User: flenvcenter Topic: Biodiversity-National
Category: Biodiversity
Last updated: Oct 22 2020 09:38 IST RSS 2.0
 
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Op-Ed: Dalai Lama: It's up to us — and especially politicians — to save our planet 14.9.2020 LA Times: Commentary

Unless we act now, we will sacrifice the future of humanity for the greed of the few.

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COVID-19, weakened environmental protections, and rights infringements threaten the Amazon’s Indigenous territories and protected areas 14.9.2020 Climate 411 - Environmental Defense Fund
This post was coauthored by Bärbel Henneberger. Indigenous communities living in the Amazon rainforest are known as the ‘guardians of the forest’ because of their effectiveness in keeping forests intact. Indigenous territories and protected areas, which cover 52 percent of the Amazon and store 58 percent of the carbon, outperform surrounding lands in terms of […]
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The Relative Abundance of Bumblebees In North America Is Estimated to Have Crashed by 97 Percent 5.9.2020 Mother Jones
This piece was originally published in Canada’s National Observer and appears here as part of our Climate Desk Partnership. Jack Bates’ blueberries rely on “non-union” bees. The Delta, British Columbia, farmer is not alone. Blueberries, raspberries, and tree fruits are some of BC’s most important crops, worth about $370 million combined—and they all depend on bees, […]
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Aligning Action with Ambition: How Leadership Companies Approach Audacious Sustainability Goals 3.9.2020 Small Business | GreenBiz.com
Aligning Action with Ambition: How Leadership Companies Approach Audacious Sustainability Goals The pressure is on when it comes to sustainability in the private sector. No longer is it sufficient to announce new ambitions. Now, driven by new reporting requirements in the form of TCFD, new regulatory regimes being enacted by the EU, increasing shareholder and consumer pressure around the pace of climate change, companies are being asked to not only set goals – but to share detailed plans about their roadmap to transform their business to reach those targets and their progress against those. These new expectations go beyond the goal-setting and reporting process – it also is now expected that companies will have multifaceted sustainability goals and programs that encompass carbon but also water, waste and biodiversity and also are creating new tools and services to enable others to build on their work.  There’s also increased competitive pressure, as more and more companies step up to the plate. Despite ...
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5 Pillars for a Green and Resilient Recovery from COVID-19 2.9.2020 WRI Stories
5 Pillars for a Green and Resilient Recovery from COVID-19 Comments|Add Comment|PrintWoman in face mask on subway. Photo by Ketut Subiyanto/Pexels The COVID-19 pandemic and economic crisis is likely to push tens of millions of people back into poverty and undercut efforts to improve human well-being around the world. And as bad as things are, this is only a preview of how the climate crisis and the destruction of nature will threaten our economies and societies. Yet we have all the means... [[ This is a content summary only. Visit my website for full links, other content, and more! ...
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UN plan to protect 30 percent of the planet by 2030 could displace hundreds of millions, NGOs and experts warn 2.9.2020 Survival International
These Khadia men were thrown off their land after it was turned into a tiger reserve. They lived for months under plastic sheets. Millions more face this fate if the 30% plan goes ahead. © Survival International One hundred twenty eight environmental and human rights NGOs and experts today warn that a United Nations drive to increase global protected areas such as national parks could lead to severe human rights violations and cause irreversible social harm for some of the world’s poorest people. 1 In May 2021, the Conference of Parties to the Convention on Biodiversity (CBD) is set to agree on a new target to place at least 30 percent of the Earth’s surface under conservation status by 2030 2 . This ‘30 x 30’ target would double the current protected land area over the coming decade. 3 However, concerns about the human cost of the proposal as well as its efficacy as an environmental measure are growing as nature protection in regions such as Africa’s Congo Basin and South Asia has become increasingly ...
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Ecology and COVID-19 #5: Coronavirus, Human Hubris, and Life in the Coevolving Biosphere 25.8.2020 EcoTone
This blogpost originally appeared on the website for Bruce Byers Consulting. by Bruce Byers The novel coronavirus is holding up a mirror for our species, giving us an opportunity to consider our place in the evolution of life on Earth and question our anthropocentrism. What I’ve missed during this pandemic and shutdown of our usual ...
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Renewable energy corporations fight endangered species status for Joshua trees 18.8.2020 LA Times: Environment

Renewable energy corporations have launched a campaign to derail a petition seeking endangered species protection for Joshua trees.

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Editorial: Elephant and lion heads belong on those animals, not on some trophy hunter's wall. 17.8.2020 LA Times: Opinion

A state bill banning the possession in California of the heads and other body parts of African wildlife killed by hunters for trophies should pass the legislature.

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A Wildlife Refuge Under Siege at the Border 16.8.2020 Mother Jones
This piece was originally published in High Country News and appears here as part of our Climate Desk Partnership. During the fall of 2019, the Department of Homeland Security began pumping large amounts of water from a southern Arizona aquifer to mix concrete for the Trump administration’s border wall. The aquifer is an essential water source […]
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Why We Oppose Golden Rice 11.8.2020 Organic Consumers Association News Headlines

The push for corporate-led solutions to hunger and malnutrition is alarming. In particular, Golden Rice is now being proposed as a solution to the worsening hunger and malnutrition associated with the pandemic. Agrochemical transnationals (TNCs) and collaborating institutions such as the International Rice Research Institute (IRRI) are using concerns over food security during the pandemic to push for an industrial agricultural system that is already discredited. To quote PAN Asia Pacific:

“in the webinar “The future of food systems in Southeast Asia post-COVID19” organised by IRRI and the FAO, Jean Balie, IRRI’s head of Agri-Food Policy, said that they are “looking to increase the mineral and vitamin content in rice grains” as a response to the pandemic, alluding to renewed promotion of the genetically-modified Golden Rice, which has recently been approved for commercialization in Bangladesh and the Philippines” said PANAP.

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Investors say agroforestry isn’t just climate friendly — it’s profitable 10.8.2020 Resource Efficiency | GreenBiz.com
Sid Brantley/U.S. National Agroforestry Center Close Authorship Traditional livestock farming, for instance, is carbon intensive. Trees are cut down for pasture, fossil fuels are used as fertilizer for feed, and that feed is transported across borders, and sometimes the world, using even more fossil fuels. Livestock raised in concentrated animal feeding operations (CAFOs), produce more methane than cows that graze on grass. A silvopasture system, on the other hand, involves planting trees in pastures — or at least not cutting them down. Farmers rotate livestock from place to place, allowing soil to hold onto more carbon. There are similar benefits to other types of agroforestry practices. Forest farming, for instance, involves growing a variety of crops under a forest canopy — a process that can improve biodiversity and soil quality, and also support the root systems and carbon sequestration potential of farms. A changing debate Etelle Higonnet, senior campaign director at campaign group Mighty Earth, ...
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Planting tiny urban forests can boost biodiversity and fight climate change 7.8.2020 Energy & Climate | Greenbiz.com
Planting tiny urban forests can boost biodiversity and fight climate change Alex Thornton Fri, 08/07/2020 - 00:30 How much space do you think you need to grow a forest? If your answer is bigger than a couple of tennis courts, think again. Miniature forests are springing up on patches of land in urban areas around the world, often planted by local community groups  using a method inspired by Japanese temples. The idea is simple — take brownfield sites, plant them densely with a wide variety of native seedlings and let them grow with minimal intervention. The result, according to the method’s proponents , is complex ecosystems perfectly suited to local conditions that improve biodiversity, grow quickly and absorb more carbon dioxide. The Miyawaki method The method is based on the work of Japanese botanist Akira Miyawaki . He found that protected areas around temples, shrines and cemeteries in Japan contained a huge variety of native vegetation that co-existed to produce resilient and diverse ecosystems. ...
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As Amazon deforestation rises, so does the need for urgent action 3.8.2020 Climate 411 - Environmental Defense Fund
The year 2020 was expected to be a “super year” for global action on climate change. Instead, it’s become an “extraordinary year” for a global community trying to cope with the impacts of the COVID-19 pandemic. Amidst this backdrop, deforestation throughout the Amazon has been rising steadily, jumping 55% in the first four months of […]
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This L.A. hunter killed an elephant. Now he's a PETA target in bid to end trophy hunting 3.8.2020 LA Times: Environment

California may soon pass a law to ban the import of "trophy" animal parts from Africa. Activists are targeting an L.A. hunter whose hunt was captured on video.

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Big Beef: You May Not Recognize the Name. But This Bad Actor’s Meat Is Sold Everywhere—Except by Your Local Grass-Fed Farmer or Rancher. 1.8.2020 Organic Consumers Association News Headlines
You’ve never seen this company’s name on a package of ground beef or steak. That’s because the world’s largest beef producer, JBS, doesn’t sell beef under its own name.  But U.S. consumers buy millions of pounds of JBS beef every year, under brand names like Cedar River Farms, Swift Black Angus, 5 Star Reserve and others, in stores like Costco, Walmart and Kroger, to name a few. Consumers also unknowingly support JBS when they buy burgers at fast food chains like McDonald’s and Burger King, and at other restaurants supplied by the meat giant.  JBS isupplies Sysco, the world’s largest food distributor, which distributes to hundreds of  restaurants, hospitals and nursing homes, schools and hotels. Sysco, in turn, wholesales JBS meat and other food products to Aramark and Sodexo, food distribution companies that in turn supply institutions like schools, hospitals, government agencies, prisons and more. JBS is big. In fact it’s the biggest of the world’s Big Meat companies. JBS also has some big ...
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'Biggest Little Farm' Director on Farming With Nature, Not Against It 1.8.2020 Organic Consumers Association News Headlines

Enter Molly and John Chester, the couple behind the Biggest Little Farm, a Hulu documentary that chronicles how they brought new life to a dead farm using regenerative agriculture techniques. When snails swarmed their orchards, they brought in ducks, whose poop was creating toxic algae blooms in a pond on the property, to eat the snails.

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The Challenge of Tracking How a Trillion Trees Grow 30.7.2020 WRI Stories
The Challenge of Tracking How a Trillion Trees Grow Comments|Add Comment|PrintIn Kenya, people are growing trees. Now, it’s time to track them. Photo by Aaron Minnick/WRI. This was the year that business added its clout to the global effort to add trillions of trees to the arsenal of weapons against climate change. The goal is to use these trees to restore land and absorb climate-warming carbon out of the atmosphere, which could keep global warming below 1.5 degrees C (2.7 degrees F), the level... [[ This is a content summary only. Visit my website for full links, other content, and more! ...
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Is a Big Win for Conservation a Blow to Climate Action? 27.7.2020 Mother Jones
This piece was originally published in High Country News and appears here as part of our Climate Desk Partnership. On July 22, Congress passed the biggest public-lands spending bill in half a century. The bipartisan bill, called the Great American Outdoors Act, puts nearly $10 billion toward repairing public-lands infrastructure, such as outdated buildings and dysfunctional […]
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Paul Polman: 'Businesses cannot succeed in societies that fail' 22.7.2020 Business Operations | GreenBiz.com
Paul Polman: 'Businesses cannot succeed in societies that fail' Deonna Anderson Wed, 07/22/2020 - 01:30 As people across the United States and the world grapple with the COVID-19 pandemic and calls for racial justice, the business community has an integral role to play in both the dialogue and the solutions to these social issues. Last week, former Unilever CEO Paul Polman urged business leaders to be courageous in their response. "What COVID has done is a few things that we weren’t really able to get across until then. COVID has made clear that there cannot be healthy people on an unhealthy planet," said Polman during his webcast conversation with Joel Makower, co-founder and executive editor of GreenBiz. "People are understanding how much more the relationships between biodiversity, climate, inequality — may I add racial tension to that? And I think it is not surprising that more people are asking now for a more holistic solution." He noted that citizens, employees and executives alike want better ...
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