User: flenvcenter Topic: Biodiversity-National
Category: Specific Organisms :: Plants
Last updated: Aug 30 2016 03:52 IST RSS 2.0
 
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The Strange, Twisted Story Behind Seattle's Blackberries 30.8.2016 NPR News
Those tangled brambles are everywhere in the city, the legacy of an eccentric named Luther Burbank whose breeding experiments with crops can still be found on many American dinner plates.
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Climate Change Pledges Not Nearly Enough to Save Tropical Ecosystems 28.8.2016 Truthout - All Articles
US Secretary of State John Kerry signs the Paris Agreement at the UN in New York while holding granddaughter Dobbs Higginson on his lap. Scientists warn that the agreement is insufficient to prevent disastrous climate change. (Photo courtesy of US Department of State) The Paris Agreement marked the biggest political milestone to combat climate change since scientists first introduced us in the late 1980s to perhaps humanity's greatest existential crisis. Last December, 178 nations pledged to do their part to keep global average temperatures from rising more than 2 degrees Celsius (3.6 degrees Fahrenheit) over preindustrial levels -- adding on an even more challenging, but aspirational goal of holding temperatures at 1.5 degrees Celsius (2.7 degrees Fahrenheit). To this end, each nation produced a pledge to cut it's own carbon emissions, targeting everything from the burning of fossil fuels to deforestation to agriculture. It seems like a Herculean task, bound, the optimistic say, to bring positive ...
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Restoring the Climate: War Is Not the Answer 26.8.2016 Commondreams.org Views
Judith Schwartz

Author and climate activist Bill McKibben has published a manifesto to “declare war” on climate change. While I agree about the urgency, I question the wisdom of invoking warfare. For one, how well have our battles against vast, multifaceted problems worked out?

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Advocates say they’ll sue to protect hundreds of species 24.8.2016 Seattle Times: Top stories

BILLINGS, Mont. (AP) — A wildlife advocacy group has filed notice that it intends to sue the U.S. government for failing to act on petitions to protect more than 400 plants and animals under the Endangered Species Act. The Center for Biological Diversity accuses the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service of leaving hundreds of species […]
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Lawsuit Launched to Speed Endangered Species Act Protection for 417 Species 23.8.2016 Commondreams.org Newswire
Center for Biological Diversity The Center for Biological Diversity today filed a formal notice of intent to sue the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service for failing to act on petitions to protect more than 417 animals and plants under the Endangered Species Act. The notice includes species from across the United States, including Florida sandhill cranes, coastal flatwood crayfish, eastern diamondback rattlesnakes and many ...
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Environmentalists to sue San Bernardino and Colton over the killing of threatened fish 23.8.2016 LA Times: Commentary

A coalition of environmental groups Monday announced plans to sue a regional water treatment authority and the cities of San Bernardino and Colton over the repeated stranding and killing of Santa Ana suckers, a fish on the federal threatened species list.

Roughly once a month, a water treatment...

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The Climate Catastrophe Cannot Be Reversed Within the Capitalist Culture 18.8.2016 Truthout.com
The biodiversity that supports the planetary ecosystem as we and our ancestors have known it is imperiled. We face a clear choice: radical political transformation or deepening mass extinction. Did you know that the Earth loses about one hundred species every day? In Extinction: A Radical History, Ashley Dawson ties together history, science and political theory to explain the impact of humans and capitalism on the world's ecosystems. Get your copy of this book by making a tax-deductible donation to Truthout! The following is the introduction to Extinction: A Radical History: His face was hacked off. Left prostrate in the red dust, to be preyed on by vultures, his body remained intact except for the obscene hole where his magnificent six foot long tusks used to be. Satao was a so-called tusker, an African elephant with a rare genetic strain that produced tusks so long that they dangled to the ground, making him a prime attraction in Kenya's Tsavo East National Park. These beautiful tusks also made him ...
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Flowering meadows benefit humankind 18.8.2016 Environmental News Network
The more it swarms, crawls and flies the better it is for humans. This is the finding of a study published in "Nature". More than 60 researchers from a number of universities were involved, including the Technical University of Munich, the Institute of Plant Sciences at the University of Bern and the Senckenberg Biodiversity and Climate Research Centre in Frankfurt. A diverse ecosystem populated by many species from all levels of the food chain provides higher levels of ecosystem services, the team reports. Even rather unpopular insects and invisible soil-dwelling organisms are important in maintaining a wide range of ecosystem services. The results underline the necessity of maintaining species-rich ecosystems for the good of humanity.
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18 Years of Data Links Neonics to Bee Decline 17.8.2016 CommonDreams.org Headlines
Nadia Prupis, staff writer

New evidence shows that the controversial pesticides known as neonicotinoids, or neonics, could be linked to bee population decline.

A new study, published Tuesday in the journal Nature Communications, looks at wild bee populations relative to the use of neonics on the oilseed rape plant in England over 18 years, from 1994-2011. The researchers found that population extinction rates went up along with the pesticide use on the plants, which are widespread throughout the country.

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Wildlife Conservation And Healthy Diet Are Closely Entwined 17.8.2016 Green on HuffingtonPost.com
Your Plant-Based Ambassador: Image by Dana Ellis Hunnes We all want to look our best, be our skinniest and healthiest selves, right? Well, I've got the secret. See, I've been a dietitian, working with individuals and patients for over 12 years. I've seen patients who eat every type of diet you have and have not heard of; from the Paleo, to the Atkins, to the Zone, to the blood-type diet. You know what? None of them worked long-term. Not only that, they never really helped the underlying disease or "problems" that the patients had; and believe me, I work with the sickest of the sick patients. I work with organ-transplant patients, cardiac patients, and all types of surgical-cancer patients. In all these years, and with all these patients, and with all my research. The one diet that works best for almost anyone**, whether you want to lose weight, reverse disease, lower your cholesterol levels, or just have clearer skin; is the plant-based diet. Not only that, but, the plant-based diet is the only diet ...
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Fueling Extinction: Fed's Protection of Endangered Species Moving At Snail's Pace 17.8.2016 Green on HuffingtonPost.com
An often cited standard response time for emergency workers in many localities is nine minutes or less. So you can only imagine the outrage, and additional loss of life, if first-responders routinely took six times longer to arrive - 54 minutes. A new peer-reviewed study suggests that's exactly what's happening when it comes to providing endangered species protections for the Nation's most critically imperiled species. Under the Endangered Species Act, the U.S. Fish and Wildlife is required to determine whether imperiled plants and animals need to be officially listed as threatened or endangered in no more than two years. But a new study I co-authored in the international scientific journal Biological Conservation found that over the past four decades, imperiled species have waited an average of more than 12 years to receive protection -- six times longer that the law allows. The study, co-authored with Fordham University postdoctoral associate Dr. Emily Puckett and Dr. Dylan Kesler, a research associate ...
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Idaho plant at center of legal battle listed as threatened 16.8.2016 Seattle Times: Top stories

BOISE, Idaho (AP) — A small, flowering plant found only in southwest Idaho will again be listed as threatened under the Endangered Species Act. The U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service on Monday announced the listing of slickspot peppergrass to take effect Sept. 16. The plant was originally listed in 2009, but Idaho Gov. C.L. “Butch” […]
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Steamboat briefs: Routt County Fair to honor memory of Sam Haslem 10.8.2016 Steamboat Pilot
A flag dedication ceremony in honor of the late Sam Haslem will be held at 7 p.m. Wednesday, Aug. 17 at the Routt County Fairgrounds. A new flagpole is being erected in Haslem’s honor on the east side of exhibit hall. The Hayden American Legion will perform the ceremony. The event is open to the public. CPW to host meeting about potential license fee hikes Colorado Parks and Wildlife is seeking sportsmen’s input on funding the future of wildlife management and conservation in Colorado. Hunters, anglers or anyone who wants to learn more about the financial challenges facing the state’s wildlife management agency is invited to attend a discussion with CPW representatives at 6 p.m. Aug. 10 at CPW’s office in Steamboat Springs, 925 Weiss Drive. CPW anticipates budget shortfalls, which could be offset by increasing resident license fees. The last increase occurred in 2006 after legislative approval the year before. Since 2009, CPW has cut or defunded 50 positions and cut $40 million from its operating budget. ...
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Time to roll out the (rain) barrels in Colorado 10.8.2016 Durango Herald
DENVER – Proponents of allowing Coloradans to collect rain from their roofs demanded “free the barrels.” On Wednesday, those barrels will be set free.That’s when a law passed by the Legislature this year takes effect, allowing Coloradans to use up to two 55-gallon barrels to catch rain for use on plants and...
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Study: Endangered Species Protection Taking Six Times Longer Than Law Allows 8.8.2016 Commondreams.org Newswire
Center for Biological Diversity A new study in the international scientific journal Biological Conservation finds that over the past 40 years, imperiled species have waited more than 12 years on average to receive protection under the Endangered Species Act, despite the fact that under the law, the process is supposed to take no more than two ...
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The average home has more than 100 kinds of bugs living in it, new study finds 6.8.2016 LA Times: Commentary

Don’t panic, but your house probably has a lot more bugs in it than you think.

The average home contains more than 100 different species of flies, spiders, beetles, ants and other bugs — with an even greater variety inside houses in wealthier neighborhoods, according to a new study in Biology Letters.

...
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Rich homes come with a greater variety of everything — including bugs 5.8.2016 Washington Post
A study published in the journal Biology Letters seems to point to what is known in biodiversity circles as "the luxury effect" — the more affluent the area, the more diverse its animals
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'Bundy Militia' Pocket Constitution Tops Amazon Charts Amidst Trump-Khan Feud 4.8.2016 Commondreams.org Newswire
'Bundy Militia' Pocket Constitution Tops Amazon Charts Amidst Trump-Khan Feud
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Good Earth Briefs 4.8.2016 Durango Herald
Botany outing to view subalpine wildflowersThe Southwest Chapter of the Colorado Native Plant Society is sponsoring a wildflower trip to Lizard Head Pass on Saturday. The hike will follow a gentle trail through wetland and meadow habitats, eventually entering evergreen forest to discover...
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Butterflies use differences in leaf shape to distinguish between plants 29.7.2016 Environmental News Network
The preference of Heliconius butterflies for certain leaf shapes is innate, but can be reversed through learning. These results support a decades-old theory for explaining the evolution of the exceptional diversity of leaf shapes in passionflowers.The tropical butterfly Heliconius eratodistinguishes between shapes, and uses them as a cue for choosing the plants on which to feed and lay eggs, shows new research by scientists from the University of Cambridge and the Smithsonian Tropical Research Institute. The butterfly has an innate preference for passionflowers with particular leaf shapes, but can learn to overcome this preference in favor of other shapes, especially those that are the most abundant in the local flora. These preferences can promote the evolution of plant biodiversity.
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