User: flenvcenter Topic: Biodiversity-National
Category: Problems :: Endangered Species
Last updated: Dec 12 2019 07:28 IST RSS 2.0
 
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Climate Curious: How much does population growth contribute to climate change? 12.12.2019 Minnesota Public Radio: Law & Justice
As part of our ongoing series, we explore how population growth contributes to climate change, and how some are trying to address it.
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Minnesota put on notice over incidental trapping of lynx 5.12.2019 Minnesota Public Radio: Law & Justice
The Center for Biological Diversity says it's ready to sue, saying the state has failed to comply with a 2008 court order that's meant to protect lynx from being caught by trappers seeking other species.
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Policy News: December 3, 2019 4.12.2019 EcoTone
The Katherine S. McCarter Graduate Student Policy Award Applications are now being accepted. ESA is now accepting applications for its 2020 Katherine S. McCarter Graduate Student Policy Award. Offered each year, this award gives graduate students an all-expense paid trip to Washington, DC for science policy training with opportunities to meet with lawmakers on Capitol ...
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How the Interior Department Got Swamped 1.12.2019 Mother Jones
This article originally was published in HuffPost and appears here as part of our Climate Desk Partnership. In October 2017, Ben Cassidy walked away from his lucrative lobbying gig at the National Rifle Association, where he raked in as much as $288,333 per year, for a post at the Department of the Interior. He’d spent nearly […]
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Minnesota's native mussels: Still in peril, but signs of hope 25.11.2019 Minnesota Public Radio: Law & Justice
Freshwater mussels are considered the most endangered group of organisms in the United States. But there are signs of hope: Thanks to conservation and reintroduction efforts, some native mussels are making a comeback in Minnesota rivers. And Minneapolis is putting their unique skills as harbingers of the river’s health to work.
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At a Protest in Arizona, Border Communities Are Fighting Trump’s Wall 24.11.2019 Mother Jones
This piece originally appeared in High Country News and appears here as part of our Climate Desk Partnership. On a Saturday morning in early November, Edwina Vogan and a few of her friends drove over two hours from the Phoenix suburbs to southern Arizona to protest new wall construction at the US-Mexico border. By the time […]
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Newsom administration sends mixed signals on delta endangered species protections 22.11.2019 LA Times: Environment

Sending mixed signals, California said it will sue to block Trump rollback of endangered species protections but also proposed delta water operations that partially echo Trump plans.

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Butterfly on a bomb range: How scientists have made the Endangered Species Act work 20.11.2019 LA Times: Environment

Nearly 1,500 species have been protected by the U.S. Endangered Species Act, and only 11 have gone extinct. When laws are enforced, species can be saved.

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Endangered Species Act at work in protecting butterflies at Fort Bragg’s artillery range 19.11.2019 Headlines: All Headlines
In the unlikely setting of the world’s most populated military installation, amid all the regimented chaos, you’ll find the Endangered Species Act at work.
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Study links Asian carp with Mississippi River fish drop 18.11.2019 Minnesota Public Radio: Law & Justice
Sport fish have declined significantly in portions of the Upper Mississippi River infested with Asian carp, adding evidence to fears about the invader’s threat to native species, according to a new study.
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Column: Interior Secretary Bernhardt's previous job raises questions about a deal for his ex-client 15.11.2019 LA Times: Environment

Westlands Water District is about to get a rich deal from Interior Secretary David Bernhardt, its former lawyer.

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China aims to build its own Yellowstone on Tibetan plateau 12.11.2019 Denver Post: Local
There's a building boom on the Tibetan plateau, one of the world's last remote places. Mountains long crowned by garlands of fluttering prayer flags are newly topped with sprawling steel power lines. At night, the illuminated signs of Sinopec gas stations cast a red glow over newly built highways.
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How US colonialism affects Indigenous peoples’ stewardship and access to food 9.11.2019 Energy & Climate | Greenbiz.com
From ceremonies to harvesting and food storage, to political leadership, to gender relations, indigenous groups have detailed understandings of how design societal institutions to support resilience. But colonialism changed that.
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Policy News: November 4, 2019 4.11.2019 EcoTone
In This Issue: Senate Advances Spending Bills, Status of Appropriations Uncertain Bills fund the Departments of Interior and Agriculture, National Science Foundation and more. Congress House passes bills banning mining and drilling the Grand Canyon and Chaco National Historical Park. Executive Branch White House revives President’s Council of Advisors on Science and Technology. Courts Conservation ...
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After Getting Whaled on by Environmentalists, the Trump Administration Is Helping a Vulnerable Sea Mammal 1.11.2019 Mother Jones
The Trump administration isn’t exactly heralded as a friend to nature’s creatures. It has, after all, rolled back Endangered Species Act protections, shrunk national monuments, and proposed opening the United States’ largest national forest up to logging and construction. But earlier this month, the administration announced it plans to designate more than 300,000 square nautical […]
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This Month in Climate Science, September 2019: Ocean and Ice Warning; Lost Birds; Pancake Breakfast at Risk? 24.10.2019 WRI Stories
This Month in Climate Science, September 2019: Ocean and Ice Warning; Lost Birds; Pancake Breakfast at Risk? Comments|Add Comment|PrintSmall melting iceberg, Svalberg, Norway. Photo by Deborah Zabarenko/WRI Every month, climate scientists make new discoveries that advance our understanding of climate change's causes and impacts. The research gives a clearer picture of the threats we already face and explores what's to come if we don't reduce emissions at a quicker pace. Our blog series, This... [[ This is a content summary only. Visit my website for full links, other content, and more! ...
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MPR News AM Update: A Trump plan is keeping kids off Medicaid 23.10.2019 Minnesota Public Radio: Law & Justice
Plus a look at Minnesota’s rural homeless population and the oft-mentioned 2030 deadline for addressing climate change.
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Trump team weakens endangered species protections for California salmon and delta smelt 22.10.2019 LA Times: Environment

The Trump administration is weakening endangered species protections for delta smelt and salmon, which have curbed water deliveries to Central Valley farm districts.

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Policy News: October 21, 2019 21.10.2019 EcoTone
In This Issue: House Natural Resources Committee Considers Bills to Boost Funding for Conservation, Create Wildlife Corridors Bill would provide $1.4 billion in dedicated funding. Congress House Science Committee advances scientific integrity legislation. Executive Branch Draft Environmental Impact Statement exempts the Tongass National Forest from 2001 Roadless Rule. Courts Federal judge blocks the implementation of ...
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Editorial: Climate change is wiping out California's Joshua trees. Of course we should protect them 17.10.2019 LA Times: Opinion

Scientists have repeatedly warned that hotter, drier conditions being fueled by climate change are causing mature western Joshua trees to die off, and fewer younger ones are able to grow to replace the dwindling population.

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