User: flenvcenter Topic: Biodiversity-National
Category: Specific Organisms :: Fungi
Last updated: Feb 10 2016 06:32 IST RSS 2.0
 
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The Fight To Save Panama's 'Symbol Of Hope' From Extinction 10.2.2016 Green on HuffingtonPost.com
I've lived in Panama for less than a month, and I've already become quite familiar with its celebrated golden frog. The little yellow guy is all over t-shirts and postcards and souvenirs. He's stamped on lottery tickets and grinning above the entrance to the aptly-named "La Rana Dorada" restaurant in downtown Panama City. Archaeologists have even discovered ancient gold relics sculpted in the shape of tiny amphibians. I asked both locals and scientists what the frog means to them; why you see its iconic face everywhere. "We're taught in school that it's a symbol Panama's biodiversity," journalist and entrepreneur Alfonso Grimaldo said. "It's a natural light; a reminder that the earth is sacred," said agriculture student Ericka Quiroz. "They were everywhere when we were kids; we used to catch them from the drain pipes," designer Ani Dillon recalled. Known for its striking day-glo coloring and the adorable waving motion it makes with its webbed hands, the golden frog represented hope and resilience and the ...
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Chaga boom: Health, cash drive northern Minnesota fungus hunt 25.1.2016 Minnesota Public Radio: Science
Chaga, a forest fungus, has become an alternative health sensation. Believers claim it helps everything from joint pain to Lyme disease. The $20 a pound it can fetch is leading chaga hunters into Minnesota's woods, and that worries the DNR.
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U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service Restricts Salamander Imports to Protect Native Species From Deadly Disease 13.1.2016 Commondreams.org Newswire
Center for Biological Diversity In response to a petition from the Center for Biological Diversity and Save The Frogs, the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service today announced a temporary rule restricting the importation of salamanders for the pet trade. The restriction is designed to prevent introduction of the deadly fungus Batrachochytrium salamandrivorans (Bsal) into the United ...
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Your Favorite Banana Is Facing Extinction As Deadly Fungus Spreads 2.12.2015 Green on HuffingtonPost.com
One of the world’s most popular fruits may go extinct -- yet again. Before 1960, your grandparents and great-grandparents were eating better bananas. Called Gros Michel, they were tastier, bigger and more resilient than the bananas found in supermarkets worldwide today. “ It has a more robust taste ,” said Dan Koeppel, author of “Banana: The Fate of the Fruit That Changed the World” of the yummier yellow fruit. “It’s more creamy.” So why can’t we too enjoy the robust creaminess of the Gros Michel, once the world's export banana? Turns out, the species went virtually extinct in the 1960s thanks to an invasive and incurable fungus that wiped out most Gros Michel plantations around the world. That explains how the Cavendish -- the blander banana we now eat -- grew in prominence. It tasted worse and was less hardy than the Gros Michel, but the species seemed able to resist the fungal invasion, known as “Panama disease.” That is, it was able to. Now, a newer, more virulent strain of Panama disease is wreaking ...
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Bat-killing Fungus Reaches Nebraska 13.11.2015 Commondreams.org Newswire
Center for Biological Diversity State and federal wildlife officials announced today that a bat-killing fungus that has swept across the eastern United States and Canada over the past eight years, killing millions of bats, has been confirmed by scientists in eastern Nebraska. Samples taken from bats in a mine in Cass County, Neb. at the end of last winter tested positive for the fungus that causes white-nose syndrome; the bat species found with the fungus were northern long-eared bats, tricolored bats and big brown ...
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Road kill will be served at a wild game dinner in Vermont 22.10.2015 Boston Globe: Latest
Road kill will be served at a wild game dinner in Vermont
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7 Fascinating Facts About Bats 19.10.2015 Mother Jones
Silhouetted against an orange harvest moon, fluttering out of a haunted house, or circling Count Dracula's cape: We often think of bats as creepy, especially this time of year. But actually, these maligned creatures are crucial to many ecosystems—and our economy. What's more, they're in trouble. A few important facts to know about our winged, insect-munching friends: Bats flying at sunset Umkehrer/Shutterstock Bats save us billions of dollars a year. Bats eat their bodyweight in insects every night. In 2011, researchers at the University of Tennessee, Knoxville used modeling techniques to calculate how much bats' amazing insect-eating abilities are worth to US farmers. The estimates included the value of prevented crop damage from pests that bats eat, as well as the amount of money farmers would have to spend on pesticides to do the same job. They came up with a wide—but staggering—range: between $3 billion and $53 billion dollars a year. A few years later, Josiah Maine, then a graduate student at ...
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Starbucks says it will buy coffee trees for rust-afflicted farmers 29.9.2015 Seattle Times: Business & Technology

The company said that for every bag of coffee purchased at participating U.S. stores, it will pay for providing a new coffee tree to a farmer whose crops have been affected by the voracious coffee rust fungus.
Mysterious fungus killing snakes in at least 9 states, including Illinois 9.8.2015 Chicago Tribune: Nation
Hidden on hillsides in a remote part of western Vermont, a small number of venomous timber rattlesnakes slither among the rocks, but their isolation can't protect them from a mysterious fungus spreading across the eastern half of the country that threatens to wipe them ...
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Mysterious fungus killing snakes in at least 9 states 9.8.2015 Yahoo: US National
NEW HAVEN, Vt. (AP) — Hidden on hillsides in a remote part of western Vermont, a small number of venomous timber rattlesnakes slither among the rocks, but their isolation can't protect them from a mysterious fungus spreading across the eastern half of the country that threatens to wipe them ...
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Mysterious fungus killing snakes in at least 9 states 9.8.2015 AP Top News
NEW HAVEN, Vt. (AP) -- Hidden on hillsides in a remote part of western Vermont, a small number of venomous timber rattlesnakes slither among the rocks, but their isolation can't protect them from a mysterious fungus spreading across the eastern half of the country that threatens to wipe them out....
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Mysterious fungus killing snakes in at least 9 states 9.8.2015 Seattle Times: Nation & World
NEW HAVEN, Vt. (AP) — Hidden on hillsides in a remote part of western Vermont, a small number of venomous timber rattlesnakes slither among the rocks, but their isolation can’t protect them from a mysterious fungus spreading across the eastern half of the country that threatens to wipe them out. In less than a decade, […]
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Under the Mushroom Cloud—Nagasaki after Nuclear War 6.8.2015 Commondreams.org Views
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As a killer fungus looms, scientists call for a ban on salamander imports 31.7.2015 LA Times: Science
If it makes its way to our shores, a newly discovered fungus from Asia could wipe out large numbers of salamander species and spark a major North American biodiversity crisis, scientists are warning.
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What It’s Like to Watch a Species Go Extinct 30.7.2015 Wired Top Stories
When scientists talk about the sixth extinction, there's one example that stands out above all others: ...
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Snowpack drought has salmon dying in overheated rivers 26.7.2015 Seattle Times: Opinion
Migrating salmon on the Columbia River face tough odds for survival as the lack of snowmelt water and searing summer heat have sent water temperatures soaring.
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Key to bats' health to be researched in Minnesota 21.7.2015 Minnesota Public Radio: Law & Justice
Scientists across Minnesota are doubling down efforts to understand one species in particular: the northern long-eared bat.
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Gov. Jerry Brown signs bill giving labor protections to pro sports cheerleaders 16.7.2015 LA Times: Commentary
Gov. Jerry Brown signed into law Wednesday legislation that will ensure cheerleaders for professional sports teams receive the minimum wage, workers' compensation and other benefits.
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How microbes are cleaning up the BP oil spill 12.7.2015 Environmental News Network
Microbes, primarily bacteria and fungi, get a bad rap in today’s society. However they’ve long played an incredible role within the Earth’s ecosystem. And one of the most important places microbes are transforming the earth is in the Gulf of Mexico, where a number of strains are busy munching up the oil still left over from the Deepwater Horizon oil spill disaster.The Deepwater Horizon oil spill, which took place just over five years ago caused a massive ecological disaster in and around the Gulf of Mexico. This is partially because the spill took so long to quell, with oil companies scrambling (and often failing) to stem the flow of oil from the seabed.
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Once And Future Nut: How Genetic Engineering May Bring Back Chestnuts 19.6.2015 NPR News
The American chestnut is poised to return — as a bionic, blight-resistant tree. Scientists hope to plant about 10,000 transgenic plantlets to pollinate trees in the "wild."
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