User: flenvcenter Topic: Biodiversity-National
Category: Specific Organisms :: Plants
Last updated: Apr 24 2014 24:56 IST RSS 2.0
 
1 to 20 of 2,456    
'Noah' Director Darren Aronofsky And Others Talk Faith And Environmentalism (LIVE VIDEO) 24.4.2014 Green on HuffingtonPost.com
What can we learn about the intersection of faith and the environment?

Click on the video above at 3:00 p.m. EDT on Wednesday, April 23 for a special live event featuring "Noah" director Darren Aronofsky. He will be joined by Sierra Club executive director Michael Brune, Danielle Baussan, managing director of Energy Policy at the Center for American Progress and Jack Jenkins, a senior writer and researcher with the Faith and Progressive Policy Initiative at the Center for American Progress.

"There is a huge statement in ['Noah,'] a strong message about the coming flood from global warming," Aronofsky told The New Yorker in March.

Read more about Aronofsky and the live event at Mother Jones.
Also found in: [+]
The U.S. Has Gotten A Lot Hotter Since The First Earth Day (INTERACTIVE GRAPHIC) 22.4.2014 Green on HuffingtonPost.com
This story originally appeared on Climate Central. It’s been 44 years since the first Earth Day was celebrated in 1970, and since that time, average temperatures have been rising across the U.S. This Climate Central interactive graphic shows a state-by-state analysis of those temperature trends. Average temperatures across most of the continental U.S. have been rising gradually for more than a century, at a rate of about 0.127°F per decade between 1910-2012. That trend parallels an overall increase in average global temperatures, which is largely the result of human greenhouse gas emissions. While global warming isn’t uniform, and some regions are warming faster than others, since the 1970s, warming across the U.S. has accelerated, previously shown in our report The Heat is On . Since then, every state’s annual average temperature has risen accordingly. On average, temperatures in the contiguous 48 states have been warming at a rate of 0.48°F per decade since 1970, nearly twice the global ...
Also found in: [+]
These Lovable Animals Remind Us Why We Need To Protect The Earth 22.4.2014 Green on HuffingtonPost.com
Every April 22 we celebrate Earth Day, and remember why it's important to take care of our home. Organized by the Earth Day Network , the annual holiday celebrates protection of the planet and urges many to ramp up their efforts to ensure a sustainable future. So, in honor of Earth Day, here are 12 reasons why we need to protect the Earth: These polar bears This tigress who wants to make her cub look presentable This sea lion pup All of these pandas cubs. ALL OF THEM. This elephant calf who loves hugs These happy dolphins This baby rhino who's favorite spot to sit is on his mom's head This baby orangutan who feels most comfortable hanging onto mom This tiny sea turtle This penguin who has to be within a wing's length of her zookeeper And, of course, this ...
Also found in: [+]
Butterfly makes a last stand in Benton County 22.4.2014 AP Washington
CORVALLIS, Ore. (AP) -- On a spring afternoon, ecologist Tom Kaye leads the way into a small meadow in the wooded hills west of Corvallis, stepping carefully as he peers at clumps of grass, flower stalks and fiddlehead ferns....
Also found in: [+]
Taking the Long View of the National Mall on Earth Day 21.4.2014 Green on HuffingtonPost.com
Earth Day 2014's theme, Green Cities, is particularly appropriate as we consider the challenges and opportunities of the iconic landscape that is the centerpiece of our Capital City -- the National Mall. The National Mall is a unique national park -- a living memorial to American ideals in the heart of an urban setting, where more than 29 million people from around the world visit each year. That's more visitors than Yosemite, the Grand Canyon, and Yellowstone National Park combined. When Pierre L'Enfant conceived the Mall in 1791, and when it began to take its current form in the early 1900s with the McMillan Plan, no one could have imagined the volume of visitors or the thousands of rallies, concerts, and events that would take place each year. The result? The National Mall has been loved to death, and the evidence is all around -- the grassy vista stretching from the Lincoln Memorial to the Capitol Building has been turned into a dustbowl of dirt and rock solid turf. Sidewalks are cracked and broken. ...
Also found in: [+]
Green turtles need help 17.4.2014 The Earth Times Online Newspaper - Environment News
How to provide for indigenous and other peoples with a rare animal as a food source and sustain their diet? (As well as make sure we don’t have another extinction on our hands). A scientific approach is required in the Caribbean, where little seems to be going well in some countries, while others conserve their fauna and flora to make large profits from tourism.
Also found in: [+]
What climate change has done to Walden's woods 16.4.2014 New Scientist: Focus on America
A hymn to citizen science, Walden Warming by Richard Primack seeks the reality of climate change in the effects that ordinary people have ...
Also found in: [+]
To bee or not to bee 15.4.2014 Global Health and Wellness News - ENN
Bumblebees are among the most loved and familiar of garden insects. The sight and sound of them buzzing from flower to flower is a quintessential part of summertime, but sadly these charismatic creatures are now struggling to survive. In our modern world of paved gardens and intensive agriculture our bumblebees find themselves hungry and homeless.
Also found in: [+]
To bee or not to bee 15.4.2014 Corporate Responsibility and Sustainability News - ENN
Bumblebees are among the most loved and familiar of garden insects. The sight and sound of them buzzing from flower to flower is a quintessential part of summertime, but sadly these charismatic creatures are now struggling to survive. In our modern world of paved gardens and intensive agriculture our bumblebees find themselves hungry and homeless.
Also found in: [+]
To bee or not to bee 15.4.2014 Green Lifestyle and Sustainable Culture News - ENN
Bumblebees are among the most loved and familiar of garden insects. The sight and sound of them buzzing from flower to flower is a quintessential part of summertime, but sadly these charismatic creatures are now struggling to survive. In our modern world of paved gardens and intensive agriculture our bumblebees find themselves hungry and homeless.
Also found in: [+]
To bee or not to bee 15.4.2014 Sustainable Ecosystems and Community News - ENN
Bumblebees are among the most loved and familiar of garden insects. The sight and sound of them buzzing from flower to flower is a quintessential part of summertime, but sadly these charismatic creatures are now struggling to survive. In our modern world of paved gardens and intensive agriculture our bumblebees find themselves hungry and homeless.
Also found in: [+]
To bee or not to bee 15.4.2014 Wildlife and Habitat Conservation News - ENN
Bumblebees are among the most loved and familiar of garden insects. The sight and sound of them buzzing from flower to flower is a quintessential part of summertime, but sadly these charismatic creatures are now struggling to survive. In our modern world of paved gardens and intensive agriculture our bumblebees find themselves hungry and homeless.
Also found in: [+]
To bee or not to bee 15.4.2014 Global Pollution and Prevention News - ENN
Bumblebees are among the most loved and familiar of garden insects. The sight and sound of them buzzing from flower to flower is a quintessential part of summertime, but sadly these charismatic creatures are now struggling to survive. In our modern world of paved gardens and intensive agriculture our bumblebees find themselves hungry and homeless.
Also found in: [+]
To bee or not to bee 15.4.2014 Green Technology and Environmental Science News - ENN
Bumblebees are among the most loved and familiar of garden insects. The sight and sound of them buzzing from flower to flower is a quintessential part of summertime, but sadly these charismatic creatures are now struggling to survive. In our modern world of paved gardens and intensive agriculture our bumblebees find themselves hungry and homeless.
Also found in: [+]
To bee or not to bee 15.4.2014 Environmental News Network
Bumblebees are among the most loved and familiar of garden insects. The sight and sound of them buzzing from flower to flower is a quintessential part of summertime, but sadly these charismatic creatures are now struggling to survive. In our modern world of paved gardens and intensive agriculture our bumblebees find themselves hungry and homeless.
Also found in: [+]
To bee or not to bee 15.4.2014 Climate Change News - ENN
Bumblebees are among the most loved and familiar of garden insects. The sight and sound of them buzzing from flower to flower is a quintessential part of summertime, but sadly these charismatic creatures are now struggling to survive. In our modern world of paved gardens and intensive agriculture our bumblebees find themselves hungry and homeless.
Also found in: [+]
Invasive Lionfish On The Decline In Jamaica After National Campaign To Save Reefs 14.4.2014 Green on HuffingtonPost.com
KINGSTON, Jamaica (AP) — Jamaica is reporting a big decline in sightings of lionfish, the voracious invasive species that has been wreaking havoc on regional reefs for years and wolfing down native juvenile fish and crustaceans. Some four years after a national campaign got started to slash numbers of the candy-striped predator with a mane of venomous spines, Jamaica's National Environment and Planning Agency is reporting a 66 percent drop in sightings of lionfish in coastal waters with depths of 75 feet (23 meters). Dayne Buddo, a Jamaican marine ecologist who focuses on marine invaders at the Caribbean island's University of the West Indies, attributes much of the local decrease in sightings to a growing appetite for their fillets. He said Sunday that Jamaican fishermen are now selling lionfish briskly at markets. In contrast, a few years ago island fishermen "didn't want to mess" with the exotic fish with spines that can deliver a very painful sting. "After learning how to handle them, the fishermen ...
Also found in: [+]
Seeds of Intimacy -- The Jane Goodall Effect 12.4.2014 Green on HuffingtonPost.com
At the 92nd Street Y , I got to interview Jane Goodall on stage about her new book Seeds of Hope . Honored to be asked, a bit anxious about my role, I started cramming well beforehand. I expected Seeds of Hope to be "interesting." I didn't expect it to create a powerful shift inside me. But it did. I began by jumping around in the book, mining for nuggets that I might incorporate into my questions for Jane. But I kept getting slowed down, caught by a thread that intrigued me, and then slowed down even more to scribble in margins and memorize what I wanted -- oh so badly -- to share. Here is just a taste... That plants communicate with each other through their root systems. Why didn't I know this? They can share information. When pea plants experience water shortage, they send a chemical message through their roots warning surrounding plants to begin preparing themselves to better withstand the drought. And they do. They help each other out. Established trees serve as "mother trees" for surrounding ...
Also found in: [+]
Organic Gardening: 10 Tips to Success 11.4.2014 Green on HuffingtonPost.com
By Dianne Venetta for GalTime.com Organic gardening is the method of gardening that utilizes only materials derived from living things, ie. all natural plant foods and pesticides. Once you know the basic tenets of this practice, organic vegetable gardening is simple. And the payoff is enormous: no toxic chemicals, no waste, better for the environment as a whole, and not to mention a crop full of natural, delicious vegetables. Remember these 10 steps and you'll have a successful crop in no time! Soil. It all begins here. Amending your soil with organic material such as composted manure or yard and kitchen scrap compost will get your dirt off to a good start. The inclusion of organic material provides a solid basis of nutrients for your plants which helps to cut down on the need for commercially made fertilizers and improves soil structure making it easier for your plant to absorb the important minerals they need. Sandy soil will not hold its moisture well. Heavy clay soil may prove too dense for healthy ...
Also found in: [+]
What If House Republicans Cared About Climate Change? (VIDEO) 11.4.2014 Politics on HuffingtonPost.com
Have you ever envisioned an alternate reality in which the majority of House Republicans not only accepted the reality of man-made climate change but also saw it as an urgent national priority? Now you can, thanks to this mashup from Rep. Jared Huffman (D-Calif.). Even though only one of 9,136 authors of recent peer-reviewed climate articles rejects the basic idea of man-made global warming, more than half of the House's Republican caucus have made public statements questioning the existence of climate change and its human origin as a result of burning fossil fuels. In a January vote on an anti-EPA bill, all 24 Republican members of the House Energy and Commerce Committee rejected a Democrat's proposed amendment that would have declared that Congress accepts greenhouse gas emissions are causing climate ...
Also found in: [+]
1 to 20 of 2,456