User: flenvcenter Topic: Biodiversity-National
Category: Problems :: Species Loss
Last updated: Mar 20 2019 02:15 IST RSS 2.0
 
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This Month in Climate Science: First Climate-Induced Mammal Extinction, Color-changing Oceans and Stranded Sea Turtles 19.3.2019 WRI Stories
This Month in Climate Science: First Climate-Induced Mammal Extinction, Color-changing Oceans and Stranded Sea Turtles Comments|Add Comment|PrintThe Bramble Cay melomys is believed to be the first mammal to go extinct due to climate change. Photo by Ian Bell/EHP, State of Queensland Every month, climate scientists make new discoveries that advance our understanding of climate change's causes and impacts. The research gives a clearer picture of the threats we already face and explores what's to... [[ This is a content summary only. Visit my website for full links, other content, and more! ...
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Gray wolves may lose federal endangered species protection under Trump administration initiative 7.3.2019 Denver Post: News: Local
Wolves face a fresh push to strip away the federal protection that's helped them recover from near-extinction, while deer, antelope and moose may get government help in Colorado and other states to roam across increasingly fragmented habitat.
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Stop Freaking Out About the Future of Climate Change and Start Worrying About the Present 1.3.2019 Mother Jones
While there are a lot of alarm bells sounding over how climate change will affect marine ecosystems and the world’s seafood supply in the future, there’s been much less attention paid to the effects it’s already had on them. In fact, the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) estimates that more than 90 percent of […]
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Scientists Just Made a Remarkable Discovery in the Galápagos Islands 27.2.2019 Mother Jones
Scientists have discovered a species of giant tortoise in the Galapagos Islands that has not been seen since 1906. The species, Chelonoidis phantasticus, more commonly known as the Fernandina giant tortoise, had been listed by the International Union for Conservation of Nature as critically endangered and possibly extinct. The female tortoise, believed to be more than 100 […]
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Scientists have new clues in the 66-million-year-old case of the dinosaurs' demise 22.2.2019 Los Angeles Times - Living Green

It’s one of the greatest whodunits of all time: What killed the dinosaurs, along with three-quarters of all other species on Earth?

We never tire of the story of this grisly extinction. Perhaps the demise of the dinosaurs gives us a sense of geologic schadenfreude. Or perhaps it’s just the opposite:...

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Fernandina Tortoise Thought to Be Extinct Found Alive 21.2.2019 Newsweek Top Stories
The Fernandina Tortoise was found on February 17.
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What Would Happen If All the Insects Went Extinct? 18.2.2019 Newsweek Top Stories
Insect numbers everywhere are declining—and scientists aren't exactly sure why.
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Strategic Marsh Creation Can Make a Big Difference in the Barataria Basin 14.2.2019 Main Feed - Environmental Defense
Strategic Marsh Creation Can Make a Big Difference in the Barataria Basin
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This Month in Climate Science: Threatened Coffee, Asylum Applications and Antarctic Ice Loss 14.2.2019 WRI Stories
This Month in Climate Science: Threatened Coffee, Asylum Applications and Antarctic Ice Loss Comments|Add Comment|PrintNew research finds 60 percent of all coffee species are threatened with extinction. Every month, climate scientists make new discoveries that advance our understanding of climate change's causes and impacts. The research gives a clearer picture of the threats we already face and explores what's to come if we don't reduce emissions at a quicker pace. Our blog series, This... [[ This is a content summary only. Visit my website for full links, other content, and more! ...
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Massive Insect Decline Could Have 'Catastrophic' Environmental Impact, Study Says 13.2.2019 Organic Consumers Association News Headlines

Insect populations are declining precipitously worldwide due to pesticide use and other factors, with a potentially "catastrophic" effect on the planet, a study has warned. More than 40% of insect species could become extinct in the next few decades, according to the journal Biological Conservation.

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World's Bananas Are in 'Imminent Danger' of Disease 11.2.2019 Newsweek Top Stories
But fear not, science can come to the rescue.
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Intelligence Squared debate: Should we bring extinct creatures back to life? 11.2.2019 Minnesota Public Radio: Law & Justice
An Intelligence Squared series debate about de-extinction.
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Humans Eating World's Biggest Animals Into Extinction 6.2.2019 Newsweek Top Stories
Almost all animals of the 162 classified as threatened were in danger because of humans hunting the creatures for food or body parts.
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What the Homo Erectus Looked like, Ate, and More 2.2.2019 Newsweek Top Stories
Our ancestor is thought to have evolved in Africa more than 2 million years ago.
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Cold comfort: Subzero weather is great for Minnesota's lakes 30.1.2019 Minnesota Public Radio: Law & Justice
The frigid temperatures this week are keeping Minnesotans indoors, but there's a bright spot. Experts say bitterly cold weather actually can have positive impacts on lakes from curbing the growth of harmful algae to reducing water loss.
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How citizen scientists can save the world 15.1.2019 Minnesota Public Radio: News
Regular people can help professional researchers extend their reach.
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George, reclusive Hawaiian snail and last of his kind, dies at 14 8.1.2019 Minnesota Public Radio: Politics
While he was but one very lonely Achatinella apexfulva, his death takes place amid a crisis for Hawaii's native snails, whose populations have been decimated by invasive species.
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Policy News: January 7, 2019 7.1.2019 EcoTone
The Katherine S. McCarter Graduate Student Policy Award ESA is now accepting applications for its 2019 Katherine S. McCarter Graduate Student Policy Award. Offered each year, this award gives graduate students an all-expense paid trip to Washington, DC for science policy training with opportunities to meet with lawmakers on Capitol Hill. Visit the ESA website for more ...
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Policy News: January 7, 2019 7.1.2019 EcoTone
The Katherine S. McCarter Graduate Student Policy Award ESA is now accepting applications for its 2019 Katherine S. McCarter Graduate Student Policy Award. Offered each year, this award gives graduate students an all-expense paid trip to Washington, DC for science policy training with opportunities to meet with lawmakers on Capitol Hill. Visit the ESA website for more ...
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45 Years After Nixon Signed It Into Law, the War on the Endangered Species Act Continues 28.12.2018 Mother Jones
Forty-five years ago, on December 28th, 1973, President Richard Nixon, a Republican, signed a piece of monumental environmental legislation, the Endangered Species Act, into law. At the time, Nixon issued a statement in support of protecting wildlife that most sitting Republicans wouldn’t dare make today: “Nothing is more priceless and more worthy of preservation than […]
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