User: flenvcenter Topic: Biodiversity-National
Category: Protection :: Policy
Last updated: Mar 28 2015 24:47 IST RSS 2.0
 
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Scaling up the War on Elephant Poaching 28.3.2015 Green on HuffingtonPost.com
For more than a year, WCS and our conservation partners have focused on three essential prongs in the battle to end the illegal ivory trade: stop the killing, stop the trafficking, and stop the demand. Today we must scale up those efforts if we want to truly end the elephant crisis--to give the elephants of Africa a chance to recover, to help ensure that the peoples of Africa do not lose this majestic part of their heritage, and to help prevent a growing crisis undermining sustainable development. For many countries in Africa, elephants are not only a part of their natural heritage, but their very patrimony.Credit: Julie Larsen Maher ©WCS. A major meeting was held this week in Botswana on the conservation needs of the African elephant given the ongoing poaching crisis across the continent. This meeting followed a summit held in the country fifteen months earlier, at which governments agreed to 14 "Urgent Measures" to address the catastrophic decline of African elephants. The meeting this week sought to ...
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Conservation Groups Appeal Old-Growth Logging in Big Thorne Sale and Tongass Forest Plan 27.3.2015 Commondreams.org Newswire
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Camera trap captures first video of lion in Gabon in 20 years 27.3.2015 TreeHugger
Good news from Gabon: Conservation efforts in Batéké Plateau National Park are rewarded with a sighting of an animal thought to have disappeared from the region.
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British swimmer braves Antarctic waters in Speedos; takes conservation message to Russia 27.3.2015 Star Tribune: World
El Lobo's Uncertain Future 27.3.2015 Green on HuffingtonPost.com
Lobo Week, March 23-30, 2015, marks the 17th anniversary of the Mexican gray wolf's return to the wild. However, this wolf subspecies' tortuous recovery journey actually began over 40 years ago, when the 1973 Endangered Species Act inspired Americans to build an ark. One of the first creatures we welcomed onto our ark was the gray wolf. But arks and best-laid plans sometimes don't work as intended. In 1977, the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service (USFWS) contracted Roy McBride to capture wild Mexican wolves in Mexico to begin a breeding program for this nearly extinct subspecies of gray wolf. Ironically, McBride, who for years had lethally trapped wolves, now applied his considerable skills to wolf conservation. In three years he caught five animals. Just in the nick of time, too, because by the early 1980s the Mexican gray wolf had gone completely extinct in the wild. Mexican Gray Wolf, California Wolf Center. Photo by Cristina Eisenberg In 1990, USFWS hired David Parsons to lead the Mexican Gray Wolf ...
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Lawsuit Filed to Protect Rare Colorado, Utah Wildflowers Threatened by Oil Shale Mining 27.3.2015 Commondreams.org Newswire
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Unprecedented sage grouse protection deal signed in Nevada 26.3.2015 Yahoo: Politics
RENO, Nev. (AP) — An unprecedented attempt to protect sage grouse habitat across parts of more than 900 square miles of privately owned land in Nevada will begin under a deal Thursday involving the federal government, an environmental group and the world's largest gold mining company.
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Unprecedented sage grouse protection deal signed in Nevada 26.3.2015 AP Washington
RENO, Nev. (AP) -- An unprecedented attempt to protect sage grouse habitat across parts of more than 900 square miles of privately owned land in Nevada will begin under a deal Thursday involving the federal government, an environmental group and the world's largest gold mining company....
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Minnesota's already at-risk wetlands will be in greater danger if SF 1515 passes 26.3.2015 MinnPost
CC/Flickr/D. Bjorn Wetlands protections are about to take a major step backward. Most people are not aware that proposed revisions to the state's Wetlands Conservation Act, as outlined in SF 1515 , will greatly endanger wetlands that are already at risk in Minnesota. The revisions in the bill, inexplicably sponsored by Sen. John Marty, will work against Gov. Mark Dayton's Executive Order 12-04. Dayton has asked agencies to "assess potential changes to current policies that will improve wetland conservation in Minnesota in a manner that maintains and restores the integrity of Minnesota's wetlands." Judy Helgen Instead, wetlands protections are about to take a major step backward. The stated purpose of the Wetlands Conservation Act (WCA), passed in 1991, is "to achieve no net loss in the quantity, quality and biological diversity of Minnesota's existing wetlands." In the current WCA law, when wetlands are to be destroyed they must be replaced (or "mitigated") if the loss cannot be avoided. This requirement ...
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Australia's Great Barrier Reef is under siege 25.3.2015 Chicago Tribune: Nation
Australia's iconic Great Barrier Reef may become irreparably damaged in the coming decades due to traumas caused by both nature and humans, leading scientists ...
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What does California's Drought Mean for the Proposed Bay-Delta Tunnels? 24.3.2015 Switchboard, from NRDC
Doug Obegi, Staff Attorney, Western Water Project, San Francisco: "Everyone has a plan until they get punched in the mouth." Mike Tyson California's drought, now in its fourth year and showing no signs of abating, is causing terrible hardship and impacts across the state to rural communities, agricultural users,...
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Rarer -- and cuter -- than a panda 24.3.2015 CNN: Top Stories
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Conservation Groups Ask Government of Canada to Classify Microbeads "Toxic" 23.3.2015 Commondreams.org Newswire
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First wood bison head for release in southwest Alaska 23.3.2015 Yahoo: US National
PORTAGE, Alaska (AP) — The first of 100 wood bison aimed at re-establishing a species that went extinct more than a century ago in Alaska were flown Sunday to a rural ...
DNR changes ID policy in response to suit by immigrant hunters 22.3.2015 Star Tribune: Local
State conservation officers won’t be allowed to enforce immigration violations.
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Group promoting wildlife conservation in Florida completes 70-day, 900-mile trek across state 21.3.2015 Star Tribune: Nation
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Zimbabwe says elephant exports to raise money for conservation 20.3.2015 World
Zimbabwe has said it will export dozens of elephants to raise money for conservation after hunting revenues fell when the U.S. banned the import of ivory from elephants hunted in the southern African nation. The move to export up to 60 elephants to countries that include China, France and United Arab Emirates has angered animal welfare groups, who say the plan is cruel.
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New watering restrictions imposed amid California drought 18.3.2015 LA Times: Opinion
With California heading into another parched year, state officials Tuesday beefed up emergency drought regulations, directing urban agencies to limit the number of days residents can water their yards.
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Zoos Boost Biodiversity Understanding 17.3.2015 Environmental News Network
Zoos and aquariums around the world have a crucial role to play in helping people understand how they can protect animals and their natural habitats, new research from the University of Warwick, the World Association of Zoos and Aquariums (WAZA) and Chester Zoo has found.
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The Great Amazonian Pantry: How Eating the Products of the Rainforest Could Save the Earth 17.3.2015 Green on HuffingtonPost.com
A glass of camu camu juice at Malabar restaurant, Lima, Peru There is a type of river snail -- a churo -- in the Peruvian Amazon, large and meaty, that is especially delicious when slow-braised and served in the shell with a bright sauce of golden tapioca pearls. Indigenous people harvest the giant snail when the forest is flooded and transformed into an otherworldly realm where, because of the rising water level, fish swim among the majestic kapok tree and through the umbrella-like branches of the cecropia tree. "People go through the middle of the flooded forest in their canoes, where the churos have laid their eggs in the treetops," explains biologist Miguel Tang, of the Association of Amazonians for the Amazon (AMPA). They pluck the snails right off the trees as the canoes glide by, harvesting only the fully grown specimens to ensure that the snail population will continue. "It's as if they're collecting fruit from the trees, no?" Tang says with a smile. He's chatting with Pedro Miguel Schiaffino, ...
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