User: flenvcenter Topic: Biodiversity-National
Category: Specific Organisms :: Plants
Last updated: Feb 13 2016 04:33 IST RSS 2.0
 
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Photos: Obama Declares 3 New National Monuments In California Desert 13.2.2016 NPR News
The new designations protect nearly 1.8 million acres of public lands that include Southern California's highest peak, thousands of Native American rock carvings, endangered animals and a ghost town.
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When it comes to saving water, Southern Californians are tapped out - or are they? 10.2.2016 LA Times: Commentary

After months of responding to calls to save water, Southern Californians say they've hit a wall.

Nearly 9 in 10 respondents say they strongly or somewhat agree that "I've already cut back on water use at my home as much as I can" and "There's not much more I can do to save water," according to...

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Rare Footage Captures America's Only Known Wild Jaguar 5.2.2016 Green on HuffingtonPost.com
In the Santa Rita Mountains outside of Tucson, Arizona, roams a lonely and unlikely predator.  His name is El Jefe, Spanish for "the boss" -- and he is  America's only known wild jaguar . While scientists have been tracking the animal for about three years, the big cat is making his video debut after the nonprofits Conservation CATalyst and the Center for Biological Diversity unveiled dramatic footage of the predator in his natural environment. " A lot of people have no idea that we have jaguars in the United States or that they belong here," said the center's Randy Serraglio, according to The Associated Press. "In bringing this video, we hope to inspire people to care about these animals and support protection for their homes." Jaguars once roamed throughout the American Southwest , with historical reports putting them as far north as the Grand Canyon and as far east as Louisiana, the center said in a statement. But over the last 150 years, these large, majestic felines vanished from their U.S. range as ...
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Mangroves Slow Climate Change By Sequestering Massive Amounts of Carbon. Why Aren't We Working Harder to Save Them? 2.2.2016 Green on HuffingtonPost.com
This story first appeared on Ecosystem Marketplace. Click here to view the original. It's hard to imagine a more valuable ecosystem than a mangrove forest.  These wooded coastal wetlands protect the shoreline from both sudden storms and gradual erosion; they provide shelter for young fish , breeding grounds for shrimp, and wood for local villagers - all of which are the fruits of clearly delineated  ecosystem services , each of which has clear human beneficiaries. This should, in theory, make it easy to find money for mangrove protection. Tourism operators and industrial fishers, for example, both have an interest in keeping coral reefs alive, and mangroves support them too, while anyone along the shore has an interest in keeping the sea at bay, as the people of Louisiana  and coastal Indonesia can attest. Unfortunately, in most developing countries, the people who depend the most on mangroves don't have the money or political clout to protect them.  This leaves the carbon market as an intriguing way to ...
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Dayton backs off water-buffer strip plan for private ditches 29.1.2016 Minnesota Public Radio: News
Gov. Mark Dayton's aggressive plans to boost water quality by requiring buffer strips along Minnesota waterways took a step back Friday when he acknowledged he's ordered state conservation officials to stop mapping "private ditches."
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Nature Conservancy climate director advocates restoring landscape's ability to resist climate change 28.1.2016 Steamboat Pilot
Doing more to restore and enhance the capacity of the world’s soils to store carbon could become one of the most effective and economical tools for mitigating climate change, The Nature Conservancy’s Tim Sullivan told a packed audience in Steamboat Springs on Tuesday. “We really believe investments in nature can be our best intermediate path to addressing climate change, including greenhouse gasses,” Sullivan said, adding that natural systems can be a “bridge to long-term solutions" for the health of the planet. “Cows Save the Planet and Other Improbable Ways of Restoring Soil to Heal the Earth” Judith G. Schwartz Sullivan is The Nature Conservancy’s climate director for North America, a resident of Steamboat and TNC’s former Colorado director. His remarks Tuesday at Creekside Cafe addressed the role of land-based solutions to the global climate strategy. Sullivan said his presentation would be predicated on the assumption that climate change is real and people should be doing something about it. As ...
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Orbital View: Rivers of Grass 27.1.2016 Yahoo: Politics
That’s what they look like, at least: A photo posted by The Jefferson Grid (@the.jefferson.grid) on Jan 25, 2016 at 11:04am PST A Jefferson Grid commenter has a theory about the brown and green swirls:
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Wildfire plan seen as biggest land policy change in decades 27.1.2016 Yahoo: Top Stories
BOISE, Idaho (AP) — A year after Interior Secretary Sally Jewell shifted the national approach to fighting wildfires across a wide swath of sagebrush country in the West, her strategy is turning out to be one of the most significant federal land policy changes in some 80 years, public land experts, outdoor enthusiasts and scientists ...
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Wildfire plan seen as biggest land policy change in decades 27.1.2016 Seattle Times: Business & Technology

BOISE, Idaho (AP) — A year after Interior Secretary Sally Jewell shifted the national approach to fighting wildfires across a wide swath of sagebrush country in the West, her strategy is turning out to be one of the most significant federal land policy changes in some 80 years, public land experts, outdoor enthusiasts and scientists […]
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"Gene-Editing" Produces GMOs That Must Be Regulated 24.1.2016 Truthout - All Articles
Just like traditional genetic engineering, gene-editing techniques can cause unintended alterations in DNA. (Image: GMO seeds via Shutterstock) Fight back against the spread of misinformation perpetuated by the mainstream media. Help Truthout grow stronger by making a tax-deductible donation today! The EU is considering the exclusion of gene-edited plants and animals from GM regulations. However, gene-edited organisms clearly fall within the definition of GMOs in both European and international law. They also present real risks to the environment and human health - and must be regulated like any other GMOs. There has been a lot in the news recently about the ethics of gene editing in humans. But, as yet largely unnoticed is that the European Commission is considering whether the gene-editing of plants and animals, for example in agriculture, be exempted from regulation or even  falls outside the scope of EU law governing genetically modified organisms (GMOs). In other words, whether the products of ...
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Questions I'm Most Often Asked About Geese 23.1.2016 Green on HuffingtonPost.com
Photo: Karen Rosenow Over the last 10 years, I've been besieged with questions about geese. "Are they from Canada?" is the most frequent, followed by the inevitable"How do you tell them apart?" Children always ask if you can pet them. Here are the answers to these questions and others that arise when geese surprise us with the unexpected, as these unbridled spirits are prone to do. Are they from Canada? No. The true migratory goose was almost driven to extinction from over-hunting some 50 years ago when scientists found some nesting pairs at Silver Lake, Minn., and placed them in captivity. Coincidentally, wildlife officials began a national recovery program by taking and incubating nest eggs from "decoy" geese they had captured to lure other geese (coming down from Canada). Eventually the young were deposited throughout the U.S., sometimes in locations where there had never been geese. Thus the resident goose was born. Resident geese don't migrate to Canada in part because they don't know the way. ...
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Sylvia McLaughlin dies at 99; longtime San Francisco Bay environmental activist 22.1.2016 LA Times: Science

Forty years later, Sylvia McLaughlin still spoke unapologetically about beauty.

She was well-versed, by then, in various scientific rationales for conserving and restoring tidal marshes — fluent water quality, ecological diversity, etc. — and a veteran of the "boards of virtually every environmental...

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Water regulators propose further relaxation of conservation requirements 16.1.2016 LA Times: Environment

Water providers that have struggled in recent months to meet  conservation targets could soon get some relief under the modified drought rules unveiled Friday by state regulators.

The proposed changes to California’s emergency drought regulation reward water districts for investing in new local...

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El Niño pushes Zambian farmers to question maize habit 14.1.2016 Yahoo: Top Stories
By Whitney Mulobela LUSAKA (Thomson Reuters Foundation) - Forward-thinking farmers in drought-hit Zambia are planning to trim the amount of maize they plant, switching to faster-growing crops such as beans that can better survive erratic weather. "I will have to stop growing maize and find other crops to sustain our livelihood because we have had no rains this season," said Sinoya Phiri, a 42-year-old peasant farmer in Katyoka village, around 27 km (16.78 miles) south of the capital ...
Occupied Oregon wildlife refuge known for listening to ranchers 10.1.2016 Seattle Times: Politics

Grievances of outside protesters don’t seem to fit Malheur National Wildlife Refuge, where local Oregon ranchers and federal managers spent years working out their differences and arriving at a collaborative “adaptive management” plan.
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African Women Organize to Reclaim Agriculture Against Corporate Takeover 6.1.2016 Truthout - All Articles
Mphathe, kneeling bottom row on right, with women of Dzomo la Mupo. (Photo courtesy of Mphathe Makaulele) Beverly Bell and Simone Adler conducted the following interview with Mphatheleini Makaulele from which this text is drawn. Makaulele is an award-winning indigenous leader, farmer, and activist, and Director of  Dzomo la Mupo , a community organization in rural South Africa. She is also part of the  African Biodiversity Network . Everybody originated with indigenous ways of living and the way of Mother Earth. The real role of women is in the seed. It is the women who harvest, select, store, and plant seeds. Our seeds come from our mothers and our grandmothers. To us, the seed is the symbol of the continuity of life. Seed is not just about the crops. Seed is about the soil, about the water, and about the forest. When we plant our seeds, we don't just plant them anytime or anywhere. We listen to our elders, who teach us about the ecological calendar. The seed follows this natural ecological flow. When ...
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Panels focus on how Durango Utilities Commission can contribute 6.1.2016 Durango Herald
The future of the city’s Utilities Commission as a board is now secure, but work remains to clarify its mission. “We want to make sure the underlying issues are resolved,” Mayor Dean Brookie said. The Durango City Council and the Utilities Commission decided over lunch Tuesday that the commission should...
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Yurok Tribe Adopts Ordinance Banning Frankenfish and GMOs 3.1.2016 Truthout - All Articles
The Yurok ban comes in the wake of the FDA decision to approve genetically engineered salmon, dubbed "Frankenfish," as being fit for human consumption, in spite of massive public opposition. In this photo, the Yurok Tribe wraps up commercial fishing for 2014. The tribe has banned genetically engineered salmon on their reservation on the Klamath River. (Photo: Beau Finley / Flickr ) The Yurok Tribe, the largest Indigenous Tribe in California with over 6,000 members, has banned genetically engineered salmon and all Genetically Engineered Organisms (GEOs) on their reservation on the Klamath River in the state's northwest region.  The Yurok ban comes in the wake of the federal Food and Drug Administration (FDA) decision on November 19 to approve genetically engineered salmon, dubbed "Frankenfish," as being fit for human consumption, in spite of massive public opposition to the decision by fishermen, Tribes, environmental organizations and public interest organizations.  On December 10, 2015, the Yurok Tribal ...
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Ten Foods That May Disappear Thanks to Climate Change 3.1.2016 Truthout - All Articles
Climate change is making the world a different place. There are more floods, droughts, wildfires, heat waves and other extreme weather events. Animal species around the world are either shifting habitat locations or simply dying off. Even humans are migrating due to a warmer world. But there is one effect that will hit many of us right in the gut: Certain foods could disappear thanks to our changing climate. Brace yourself: here are 10 foods you'll probably be sad to see go. 1. Guacamole Around 8 million pounds  of guacamole are consumed during the Super Bowl, but football fans might soon have to find something else to dip their tortilla chips into. Scientists from the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory predict as much as a 40 percent decrease  in avocado production over the next 30 years due to increasing temperatures brought on by climate change. As a result, the fast food chain Chipotle, which goes through 97,000 pounds of avocados a day — 35 million pounds every year — has warned that if climate ...
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Will bananas become extinct? 31.12.2015 Chicago Tribune: Opinion
Americans of a certain age can recall the good old days when bananas were bigger, sweeter and creamier than the ones we eat today. No, Grandma isn't falsely romanticizing the past. Until the late 1950s, the standard banana was the Gros Michel, which by all accounts was markedly superior to ...
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