User: flenvcenter Topic: Biodiversity-National
Category: Specific Organisms :: Plants
Last updated: Sep 01 2015 16:49 IST RSS 2.0
 
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Climate Change Means One World’s Death and Another’s Birth 1.9.2015 Wired Top Stories
Climate change will kill off plenty of species...leaving room for new ones to adapt and ...
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Bees feel the squeeze as cropland consumes habitat 1.9.2015 Minnesota Public Radio: Law & Justice
North Dakota and Minnesota researchers studying Midwest bee health and land use say a shifting agricultural landscape is making it harder for bees to find enough food.
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Friday Fun: Three Cities Innovate Solutions for Tackling Water Scarcity 28.8.2015 THE CITY FIX
Today marks the end of World Water Week in Stockholm, where experts from across the globe convene to discuss the world’s water issues. To further explore water stress across the globe, take a look at the interactive maps and resources of Aqueduct, a ...
Pretty DIY composting system doubles as a planter 28.8.2015 TreeHugger
Hil Padilla, who works with the Kadoorie Conservation China Department, designed this cool composer/planter system you can make yourself.
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Community Ag Alliance: Soil Health 101 28.8.2015 Steamboat Pilot
Have you ever thought of soil as a living ecosystem, composed of billions of tiny organisms working to support plants, animals and humans? Healthy soil is the foundation that sustains plentiful croplands and healthy forests, filters pollutants from air and water, maintains productive grazing lands for livestock and wildlife and helps control surface water flows. When we view soil in this way, rather than as an inert growing medium, we are able to recognize the importance of managing this ecosystem so it remains intact for future generations. Humans have the ability to change soil for better or worse, depending on how it is managed and protected. These management decisions can impact key functions provided by the soil, including, nutrient cycling, water relations, biodiversity and physical stability and support. Whether you farm or ranch hundreds of acres of land or compost in your backyard garden, the indicators of soil health remain the same. The ability to recognize these indicators and adapt ...
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Superfund splits Silverton 26.8.2015 Durango Herald
SILVERTON – The question of Superfund dominated the first meeting of the Animas River Stakeholders Group to take place since the Gold King Mine blowout, and the topic divided the hundred people from Silverton, Durango and even Denver who crowded into Silverton Town Hall on Tuesday night.Peter Butler, co-coordinator of the group,...
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Yosemite Black Bears' Diet Surprises Researchers 25.8.2015 Environmental News Network
Black bears in Yosemite National Park that don’t seek out human foods subsist primarily on plants and nuts, according to a study conducted by biologists at UC San Diego who also found that ants and other sources of animal protein, such as mule deer, make up only a small fraction of the bears’ annual diet.
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Wacky recycled rubber-covered stilted cabin "re-wilds" a meadow in Latvia 25.8.2015 TreeHugger
Built as way to improve a green space linking a town and a castle, this distinctive cabin looks like 'creature' walking out the of forest.
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Q&A: The story behind an invasive plant in the southwest 21.8.2015 Yahoo: US National
PHOENIX (AP) — The tiny seedling was brought over from Eastern Europe and parts of Asia nearly 200 years ago and planted along riverbanks across the United States, mostly in the southwest, to prevent erosion. It grew fast, its thick branches and oily leaves spreading out across five states in the ...
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Q&A: Southwest struggles to stem fire-fueling invasive plant 21.8.2015 Yahoo: US National
PHOENIX (AP) — The tiny seedling was brought over from Eastern Europe and parts of Asia nearly 200 years ago and planted along riverbanks across the United States, mostly in the Southwest, to prevent erosion. It grew fast, its thick branches and oily leaves spreading across five ...
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Creative Ways to Conserve Water During a Drought 21.8.2015 Green on HuffingtonPost.com
In a previous post , I threw myself and my “smelly kids” under the bus for contributing to California’s water woes. I also threw a lot of other folks under the bus (including one of my favorite breweries, golf courses, and my hometown for that matter), but I feel like many Californians are finally starting to get past the denial/anger/bargaining/depression stages of the drought and accepting conservation and sustainable water practices for the long haul. While we have a lot of work to do, our recent water bills show a drastic cut in the amount of water our family is using, so I thought it was worth sharing some of the creative ways we're cutting back to help further the conservation conversation. Here are some of the water-saving practices we’ve adopted, including a massive lawn-removal project that helped my parents reduce water use for the month of May by 70% over the same period last year. SEVENTY PERCENT! If we’ve learned anything after four years of drought, it’s that extreme weather is here to stay ...
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U.S. agency pledges $20 million to save monarch butterfly 21.8.2015 Minnesota Public Radio: News
The money will be spent over the next five years and is spurred by a steady decline in the number of monarch butterflies.
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September deadline looms for deciding endangered status of greater sage grouse 20.8.2015 Steamboat Pilot
An audience of more than 50 people at Library Hall Tuesday night learned there’s much more to the massive conservation effort to restore populations of greater sage grouse than just one species of bird. The inspiring documentary film “The Sagebrush Sea,” combined with a panel of experts with ties to Northwest Colorado, made the point: Although the vast expanses of high desert covered in sagebrush in the Intermountain West don’t offer the eye candy of a wildflower meadow, they are equally complex and as precariously balanced as any ecosystem in the Rocky Mountains. “The sage grouse are an iconic western species, and it’s an incredible ecosystem,” Colorado Parks and Wildlife District Wildlife Manager Jim Haskins said. “It’s incredibly important to protect the bird. Sagebrush isn’t just sage brush, it’s all the stuff that grows beneath sagebrush — it’s (comparable to) the plants and animals that live beneath an aspen forest.” The Craig Daily Press published an in-depth article by reporter Lauren Blair about ...
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Leveraging old idea, new national effort will save seeds — and landscapes 19.8.2015 MinnPost
As another horrible wildfire season burns on, an interesting new national effort has gotten under way to restore the resilience of plant communities on damaged public lands – with a novel seed-saving network at its heart. “The right seed in the right place at the right time” is the guiding principle of the National Seed Strategy for Rehabilitation and Restoration . But that’s far simpler to say than to do in the wake of horrific fire and hurricane events, not to mention prolonged drought, extreme rainfall events and other consequences of a changing climate. For one thing, the wrong seed is usually already waiting to put down roots, having hitched a ride into new territory not only on the wind, on birds and tourists, but also – and in large quantities – on firefighters and their heavy equipment. For another, seeds for the right grasses, wildflowers, shrubs and trees are often in short supply, because their ecological importance may not translate into commercial value for seed producers. That’s a problem ...
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You can help bring monarchs back from the brink 19.8.2015 rabble.ca - News for the rest of us

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Four Ways Mexico’s Indigenous Farmers Are Practicing the Agriculture of the Future 15.8.2015 Commondreams.org Views
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More Than 2,700 Acres Protected for Two South Florida Flowers 15.8.2015 Commondreams.org Newswire
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Friday Fun: Balancing Urbanization and Elephants in Southern Africa 14.8.2015 THE CITY FIX
When two elephants fight, grass gets trampled. No kidding. Though this widely-used African proverb alludes to the extensive damage caused when two great mammals clash, what it’s really communicating is that these great animals need space. However, this proverb is ...
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We Need Our Mighty Rivers to Save Salmon...And Whales 13.8.2015 Green on HuffingtonPost.com
Making a Connection: Salmon as Networker I have been watching Cosmos a lot. It's got wide appeal in my house--children and adults are equally enchanted. Cosmos reminds me of our connection to all living things--all of us born of stardust. I hadn't thought about that in a long time. Most of us don't dwell on the mysteries of the universe, but they matter. Our interconnectedness, in particular, matters for people--and for wildlife out there in those wild places. Some species are more linked than others. In Malcolm Gladwell 's world, we'd call them "connectors." In science, they're called " keystone species ." These animals, and even some plants, have a large impact on the creatures surrounding them--so large that the habitat would be fundamentally different without them. Salmon are amazing connectors; they connect to more than 190 plants and animals. So when salmon go missing, it's like the life of the party has suddenly disappeared--everyone feels it. It may not surprise you to learn that salmon are an ...
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More Than 5,000 Acres Protected for Rare Wildflower in Santa Barbara County 11.8.2015 Commondreams.org Newswire
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