User: flenvcenter Topic: Biodiversity-National
Category: Specific Organisms :: Fungi
Last updated: Jun 19 2015 18:39 IST RSS 2.0
 
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Once And Future Nut: How Genetic Engineering May Bring Back Chestnuts 19.6.2015 NPR News
The American chestnut is poised to return — as a bionic, blight-resistant tree. Scientists hope to plant about 10,000 transgenic plantlets to pollinate trees in the "wild."
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Fighting microbe with microbe in race to defeat the fungus plaguing bats 28.5.2015 MinnPost
REUTERS Two research teams have identified bacterial agents that may be able to keep bats from developing white-nose syndrome. After nine years of deepening gloom, there’s some very good news for our endangered bats. Two research teams, working independently, have identified bacterial agents that may be able to keep bats from developing white-nose syndrome. In a field test reported a week ago, about 150 bats already under attack from the flesh-eating fungal infection were able to fight their way back to health with help from a soil bacterium. And in laboratory tests reported a few weeks earlier, six strains of bacteria commonly found on bats were shown to be effective fungus-killers if their presence could be boosted a bit. Because both approaches rely on essentially natural elements already present in the bats’ environment, these microbe vs. microbe strategies carry a smaller risk of unintended harm than, say, chemical fungicides. Since its discovery in a cave in New York State in the winter of ...
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The Newest Strategy to Save Bats From Extinction? Bacteria 28.5.2015 Wired Top Stories
Researchers think they may have stumbled on an intervention that can both treat WNS and prevent more colonies from being ...
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Fungus' Unchecked Advance Threatens Hibernating Bats Across West 20.5.2015 Commondreams.org Newswire
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Petition Seeks Emergency Moratorium on Imports of Salamanders for Pet Trade 14.5.2015 Commondreams.org Newswire
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Local Briefs 13.5.2015 Durango Herald
Mesa Verde to hold native graves talkPeter Pino will present insights into his 20-year involvement with issues related to the Native American Graves Protection and Repatriation Act and Mesa Verde National Park at 7 p.m. Wednesday at the Far View Lodge in Mesa Verde National Park.Pino, former Zia Pueblo tribal administrator and...
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Meatless Monday: Small Steps, Big Changes -- Gene Baur and 'Living the Farm Sanctuary Life' 27.4.2015 Green on HuffingtonPost.com
There was no plan, there was only "concern about animals and nature," says Gene Baur. "I wanted to do something positive it the world." He did. In 1986, he co-founded Farm Sanctuary . Now almost 30 years later, Farm Sanctuary is America's premier farm animal protection organization, a safe haven for factory farm animals abused and/or left for dead, and a transformative place for people, too. Farm Sanctuary offers education, outreach and the opportunity to rediscover our primal bond with animals. "Farm animals are not that different from cats and dogs," says Baur. "They have feelings, relationships, respect and compassion." Their open affection remind of us our own humanity. And our responsibility. "We don't share our lives with animals just because we want to. We do it because we need them," Baur writes in Living the Farm Sanctuary Life. Co-written with Gene Stone, Baur's new book provides a little Farm Sanctuary wherever you are, with adorable farm animal photos, pleasing plant-based recipes from fab ...
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Bat Disease Epidemic Still Expanding Throughout North America 24.4.2015 Green on HuffingtonPost.com
For the past decade, an epidemic called White-Nose Syndrome has had severe impacts on bat populations throughout North America. The fungus, Pseudogymnoascus destructans, feeds on soft tissues of bats such as their wings and noses. Little Brown Bat with white-nose syndrome Credit: Jonathan Mays, Wildlife Biologist, Maine Department of Inland Fisheries and Wildlife White Nose Syndrome was first discovered in Haile's Cave at John Boyd Thacher State Park by the New York State Department of Environmental Conservation during a routine bat survey in March 2007. The earliest evidence of the disease in North America can be seen in photographs taken by a cave hydrologist at Howe Caverns in Schoharie County, New York in the winter of 2006. New York State DEC states that since March 2007 "we discovered the disease in every hibernation site in New York in which we have looked for it." The U.S. Fish & Wildlife estimates a death toll between 5-7 million bats based on the most recent survey conducted in 2012 . Impacts ...
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Earth Day 2015: Regenerating the Soil and Reversing Global Warming 23.4.2015 Truthout.com
"The elimination of fossil fuels for all but the most limited and essential purposes is necessary but not sufficient to allow our descendants a fair chance for a healthy and prosperous future. Enhancing carbon biosequestration in terrestrial ecosystems is also essential."  - Wayne A. White, Biosequestration and Ecological Diversity p.118 (CRC Press 2013) The standard gloom and doom discourse surrounding global warming and climate change has infected the body politic with a severe case of depression and disempowerment. So starting April 22, embracing what the United Nations has designated as the "Year of the Soil," let's look at our planetary crisis from an entirely different, and more hopeful perspective. The good news is that the global grassroots, farmers and consumers united, can reverse our suicidal "business as usual" food, farming, energy, and land use practices. Harnessing the awesome power of Regenerative Organic Agriculture and reforestation, we can literally suck down enough excess (50-100 ppm ...
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Ants avoid traffic jams 22.4.2015 Environmental News Network
Rather than slowing down, ants speed up in response to a higher density of traffic on their trails, according to new research published in Springer's journal The Science of Nature - Naturwissenschaften. When the researchers increased the supply of food by leaving food next to the trail, ants accelerated their speed by 50 percent. This was despite more than double the density of traffic.
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How to grow mushrooms in your garden path 15.4.2015 TreeHugger
Plants don't like being trodden on. Mushrooms, however, do not seem to mind.
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Federal Government Protects Bat, Angers Industry 12.4.2015 NPR: All Things Considered
The northern long-eared bat has been designated as a threatened species, triggering new regulations to protect it. But oil and gas and agriculture organizations say those new rules will hurt them.
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Bats In Pennsylvania Threatened By White Nose Syndrome 6.4.2015 Green on HuffingtonPost.com
PITTSBURGH (AP) — One of the most common bat species in Pennsylvania is being threatened by white-nose syndrome, a fungal disease that has killed millions of bats of that species and others in North America. The U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service has listed the northern long-eared bat as a "threatened" species, the Pittsburgh Post-Gazette (http://bit.ly/1Cb0Nh3 ) reported Monday. The agency was considering listing the species as "endangered" — a more serious designation — but decided on "threatened" because the bat's population has not been affected outside areas where the fungal disease has caused problems, the newspaper reported. The agency is proposing interim rules meant to safeguard the bat's habitat, including limits on forest timbering. But the rules could also impact the wind energy and natural gas and oil drilling industries. Lora Zimmerman, a project leader with the Fish and Wildlife Service, said the "threatened" listing in Pennsylvania might seem odd in light of the fact that the long-eared bat's ...
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Feds propose a bat-protection program of minimal restrictions, dubious outlook 2.4.2015 MinnPost
CC/Flickr/USFWSmidwest The principal killer of northern long-eared bats is a fungal disease, white-nose syndrome. Any fears that the northern long-eared bat would become a latter-day northern spotted owl, federally protected at the cost of loggers’ jobs, pipeline projects and wind farms, were put to rest yesterday with the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service’s announcement of a protection plan that might fairly be described as minimalist. I’m not saying that’s a travesty. I think everybody understands that the principal killer of these bats is a fungal disease, white-nose syndrome, that so far has eluded both a cure and effective controls as it marches westward with generally genocidal impact. Nor am I saying, as some environmentalists are, that this decision represents an FWS cave-in to powerful industrial interests, simply because it anticipates restrictions on a minuscule portion of forestland in the bats’ overall range across 37 states. If the agency is taken to court over this application of the ...
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New protections for northern long-eared bats on the radar 2.4.2015 Star Tribune: Latest
To slow the spread of white-nose syndrome, federal agency wants to restrict logging near breeding areas.
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Bark Beetles Are Decimating Our Forests. That Might Actually Be a Good Thing. 19.3.2015 Mother Jones
There is an eerie feel to this grove of lodgepole pines that I can't quite put my finger on as entomologist Diana Six tromps ahead of me, hatchet in hand, scanning the southwestern Montana woods for her target. But as she digs the blade into a towering trunk, it finally hits me: the smell. There's no scent of pine needles, no sharp, minty note wafting through the brisk fall air. Six hacks away hunks of bark until she reveals an inner layer riddled with wormy passageways. "Hey, looky!" she exclaims, poking at a small dark form. "Are you dead? Yeah, you're dead." She extends her hand, holding a tiny black oval, maybe a quarter of an inch long. Scientists often compare this insect to a grain of rice, but Six prefers mouse dropping: "Beetle in one hand, mouse turd in another. You can't tell them apart." She turns to the next few trees in search of more traces. Pill-size holes pock their ashen trunks—a sign, along with the missing pine scent, of a forest reeling from an invasion. These tiny winged beetles ...
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Biodiversity may reduce threat of disease 20.2.2015 Environmental News Network
Biodiversity level changes can have consequences for species and habitats around the world. A new study published in the Proceedings of the Royal Society B, reaffirms previous findings that higher diversity in ecological communities may lead to reduced disease threat. The study concludes that higher amphibian diversity in the Brazilian Atlantic Forest is linked to a lower infection rate of a fungus that is devastating amphibian populations around the world. 
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Good news for bats: Disease spread slowing down 13.1.2015 Minnesota Public Radio: Law & Justice
The disease known as white-nose syndrome has killed millions of bats, but scientists are seeing hopeful signs that some bat colonies are recovering.
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New studies solve some mysteries about the plague that's killing our bats 13.1.2015 MinnPost
REUTERS A bat suffering from white-nose syndrome Two recent studies of white-nose syndrome (WNS) have turned up intriguing new details of how the disease seems to progress, not only within individual bats but also across bat populations. Neither points directly to a cure for the fungal plague of WNS, which has killed nearly 6 million American bats in the last eight years and continues to push some species toward extinction. But if effective cures are developed – along the lines, say, of bacterial agents that hold some promise of killing the fungus/spores, without unacceptable side effects – each set of findings points toward possible deployment strategies, and thus toward reversing the catastrophic losses of these key contributors to ecosystem health. WNS attacks hibernating bats during the cool months of winter. Scientists have suspected that it kills by rousing the bats from rest, or torpor, sending them out and about for flights in wintry weather when they should be resting. (Thus the public-service ...
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Good News For Bats! Things Are Looking Up For Stemming Disease Spread 13.1.2015 NPR News
The disease known as white-nose syndrome has killed millions of bats, but scientists are seeing hopeful signs that some bat colonies are recovering.
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