User: flenvcenter Topic: Biodiversity-National
Category: Specific Organisms :: Plants
Last updated: Oct 31 2014 24:28 IST RSS 2.0
 
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Community Agriculture Alliance: Rethinking grazing 31.10.2014 Steamboat Pilot
In the '50s and '60s, there was a real movement to remove grazing as a use for public lands here in the West because it was thought that grazing was responsible for all sorts of ecological ills such as erosion and endangering species. In the past, the solution was to remove all human activity from the land. However, the results were not what was expected. Dan Dagget, a self-proclaimed environmentalist with memberships in Sierra Club and Earth First, searched out the places that were removed from livestock grazing and took photos to record the improved health conditions. His surprising results were that the cure was worse, so much worse that the damage done is really severe and potentially permanent. The renowned ecologist who advocated for the removal of grazing to stop desertification, Allan Savory, has found that grazing livestock and not letting the land return to its natural state has caused an increase in the process. He established a system called “Holistic Range Management," which utilizes ...
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Can Long Island Be Saved? -- Part X: Governor Cuomo Announces An Action Plan For Long Island 30.10.2014 Green on HuffingtonPost.com
Graphic courtesy The Nature Conservancy, Stony Brook University's School of Marine and Atmospheric Sciences and LICCRA Readers of this series 'Can Long Island Be Saved?' will recall the flurry of public meetings and forums from this May. Here's a great link to all the key materials from the three meetings called for by the Governor. Local, state, and federal officials and policy makers and various environmental groups studying Long Island's groundwater pollution crisis convened for a series of discussions about the collapse of our marine and coastal environments and what could still be done to stem the tide. What is Long Island without fishing, shell fishing, beach going, boating, and swimming? What happens to our coasts when the marshes and sea grass are gone, how much more vulnerable will we be? How do we stem the tide, reverse the precipitous decline, and build a Long Island we would pass on to future generations? IBM Smarter Cities awarded a $500,000 grant in the form of consulting services ...
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As infrastructure crumbles, trillions of gallons of water lost 30.10.2014 Minnesota Public Radio: News
Fixing the nation's water systems isn't cheap. Across the country, many communities are raising water rates -- some in the double and triple digits-- to begin addressing the problem of leaky pipes.
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This Is What It's Like To Be A Lion Killing Its Prey 29.10.2014 Green on HuffingtonPost.com
Nature can be brutal. GoPro recently released footage (below) of a human-raised lioness called Meg as she patrols the South African plains. With a camera strapped to her back, Meg does what lions do, stalking a waterbuck and taking it down for the kill. The video begins with " Lion Whisperer " and wildlife conservationist Kevin Richardson palling around with Meg and outfitting her with a GoPro. Then Meg goes off to hunt, and Richardson rejoins her after her kill. Though he says his heart goes out to Meg's prey, he concedes that "this is nature." While Richardson's closeness to lions he raised has generated some controversy , there's no denying Meg and her ilk's place atop the four-legged food chain. Lionesses do 85 to 90 percent of the hunting in prides, Out To Africa notes. Take a look at the footage from Meg's hunt (below), starting at the 2:19 mark. WARNING: Footage is ...
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USDA boosts bee habitat money for Minnesota 29.10.2014 Minnesota Public Radio: News
Farmers can use the funds to plant bee-friendly wild flowers. Officials hope the investment will aid efforts to curb colony collapse.
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EU Just Shy Of Meeting 2020 Emissions Goal After New Greenhouse Gas Cuts Announced 28.10.2014 Green on HuffingtonPost.com
COPENHAGEN, Denmark (AP) — The European Union's environment agency says the bloc's greenhouse gas emissions dropped by nearly 2 percent last year, putting the EU very close to reaching its emissions target for 2020. That goal is to reduce emissions of CO2 and other greenhouse gases by 20 percent compared to 1990 levels. The European Environment Agency said Tuesday that emissions already have fallen 19 percent, meaning the 28-nation bloc is likely to achieve a larger reduction than it aimed for. The EEA projected that 2020 emissions will be 21 percent or 24 percent lower than they were in 1990, depending on whether planned climate action is implemented in full. However, some countries weren't on track to meet their individual targets through domestic action, including Germany and Spain. Most scientists agree the greenhouse gas emissions resulting from the burning of fossil fuels and deforestation are the main cause of climate change. The EEA said the EU as a whole also was on track to meet its goals on ...
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U.S. Fish And Wildlife Service Proposes Listing African Lion As Threatened Species 27.10.2014 Green on HuffingtonPost.com
WASHINGTON, Oct 27 (Reuters) - The U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service on Monday proposed listing the African lion as threatened after a study showed the big cats were in danger of extinction in the foreseeable future. A listing as threatened under the U.S. Endangered Species Act would bar trafficking of the species as it faces dwindling habitat in Africa and more competition with humans. African lions, or Panthera leo leo, are found across a wide range in the continent, but about 70 percent, or 24,000, of them live in only 10 major strongholds, the service said in a statement. Listing the African lion as threatened "will bring the full protections of U.S. law to lion conservation, allowing us to strengthen enforcement and monitoring of imports and international trade," Fish and Wildlife Service Director Dan Ashe said. The main threats to the African lion are loss of habitat and of the animals lions prey on, and increased conflict with humans, the statement said. People and farming and grazing ...
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Why Big, Old, Fat, Fertile Female Fish Are The Rockstars Of The Ocean 27.10.2014 Green on HuffingtonPost.com
The next time you catch a BOFFFF, maybe you should throw her back. A growing collection of research shows that big, old, fat, fertile female fish -- what scientists call BOFFFFs -- are critically important to ocean fisheries because they’re basically rockstars of reproduction . Conventional wisdom has held that, in order to protect ocean stocks and maintain strong populations, fishermen should catch big fish but release smaller ones so that they can grow, produce eggs and continue the circle of life. But in the October 2014 issue of the “ICES Journal of Marine Science” , three experts argue that fishing efforts should focus on medium sized fish, rather than snatching out and bragging about the huge ones. “The loss of big fish [often] decreases the productivity and stability of fishery stocks,” explained Mark Hixon, a marine biologist at the University of Hawaii at Mānoa, who published the paper with California State University marine biologist Darren Johnson and NOAA Fisheries ecologist Susan Sogard. ...
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IPCC Chairman Pachauri Urges Governments To Keep Up hope Amid Climate Change Battle 27.10.2014 Green on HuffingtonPost.com
COPENHAGEN, Denmark (AP) — A top U.N. climate change expert urged world governments Monday not to be overcome by hopelessness as they negotiate a new agreement to fight global warming. Rajendra Pachauri, chairman of the U.N.'s Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change, said despite the IPCC's own warnings that time is running out, the panel has also suggested actions needed to keep climate change in check. The IPCC is meeting in Copenhagen this week to adopt the final report in its gigantic assessment of climate change. A leaked draft uses starker language than three previous reports, warning of "severe, pervasive and irreversible" climate impacts if the world doesn't rein in its emissions of heat-trapping greenhouse gases. "The synthesis report will provide the roadmap by which policymakers will hopefully find their way to a global agreement to finally reverse course on climate change," Pachauri said. Governments are aiming to reach such an agreement next year, but the negotiations have been hampered by ...
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11 eclectic paradises 27.10.2014 CNN: Top Stories
When is a garden not a garden? When it's an avant garden.
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Milton couples honored for work to save rare orchid 27.10.2014 Star Tribune: Business
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Climate Change May Cause 'Serious, Pervasive And Irreversible' Damage: Report 26.10.2014 Green on HuffingtonPost.com
OSLO, Oct 26 (Reuters) - Climate change may have "serious, pervasive and irreversible" impacts on human society and nature, according to a draft U.N. report due for approval this week that says governments still have time to avert the worst. Delegates from more than 100 governments and top scientists meet in Copenhagen on Oct 27-31 to edit the report, meant as the main guide for nations working on a U.N. deal to fight climate change at a summit in Paris in late 2015. They will publish the study on Nov. 2. European Union leaders on Friday agreed to cut emissions by 40 percent below 1990 levels by 2030, in a shift from fossil fuels towards renewable energies, and urged other major emitters led by China and the United States to follow. "The report will be a guide for us," Peruvian Environment Minister Manuel Pulgar-Vidal, who will host a U.N. meeting of environment ministers in Lima in late 2014 to lay the groundwork for the Paris summit, told Reuters. He said the synthesis report by the ...
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Down by the River 22.10.2014 Orion Magazine Articles
Collaboration and innovation restore a community’s relationship with the Yuma River.
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Ban on GMO plants advances at L.A. City Hall 21.10.2014 LA Times: Top News
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How predators protect plant biodiversity 20.10.2014 TreeHugger
Herbivores are having a field day Kenya.
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Photo: Saguaro cactus defines a landscape 18.10.2014 TreeHugger
Their blossoms are the official wildflower of Arizona, where this cactus enjoys special conservation protections.
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Scientists Mull Change Of Epoch To Reflect Human Impact On The Planet 17.10.2014 Green on HuffingtonPost.com
By Emma Anderson BERLIN (Reuters) - Scientists from around the world met this week to decide whether to call time on the Holocene epoch after 11,700 years and begin a new geological age called the Anthropocene - to reflect humankind's deep impact on the planet. For decades, researchers have asked whether humanity's impact on the Earth's surface and atmosphere mean we have entered the Anthropocene - or new human era. "What we see is the urban phenomenon and the boom of China has a direct marking in the forms of the strata," said John Palmesino, a London-based architect who has worked with the scientists to capture on film the impact of humans on the Earth. "You can no longer distinguish what is man-made from what is natural." A group of geologists, climate scientists, ecologists and an expert in international law that have been conducting research since 2009, all met face-to-face for the first time in Berlin on Thursday and Friday to discuss the issue. They appeared to agree it is time for a change of ...
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More California gardeners go native 16.10.2014 LA Times: Opinion
Landscaping with California native plants has probably never been more compelling than it is today, when gardeners throughout Southern California are taking drastic measures to keep their yards looking green or, at the very least, alive.
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Can Organic Agriculture Really Reverse Climate Change? 15.10.2014 Green on HuffingtonPost.com
by guest blogger "Coach" Mark Smallwood, Rodale Institute executive director Over the past 14 days, I have been on a walk --a walk that, I hope, will change the way that we look at climate change. Each day I walk 10 miles on a journey from the Rodale Institute in Kutztown, Pennsylvania, to Washington, DC. Along the way, I have had the honor of meeting with farmers, local public officials, community members, students, and activists. Every person I meet has been affected by the impacts of climate change, from the disastrous hailstorm that occurred in Reading, PA, in May to the local fisherman concerned that atrazine was found in spawning beds of smallmouth bass in the Susquehanna River. Climate change affects us all, and the impacts and destruction caused by catastrophic weather events are more noticeable with each passing year. Along the way, I continue to tell people that climate change is a gift. This is Mother Nature's way of letting us know that she is sick. We have broken our ecological systems, and ...
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Global Climate Deal Shouldn't Be Legally Binding, Top State Department Official Says 15.10.2014 Green on HuffingtonPost.com
By Valerie Volcovici WASHINGTON, Oct 14 (Reuters) - The United States wants to broker a global agreement on climate change that would contain some legal elements but would stop short of being legally binding on an international level, the country's top diplomat on climate change issues said. Todd Stern, the State Department climate change special envoy, addressed one of the thorniest issues in ongoing talks to secure a global plan to curb greenhouse gas emissions - its legal form. Stern said a recent proposal by New Zealand for countries to submit a "schedule" for reducing emissions that would be legally binding and subject to mandatory accounting, reporting and review offers an approach that could get the buy-in of countries like the United States that are wary of ratifying an internationally binding treaty. The content of the schedule itself and the actions each country pledges would not be legally binding at an international level. "Some are sure to disapprove of the New Zealand idea, ...
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