User: flenvcenter Topic: Biodiversity-National
Category: Specific Organisms :: Plants
Last updated: Jan 17 2017 24:55 IST RSS 2.0
 
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Pee for Plants 17.1.2017 Green on HuffingtonPost.com
Lately there has been a whole lot of talk about golden showers. For most people, showers are something that come in April and fall from the clouds in the sky, not something you go to Russian hotel rooms to find. That is as it should be. Instead we are focusing on urine and its relationship to our soon to be inaugurated PEEOTUS. In general, urine is something we think about only when we have to find a bathroom. Some exceptions: If you are into water conservation you may ascribe to the 'if it's yellow let it mellow' school of toilet flushing. If you have prostate issues, well, you have my sympathies. But there is a good way that urine can go with showers. Urine comes out of you sterile- so even if you are a 'germaphobe' it is safe to use. It also contains all of the necessary plant nutrients. So- with a little dilution- you can combine that urine with those April showers (or water from the hose or tap) and get truly spectacular May flowers ...
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On wildness: Community and control in urban green space 13.1.2017 rabble.ca - News for the rest of us
Friday, January 13, 2017 The city is a structured place. Roads and sidewalks follow mainly straight lines, while houses, apartment buildings, offices and shops march dutifully alongside them, one after the other. Many of us live structured lives within our concrete, highly controlled world, following the schedules, routines, and norms of our workplaces and leisure activities. Urban green space is often no different -- processions of trees stand on manicured turf and garden beds are filled with neat lines of annuals. Community use of park space is defined and limited by a stifling array of municipal policies, bylaws, permits and red tape. The wild and wayward life of a tiny, disproportionately lively square of parkland in Toronto's west end has a lesson to teach us about the rewards of relinquishing ...
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PRESSURE FROM GRAZERS HASTENS ECOSYSTEM COLLAPSE FROM DROUGHT 12.1.2017 Environmental News Network
Extreme droughts, intensified by a warming climate, are increasingly causing ecosystem collapse in many regions worldwide. But models used by scientists to predict the tipping points at which drought stress leads to ecosystem collapse have proven unreliable and too optimistic.A new study by scientists at Duke University and Beijing Normal University may hold the answer why.   The researchers found that these tipping points can happen much sooner than current models predict because of the added pressures placed on drought-weakened plants by grazing animals and fungal pathogens.
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Rusty patched bumblebee now an endangered species 11.1.2017 AP National
TRAVERSE CITY, Mich. (AP) -- The rusty patched bumblebee has become the first bee species in the continental U.S. to be declared endangered after suffering a dramatic population decline over the past 20 years, federal officials said Tuesday....
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Bee found in Minnesota placed on endangered species list 11.1.2017 Minnesota Public Radio: News
The Fish and Wildlife Service will develop a plan to protect the rusty patched bumble bee, but it says the public can help by planting native flowers, limiting pesticide use and leaving native habitat where bees can overwinter.
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APNewsBreak: Rusty patched bumblebee declared endangered 10.1.2017 Seattle Times: Nation & World

TRAVERSE CITY, Mich. (AP) — The rusty patched bumblebee has become the first bee species in the continental U.S. to be declared endangered after suffering a dramatic population decline over the past 20 years, federal officials said Tuesday. The U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service told The Associated Press it was adding the bee to the […]
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Rising Carbon Emissions from Warming Soil Highlight Benefits of Land Restoration 9.1.2017 WRI Stories
Rising Carbon Emissions from Warming Soil Highlight Benefits of Land RestorationAdd Comment|PrintFarmers in Malawi use nitrogen-fixing plants to rebuild soil carbon and boost yields. Photo by Robert Winterbottom/WRI A new study in the journal Nature explores a vicious cycle: as a changing climate driven by greenhouse gas emissions warms the planet, soils heat up and the micro-organisms that live in the soil start to expel heat-trapping carbon dioxide, reinforcing the problem of climate... [[ This is a content summary only. Visit my website for full links, other content, and more! ...
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Philadelphia's new Revolutionary War museum will showcase the era's sights - and even the smell 8.1.2017 LA Times: Commentary

History buffs will be able to peer into the eyes of a “most excellent likeness” of George Washington and get an actual whiff of the Revolutionary War when Philadelphia’s Museum of the American Revolution opens this year.

Curators have scoured the country for the priceless artifacts to display in...

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Chesapeake Bay is healthier than before, but still gets C- in new report 8.1.2017 LA Times: Commentary

The Chesapeake Bay is healthier today by nearly every measure, with upticks in blue crabs and striped bass, record levels of underwater grasses and the clearest water in years.

That's the upshot of a two-year "2016 State of the Bay" report from the Chesapeake Bay Foundation about the vast estuary...

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New trash-collecting barge looks like a cross between a steamboat and a conch shell 7.1.2017 LA Times: Commentary

Removing debris from Upper Newport Bay could be aided by a proposal that's been floating around City Hall for several months — a trash-collecting barge.

At first glance, the so-called water wheel looks like a cross between a steamboat and a conch shell. From its proposed stationary position where...

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Bat-friendly tequila, research play role in species recovery 7.1.2017 AP Business
ALBUQUERQUE, N.M. (AP) -- Wildlife officials say it might be time for a toast now that a once-rare bat important to the pollination of plants used to produce tequila is making a comeback....
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Bat-friendly tequila, research play role in species recovery 7.1.2017 Seattle Times: Nation & World

ALBUQUERQUE, N.M. (AP) — Wildlife officials say it might be time for a toast now that a once-rare bat important to the pollination of plants used to produce tequila is making a comeback. The U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service on Thursday proposed removing the lesser long-nosed bat from the endangered species list. Mexico delisted the […]
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Californians saved less water in November than previous year, water board report says 5.1.2017 LA Times: Commentary

California water conservation took a slight step backward in November, officials announced Wednesday, possibly due in part to an unusually wet fall and months of successful conservation efforts.

Californians used 18.8% less water this past November compared with November 2013, the benchmark year...

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San Diego State botanists name plant discovery after Jimi Hendrix 29.12.2016 Seattle Times: Nation & World

Scientists who discovered the plant in Baja California named the plant Dudleya hendrixii, or “Hendrix’s live forever,” in honor of the late guitarist.
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Jimi Hendrix's legend grows: Botanists name a plant discovery after him 29.12.2016 LA Times: Commentary

A succulent plant discovered in Mexico more than 20 years ago by San Diego State University botany students may look small, but its name evokes a towering figure.

Mark Dodero, a senior biologist with the environmental consulting firm Recon, was listening to Jimi Hendrix’s “Voodoo Child” while driving...

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Gypsum council rejects plan for gravel pit above Colorado River near Dotsero 14.12.2016 Denver Post: Business
After a steady stream of Eagle County residents blasted a plan to develop a gravel pit on a mesa above the Colorado River near Dotsero, the Gypsum Town Council took barely two minutes Tuesday night to unanimously reject the project.
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They Lost Their Jungles to Plantations, but These Indigenous Women Grew Them Back 11.12.2016 Truthout - All Articles
It is early morning in Dhepagudi, a sleepy hamlet nestled in the green hills of Odisha, India. Admai Kumruka is sifting millet in a traditional sieve made of bamboo strips. Children mill around, playing on a mud and sand mound. A few huts down, Rello Dindika is sorting through harvested corn. A group of women are chopping fresh pumpkin leaves and flowers for a stir-fry dish. They have finished morning chores and farming work and are now preparing breakfast. Some of the corn will be ground to a powder for a wholesome porridge. The rest will be popped in clay vessels for evening snacks. "We have mandya or kosla [varieties of millets] or maka [corn] porridge in the mornings sometimes with roots and tubers or gondri saag [a variety of greens] foraged from the jungles," Kumruka says. "In the afternoons and evenings, we make rice with tubers, vegetables and legumes. Sometimes we add wild mushrooms or jhotta [okra] and holud [turmeric roots]." The women belong to the Khond community, a large indigenous tribal ...
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Awesome Is What The 2016 National Geographic 'Nature Photographer Of The Year' Winners Are 10.12.2016 Green on HuffingtonPost.com
Just like last year , the winners of the 2016 National Geographic Nature Photographer of the Year Contest  amaze and astound us.  This year the Grand Prize goes to Greg Lecoeur ’s jaw-dropping shot of the feeding frenzy that accompanies sardine migration along the Wild Coast of South Africa.  Additional prizes are given in four categories: Action, Animal Portraits, Landscapes and Environmental Issues.  Check out the rest of the awesome  photography  below: -- This feed and its contents are the property of The Huffington Post, and use is subject to our terms. It may be used for personal consumption, but may not be distributed on a ...
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Hundreds of species are already going locally extinct because of climate change, study says 9.12.2016 LA Times: Science

As the planet warms, species around the world are engaged in a race against time to either adapt or move to cooler habitats. Hundreds of them are already losing, according to a recent study in PLoS Biology.

As animals and plants move to higher elevations or away from the equator in search of new...

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Giraffes, rarer than elephants, put on extinction watch list 8.12.2016 Seattle Times: Top stories

WASHINGTON (AP) — The giraffe, the tallest land animal, is now at risk of extinction, biologists say. Because the giraffe population has shrunk nearly 40 percent in just 30 years, scientists put it on the official watch list of threatened and endangered species worldwide, calling it “vulnerable.” That’s two steps up the danger ladder from […]
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