User: flenvcenter Topic: Biodiversity-National
Category: Protection :: Policy
Last updated: Dec 04 2016 23:26 IST RSS 2.0
 
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Top Scientists: Amazon's Tapajós Dam Complex "a Crisis in the Making" 4.12.2016 Truthout - All Articles
The Tapajós River, Brazil. More than 40 dams would turn this free-flowing river and its tributaries into a vast industrial waterway threatening the Tapajós Basin's ecosystems, wildlife, people and even the regional and global climate. (Photo: International Rivers on Flickr, licensed under an Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike 2.0 Generic (CC BY-NC-SA 2.0) license) Brazil is forging ahead with plans to build a vast hydropower dam complex in the heart of the Amazon that would convert the now remote and wild Tapajós river system into a tamed industrial waterway for the purpose of transporting soybeans -- development that scientists and NGOs say will threaten Amazonian biodiversity , ecosystems, traditional livelihoods, indigenous cultures, and the global climate. A total of 42 large dams are planned or under construction in the Tapajós Basin, a biologically and culturally rich region, and one of eight areas of Amazonian biological endemism . Fed by tributaries in the states of Mato Grosso, Rondônia and ...
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Mainstreaming Biodiversity: A Real Solution to the Devastation of Nature? 2.12.2016 Commondreams.org Views
Nele Marien

4 December marks the start of the Conference of the Parties of the Convention on Biological Diversity (CBD COP). While not as well-known as the climate COPs, this conference responds to a complex crisis that is both as threatening and urgent as the climate crisis.  Globally, biodiversity is being depleted at an alarming rate. Animals are being wiped out as much as 100 times faster than their natural extinction rate. The last time the world experienced such a rate of decline was 65 million years ago, with the disappearance of the dinosaurs.

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Number of Species on Waiting List for Endangered Species Act Protection Drops to Lowest Level in History 2.12.2016 Commondreams.org Newswire
Center for Biological Diversity As a result of a pair of settlement agreements with the Center for Biological Diversity and WildEarth Guardians, the number of species on the waiting list for Endangered Species Act protection has dropped to the lowest level since the “candidate” list was begun in 1975. The U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service announced today that only 30 species are now on the candidate waiting list for protection, including the Pacific walrus, Oregon’s red tree vole and the eastern gopher ...
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Awareness of the Ivory Crisis is Taking Shape 1.12.2016 Green on HuffingtonPost.com
In recent years, African nations with large elephant populations such as Kenya, Mozambique, and the Republic of Congo have made powerful statements by publicly burning their stockpiles of ivory confiscated from poachers and illegal wildlife traffickers. At the CITES Conference of the Parties this past October, 182 governments around the world agreed to a resolution calling for the closure of all domestic ivory markets. Every day in Africa today, some 96 elephants are killed -- an average of one every 15 minutes. Credit: Julie Larsen Maher. The Wildlife Conservation Society's 96 Elephants campaign has helped bring unprecedented worldwide attention to the poaching crisis since its inception in 2013. Named for the number of elephants killed for their ivory every day in Africa, 96 Elephants has led multiple efforts that have yielded important results for elephant conservation. This year, the Obama Administration and the U.S. government joined several states in enacting a ban on the trade of elephant ...
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This $100 billion marketplace benefits business and landowners 1.12.2016 Energy & Climate | Greenbiz.com
It's changing the face of real estate, and caters to rural America, business and industry. Here's how Allegheny Power Company unearthed hidden value.
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New Landmark Study: Tighter Pesticide Regulations Key to Reversing Pollinator Declines 29.11.2016 Commondreams.org Newswire
Center for Biological Diversity Tighter regulation of pesticides is the top recommendation issued by leading pollinator researchers to reverse dramatic declines in populations of  bees, butterflies and other pollinators, according to a new paper just published in the journal Science. The researchers’ urgent recommendations for protecting pollinators come on the heels of last week’s release of the largest and most ...
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The endangered Tapaculo adapts to fragmentation of its forest. 28.11.2016 The Earth Times Online Newspaper - Health News
When we lose so many animals and plants from South America, often as soon as they are discovered as new species. It is consoling to discover such an animal that seems to be looking after itself, in secondary forest, and with hopes of recovery from population loss. Of course, some smart new conservation effort may be required in the form of forest regeneration and afforestation ----- !
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Bei Bei OK! National Zoo's Panda Cub Recovering After Bowel Surgery 26.11.2016 NPR News
A team of veterinarians performed emergency surgery to remove a dense, lemon-sized mass of bamboo. His prognosis is "very good."
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Start-up is pitching a new type of bond to fix California's wildfire and water woes 25.11.2016 LA Times: Commentary

Deep in the Stanislaus National Forest, an hour’s drive from the foothill town of Sonora, two forests stand side by side.

One is open and airy, with light that streams through gaps between vast sugar and ponderosa pines down to an almost bare forest floor. The other is so dense with brush and smaller...

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Conservation efforts rush to beat a deadline: Inauguration Day 25.11.2016 LA Times: Commentary

The West’s most powerful water managers held an emergency conference call on the morning before Thanksgiving to consider the same question people across the country are asking: What will the election of Donald Trump mean for the issues they care about?

The group desperately wants to formalize new...

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Protections for Rare and Endangered Animals Under Threat From Drilling Industry 24.11.2016 Truthout.com
While the nation's list of protected species is poised to grow, a handful of those rare and wild animals can only survive in habitat also targeted by Texan drillers. And any changes to environmental standards driven by oil lobbyists could undermine fundamental protections for wildlife nationwide. A well is drilled at an Apache Energy site in the Permian Basin in Midland, Texas, February 14, 2012. (Photo: Jim Wilson / The New York Times) Midland, Texas -- Monarch butterflies, tiny lizards, and a type of grouse known as the lesser prairie chicken all drew close scrutiny from a large gathering of oil and gas executives at the Permian Basin Petroleum Association's annual meeting this year. Fracking has helped turn the Permian Basin into the nation's most productive oil field -- and the only part of the U.S. where the oil industry continues to expand robustly despite a price slump that began in mid-2014. But the parched Permian Basin is also home to a broad array of rare wildlife, including a significant ...
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Trump And Endangered Species? A Terrifying Dumpster Fire 24.11.2016 Politics on HuffingtonPost.com
Among all the nightmares to contemplate with the next administration, consider this one: President Trump and his band of villains trying to save endangered species. Just look at the people who have his ear on whether to save endangered wolves, whales and sea turtles. Steve Bannon was made chief executive officer of the Trump campaign in August and has now been picked to be President Trump's chief strategist and senior counselor. Prior to joining the Trump campaign, Bannon was executive chairman of Breitbart News, which has often been criticized for racist, xenophobic and misogynist content, particularly under Bannon's leadership. Lesser known are the frequent tropes on Breitbart mocking protections for endangered species and the Endangered Species Act. For example, an August 2015 Breitbart piece, " Animals That Aren't Delicious or Useful Deserve to Be Extinct ," crassly called elephants "the original fat acceptance campaigners" and said the severely endangered vaquita porpoise of Mexico "can definitely ...
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Historic Bear Lake ranch to be spared from development 23.11.2016 Salt Lake Tribune
A deal has been reached to preserve the historic South Eden Ranch on Bear Lake’s east shore, which the Nebeker family promises to keep in production and undeveloped while adjacent lakefront property is subdivided and developed into residences. The $800,000 deal targets a 50-acre slice of the 620-acre property, but it will ensure an indefinite reprieve from intensifying development pressure while further deals are reached to protect the entire property, according to ranch manager Krista Klein. T... <iframe src="http://www.sltrib.com/csp/mediapool/sites/sltrib/pages/garss.csp" height="1" width="1" > </frame>
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Several Cities Convert To LED Street Lights In Conservation Efforts 22.11.2016 NPR: All Things Considered
Many cities are converting to LED street lights. The move can help restore darker skies and make stars visible again, and they also save energy and money. But some LEDs emit light that disrupts sleep.
Polly Dyer, driving force for Northwest conservation, dead at 96 21.11.2016 Seattle Times: Local

The Northwest might look very different were it not for Polly Dyer, who moved from the East Coast and became a champion of Northwest wilderness. Mrs. Dyer died Sunday at 96.
Beetle reintroduction paying off in southwest Missouri 19.11.2016 Yahoo: US National
ST. LOUIS (AP) — A colorful beetle that was once common in southwest Missouri is showing signs of a comeback, thanks to a joint effort by the St. Louis Zoo and conservation ...
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Beetle reintroduction paying off in southwest Missouri 19.11.2016 Seattle Times: Top stories

ST. LOUIS (AP) — A colorful beetle that was once common in southwest Missouri is showing signs of a comeback, thanks to a joint effort by the St. Louis Zoo and conservation organizations. The zoo said 850 American burying beetles, which disappeared in the state in the 1970s, have been found in traps it placed […]
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Female panther crosses Florida river; humans applaud 15.11.2016 Minnesota Public Radio: Law & Justice
The endangered Florida panther has bred only south of the Caloosahatchee River since 1973. Now, a female has turned up on the north side, and it could be a good thing for the future of the species.
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New mapping data reveals major growth in eco markets 15.11.2016 Energy & Climate | Greenbiz.com
Here's a clear new tool to quantify the dramatic growth of U.S. environmental markets.
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Coberly Creek Ranch conservation emblematic of the 1880s in South Routt County 15.11.2016 Steamboat Pilot
The final piece of the conservation of the sprawling Coberly Creek Ranch in South Routt County was approved by the Routt County Board of Commissioners Nov. 8, and the 400-acre Trapper Jack parcel alludes to an obscure piece of local history. Owners Mike Neelis and Merrilee Ellis have now put conservation easements on 3,350 acres of their ranch south of Yampa. The ranch lies just east of the intersection of Colorado Highway 134 where it heads up the west side of Gore Pass, and Colorado Highway 131 where it parallels Egeria Creek. Within the new conservation easement lie the remnants of a little pioneer dwelling known as Trapper Jack’s Cabin, named after an early owner. The Board of Commissioners approved using $325,000 of dedicated property tax dollars to facilitate the easement. The easement, which was facilitated by the Colorado Cattlemen’s Agricultural Land Trust and taxpayer funding through Routt County’s Purchase of Development Rights (PDR) program, ensures the parcel will never be developed. PDR ...
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