User: flenvcenter Topic: Biodiversity-National
Category: Specific Organisms :: Plants
1 new since Jul 28 2014 15:23 IST RSS 2.0
 
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We're putting a forest on a climate-change fast-track 28.7.2014 New Scientist: GM Organisms
An ambitious experiment that exposes a natural woodland to rising carbon dioxide levels will tell us what's in store for the world's trees, says Rob ...
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Bombs for Butterflies 27.7.2014 Commondreams.org Views
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Smart, simple ways to conserve water outdoors 26.7.2014 Seattle Times: Top stories
This time of year, more than 40 percent of home water consumption takes place outdoors. Although most tips for reducing outdoor water use have been around for decades, let’s take a fresh look at how to make those strategies work in real life in our region.
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Earth Is In The Early Days Of A New Mass-Extinction Event, Researchers Warn 26.7.2014 Green on HuffingtonPost.com
Remember the mass-extinction event that wiped out the dinosaurs? Earth is apparently on the verge of another great biological extinction, and humans are solely to blame. Scientists have previously classified five large-scale losses of animal life as mass-extinction events , all of which occurred millions of years ago. In recent years, the planet has seen the loss of hundreds of species of animals , and according to a new analysis from an international team, the planet may be in the early days of its sixth mass-extinction event . As part of the study, researchers analyzed previous studies and scientific data to draw their conclusion that human activities and population surges worldwide -- not a catastrophic event, like an asteroid impact, for example -- are responsible for the drastic decline of animal life. Lead author Rodolfo Dirzo , a biology professor at Stanford University, cites actions like overexploitation of resources and habitat destruction as examples of harmful human activities. Since 1500, ...
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As cottonwood planting takes root, worries grow 25.7.2014 Minnesota Public Radio: News
When people hear about Maria DeLaundreau's summer cottonwood planting project, they think she's crazy. Plant more of those messy, trees? What about the seeds?
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This Is Where Confiscated Wildlife Items Go To Die Another Death 23.7.2014 Green on HuffingtonPost.com
Don't be fooled by the building's unremarkable exterior; inside this staid warehouse northeast of Denver resides one of the world's largest concentrations of items from the illegal wildlife trade. The 22,000-square-foot warehouse, officially called the " National Wildlife Property Repository ," belongs to the U.S. Fish & Wildlife Service and contains upward of a million items, ranging from ivory and furs to stuffed tiger fetuses. In a video published Tuesday, The Atlantic offered a revealing look inside the repository, in addition to the National Eagle Repository next door. Some of the items are destroyed after arriving at the repository -- including nearly 6 tons of ivory which were crushed at a high-profile event last year -- while other artifacts live on in conservation agencies, to be used as instructional tools in the fight against the illegal wildlife trade. " People will buy just about anything ," says Doni Sprague, a wildlife repository specialist, reflecting on the devastating range of artifacts ...
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Waste Less, Pollute Less: Using Urban Water Conservation to Advance Clean Water Act Compliance 23.7.2014 Switchboard, from NRDC
Larry Levine, Senior Attorney, New York: In many parts of the United States, cities and suburbs -- and the wastewater and stormwater utilities that serve them -- are among the largest sources of water pollution. They need hundreds of billions of dollars to repair, maintain, and...
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Arturo, 'World's Saddest Bear,' Won't Be Moved, Argentine Zoo Says 23.7.2014 Green on HuffingtonPost.com
Arturo, the only polar bear in Argentina, living in captivity at a zoo in Mendoza, 650 miles west of Buenos Aires, is pictured at his enclosure on Feb. 5, 2014. Specialists and activists are lobbying to transfer old Arturo to a zoo in Canada to spare him from the Argentine heat. MENDOZA, Argentina (AP) — Argentina's last captive polar bear will remain in the country despite a petition by more than a half million people asking that it be moved to Canada. The director of the Mendoza Zoo in western Argentina told The Associated Press on Tuesday that the 28-year-old bear is too old to safely be relocated. Animal rights advocates say the bear, named Arturo, paces nervously in his concrete enclosure and they suggest the animal suffers from depression. They have campaigned to move the bear to a zoo in Winnipeg, Manitoba, which has welcomed the idea. Even former U.S. House Speaker Newt Gingrich has rallied to the cause. "If you love animals the way I do, please sign the petition to help the Argentinian polar ...
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Future conservationists help out at Heinz refuge 22.7.2014 Philly.com News
At the beginning of a work week that promised hot, steamy days, five high school students put on bug repellent, yellow hard hats, gardening gloves, and work boots before Monday's shift at the John Heinz National Wildlife Refuge at Tinicum.
Northwest wildlife refuges to phase out pesticide 22.7.2014 Yahoo: Top Stories
GRANTS PASS, Ore. (AP) — Federal wildlife refuges in the Northwest and Hawaii will phase out a class of pesticides that are chemically similar to nicotine because they pose a threat to bees and other pollinators key to crop growth.
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Northwest wildlife refuges to phase out pesticide 22.7.2014 AP Washington
GRANTS PASS, Ore. (AP) -- Federal wildlife refuges in the Northwest and Hawaii will phase out a class of pesticides that are chemically similar to nicotine because they pose a threat to bees and other pollinators key to crop growth....
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Wildlife refuges in Northwest, Hawaii are 1st in nation to phase out bee-killing pesticide 22.7.2014 Star Tribune: Nation
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The World Just Had Its Hottest June On Record 21.7.2014 Green on HuffingtonPost.com

WASHINGTON (AP) — The globe is on a hot streak, setting a heat record in June. That's after the world broke a record in May.


The National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration announced Monday that last month's average global temperature was 61.2 degrees, which is 1.3 degrees higher than the 20th century average. It beat 2010's old record by one-twentieth of a degree.


NOAA climate monitoring chief Derek Arndt said the record was driven by unusually hot oceans, especially the Pacific and Indian oceans.


Heat records broke on every continent but Antarctica, especially in New Zealand, northern South America, Greenland, central Africa and southern Asia.


The United States had only its 33rd hottest June.


Global temperature records go back to 1880 and this is the 352nd hotter than average month in a row.

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This invasive plant is swallowing the U.S. at the rate of 50,000 baseball fields per year 18.7.2014 TreeHugger
In the dictionary next to the definition of "invasive species", they could show a photo of kudzu.
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An Open Letter From a Farmer to Angry Vegetarians 18.7.2014 Green on HuffingtonPost.com
About once a week I get an email or comment from the Animal Rights contingent. It is expected and usually I do not engage. I need to remember that when I published my first book I was a vegetarian raising a few laying hens and pet rabbits. Readers who knew me as the 25-year-old girl they read about (at the time just farm-curious and toying with the idea of homesteading) meet a very different woman on my current blog. To read that book and then pop into a blog where just seven years later that same vegetarian is raising hogs, lambs, and poultry for meat is unsettling and shocking to some readers. And so I get these notes from what I call the Angry Vegetarians. The folks who feel personally betrayed, not just for my change of diet but my change in ideas. Yesterday I was called a murderer. I've been called that many time, and in some emails, that is the nicest part of the correspondence. The following is a letter to that Angry Vegetarian and to any others who may feel the same way. But before you read it ...
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Letter: Penstemon agreement not enough protection 16.7.2014 Salt Lake Tribune
The conservation agreement highlighted in your recent op-ed (“Penstemon Agreement Saves More Flowers than Endangered Species Act Would,” July 11) is the latest, last-minute effort by individuals wanting to derail all Endangered Species Act listing proposals. No plants have been listed in the Uinta Basin since 1992; only one Utah plant species has been listed since 2001. The op-ed correctly states the act protects plants only on federal lands or other lands where federal action, like a permit, i...
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For bees (and flowers), tongue size matters 16.7.2014 EcoTone
For bees (and flowers), tongue size matters
Carbon Dioxide Suffers Just Like Jews In Nazi Germany, 'Expert' Says On CNBC 16.7.2014 Green on HuffingtonPost.com
"The demonization of carbon dioxide is just like the demonization of the poor Jews under Hitler," said Princeton University professor William Happer while being interviewed on "Squawk Box" on CNBC. Before host Andrew Ross Sorkin could respond in incredulity, Happer went on to say, "Carbon dioxide is actually a benefit to the world, and so were the Jews." Happer was introduced as an expert on climate change, despite there being no proof that he is one . When ExxonMobil donated hundreds of thousands of dollars to Happer's organization, the Marshall Institute, they probably didn't expect him to make such haphazard comments. These statements were in response to Sorkin's curiosity about a quote attributed to Happer where he compared climate change to the Holocaust. In the interview, Happer was visibly unhappy with Sorkin's prodding, pointedly telling him to "shut up" in response to Sorkin saying that Happer denies the existence of global climate change. Now Happer is absolutely correct when he says the world ...
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Pesticide impairs bees' ability to forage 14.7.2014 Environmental News Network
A study that involved fitting bumblebees with tiny radio frequency tags found long-term exposure to a neonicotinoid pesticide hampers bees' ability to forage for pollen. The research by Nigel Raine, a professor at the University of Guelph, and Richard Gill of Imperial College, London, shows how long-term pesticide exposure affects individual bees' day-to-day behaviour, including pollen collection and which flowers worker bees chose to visit.
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Hints Of Hope Emerge In Deadly American Bat Plague 13.7.2014 Green on HuffingtonPost.com
This story originally appeared on Mother Nature Network. About 6 million American bats have died from white-nose syndrome since its mysterious 2006 debut, and the disease's rapid spread still threatens the survival of some species. But if scientists are right about a few little brown bats in the U.S. Northeast, there may finally be a light at the end of the tunnel. A new study from Vermont suggests up to 96 percent of little brown bats survived last winter's hibernation in Aeolus Cave, a major bat hangout that has been riddled with white-nose syndrome (WNS) since 2008. First reported by the Associated Press, this is at least the third known case of WNS seemingly losing its grip on a bat colony. Two caves in New York have shown similar hints of recovery, and biologists in Vermont also recently found the rate of that state's bat die-off may be slowing down . The Aeolus Cave researchers radio-tagged 442 little brown bats before hibernation began last fall, then installed equipment to record how many tagged ...
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