User: flenvcenter Topic: Biodiversity-National
Category: Problems :: Species Loss
Last updated: Oct 21 2017 01:46 IST RSS 2.0
 
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Do you care if your fish dinner was raised humanely? Animal advocates say you should 20.10.2017 Minnesota Public Radio: Law & Justice
Concerns over animal welfare have led to changes in recent years in how livestock are raised. But seafood has been missing from the conversation. One group aims to change that.
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Tropical beetles face extinction threat 18.10.2017 Environmental News Network
Climate change is putting many tropical high altitude beetles at risk of extinction, warn an international team of scientists.
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Bold effort underway to save the vaquita porpoise from extinction 12.10.2017 TreeHugger
With fewer than 30 vaquitas left in the wild, the 'panda of the sea' is the most endangered marine mammal in the world. Now a crazy plan might just save them.
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World's largest trees given new hope for preservation 12.10.2017 Planet Ark News
A new project will decode genetic make-up of world's largest trees in order to better understand and protect them.
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Delta Dispatches: Advocating for Louisiana's Vanishing Paradise 18.9.2017 Main Feed - Environmental Defense
On today’s show Erin Brown of Vanishing Paradise stops by to talk with Simone and Jacques about how they advocate for restoration of the Mississippi River Delta by nationalizing the issue, raising awareness, and educating members of Congress. Chef Nathan Richard also joins the program to talk with Simone & Jacques about the Fresh Water Supper at Cavan Restaurant in New Orleans for the Vanishing Paradise, highlighting species that depend on freshwater marsh in coastal Louisiana. Below is a transcript ...
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Long-endangered snow leopard upgraded to ‘vulnerable’ status 15.9.2017 Washington Post: World
The elusive snow leopard — long considered endangered — has been upgraded to “vulnerable,” though conservations warned the new classification does not mean they are safe.
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Once-Abundant Ash Tree and Antelope Species Face Extinction – IUCN Red List 14.9.2017 Green Technology and Environmental Science News - ENN
North America’s most widespread and valuable ash tree species are on the brink of extinction due to an invasive beetle decimating their populations, while the loss of wilderness areas and poaching are contributing to the declining numbers of five African antelope species, according to the latest update of The IUCN Red List of Threatened Species™
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Scientists: Ash tree species pushed to brink of extinction 14.9.2017 Seattle Times: Local

NEW YORK (AP) — Five prominent species of ash tree in the eastern U.S. have been driven to the brink of extinction from years of lethal attack by a beetle, a scientific group says. Tens of millions of trees in the U.S. and Canada have already succumbed, and the toll may eventually reach more than […]
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Long-endangered snow leopard upgraded to ‘vulnerable’ status 14.9.2017 Seattle Times: Local

BANGKOK (AP) — The elusive snow leopard — long considered an endangered species — has been upgraded to “vulnerable,” international conservationists said Thursday. But experts warned the new classification does not mean they are safe. The animals still face serious challenges including poaching and loss of prey in their high Himalayan habitat. “The species still […]
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Scientists: Ash tree species pushed to brink of extinction 14.9.2017 AP National
NEW YORK (AP) -- A scientific group says five prominent species of ash tree in the eastern U.S. have been driven to the brink of extinction from years of lethal attack by a beetle....
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Scientists hope to restore extinct Galapagos turtle species 14.9.2017 Washington Post: World
Scientists in Ecuador’s Galapagos islands are hoping to restore a turtle species believed extinct since the 1800s.
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Scientists hope to restore extinct Galapagos turtle species 14.9.2017 Seattle Times: Local

QUITO, Ecuador (AP) — Scientists in Ecuador’s Galapagos islands are hoping to restore a turtle species believed extinct since the 1800s. The Chelonoidis elephantopus lived on Floreana Island and was captured by seamen in large numbers for food during their long journeys across the Pacific. The species is thought to have disappeared shortly after Charles […]
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A race against time: Saving the North Atlantic right whale 5.9.2017 Sustainable Ecosystems and Community News - ENN
In June 2017, three critically endangered North Atlantic right whale carcasses were spotted floating in the Gulf of St. Lawrence. In the weeks that followed the number of dead right whales rose to 10, while three more were found entangled alive in fishing gear. (The total number of deaths may be as high as 12.)For a species with approximately 500 surviving animals in the world, this was a crisis — an unprecedented die-off signalling a troubled outlook for the species.
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Diverse Landscapes Are More Productive and Adapt better to Climate Change 5.9.2017 Environmental News Network
The dramatic, worldwide loss of biodiversity is one of today's greatest environmental problems. The loss of species diversity affects important ecosystems on which humans depend. Previous research predominantly addressed short-term effects of biodiversity in small experimental plots planted with few randomly selected plant species. These studies have shown that species-poor plant assemblages function less well and produce less biomass than species rich systems.
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Fishermen Caught With 6,600 Sharks In Galapagos, Now Headed To Prison 30.8.2017 NPR Health Science
The dead sharks, mostly endangered hammerheads, were part of a 300-ton haul of fish found on a Chinese boat off the Galapagos Islands. An Ecuadorean judge fined and jailed the crew up to four years.
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Bahamian Songbirds Disappeared During Last Glacial-Interglacial Transition 30.8.2017 Environmental News Network
Two species of songbirds that once made a home in the Bahamas likely became extinct on the islands because of rising sea levels and a warmer, wetter climate, according to a new study by researchers at the University of California, Riverside and the University of Florida, Gainesville. The study, which was published today in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, presents a historical view of how climate change and the resulting habitat loss can affect Earth’s biodiversity.
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Activists blame Mexican government for near-loss of porpoise 29.8.2017 Seattle Times: Nation & World

MEXICO CITY (AP) — Conservation groups said Monday that the Mexican government’s lack of action is to blame for the near-extinction of the critically endangered vaquita marina porpoise. The groups said the National Fisheries Commission didn’t supervise fishing season rules and improperly increased catch quotas in the upper Gulf of California. They said the commission […]
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Delta Dispatches: Sediment – The Building Blocks of Land Building 29.8.2017 Main Feed - Environmental Defense
On today’s show, Simone and Jacques are joined by journalist and author Jim Robbins to talk about his book "The Wonder of Birds: What They Tell Us About Ourselves, the World, and a Better Future " and why sediment is an important part of Louisiana's ecosystem. On the second half of the show, Alex Kolker speaks about his new paper and why the Cubit's Gap subdelta provides the perfect study site for future river diversion projects. Below is a ...
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Is The Secret To A Healthier Microbiome Hidden In The Hadza Diet? 25.8.2017 NPR News
Some species of bacteria in our intestines are disappearing. Can we reverse the microbial die-off? The food eaten by Tanzania's Hadza tribe could hold the answer.
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Where’s the kelp? Warm ocean takes toll on undersea forests 22.8.2017 Seattle Times: Top stories

APPLEDORE ISLAND, Maine (AP) — When diving in the Gulf of Maine a few years back, Jennifer Dijkstra expected to be swimming through a flowing kelp forest that had long served as a nursery and food for juvenile fish and lobster. But Dijkstra, a University of New Hampshire marine biologist, saw only a patchy seafloor […]
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