User: flenvcenter Topic: Biodiversity-National
Category: Problems :: Species Loss
Last updated: Oct 22 2020 09:38 IST RSS 2.0
 
1 to 20 of 4,655    
7 Ways to Bridge the Blue Finance Gap 22.10.2020 WRI Stories
Print In addition to the economic potential, addressing the blue finance gap can help stop biodiversity loss. Photo by Hiroko Yoshii/Unsplash The ocean is a cornerstone of the global economy and a critical source of resources for the world’s growing population. It provides food, jobs and livelihoods to over three billion people, facilitates global trade and creates a home for the nearly 2.4 billion people who live in coastal areas. Before the COVID-19 pandemic, forecasts suggested that the ocean economy could provide economic growth opportunities over the coming decade, creating $3 trillion annually in gross value added by 2030. However, investment into the ocean economy is drastically low. Just 1% of the ocean economy’s total value was invested in sustainable project through philanthropy and official development assistance over the last ten years. The impacts of climate change, pollution and overfishing put mounting pressure on the ocean, its natural capital and the services it provides. To change this ...
Also found in: [+]
Restoring Farmland Could Drastically Slow Extinctions, Fight Climate Change 17.10.2020 Organic Consumers Association News Headlines

The twin crises of climate change and biodiversity loss are intertwined: Storms and wildfires are worsening while as many as one million species are at risk of extinction. The solutions are not small or easy, but they exist, scientists say.

Also found in: [+]
Gain-of-Function Ghouls: SARS-CoV-2 Isn’t the Scariest Thing That Could Leak From a Lab 15.10.2020 Organic Consumers Association News Headlines
Lab accidents happen. When the first Severe Acute Respiratory Syndrome (SARS-1) pandemic ended in 2003, lab-acquired infections continued. Immediately following the end of the 2003 pandemic of SARS-1, there were four separate outbreaks of lab-acquired infections of SARS-1 within one year at three different labs in Beijing, Singapore and Taipei. The situation was so bad that Science Magazine warned, “health experts fear that the next SARS epidemic may be more likely to emerge from a research lab than from the presumed animal reservoir.” In one lab accident , a 26-year-old graduate student was exposed while working at the Institute of Viral Disease Control at the Chinese CDC. Her mother caught the disease from her and ...
Also found in: [+]
Bill Gates' Global Agenda and How We Can Resist His War on Life 23.9.2020 Organic Consumers Association News Headlines

In March 2015, Bill Gates showed an image of the coronavirus during a TED Talk and told the audience that it was what the greatest catastrophe of our time would look like. The real threat to life, he said, is ‘not missiles, but microbes.’ When the coronavirus pandemic swept over the earth like a tsunami five years later, he revived the war language, describing the pandemic as ‘a world war’.

‘The coronavirus pandemic pits all of humanity against the virus,’ he said.

Also found in: [+]
The Relative Abundance of Bumblebees In North America Is Estimated to Have Crashed by 97 Percent 5.9.2020 Mother Jones
This piece was originally published in Canada’s National Observer and appears here as part of our Climate Desk Partnership. Jack Bates’ blueberries rely on “non-union” bees. The Delta, British Columbia, farmer is not alone. Blueberries, raspberries, and tree fruits are some of BC’s most important crops, worth about $370 million combined—and they all depend on bees, […]
Also found in: [+]
Captive-bred Blanding’s turtles released into the wild: ‘To bring them back from the brink of extinction is a monumental undertaking’ 3.9.2020 Chicago Tribune: Popular
Wednesday’s journey into the marsh featured the first cohort in 25 years that included captive-bred turtles from Brookfield Zoo.
Also found in: [+]
Ecology and COVID-19 #5: Coronavirus, Human Hubris, and Life in the Coevolving Biosphere 25.8.2020 EcoTone
This blogpost originally appeared on the website for Bruce Byers Consulting. by Bruce Byers The novel coronavirus is holding up a mirror for our species, giving us an opportunity to consider our place in the evolution of life on Earth and question our anthropocentrism. What I’ve missed during this pandemic and shutdown of our usual ...
Also found in: [+]
Some Insects Are Very Social. They Also May Offer Hints for Controlling Disease. 25.7.2020 Mother Jones
This piece was originally published in Undark and appears here as part of our Climate Desk Partnership. Given that she infects ant colonies with deadly pathogens and then studies how they respond, one might say that Nathalie Stroeymeyt, a senior lecturer in the school of biological sciences at the University of Bristol in the UK, […]
Also found in: [+]
4 Investments to Secure Ocean Health and Wealth 14.7.2020 WRI Stories
4 Investments to Secure Ocean Health and Wealth Comments|Add Comment|PrintSustainable, ocean-based investments can yield a number of benefits for economies, communities, businesses and households. Photo by Knut Troim/Unsplash Ocean-based industries are worth at least 3.5% of global GDP, a value the OECD predicted will double by 2030. More than 3 billion people rely on the ocean for their livelihoods and more than 350 million jobs are linked to the ocean worldwide. The COVID-19 pandemic is... [[ This is a content summary only. Visit my website for full links, other content, and more! ...
Also found in: [+]
Worries mount in Yucca Valley that Joshua trees will be designated an endangered species 3.7.2020 LA Times: Environment

The proposed listing of western Joshua trees as an endangered species has some residents of Yucca Valley worried.

Also found in: [+]
Chefs could be the missing ingredient to circular food systems 22.6.2020 Resource Efficiency | GreenBiz.com
Chefs could be the missing ingredient to circular food systems Lauren Phipps Mon, 06/22/2020 - 01:00 It’s often said that the way to a person’s heart is through the stomach. The same principle could apply to fixing the broken food system.  Food loss and waste, the carbon-intensive production and distribution of food, hunger and food deserts: These are just a few inefficient and unequal outcomes of today’s global food system. The principles of a circular economy offer a helpful framework to envision a more resilient and regenerative alternative — and chefs might be the missing ingredient to successfully realizing a new model.  "When you talk about biodiversity and conservation, there is no value," said prominent Brazilian chef Alex Atala, who runs the world-renowned restaurant D.O.M. in São Paulo. "When you taste biodiversity, there’s a new meaning and new value."  Atala was one of four chefs tuning in from around the world who spoke about cultivating a circular economy for food during the Ellen MacArthur ...
Also found in: [+]
Save the Insects, Save the Farmers, Save Ourselves: New Global Report Calls for End of Industrial Agriculture 11.6.2020 Organic Consumers Association News Headlines

A new report released Tuesday draws attention to the worldwide decline in insects and calls for global policies to boost the conservation of both agriculture and the six-footed creatures. The publication, entitled Insect Atlas, comes from two progressive networks: Brussels-based Friends of the Earth and Berlin-based Heinrich Böll Foundation.

Also found in: [+]
COVID 19: The Spike and the Furin Cleavage 4.6.2020 Organic Consumers Association News Headlines
After months of insisting that COVID-19 originated in the Huanan Seafood Market in Wuhan, Gao Fu, director of the Chinese Centre for Disease Control and Prevention, stated that no viruses were detected in animal samples at the market. According to May 31 report in the Daily Mail, Fu, the top epidemiologist in China said: “At first, we assumed the seafood market might have the virus, but now the market is more like a victim.” Fu also told the Daily Mail that “the novel coronavirus had existed long ...
Also found in: [+]
The Case Is Building That COVID-19 Had a Lab Origin 4.6.2020 Organic Consumers Association News Headlines

If the public has learned a lesson from the COVID-19 pandemic it is that science does not generate certainty. Do homemade face masks work? What is the death rate of COVID-19? How accurate are the tests? How many people have no symptoms? And so on. Practically the lone undisputed assertion made so far is that all the nearest known genetic relatives of its cause, the Sars-CoV-2 virus, are found in horseshoe bats (Zhou et al., 2020).

Also found in: [+]
Policy News: May 18, 2020 19.5.2020 EcoTone
In This Issue: Pandemic Response House Legislation Includes Funding for Science, Wildlife Disease The latest coronavirus bill includes $125 million for NSF. Webinar: Invasive Species Policy and COVID-19 Speakers will explore how ecological research can inform policy and contribute knowledge to prevent the introduction and spread of invasive species. National Science Board Unveils Visions 2030 ...
Also found in: [+]
This Pandemic Has Reignited a Passionate Debate Over Bats and Disease 11.5.2020 Mother Jones
This piece was originally published in Undark and appears here as part of our Climate Desk Partnership. In the past few months, Arinjay Banerjee has gotten an unexpected taste of Internet fame. Since December, when news of COVID-19 began to shudder across the world, Banerjee—who studies the immune systems of bats at McMaster University in Ontario, Canada—has […]
Also found in: [+]
Your Perfect Green Lawn Is a Buzz Kill 7.5.2020 Mother Jones
Since the post–World War II rise of suburbia, the great American lawn has beckoned with the promise of a grassy, orderly Eden surrounding a single-family fortress. For just as long, lawns have been sending bees and other pollinating critters the opposite message: Buzz off. That’s because the very essence of a lawn (closely shorn, uniform, weed-free) […]
Also found in: [+]
Policy News: May 4, 2020 5.5.2020 EcoTone
In This Issue: National Science Board to Convene, Discuss NSF’s COVID-19 Response Agencies release guidance for grantees and grant opportunities for COVID-19-related research. Congress Senate Environment and Public Works Committee introduces draft water infrastructure bill. Executive Branch EPA finalizes WOTUS rule, Science Advisory Board finalizes review of “Transparency in Science” rule Courts Supreme Court creates ...
Also found in: [+]
This Month in Climate Science, February-March 2020: Carbon Sinks Shrink, Bumble Bees Decline, Nightingale Wings Shorten – and Ecosystems Could Collapse Faster 27.4.2020 WRI Stories
This Month in Climate Science, February-March 2020: Carbon Sinks Shrink, Bumble Bees Decline, Nightingale Wings Shorten – and Ecosystems Could Collapse Faster Comments|Add Comment|PrintBumble bee species are declining. Photo by Matt/Flickr Every month, climate scientists make new discoveries that advance our understanding of climate change's causes and impacts. The research gives a clearer picture of the threats we already face and explores what's to come if we don't reduce emissions at a... [[ This is a content summary only. Visit my website for full links, other content, and more! ...
Also found in: [+]
The Ocean Genome Helps Fight Disease: Here's How We Save It 24.4.2020 WRI Stories
The Ocean Genome Helps Fight Disease: Here's How We Save It Comments|Add Comment|PrintOcean ecosystems are rich sources of compounds used in medicine. Photo by Bob Embley/NOAA. The ocean plays a surprising role in fighting COVID-19. With death and infection numbers escalating daily, the World Health Organization has made it clear that countries need to do three things to successfully fight this pandemic: test, test and test. The dramatic increase in demand for testing has drawn renewed... [[ This is a content summary only. Visit my website for full links, other content, and more! ...
Also found in: [+]
1 to 20 of 4,655