User: flenvcenter Topic: Biodiversity-National
Category: Specific Organisms :: Fungi
Last updated: Sep 10 2016 17:57 IST RSS 2.0
 
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In The Battle To Save Frogs, Scientists Fight Fungus With Fungus 10.9.2016 NPR News
A deadly fungus is devastating frog populations around the world. In California, scientists are racing to find a way to immunize one species, mountain yellow-legged frogs, against the fungus.
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Meatless Monday: Small Steps, Big Changes -- Gene Baur and "Living the Farm Sanctuary Life" 22.8.2016 Green on HuffingtonPost.com
There was no plan, there was only "concern about animals and nature," says Gene Baur. "I wanted to do something positive it the world." He did. In 1986, he co-founded Farm Sanctuary. Now almost 30 years later, Farm Sanctuary is America's premier farm animal protection organization, a safe haven for factory farm animals abused and/or left for dead, and a transformative place for people, too. Farm Sanctuary offers education, outreach and the opportunity to rediscover our primal bond with animals. "Farm animals are not that different from cats and dogs," says Baur. "They have feelings, relationships, respect and compassion." Their open affection remind of us our own humanity. And our responsibility. "We don't share our lives with animals just because we want to. We do it because we need them," Baur writes in "Living the Farm Sanctuary Life." Co-written with Gene Stone, Baur's new book provides a little Farm Sanctuary wherever you are, with adorable farm animal photos, pleasing plant-based recipes from fab ...
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North Country trail: The Minnesota national park you've never heard of 11.8.2016 Minnesota Public Radio: News
The North Country National Scenic Trail is a passion project of volunteers from New York to North Dakota.
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The average home has more than 100 kinds of bugs living in it, new study finds 6.8.2016 LA Times: Commentary

Don’t panic, but your house probably has a lot more bugs in it than you think.

The average home contains more than 100 different species of flies, spiders, beetles, ants and other bugs — with an even greater variety inside houses in wealthier neighborhoods, according to a new study in Biology Letters.

...
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Trees talk to each other and recognize their offspring 29.7.2016 TreeHugger
The Lorax might have spoken for the trees, but it turns out that trees can speak for themselves. At least to other trees, that is.
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Climate Change This Week: A Hot New High, Kids Show the Way, and More! 27.7.2016 Green on HuffingtonPost.com
OO Europe's Oil Imports 'Dependent On Unstable Countries' OO Power From "The New Coal", Natural Gas, Expected To Reach A Record High, Despite Climate Concerns - bad news, because besides the bad methane emissions from its production and distribution, burning it adds further emissions. OO US Coal Ash Crisis Builds - Coal production and use has plummeted, but the wastes left behind after burning it keep on coming, and they have been stored in lightly regulated, water-filled basins since at least the 1950s. OO China Pledged To Curb Coal Plants. Greenpeace Says It's Still Adding Them. The construction boom would result in about 400 gigawatts of excess capacity and waste more than $150 billion on building unneeded plants, said the new a report. But ... OO Record Growth In Chinese Renewable Energy Markets OO Coal India Accused Of Bulldozing Human Rights Amid Production Boom says Amnesty International report. <> OO Fossil Fuel Industry Risks Losing $33 Trillion in revenue in the next 25 years due to global ...
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Frogs that can take the heat expected to fare better in a changing world 8.7.2016 Environmental News Network
Amphibians that tolerate higher temperatures are likely to fare better in a world affected by climate change, disease and habitat loss, according to two recent studies from the University of California, Davis.Frogs are disappearing globally, and the studies examine why some survive while others perish. The studies reveal that thermal tolerance -- the ability to withstand higher temperatures -- may be a key trait in predicting amphibian declines.HEAT-TOLERANT FROGS ESCAPE DEADLY FUNGUSOne of the world's deadliest wildlife pandemics is caused by a fungus, Batrachochytrium dendrobatidis, or Bd. The fungus is linked to several amphibian extinctions and global declines.
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As deadly bat disease takes hold in Minn., scientists focus on future 23.6.2016 Minnesota Public Radio: News
White nose syndrome threatens to decimate Minnesota's bat population. Researchers are working now to learn more about the bats' summer habitat and reproduction before the full effects of the disease hit.
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Hundreds of toads hop free, offering hope for at-risk animal 2.6.2016 Seattle Times: Local

CHEYENNE, Wyo. (AP) — Wildlife officials are releasing more than 900 toads in Wyoming, saying they could help researchers find ways for the endangered species and other amphibians to resist a devastating fungus. The U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service are freeing the toads Wednesday at three places, including the Mortenson Lake National Wildlife Refuge. The […]
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Saving salamanders: Searching for signs of a deadly fungus 27.5.2016 Seattle Times: Local

SUNDERLAND, Vt. (AP) — Holding a sandwich bag containing a squirming, Eastern red-spotted newt, Evan Grant inspects its shiny skin for signs of a killer. If he finds what he’s looking for, a gruesome fate awaits the amphibian. Ulcers would cover its body, eating away the skin and killing it outright or leaving it vulnerable […]
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Saving salamanders: Searching for signs of a deadly fungus 27.5.2016 AP National
SUNDERLAND, Vt. (AP) -- Holding a sandwich bag containing a squirming, Eastern red-spotted newt, Evan Grant inspects its shiny skin for signs of a killer....
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Why You Must Devote Time and Investment in Waste 25.4.2016 Yahoo: Business

Restoring Hope in the Juvenile Justice SystemIf you are thinking of entering in the waste market, it is not at all waste of time. It is much larger than expected. Environment Research and Education Foundation (EREF) research reveals that recycling in U.S. is creating a positive impact on the economy. According to this comprehensive study, there are 8,828 waste and recycling operations. It...


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Genetically modified mushrooms cleared by the USDA 16.4.2016 Technology
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Colorado biologists concerned by latest spread of fungal disease in bats 5.4.2016 Steamboat Pilot
Biologists in Colorado are on high alert after a deadly fungal disease that has killed millions of bats in the Eastern United States suddenly jumped 1,300 miles and killed a bat on the West Coast near Seattle. For the first time, the bats in this state are surrounded by white nose syndrome on two fronts, and the scientists who are racing to learn more about the small and elusive animals are worried. Find out more about white-nose syndrome and how it is spreading here . Catch up on the latest efforts to conserve bats by following the Colorado Bat Working Group here . Read up on how the state of Colorado is preparing for the possible arrival of white-nose here . “We're all kind of nervous,” Rob Schorr, a bat researcher with the Colorado Natural Heritage Program, said Monday after sitting in on an emergency phone call with a working group of bat biologists from western states who were discussing the latest case in Washington. “How do you control this when you don't know how it got to where it is now? The ...
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Fungus that has killed roughly 7 million bats has now reached the West Coast 1.4.2016 LA Times: Science

Federal biologists on Thursday confirmed the presence of a lethal fungus known as white-nose syndrome in Washington, the first occurrence in western North America of the disease that has killed roughly 7 million bats.

The discovery of white-nose syndrome in a little brown bat in North Bend, Wash.,...

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Termites, Mushrooms and Cheetahs 18.3.2016 Green on HuffingtonPost.com
It's Termite Awareness Week. The National Pest Management Association (NPMA) uses this week, March 15-March 21, to educate people in the U.S. about termite prevention. Namibia may be known as "The Cheetah Capital of the World," but we also have our share of termites, too. Like their American counterparts, termites here can be destructive to human structures and strip farmlands of life-supporting vegetation. So what does this have to do with cheetah conservation? From the African farmer's perspective, cheetahs and termites have much in common. Historically both have been perceived as worthless vermin, pests that threaten human livelihoods. Species perceived to interfere with human livelihoods often become targets for mass eradication. During the 1970s and 1980s approximately 10,000 cheetah were removed from Namibia by farmers for posing predation threats to livestock. And for many years now, African farmers have been trying to rid the landscape of termites, because they perceive them to compete with ...
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Bat Fight: Environmentalists Sue Feds for Failing to Protect Bats 11.3.2016 American Prospect
AP Photo/Wisconsin Department of Natural Resources A northern long-eared bat.  Imagine if the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service decided to allow trees where bald eagles nest to be cut down as soon as this year’s baby eagles leave the nest. The public outcry would be enormous; it’s easy to picture activists forming human blockades to protect the trees. Yet that’s exactly the effect a recent Fish and Wildlife Service ruling has on a threatened species of North American bat—and almost nobody’s protesting. The explanation is simple: Bats are a species more feared than revered, associated in the public mind with rabies and vampires. Yet bats contribute billions of dollars annually to the U.S. economy in insect control, forest health, lower pesticide use, and pollination of important plants. That’s what makes the Fish and Wildlife Service’s failure to seize a recent, rare opportunity to protect American bats all the more disturbing—and why four environmental groups have announced plans to sue the service for ...
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Ignored Too Long: Kids' Health & The Crumbling Schoolhouse 3.3.2016 Green on HuffingtonPost.com
Co-Author Nsedu Obot-Witherspoon, MPH, Executive Director, Children's Environmental Health Network It seems like school children trying to learn in Detroit and Flint, MI can't catch a break, nor can they in Hoosick Falls, NY , and hundreds of other communities. We read daily about polluted drinking water ; then, about schools with black mold, failing heating systems, roaches and rats where children, by law , must spend their days. And behave. And take tests. We also know that it's unfair to single out schools in Detroit , a city that has come to represent the post-industrial collapse of manufacturing centers. Detroit simply is not the only city with mushrooms growing out of damp school building walls. In New York, the state education department cut staff responsible for addressing school facilities by half and has failed to improve school design standards . California and other states have suspended or slashed school construction funds . We also hear from parents and teachers about these conditions. For ...
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Frogs Are Really Cool. Too Bad Humans Are Killing Them All 15.2.2016 Wired Top Stories
In the age of human-induced mass extinction, frogs face great peril, which makes cataloging and understanding them of urgent ...
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The Fight To Save Panama's 'Symbol Of Hope' From Extinction 10.2.2016 Green on HuffingtonPost.com
I've lived in Panama for less than a month, and I've already become quite familiar with its celebrated golden frog. The little yellow guy is all over t-shirts and postcards and souvenirs. He's stamped on lottery tickets and grinning above the entrance to the aptly-named "La Rana Dorada" restaurant in downtown Panama City. Archaeologists have even discovered ancient gold relics sculpted in the shape of tiny amphibians. I asked both locals and scientists what the frog means to them; why you see its iconic face everywhere. "We're taught in school that it's a symbol Panama's biodiversity," journalist and entrepreneur Alfonso Grimaldo said. "It's a natural light; a reminder that the earth is sacred," said agriculture student Ericka Quiroz. "They were everywhere when we were kids; we used to catch them from the drain pipes," designer Ani Dillon recalled. Known for its striking day-glo coloring and the adorable waving motion it makes with its webbed hands, the golden frog represented hope and resilience and the ...
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