User: flenvcenter Topic: Biodiversity-National
Category: Specific Organisms :: Plants
Last updated: Mar 01 2015 24:45 IST RSS 2.0
 
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2015 Philadelphia Flower Show winners 28.2.2015 Philly.com News
Judges at the Philadelphia Flower Show have announced their list of 2015 winners.
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Dry and dusty 28.2.2015 Durango Herald
Years of drought and overgrazing have dried out the fields in southwestern La Plata County. Dust easily blows away in the wind. Last year, from March until May, dust storms caused problems for students, drivers and farmers, and without enough precipitation, the dirty storms could return. At Fort Lewis Mesa Elementary, the...
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Amid drought, a turf war between residents and homeowners associations 27.2.2015 LA Times: Opinion
Rancho Pacifica, a gated community of spectacular multimillion dollar homes in the hills east of Del Mar, is not immune to the ravages of the California drought. Residents, who can easily afford massive water bills, have sought to reduce their water consumption — not just because they...
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Dog Who Was Homeless For 10 Years Moves Into A Warm, Loving Home 27.2.2015 Green on HuffingtonPost.com
Donations are pouring in to make sure that a dog who spent the last decade outside in a New York City park will never want for anything, ever again. Charlie -- who is also known as Ricky -- had been seen around Highbridge Park in upper Manhattan for about 10 years before a group of residents banded together to save him this month. Post by Ricky Charlie Highbridge Park Dog . Neighbors like Yuliya Avezbakiyeva and her mother, who'd been bringing Charlie food for years, thought the dog seemed more vulnerable after the pack he used to spend time with disappeared over the last half-decade. Dog walker Denise Lauffer told The Huffington Post that recently, she'd felt Charlie seemed to be having trouble with his hips, too. They and and others grew even more concerned this winter after noticing their favorite wild canine wasn't eating the food that folks in the area left out for him. With the weather growing harsher -- the average minimum temperature in New York was 9 degrees the week that Charlie was finally ...
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Food fight looks likely as nutrition panel urges attention to environmental impact 26.2.2015 MinnPost
CC/Flickr/Dan Domme What if nutrition guidelines indicated food's impact on the environment, not just its impact on your waistline? Should the nation’s official nutrition guidelines address the environmental impact of American eating habits along with personal-health concerns? Absolutely, in the view of a federal advisory board that has assembled a scientific foundation for the guidelines’ next revision , due later this year. As you probably have heard, the panel suggested last week that the guidelines drop their longstanding warning about cholesterol intake, especially from eggs, while reassuring us that moderate coffee and alcohol use probably shouldn’t be a concern. That's the natural stuff of news briefs. But the truly new – and highly controversial – substance of its recommendations lies at the intersection of public and environmental health. For example, in suggesting that Americans eat less meat, and particularly less red meat, while moving toward more plant-based diet plans, the panel ...
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Oregon Gray Wolf Population Rebounding, But Remains Fragile 26.2.2015 Green on HuffingtonPost.com
By Courtney Sherwood PORTLAND, Ore., Feb 25 (Reuters) - Oregon's once decimated gray wolf population has rebounded to at least 77 animals, and the wolves are now pairing off and breeding across a wide region, state officials with the state's Department of Fish and Wildlife said on Wednesday. Gray wolves, native to Oregon but wiped out in the state by an eradication campaign in the early 20th century, first returned there in 2008 and have now spread out to multiple parts of the Pacific Northwest state. "The wolf population continues to grow and expand, and for the first time we've had wolf reproduction in southern Oregon," said Michelle Dennehy, spokeswoman for the state wildlife department. "And we had eight breeding pairs last year. We also documented six new pairs of wolves, and 26 pups." But as population growth triggers a review of state Endangered Species Act restrictions on harassing or killing wolves that threaten livestock, conservationists cautioned it remained too early to ...
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Friendly Fungi Could Help Barley Growers 24.2.2015 Environmental News Network
Botanists from Trinity College Dublin have made a breakthrough discovery that could save barley farmers sleepless nights and millions of Euro each year: naturally occurring plant-friendly fungi prevent crop-ravishing diseases from spreading, and also aid plant survival in testing environmental conditions. Importantly, these amazing little organisms cause no harm to the plant roots in which they take up their abode. However, their gift of immunity against common seed diseases greatly reduces the need for farmers to spray environmentally damaging chemicals, which can affect ecosystems in a plethora of negative ways.
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Watch Adorable Baby Otters Adorably Eating Breakfast 24.2.2015 Green on HuffingtonPost.com
Breakfast has never been cuter. Just look at bits of food get stuck on the chin of one of these rescued baby otters! OK, so it's the pups who really supply the charm, but you get the message. The little critters can make anything more adorable. Post by Conservancy of Southwest Florida . This particular pair was found unresponsive in Naples, Florida, and taken to von Arx Wildlife Hospital at the Conservancy of Southwest Florida by the hospital director herself, Joanna Fitzgerald. Both are doing much better , CSF staff wrote on Facebook. If breakfast isn't the most important meal of the day, these two have certainly made it the most ...
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Lions Rescued From Circuses In Peru Get Their Teeth Fixed 21.2.2015 Green on HuffingtonPost.com
LIMA, Peru (AP) — King was unable to chew normally because most of his teeth had been pulled by the circus owners. Simba's front claws had been removed and his fangs broken. The lions were among 21 rescued from Peruvian circuses in 2014 by members of Los Angeles-based Animal Defenders International. Activists say the lions were kept in appalling conditions. "In the circuses they often break their teeth and remove their claws," said Eva Chomba, a Peruvian veterinarian with Animal Defenders. "It's a painful process in which they do not use anesthesia and those doing it are not veterinarians." On Friday, a team of veterinarians sedated King and Simba to perform dental surgery on the big cats, which weigh more than 160 kilograms (352 pounds) and are 17 and 7 years old, respectively. U.S. veterinarian Peter Emily, founder of the Peter Emily International Veterinary Dental Foundation, said a previous oral surgery on King had created a small hole between his mouth and nose that had become badly infected. The ...
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Unprecedented California Sea Lion Strandings Linked To Warmer Pacific 19.2.2015 Green on HuffingtonPost.com
By Mary Papenfuss SAN FRANCISCO, Feb 18 (Reuters) - The strandings of a record number of sea lion pups along the California coast this year are linked to a puzzling weather pattern that has warmed their Pacific Ocean habitat and likely impacted fish populations they rely on for food, federal scientists said on Wednesday. Some 940 stranded sea lions, mostly pups, have been treated by marine mammal centers in California so far this year, according to Justin Viezbicke, West Coast Stranding Coordinator for the U.S. National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration. That is well above the 240 strandings typically seen through April, and scientists suspect the emaciated pups are prematurely leaving Southern California sea lion rookeries to seek food on their own after their mothers failed to return swiftly from hunting trips to nurse. "These little pups, so desperate and so thin, are leaving the rookeries long before they're capable of hunting effectively," said Shawn Johnson, director of ...
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Bald eagles are starting to flourish again — but hold the confetti 19.2.2015 Washington Post
Working late in a tiny Arkansas lab, Susan Wilde found herself alone with a killer.It startled her. She jumped, let out a yelp, and took off down a hall. Wilde wasn’t running for her life; she was amazed by a discovery. She had uncovered a bacteria, one with a powerful toxin that attacked waterfowl, hiding on the underside of an aquatic leaf that grows nearly everywhere in the United States, including the Chesapeake Bay.Read full article >>
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Three Sci-Fi Designs for the Future of Farming 18.2.2015 Wired Top Stories
Three scenarios for what farming might be like in 2115, when bioterrorism and weather manipulation are ...
9 Great Reasons to Grow Fruits and Vegetables In the City 18.2.2015 Green on HuffingtonPost.com
1. For their taste Famous chefs, such as the ones who fill Paris's hotels and Michelin-starred restaurants, have vegetable gardens on their roofs to provide supremely fresh produce. Tomatoes, strawberries, aromatics, salad greens, or edible flowers are fragile and easily damaged in trucks, cold rooms, or stalls. Gourmets know that the taste of produce and its nutritional value are far better when they are freshly harvested. 2. To intelligently recycle our garbage Organic waste constitutes 30 percent of our garbage, and most of it is incinerated and placed in landfills. Instead, this mineral-rich waste could be transformed into compost and used to fertilize soil for urban farming. In Paris alone, we could avoid dealing with 400,000 tons of waste every year and thus decrease associated environmental hazards (garbage trucks, garbage dumps, incinerators) and their associated costs. 3. Because we can grow crops (almost) everywhere To grow aromatics, strawberries, or radishes you only need a window and a ...
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Latin America Green News: drought plaguing coffee in Nicaragua, geothermal plant planned in Mexico, Latin American countries lead deforestation pledges 17.2.2015 Switchboard, from NRDC
Maria Martinez, Program Assistant, Director of Programs & Latin America Project, Washington, D.C.: Latin America Green News: drought plaguing coffee in Nicaragua, geothermal plant planned in Mexico, Latin American countries lead deforestation pledges Latin America Green News is a selection of weekly news highlights about environmental and energy issues in Latin America. February...
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Tiny Oregon Minnow Is Now First Fish Taken Off Endangered Species List 17.2.2015 Politics on HuffingtonPost.com
GRANTS PASS, Ore. (AP) — It's official. A tiny minnow that lives only in backwaters in Oregon's Willamette Valley is the first fish to be formally removed from Endangered Species Act protection because it is no longer in danger of extinction. U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service Director Dan Ashe was to make the announcement Tuesday afternoon at a wildlife refuge outside Corvallis. The action comes 22 years after the 3-inch-long fish was first listed as an endangered species, and five years after it was upgraded to threatened. Paul Henson, Oregon director of U.S. Fish and Wildlife, said the Oregon chub demonstrates that a lot of species can be brought back from the brink of extinction, if key needs are met, such as a safe place to live, even in an urban landscape. "This doesn't mean that all of a sudden it's hands off, and we never need to do anything for them," Henson said. "But we can at least put them back in the group of species that need attention, but don't need to go into the emergency room of the ...
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Region is a link in monarch butterflies' survival trail 17.2.2015 Philly.com News
Their critical food source - native milkweed - isn't a weed but a native perennial plant. For the delicate and colorful monarch butterfly, the leaves offer food for its larvae and the bright flowers produce nectar for the adults.
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Nearly a billion monarchs have vanished 15.2.2015 Star Tribune: Latest
U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service launches initiative to help save butterflies.
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Endangered Monkey Deaths At Louisiana Zoo Blamed On Worker's Negligence 13.2.2015 Green on HuffingtonPost.com
An employee's negligence on the coldest night of the year in central Louisiana killed two tiny endangered tropical monkeys last month, says the spokeswoman for the city of Alexandria. The employee had worked at the Alexandria Zoological Park since 2008 and admitted failing to properly check the cotton top tamarins on Jan. 7, Cynthia Jardon said. The black-and-white monkeys, which have a fan of white hair on their heads, are among the smallest new-world monkeys, topping out at a bit over a pound. They need temperatures of 76 to 85 degrees. The overnight low early Jan. 8 was in the teens. "As a result of this single person's act of negligence we lost Kate, 12 years old, and her 2-year-old baby girl," Jardon wrote in an email to The Associated Press. The 14-year-old male, Eddie, survived, Jardon said. Eddie was the largest of the three, and that bit of extra bulk may have saved his life, she said. He has been at the zoo since May 2008, joining Kate, who arrived in November 2007. Their daughter was called ...
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New Study Predicts Plant Responses to Drought 11.2.2015 Environmental News Network
A new U.S. Geological Survey study shows how plants’ vulnerability to drought varies across the landscape; factors such as plant structure and soil type where the plant is growing can either make them more vulnerable or protect them from declines. Recent elevated temperatures and prolonged droughts in many already water-limited regions throughout the world, including the southwestern U.S., are likely to intensify according to future climate model projections.
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Wolf Shot In Utah Was Previously First Wolf Spotted In Northern Arizona In More Than 70 Years 11.2.2015 Green on HuffingtonPost.com

SALT LAKE CITY (AP) — Federal wildlife officials say DNA tests confirm a wolf accidently shot by a hunter in Utah was the same one seen in the Grand Canyon area last year.


The U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service said Wednesday the 3-year-old female killed in late December was the first wolf seen in northern Arizona in more than 70 years.


Spokesman Steve Segin says geneticists at the University of Idaho compared the DNA from the northern gray wolf killed in southwestern Utah with samples taken from the wolf seen near the Grand Canyon last fall.


Officials have said the Utah hunter mistook the wolf for a coyote. Wolves are protected in Utah under the Endangered Species Act, and officials are investigating the death.


The wolf had worn a radio collar since January 2014.

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