User: flenvcenter Topic: Biodiversity-National
Category: Specific Organisms :: Plants
Last updated: Sep 20 2016 15:30 IST RSS 2.0
 
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Create a viral grassroots sustainability program in 7 steps 20.9.2016 Small Business | GreenBiz.com
Sponsored article: The passions of our employees can be your greatest asset when launching a major sustainability effort. Here's a case study from CH2M.
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Sarah Reichard, beloved for her brilliance, directed UW Botanic Gardens 17.9.2016 Seattle Times: Top stories

Beloved for her brilliance, energy and dedication, Reichard died suddenly in her sleep while leading a botanical trip to South Africa.
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Who needs Pokémon when you have real Washington wildlife? 8.9.2016 Seattle Times: Top stories

Here’s where to look for creatures of the wild.
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Climbers Are Scaling The World's Tallest Trees In An Effort To Save Them 7.9.2016 Politics on HuffingtonPost.com
A group of dedicated tree-climbers are scaling towering trees in an effort to help heal the planet. Protected with little more than a harness and some rope,arborist Jake Milarch has scaled redwoods topping 300 feet — that’s as tall as the Statue of Liberty. “It’s a humbling experience being next to something so big and so old,” said Milarch from his home in Copemish, Michigan, last month. “Some of these trees have survived for 4,000 years. It’s pretty cool.” Climbing these enormous trees is electrifying, but Milarch’s ascents aren’t for mere thrill-seeking. His family runs the nonprofit  Archangel Ancient Tree Archive , which has attempted to preserve some of America’s biggest and most ancient old-growth trees since its founding seven years ago. The arborists climb these trees to collect genetic material from their branches. The goal: to clone this material for safekeeping and reforestation elsewhere . “Old-growth trees are some of the largest, oldest things on Earth,” said David Milarch, Jake Milarch’s ...
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This island is in desperate need of water 7.9.2016 LA Times: Commentary

Good morning. It is Wednesday, Sept. 7. A bride and groom. A sunset. Yosemite. Those are the ingredients for an amazing photograph. Here's what is happening in the Golden State:

TOP STORIES

Cold case gets warm

It’s a two-decade-old mystery. What happened to Cal Poly student Kristin Smart, who vanished...

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Despite desalinating water, floating it in by barge and taking short showers, Catalina islanders are told to cut back even more 7.9.2016 LA Times: Commentary

This quaint resort town has a reputation for making visitors feel as if they’re an ocean apart from the troubled megalopolis 22 miles to the east.

So it figures that the tourists in Hawaiian shirts and flip-flops strolling past Avalon’s restaurants, bars and trinket shops seemed unruffled by the...

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Extinction danger for great apes, Hawaiian plants and many more! 6.9.2016 The Earth Times Online Newspaper - Health News
The IUCN have concentrated on plant species and great apes and Africa in their latest update to the Red List.
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World’s largest gorilla moved to ‘critically endangered’ status 5.9.2016 Washington Post
An update of the International Union for the Conservation of Nature Red List contains bad news about the great ape species in the Democratic Republic of Congo.
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Invasive lake algae surface in Itasca, Beltrami, Stearns counties 2.9.2016 Minnesota Public Radio: Law & Justice
Starry stonewort infestations have been found in three more lakes, including Lake Winnibigoshish, which flows into the Mississippi River. The DNR is weighing next steps to fight the invader, which could wreak havoc on boaters.
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Climate change has less impact on drought than previously expected 1.9.2016 Environmental News Network
As a multiyear drought grinds on in the Southwestern United States, many wonder about the impact of global climate change on more frequent and longer dry spells. As humans emit more carbon dioxide into the atmosphere, how will water supply for people, farms, and forests be affected?A new study from the University of California, Irvine and the University of Washington shows that water conserved by plants under high CO2 conditions compensates for much of the effect of warmer temperatures, retaining more water on land than predicted in commonly used drought assessments.According to the study published this week in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, the implications of plants needing less water with more CO2 in the environment changes assumptions of climate change impacts on agriculture, water resources, wildfire risk, and plant growth.
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Biofuels may be good for the climate - but they could be bad for bees, research says 1.9.2016 Washington Post
Biofuels may be good for the climate - but they could be bad for bees, research says
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The Strange, Twisted Story Behind Seattle's Blackberries 30.8.2016 NPR News
Those tangled brambles are everywhere in the city, the legacy of an eccentric named Luther Burbank whose breeding experiments with crops can still be found on many American dinner plates.
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Climate Change Pledges Not Nearly Enough to Save Tropical Ecosystems 28.8.2016 Truthout - All Articles
US Secretary of State John Kerry signs the Paris Agreement at the UN in New York while holding granddaughter Dobbs Higginson on his lap. Scientists warn that the agreement is insufficient to prevent disastrous climate change. (Photo courtesy of US Department of State) The Paris Agreement marked the biggest political milestone to combat climate change since scientists first introduced us in the late 1980s to perhaps humanity's greatest existential crisis. Last December, 178 nations pledged to do their part to keep global average temperatures from rising more than 2 degrees Celsius (3.6 degrees Fahrenheit) over preindustrial levels -- adding on an even more challenging, but aspirational goal of holding temperatures at 1.5 degrees Celsius (2.7 degrees Fahrenheit). To this end, each nation produced a pledge to cut it's own carbon emissions, targeting everything from the burning of fossil fuels to deforestation to agriculture. It seems like a Herculean task, bound, the optimistic say, to bring positive ...
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Restoring the Climate: War Is Not the Answer 26.8.2016 Commondreams.org Views
Judith Schwartz

Author and climate activist Bill McKibben has published a manifesto to “declare war” on climate change. While I agree about the urgency, I question the wisdom of invoking warfare. For one, how well have our battles against vast, multifaceted problems worked out?

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Advocates say they’ll sue to protect hundreds of species 24.8.2016 Seattle Times: Top stories

BILLINGS, Mont. (AP) — A wildlife advocacy group has filed notice that it intends to sue the U.S. government for failing to act on petitions to protect more than 400 plants and animals under the Endangered Species Act. The Center for Biological Diversity accuses the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service of leaving hundreds of species […]
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Lawsuit Launched to Speed Endangered Species Act Protection for 417 Species 23.8.2016 Commondreams.org Newswire
Center for Biological Diversity The Center for Biological Diversity today filed a formal notice of intent to sue the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service for failing to act on petitions to protect more than 417 animals and plants under the Endangered Species Act. The notice includes species from across the United States, including Florida sandhill cranes, coastal flatwood crayfish, eastern diamondback rattlesnakes and many ...
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Environmentalists to sue San Bernardino and Colton over the killing of threatened fish 23.8.2016 LA Times: Commentary

A coalition of environmental groups Monday announced plans to sue a regional water treatment authority and the cities of San Bernardino and Colton over the repeated stranding and killing of Santa Ana suckers, a fish on the federal threatened species list.

Roughly once a month, a water treatment...

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The Climate Catastrophe Cannot Be Reversed Within the Capitalist Culture 18.8.2016 Truthout.com
The biodiversity that supports the planetary ecosystem as we and our ancestors have known it is imperiled. We face a clear choice: radical political transformation or deepening mass extinction. Did you know that the Earth loses about one hundred species every day? In Extinction: A Radical History, Ashley Dawson ties together history, science and political theory to explain the impact of humans and capitalism on the world's ecosystems. Get your copy of this book by making a tax-deductible donation to Truthout! The following is the introduction to Extinction: A Radical History: His face was hacked off. Left prostrate in the red dust, to be preyed on by vultures, his body remained intact except for the obscene hole where his magnificent six foot long tusks used to be. Satao was a so-called tusker, an African elephant with a rare genetic strain that produced tusks so long that they dangled to the ground, making him a prime attraction in Kenya's Tsavo East National Park. These beautiful tusks also made him ...
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Flowering meadows benefit humankind 18.8.2016 Environmental News Network
The more it swarms, crawls and flies the better it is for humans. This is the finding of a study published in "Nature". More than 60 researchers from a number of universities were involved, including the Technical University of Munich, the Institute of Plant Sciences at the University of Bern and the Senckenberg Biodiversity and Climate Research Centre in Frankfurt. A diverse ecosystem populated by many species from all levels of the food chain provides higher levels of ecosystem services, the team reports. Even rather unpopular insects and invisible soil-dwelling organisms are important in maintaining a wide range of ecosystem services. The results underline the necessity of maintaining species-rich ecosystems for the good of humanity.
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18 Years of Data Links Neonics to Bee Decline 17.8.2016 CommonDreams.org Headlines
Nadia Prupis, staff writer

New evidence shows that the controversial pesticides known as neonicotinoids, or neonics, could be linked to bee population decline.

A new study, published Tuesday in the journal Nature Communications, looks at wild bee populations relative to the use of neonics on the oilseed rape plant in England over 18 years, from 1994-2011. The researchers found that population extinction rates went up along with the pesticide use on the plants, which are widespread throughout the country.

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