User: flenvcenter Topic: Biodiversity-National
Category: Specific Organisms :: Plants
Last updated: Jun 29 2015 22:37 IST RSS 2.0
 
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Native-species habitat bill passes the Assembly 29.6.2015 Philly.com News
TRENTON A measure that would encourage homeowners to create way stations for birds, monarch butterflies, and other wildlife has unanimously passed the New Jersey General Assembly and is awaiting action in the Senate.
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Stupidity and Intelligence: Science, GMOs and Our Food 29.6.2015 Commondreams.org Views
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Navy bases do their part to conserve water in California drought 28.6.2015 LA Times: Commentary
With its red and green synthetic turf, Destroyer Field at Surface Warrior Park is meant to reduce water use at Naval Base San Diego. The softball field needs occasionally to be combed, but not watered or mowed.
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Alarming Decline in Monarch Population Justifies Immediate Action: NRDC Urges UN To Declare Mexican Butterfly Refuge “In Danger” 26.6.2015 NRDC: News/Media Center Feed
Advocates for monarch butterflies are heading to a World Heritage Committee meeting in Bonn, Germany, urging immediate action to increase protections for the migrating monarch butterfly population that spends the winter in Mexico’s Monarch Butterfly Biosphere Reserve, a World Heritage site. 
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California Drought Leads To Inventive Water Conservation Methods In Long Beach 26.6.2015 Green on HuffingtonPost.com
The drought in California has reached a near- Tatooine level of dryness, and the state is looking for any way to conserve what's left of its water supply. To that end, officials in Long Beach have gotten creative about tracking down those who don't comply. As Long Beach Water Department director of operations Tai Tseng described to HuffPost Live on Wednesday, the city has been mostly successful thus far in its water conservation methods , but its also found a way to keep consumers honest. "Ninety-eight percent of our residents are complying with these restrictions, but there are a few that are not," Tseng said. "We have a comprehensive media system to determine who these residents are. Once we determine who these residents are, we can actually install a smart register on their water meter that allows us to have five-minute interval water usage data from that resident and then allows us to figure out if they're violating our water-use restrictions." There's clearly nowhere to hide your water-lavish ...
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Definitive Proof That There's Nothing Cuter Than A Baby Hippo Learning To Swim 24.6.2015 Green on HuffingtonPost.com
Baby pygmy hippo Obi might only be 3 weeks old, but he sure is getting the hang of this whole swimming thing. Obi and his mom, Petre, ventured into a large pool at the Melbourne Zoo last week for Obi's first real swim -- and, by the looks of it, he's a natural. As Obi bobs up and down and flicks his tiny hippo ears, we can't help falling in love. For the past few weeks, Obi -- whose name means "heart" in Igbo, a Nigerian language -- had been learning to swim in a shallow nursery pool, but zookeepers thought it was time for him to take the next step. Pygmy hippos, which grow to about one-quarter the weight of a regular hippopotamus , are highly endangered, with only a few thousand estimated left in the wild. Below are a few GIFs so you can watch Obi on an infinite loop: -- This feed and its contents are the property of The Huffington Post, and use is subject to our terms. It may be used for personal consumption, but may not be distributed on a ...
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New Guinea Flatworm, One Of The World's 'Worst' Invasive Species, Found In Florida 24.6.2015 Green on HuffingtonPost.com
A worm called one of the world's "worst" invasive species by conservationists has been found in the United States for the first time, an international team of researchers announced on Tuesday. The Platydemus manokwari , also called the New Guinea flatworm, poses a major threat to the planet's snail biodiversity, according to an article published in the scientific journal PeerJ. "It is considered a danger to endemic snails wherever it has been introduced," the report states. The flatworm is thought to originate in New Guinea, but researchers say it has spread to Florida, New Caledonia, Puerto Rico, Singapore, the Solomon Islands, and the Wallis and Futuna Islands. Jean-Lou Justine , who led the research team, said that scientists had previously found the animal in other Pacific islands and in France. Platydemus manokwari in Coral Gables, Florida. "Once the New Guinea flatworm arrives in a new territory, and providing the conditions are right, it reproduces quickly," Justine said in an email to The ...
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Notorious invasive worm slithers into Florida 24.6.2015 Yahoo: Top Stories
One of the most notorious invasive species in the world has turned up in the mainland United States, raising new concerns about a flatworm that devours snails and earthworms, researchers said Tuesday. Now it has been spotted in several gardens in Miami, Florida and experts fear that it may upset the local ecosystem by eating earthworms and native snails that are important for soil and plants. The flatworm, which is native to New Guinea, also doesn't have many known ...
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Climate-resistant restoration announced at NYC ecological treasure 23.6.2015 TreeHugger
A habitat restoration is planned for Jamaica Bay Wildlife Refuge.
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As its water dwindled, Fresno cracked down hard 22.6.2015 LA Times: Environment
Don Wells spotted a trail of pooling water and slowed his van. Runoff from a sprinkler gone rogue streamed down a long block of thirsty brown lawns, watering the sidewalk.
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Santa Barbara's cautious relationship with water offers a drought lesson 21.6.2015 LA Times: Top News
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Why Tribal Peoples Are the Best Conservationists 19.6.2015 Truthout - All Articles
Awá man making arrows, Brazil. The Awá have an intimate knowledge of their rainforest and are extremely skilled hunters. (Photo: Survival International) Awá Indians  in Brazil’s north-eastern Amazon rainforest know at least 275 useful plants, and at least 31 species of honey-producing bee. Each bee type is associated with another rainforest animal like the tortoise or the tapir. In the 1980s, the Great Carajás Project opened up Awá lands to illegal loggers and ranchers. More than 30% of one of their territories has since been destroyed. The Baka have developed sophisticated codes of conservation yet face persecution by wildlife officers. (Photo: Selcen Kucukustel/Atlas) Baka “Pygmies” of Central Africa eat 14 kinds of wild honey and more than 10 types of wild yam. By leaving part of the root intact in the soil, the Baka spread pockets of wild yams – a favorite food of elephants and wild boar – throughout the forest. The Baka are taught not to overhunt the animals of the forest. A Baka woman said, “When ...
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Lawsuit Launched to Protect Endangered Wildlife From Dangerous New Chemical Cocktail 19.6.2015 Commondreams.org Newswire
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L.A. museums and the art of water conservation 17.6.2015 LA Times: Opinion
The reach of the California drought has extended to some high-profile art museums with lush gardens and abundant water features. Here’s what three key Los Angeles-area institutions are doing to cut back:
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Scientists fly drones to map sagebrush for wildfire strategy 17.6.2015 AP National
BOISE, Idaho (AP) -- Scientists have deployed drones over western Idaho to map a little-known landscape as part of an effort to reduce wildfire risks and protect sage grouse and other wildlife across the West....
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Scientists fly drones to map sagebrush for wildfire strategy 17.6.2015 Yahoo: Top Stories
BOISE, Idaho (AP) — Scientists have deployed drones over western Idaho to map a little-known landscape as part of an effort to reduce wildfire risks and protect sage grouse and other wildlife across the West.
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Eastern Puma Declared Extinct, Removed From Endangered Species List 17.6.2015 Commondreams.org Newswire
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When 'womanless weddings' were trendy 16.6.2015 Minnesota Public Radio: News
With bearded brides and deep-voiced flower girls, these surreal, public-spirited rituals delighted American communities for decades.
Reintroduction of bobwhite quail to Pinelands going well 16.6.2015 Philly.com News
Their Pinelands habitat had been carefully prepared over more than 10 years. Controlled forest fires and tree-thinning opened up the landscape. And tall grasses filled in, providing cover for nests.
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Want to help the bee populations? Grow a variety of flowers 15.6.2015 LA Times: Opinion
The European honey bee was brought to this continent in the early 1600s, but not to pollinate crops. Rather, early settlers sought beeswax to make candles. Native bees, which are mostly solitary ground-dwellers, were effective pollinators but did not provide significant quantities of wax or honey.
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