User: flenvcenter Topic: Biodiversity-National
Category: Protection :: Policy
Last updated: Jul 02 2016 24:25 IST RSS 2.0
 
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Leaked Videos Of Wildlife Abuse Spark Corruption Scandal In Tanzania 1.7.2016 Green on HuffingtonPost.com
Lake Natron, in Tanzania, is a serene expanse of water where flamingoes stop on their migration, below the titanic bulk of Ol Doinyo Lengai, an active volcano revered by Masai people who live here. The variety of animals in the remote semi-desert environment—greater kudu, water buffalo, and eland—attract the safari business, with trophy-hunting tourists paying for camps and guides. If you remember Cecil the Lion , you know this isn’t a subject without controversy. In Tanzania, where few resources are available for conservation, hunting blocks are leased by dozens of companies, who are expected to finance anti-poaching patrols and often invest in basic infrastructure in the area. Environmental activists say that this model is more exception than rule, with hunting groups ignoring or flouting conservation rules. Regardless, the extraordinary natural beauty and resources of the land around Lake Natron remain a key resource to be employed on behalf of the people of Tanzania—or abused. The rights to maintain ...
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Plight of African lions persists 1 year after Cecil killing 30.6.2016 Salt Lake Tribune
Johannesburg • Some call it the Cecil the lion effect. A year ago, an American killed a lion in Zimbabwe in what authorities said was an illegal hunt, infuriating people worldwide and invigorating an international campaign against trophy hunting in Africa. Some conservationists, however, warn there are greater threats to Africa’s beleaguered lion populations, including human encroachment on their habitats and the poaching of antelopes and other animals for food, a custom that deprives lions of p...
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Plight of African lions persists 1 year after Cecil killing 30.6.2016 AP Top News
JOHANNESBURG (AP) -- Some call it the Cecil the lion effect....
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Minnesota prairie restorers recruit a surprising ally: cows 30.6.2016 Minnesota Public Radio: News
Minnesota's vast tallgrass prairies have been largely plowed under. Now, some conservationists are turning to cattlemen to preserve what's left.
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Tanzania gives hunting permit to a firm despite video of animal abuse 30.6.2016 Washington Post: World
A company that caters to wealthy U.A.E. tourists was welcomed back after a suspension.
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ESA Policy News: June 29, 2016, Senate: NSF authorizing bill introduced, Appropriations: Senate FY 2017 Interior bill reported,Climate Science: ESA & leading scientific societies send letter to the Hill 29.6.2016 EcoTone
"ESA in a partnership with 30 leading nonpartisan scientific societies reaffirmed the reality of human-caused climate ...
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Should Pacific Bluefin Tuna Be Listed As An Endangered Species? 29.6.2016 NPR Health Science
Environmental groups have asked the U.S. to give the prized fish protection under the Endangered Species Act. Some scientists and activists say the chances are slim but the action is long overdue.
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This parrot was thought to be extinct in the wild — until a farmer spotted one 29.6.2016 Washington Post: World
“There’s hope again" for the future of the the Spix's macaw.
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U.S. Charity Loophole Enabled Trading Of 1,300 Endangered Animals 27.6.2016 Green on HuffingtonPost.com
By John Shiffman WASHINGTON (Reuters) - Last year, after a Minnesota dentist sparked an uproar by killing a popular lion named Cecil while on safari in Zimbabwe, the U.S. Fish & Wildlife Service placed similar African lions on the endangered species list, making it illegal to import them as trophies to the United States. But for African lions and other threatened and endangered species, there’s an exception to this rule: Hunters, circuses, zoos, breeders and theme parks can get permits to import, export or sell endangered animals if they can demonstrate that the transactions will “enhance the survival” of the species. Often, records show, this requirement is met in part by making a cash contribution to charity - usually a few thousand dollars. The practice has angered both animal-rights activists who say it exploits wildlife and exhibitors who describe the process as unfair and arbitrary. In the last five years, the vast majority of the estimated 1,375 endangered species permits granted by the Fish & ...
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APNewsBreak: Scientists send coral reef plea to Australia 26.6.2016 Seattle Times: Local

HONOLULU (AP) — As the largest international gathering of coral reef experts comes to a close, scientists have sent a letter to Australian officials calling for action to save the world’s reefs, which are being rapidly damaged. The letter was sent Saturday to Australian Prime Minister Malcolm Turnbull imploring his government to do more to […]
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What drought? Many Californians no longer required to curb water use 25.6.2016 LA Times: Commentary

After a year of mandatory water conservation that shortened showers and faded lawns, millions of drought-weary Californians will no longer be required to aggressively cut back their use.

In order to comply with the state’s latest emergency regulation, local water providers this week submitted documents...

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This Rabbit May Be Conservation's Newest, Cutest Success Story 25.6.2016 Green on HuffingtonPost.com
New England’s only native rabbit species may soon be hopping in the wild in abundant numbers once again. The New England cottontail population has declined by more than 75 percent since 1960, mostly from habitat loss caused by development, according to the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service. There are now only five small populations across a range from Maine to New York. (Yes, technically New York is not part of New England, but apparently no one told the New England cottontail that.) But conservation efforts for the bunnies are proving to be promising, the Associated Press reports. Captive breeding and reintroduction efforts has helped the population on Rhode Island’s Patience Island double to more than 150 rabbits. And two dozen rabbits released at a managed wildlife area in New Hampshire are thriving and expanding in numbers. Of course, since the habitat loss was the problem in the first place, it’s crucial to ensure the growing population actually has a place to live. New England cottontails live in the ...
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Women's rights in protected areas: Championing gender equality in environmental conservation policy 24.6.2016 Green on HuffingtonPost.com
In a small village near Xuan Thuy National Park in Vietnam, Pham Thi Kim Phuong bikes seven kilometers every morning to the mudflats by the park's mangroves. There, she joins hundreds of other women who take advantage of the early morning low tide to manually gather clams and snails. The mudflats where Pham works are part of a protected area and since 2013, an initiative to strengthen park management has engaged local women in co-management of the mangrove forests. Women and men living in and utilizing protected areas differ in their relationships to their ecosystems; they have differentiated roles and responsibilities, unequal access to and control over resources, unique knowledge bases and unbalanced participation in decision-making processes. Gender inequality in biodiversity conservation and management restricts women's access to benefits, perpetuating poverty and undermining sustainable resource use and management. However, gender equality in this field is rarely measured or written into policy. To ...
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Why investments in agricultural carbon markets make good business sense 23.6.2016 Main Feed - Environmental Defense
By Sara Kroopf Over the past decade, private investment in conservation has more than doubled, with sustainable forestry and agriculture investments as the main drivers of growth. This unprecedented expansion in “impact investing” or “ conservation finance ” has occurred as investors seek ROI that can also benefit the environment.  According to Credit Suisse , sustainable agriculture is particularly appealing to investors as it offers a wider array of risk mitigation approaches than sectors such as energy and transportation. Yet despite this boom, there has been very little investment from private capital in emerging ecosystems markets, especially in the agricultural sector. We’ve blogged before about the benefits growers – and the environment – realize from participating in agricultural carbon markets or habitat exchanges. But here’s why the private sector, food companies and retailers should invest in agricultural carbon markets. 1. Markets are up and running The American Carbon Registry and the ...
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Rain-barrel law helps educate about water conservation in the West 23.6.2016 Durango Herald
It’s not rocket-science, and it’s not really all that controversial. But it was illegal in Colorado until last month, and it could have landed violators a $500 fine.The crime: catching rain in a barrel.In May, Gov. John Hickenlooper signed a bill that passed both chambers of the Colorado Legislature allowing a...
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Of bears and biases: scientific judgment and the fate of Yellowstone's grizzlies 21.6.2016 Green on HuffingtonPost.com
The grizzly, or brown, bear in the Greater Yellowstone Ecosystem is posed to lose protections under the Endangered Species Act. Jim Peaco, Yellowstone National Park via flickr By Jeremy T. Bruskotter , The Ohio State University ; John A Vucetich , Michigan Technology University , and Robyn S. Wilson , The Ohio State University In March, the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service (USFWS) announced its intent to remove protections afforded by the U.S. Endangered Species Act (ESA) to grizzly bears in the Greater Yellowstone Ecosystem (GYE). Citing four decades of growth in the bear population, the USFWS Director Dan Ashe heralded the decision as "a historic success for partnership-driven wildlife conservation ." However, conservation organizations oppose "delisting" GYE grizzlies. They cite persistent threats to grizzlies, public opposition to delisting and ongoing scientific uncertainty regarding the population's viability. Indeed, scientific uncertainty, especially threats posed by a changing climate, is one ...
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Conservation Organizations Thank Secretary Jewell for Visiting Gulf Coast 21.6.2016 Main Feed - Environmental Defense
Conservation Organizations Thank Secretary Jewell for Visiting Gulf Coast
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Conservation Organizations Thank Secretary Jewell for Visiting Gulf Coast 21.6.2016 Main Feed - Environmental Defense
Emily Guidry Schatzel, National Wildlife Federation, 225.253.9781, schatzele@nwf.org Elizabeth Van Cleve, Environmental Defense Fund, 202.553.2543, evancleve@edf.org Jacques Hebert, National Audubon Society, 504.264.6849, jhebert@audubon.org Jimmy Frederick, Coalition to Restore Coastal Louisiana, 225.317.2046, jimmy.frederick@crcl.org John Lopez, Lake Pontchartrain Basin Foundation, 504.421.7348, jlopez@saveourlake.org Conservation Organizations Thank Secretary Jewell for Visiting Gulf Coast Groups Urge Investment in Large-Scale Restoration with BP Dollars (New Orleans, LA – June 21, 2016) This week, U.S. Secretary of the Interior Sally Jewell is visiting Louisiana to highlight the Department’s restoration projects selected for funding last year by the Gulf Coast Ecosystem Restoration Council (Council) prior to the BP settlement. Leading national and local conservation organizations working on Mississippi River Delta and Gulf Coast restoration – Environmental Defense Fund , National Audubon Society , ...
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The Last Fish Eaten 21.6.2016 Green on HuffingtonPost.com
Famine in Sub-Saharan Africa does not make for pleasant news, but fortunately it does not affect us directly. Neither does the news of rising deaths of the penguins in the Antartica. Closer home, some of the recent headlines also fail to evoke the desired reaction for the same reason: Feb 17: 'Chhattisgarh Govt. cancels tribal rights over forests to facilitate coal mining' June 10: 'After Bihar's Nilgai culling, HP announces plan to start culling Shimla's 2500 Monkeys' Yet these stories have a vital link to our existence. They are all, in fact, pointers to a devastatingly challenging era when all debates on development versus conservations are to be about bitter survival. But where, increasingly, we stand to lose more than we gain, if we think only about ourselves. And so, just as Odisha's resource-rich Sukinda valley coughed up lungful of polluted air, Chattisgarh will be left to lick its own deep wounds, perhaps never to heal again. After nilgais and monkeys, a far more severe vermin epidemic, from ...
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Endangered Sonoma County Tiger Salamander Gets Recovery Plan 21.6.2016 Commondreams.org Newswire
Center for Biological Diversity In accordance with a settlement with the Center for Biological Diversity, the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service today released a final recovery plan for the endangered Sonoma County population of the California tiger salamander . The plan calls for purchase and permanent protection of approximately 15,000 acres of the salamander’s breeding ponds and adjacent ...
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