwellers can get the benefits of being near nature with indoor plants.
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How, and why, some farmers are bringing livestock back to the prairie 1.8.2017 Minnesota Public Radio: News
Some farmers are grazing different types of animals on the same land in a carefully controlled pattern, which ideally will enhance animal welfare and also help regenerate the landscape.
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How, And Why, Some Farmers Are Bringing Livestock Back To The Prairie 1.8.2017 NPR News
Some farmers are grazing different types of animals on the same land in a carefully controlled pattern, which ideally will enhance animal welfare and also help regenerate the landscape.
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Australians celebrate 22 years of National Tree Day 1.8.2017 Planet Ark News
Green thumbs were out in force to help celebrate Planet Ark's 22nd National Tree Day, planting to support the natural environment and enjoying spending time in nature with family, friends, neighbours and colleagues.
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Trump Administration Plans to Skip Border Wall Environmental Review 31.7.2017 Truthout.com
On the long list of terrible ideas for nature preserves, a giant wall running through the middle of a vulnerable area ranks pretty high. The plants and animals of the Santa Ana National Wildlife Refuge  face just that, though, as the Trump administration aims to construct its ambitious border wall on these lands -- and sidestep the environmental review that could put the brakes on the project. The border wall project has been plagued with a host of problems , starting with the fact that it's racist and xenophobic -- as well as too expensive and logistically complex to realistically build. The government has struggled to access private land along the border, with numerous condemnation suits lingering in court. So the Trump administration came up with a bright idea: Why not start the wall with a segment on land it already owns? That land happens to lie within the Santa Ana National Wildlife Refuge, a diverse, beautiful and unique 2,088 acres in Texas initially set aside for migratory birds in the 1940s. ...
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'Secret garden' filled with rare species open after century 27.7.2017 AP National
TRUCKEE, Calif. (AP) -- Pink and yellow wildflowers burst from a lush bed of grass hidden from public view for more than a century. Towering trees and snow-capped mountains encircle the wild meadow, beckoning visitors to a largely untouched piece of California's Sierra Nevada....
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‘Secret garden’ filled with rare species open after century 27.7.2017 Seattle Times: Local

TRUCKEE, Calif. (AP) — Pink and yellow wildflowers burst from a lush bed of grass hidden from public view for more than a century. Towering trees and snow-capped mountains encircle the wild meadow, beckoning visitors to a largely untouched piece of California’s Sierra Nevada. Conservation groups bought the land in Lower Carpenter Valley north of […]
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Food and farming from Annual to Sugar beet 24.7.2017 Minnesota Public Radio: Science
This handy guide should help you navigate the world of agriculture and food production. We'll be updating it periodically with new terms, so check back!
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Mixed outcomes for plants and animals in warmer 2080s climate 20.7.2017 Environmental News Network
More than three quarters of plants and animals in England are likely to be significantly affected by climate change by the end of the century, say researchers.
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Are our gardens the monarch butterfly sanctuaries we think they are? 19.7.2017 Washington Post
Are our gardens the monarch butterfly sanctuaries we think they are?
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New Studies Show How The 2010 Gulf Oil Spill Still Starves Fish At Sea And Plants On Shore 18.7.2017 Politics on HuffingtonPost.com
One of the reports also sheds light on the effect on herring of a 1989 spill in Alaska.
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Climate change: Biodiversity rescues biodiversity in a warmer world 15.7.2017 Environmental News Network
The last month was recorded as the warmest June ever in many parts of the world. Last year, 2016, was the warmest year in the modern temperature record. Our planet is constantly heating up. This poses direct threats to humans, like extreme weather events and global sea-level rise, but scientists are concerned that it may also affect our well-being indirectly via changes in biodiversity. The variety of life, from plants and animals to microorganisms, is the basis of many services ecosystems provide to us, for example clean drinking water or food. Today, ecologists are challenged by the question: what does a warmer world mean for biodiversity? More species, less species, or no change?
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Worried about the planet? Avoid that extra kid 13.7.2017 TreeHugger
Forget light bulbs and cloth bags. The actions that will mitigate climate change most effectively are the ones nobody's talking about.
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Officials: Century old trees cut down for illegal 2-acre Pa. pot farm 11.7.2017 Philly.com News
Some of the downed trees were used for raised beds at the 2-acre site, officials said.
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Why the Open Access Movement in Agriculture Matters 7.7.2017 Truthout - All Articles
Western discourse around open access has largely been restricted to academic, scholarly communications circles. In fact, many friends and colleagues have told me they first encountered open access when, after graduating from university, they were confronted with the fact they no longer had access to school databases; or when online article searches reached the dead-end prompt "click here to pay for access." The internet now provides a free platform for sharing knowledge. How is it possible -- or even socially just -- that so many of us can't get access to scholarly research? Isn't society propelled forward by access to the science, literature, and art of the world's scholars? What if that research is publically funded? These are the primary concerns that drive the open access movement. What would these concerns look like if we removed them from the scholarly communications circle and applied them to realms beyond the ivory tower like nature, society, technology, and ultimately the intersection of those ...
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Pesticides are harming bees -- but not everywhere, major new study shows 30.6.2017 Minnesota Public Radio: News
A huge new study conducted in 33 sites across Europe finds that seeds coated with neonicotinoid pesticides harm bees living nearby. The damage, though, depends on local conditions.
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Pesticides Are Harming Bees — But Not Everywhere, Major New Study Shows 30.6.2017 NPR Health Science
A huge new study conducted in 33 sites across Europe finds that seeds coated with neonicotinoid pesticides harm bees living nearby. The damage, though, depends on local conditions.
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