User: flenvcenter Topic: Biodiversity-National
Category: Specific Organisms :: Fungi
Last updated: Nov 23 2014 03:06 IST RSS 2.0
 
1 to 20 of 465    
This biodegradable drone is grown from mushrooms and covered in wasp spit 22.11.2014 Washington Post

A group of college students has created an environmentally friendly drone -- think veggie leather.

Led by one of NASA's synthetic biology experts, they made an unmanned aerial vehicle almost entirely out of biodegradable materials. After a crash, these little fliers would basically disappear.

Read full article >>
Also found in: [+]
Northern long-eared bat is not endangered, state conservation groups say 15.11.2014 Star Tribune: Latest
Minnesota’s timber industry is hoping that it will avoid logging restrictions now that many forest and wildlife associations have concluded that the northern long-eared bat shouldn’t be declared an endangered species.
Also found in: [+]
A Health Check-up for Our Environment—Ignored at Our Own Risk 12.11.2014 Commondreams.org Views
Also found in: [+]
A Health Check-up for Our Environment - Ignored at Our Own Risk 11.11.2014 International Rivers Sitewide RSS Feed
Chinese river dolphins baijidolphin.weebly.com In the 1950s, thousands of Baiji river dolphins plied the waters of the Yangtze, Asia’s mightiest river. The Chinese river dolphin had evolved over 20 millions of years, and was revered as the goddess of the Yangtze. By 1994, fewer than 100 individuals remained, and by 2006, the dolphin had become extinct . A proud branch on the tree of life had been destroyed in the blink of an eye by pollution, dam building, and reckless navigation. Sadly, the goddess of the Yangtze is not alone in her fate. The last Chinese paddlefish was sighted in 2003. The majestic Chinese sturgeon is considered to be critically endangered as well. Of the 143 fish species which were historically recorded in the Yangtze River, only 17 were left in 2013. As many as 30 million animal, plant and fungi species populate Planet Earth. About 1.7 million of them have been identified and described. What is the health of these plant and animal kingdoms? Which species groups are at particular ...
Also found in: [+]
A Health Check-up for Our Environment - Ignored at Our Own Risk 11.11.2014 Green on HuffingtonPost.com
In the 1950s, thousands of Baiji river dolphins (pictured) plied the waters of the Yangtze, Asia's mightiest river. The Chinese river dolphin had evolved over 20 millions of years, and was revered as the goddess of the Yangtze. By 1994, fewer than 100 individuals remained, and by 2006, the dolphin had become extinct . A proud branch on the tree of life had been destroyed in the blink of an eye by pollution, dam building, and reckless navigation. Sadly, the goddess of the Yangtze is not alone in her fate. The last Chinese paddlefish was sighted in 2003. The majestic Chinese sturgeon is considered to be critically endangered as well. Of the 143 fish species which were historically recorded in the Yangtze River, only 17 were left in 2013. As many as 30 million animal, plant and fungi species populate Planet Earth. About 1.7 million of them have been identified and described. What is the health of these plant and animal kingdoms? Which species groups are at particular risk? Are the extinct Chinese river ...
Also found in: [+]
Salvage logging begins after 35,000-acre Oregon wildfire 27.10.2014 Seattle Times: Top stories
Timber managers are scouring the scene of August’s 35,000-acre Oregon Gulch fire near Klamath Falls to find out what’s left and if it has any value.
Also found in: [+]
Salvage logging begins after 35,000-acre Oregon wildfire 27.10.2014 Seattle Times: Local
Timber managers are scouring the scene of August’s 35,000-acre Oregon Gulch fire near Klamath Falls to find out what’s left and if it has any value.
Also found in: [+]
Spanish amphibians struck down by virus attack 16.10.2014 New Scientist: Sex and Cloning
Spanish amphibians struck down by virus attack
Also found in: [+]
Loon, Interrupted: Chicks Dying, Social Chaos; Is Their Comeback Unraveling? 8.10.2014 Truthout - All Articles
A common loon. (Photo: Matthew / Flickr ) Holderness, New Hampshire - Tiffany Grade sweeps her binoculars over tangled tree roots at water’s edge. She spots a black and white checkerboard of feathers in a lichen-covered crease in the shoreline – a loon sitting on a nest. Just offshore, a second loon glides past, dives, then disappears. Also see: Heavy Metal Songs: Contaminated Songbirds Sing the Wrong Tunes To the untrained eye, it’s an idyllic summer scene on Squam Lake. But to a loon biologist like Grade, it’s trouble. “Do you see the way he stretches his neck up?” Grade says, pointing to the diving bird. “He knows he’s some place he shouldn’t be.” The male intruder is biding his time until the nesting loon leaves. This vying for territory imperils the unhatched chick: Its parents can be killed or distracted, leaving the egg undefended or the chick unfed. And if one parent is ousted, the intruder kills the chick. At Squam Lake, it’s social chaos. Chicks are dying. Eggs aren’t hatching. It’s a scenario ...
Also found in: [+]
Loon, Interrupted: Chicks Dying, Social Chaos. Is Their Comeback Unraveling? 8.10.2014 Truthout.com
A common loon. (Photo: Matthew / Flickr ) Holderness, New Hampshire - Tiffany Grade sweeps her binoculars over tangled tree roots at water’s edge. She spots a black and white checkerboard of feathers in a lichen-covered crease in the shoreline – a loon sitting on a nest. Just offshore, a second loon glides past, dives, then disappears. Also see: Heavy Metal Songs: Contaminated Songbirds Sing the Wrong Tunes To the untrained eye, it’s an idyllic summer scene on Squam Lake. But to a loon biologist like Grade, it’s trouble. “Do you see the way he stretches his neck up?” Grade says, pointing to the diving bird. “He knows he’s some place he shouldn’t be.” The male intruder is biding his time until the nesting loon leaves. This vying for territory imperils the unhatched chick: Its parents can be killed or distracted, leaving the egg undefended or the chick unfed. And if one parent is ousted, the intruder kills the chick. At Squam Lake, it’s social chaos. Chicks are dying. Eggs aren’t hatching. It’s a scenario ...
Also found in: [+]
Biological Collections Are Vital to Preserving Species in the Face of Climate Change 29.9.2014 Green on HuffingtonPost.com
Among the many different resources that scientists will use to try to forestall some of the effects of climate change, the nation's treasure trove of preserved plants, animals, and microscopic organisms is undoubtedly one of the least known to most people. But these biological collections represent a very powerful tool for understanding how climate change is likely to affect life on Earth. Our nation has a rich heritage in such collections, which are held at about 1,000 scientific research institutions such as universities, natural history museums, and botanical gardens. What are in these collections? They consist of such things as the skeletons and skins of mammals, birds and reptiles; fossils, tissue samples, and fish and spiders preserved in fluid; dried plants and fungi glued to stiff paper or stored in boxes; and tiny organisms on microscope slides. Although no one knows exactly, we estimate that there are approximately one billion preserved specimens in the U.S. that have been gathered by ...
Also found in: [+]
The Ghosts of Whitebark Pine 23.9.2014 Switchboard, from NRDC
Sylvia Fallon, Senior Scientist, Washington, DC: Today, the Endangered Species Coalition released its annual Top 10 report – this year’s theme is Vanishing Wildlife:  the top 10 species our children may never see.  Among the species in their report is whitebark pine – the high-elevation pine...
Also found in: [+]
Four Ways Industrial Ag Is Destroying the Soil - and Your Health 14.9.2014 Truthout.com
Also found in: [+]
Bat disease limited to 1 mine, Wisconsin officials say 10.9.2014 Twincities.com: Local

Wisconsin wildlife officials say a deadly bat disease hasn't spread beyond a single Grant County mine.

Also found in: [+]
Deep Sea 'Mushrooms' Defy Classification In The Tree Of Life 5.9.2014 Green on HuffingtonPost.com
This is Dendrogramma enigmatica. And as its name suggests, it’s quite the enigma. In fact, the tiny, mushroom-shaped organism is so mysterious that it seems to defy just about everything we know about animals. It doesn't fit into any of the known categories in the animal kingdom, scientists say, and as of now, its links to other animal groups remain hazy. Recently, D. enigmatica was thrown into the spotlight when Jean Just, a zoologist at the Natural History Museum of Denmark in Copenhagen, discovered it among invertebrate specimens he had collected at depths of 400 and 1,000 meters in the Tasman Sea in the 1980s. According to a new study co-authored by Just and published Wednesday in the journal PLOS ONE , more than a dozen of the specimens were found to defy classification in the tree of life. They were unique. "Finding something like this is extremely rare, it's maybe only happened about four times in the last 100 years ," study co-author Jorgen Olesen, an associate professor at the University of ...
Also found in: [+]
Green research is needed for Minnesota bats and bridges 3.9.2014 MinnPost
CC/Flickr/Eli Sagor Could Minnesota's forestry industry benefit from using timber to build bridges? And would it be worth it? Minnesota is ripe for a bridge-building industry that would revive lumber production in the state, put northern Minnesota mills and mill workers back in action, and spur “green” economic investment in the state, insists a leading green economic development specialist. Lee Egerstrom Carol Coren, founder and principal with the Cornerstone Ventures group, said Minnesota is among 10 states with timber resources and forest industries that would greatly benefit from a “green” approach to repairing and replacing older bridges with wood expanses and structures. The concrete and steel industries have dominated road and bridge construction, partly as an outgrowth of the federal interstate highway system. But this ignores the green, or renewable, wood industry that is supplying bridge construction in various parts of Europe and on other continents where deferred maintenance work is using ...
Also found in: [+]
Don’t lose your lid! (the green roof argument) 2.9.2014 The Earth Times Online Newspaper - Health News
Life is changing. Now we can have a garden on our roof, but the wildlife and energy-transforming possibilities are really building up. I doubt if you’ll like some of our ideas here, but there may be some way you can imagine a green roof being of benefit and fitting in to your local landscape.
Also found in: [+]
Community Agriculture Alliance: Soil health 28.8.2014 Steamboat Pilot
Soil health — you may have heard this latest descriptor and wondered what it is. Hopefully, by now you are aware that soil is not just dirt. It’s a complicated ecosystem that takes place beneath our feet to support the environment that we see above ground. Plants often are portrayed as the one of the most important organism in our ecosystem, but without good soil, there would be no plants. So while you may not consider soil as “pretty” as a plant, I would argue that it is more important. A healthy soil consists of billions of micro-organisms and thousands of macro-organisms that all work together to better the soil. Glomalin is a micro-organism that stores carbon in its protein and carbohydrate (glucose or sugar) subunits. Arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi, found living on plant roots around the world, appear to be the only producers of glomalin. The fungi use carbon from the plant to grow and make glomalin. In return, the fungi's hair-like filaments, called hyphae, extend the reach of plant roots. Hyphae ...
Also found in: [+]
As fungus kills bats, MN timber industry winces 19.8.2014 Star Tribune: Business
Also found in: [+]
The Secret Bataclysm: White Nose Syndrome and Extinction 12.8.2014 Wired Top Stories
In just 8 years, bats have gone from the most common mammal in the US to endangered species candidates.
Also found in: [+]
1 to 20 of 465