User: flenvcenter Topic: Biodiversity-National
Category: Specific Organisms :: Fungi
Last updated: Nov 29 2016 03:56 IST RSS 2.0
 
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Mysterious willow die-off in northern San Diego County 29.11.2016 LA Times: Commentary

A mysterious pest has damaged willows along the Escondido Creek watershed of northern San Diego County, leaving conservation officials scrambling for answers to the die-off.

Officials with the Escondido Creek Conservancy originally suspected the damage was caused by the shot hole borer beetle,...

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Before the Holiday Feast: New Data on Pesticides in Food Raises Safety Questions 23.11.2016 Green on HuffingtonPost.com
As American gather their families to share a Thanksgiving meal this week, new government data offers a potentially unappetizing assessment of the U.S. food supply: Residues of many types of insecticides, fungicides and weed killing chemicals have been found in roughly 85 percent of thousands of foods tested. Data released last week by the U.S. Department of Agriculture shows varying levels of pesticide residues in everything from mushrooms to potatoes and grapes to green beans. One sample of strawberries contained residues of 20 pesticides, according to the "Pesticide Data Program" (PDP) report issued this month by the USDA's Agricultural Marketing Service. The report is the 25th annual such compilation of residue data for the agency, and covered sampling the USDA did in 2015 Notably, the agency said only 15 percent of the 10,187 samples tested were free from any detectable pesticide residues. That's a marked difference from 2014, when the USDA found that over 41 percent of samples were "clean" or ...
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Their mission: save Minnesota's rare orchids before it's too late 31.10.2016 Minnesota Public Radio: News
Researchers are tromping across the state gathering microscopic seeds from Minnesota's 48 rare orchid species, part of a nationwide effort to conserve the threatened flowers. Here's a look at what they found in the woods.
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Snakes make your skin crawl? This deadly fungus has the same effect on snakes. 25.10.2016 Salt Lake Tribune
Snakes have a well-earned reputation as silent and deadly killers. But there’s another predator that quietly hunts in the wild. It’s called snake fungal disease and they appear to be no match for it. If the fungus known as SFD continues to devastate snake populations in the United States, the eastern massasauga rattlesnake could soon be a goner, according to a study announced Monday by the U.S. Geological Survey. So could the Louisiana pine snake. “Some snake populations in the eastern and Midwe...
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Can science stop a banana extinction? 25.10.2016 CNN: Top Stories
The banana is the world's most popular fruit crop, with over 100 million metric tons produced annually in over 130 tropical and subtropical countries.
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In The Battle To Save Frogs, Scientists Fight Fungus With Fungus 10.9.2016 NPR News
A deadly fungus is devastating frog populations around the world. In California, scientists are racing to find a way to immunize one species, mountain yellow-legged frogs, against the fungus.
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Meatless Monday: Small Steps, Big Changes -- Gene Baur and "Living the Farm Sanctuary Life" 22.8.2016 Green on HuffingtonPost.com
There was no plan, there was only "concern about animals and nature," says Gene Baur. "I wanted to do something positive it the world." He did. In 1986, he co-founded Farm Sanctuary. Now almost 30 years later, Farm Sanctuary is America's premier farm animal protection organization, a safe haven for factory farm animals abused and/or left for dead, and a transformative place for people, too. Farm Sanctuary offers education, outreach and the opportunity to rediscover our primal bond with animals. "Farm animals are not that different from cats and dogs," says Baur. "They have feelings, relationships, respect and compassion." Their open affection remind of us our own humanity. And our responsibility. "We don't share our lives with animals just because we want to. We do it because we need them," Baur writes in "Living the Farm Sanctuary Life." Co-written with Gene Stone, Baur's new book provides a little Farm Sanctuary wherever you are, with adorable farm animal photos, pleasing plant-based recipes from fab ...
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North Country trail: The Minnesota national park you've never heard of 11.8.2016 Minnesota Public Radio: News
The North Country National Scenic Trail is a passion project of volunteers from New York to North Dakota.
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The average home has more than 100 kinds of bugs living in it, new study finds 6.8.2016 LA Times: Commentary

Don’t panic, but your house probably has a lot more bugs in it than you think.

The average home contains more than 100 different species of flies, spiders, beetles, ants and other bugs — with an even greater variety inside houses in wealthier neighborhoods, according to a new study in Biology Letters.

...
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Trees talk to each other and recognize their offspring 29.7.2016 TreeHugger
The Lorax might have spoken for the trees, but it turns out that trees can speak for themselves. At least to other trees, that is.
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Climate Change This Week: A Hot New High, Kids Show the Way, and More! 27.7.2016 Green on HuffingtonPost.com
OO Europe's Oil Imports 'Dependent On Unstable Countries' OO Power From "The New Coal", Natural Gas, Expected To Reach A Record High, Despite Climate Concerns - bad news, because besides the bad methane emissions from its production and distribution, burning it adds further emissions. OO US Coal Ash Crisis Builds - Coal production and use has plummeted, but the wastes left behind after burning it keep on coming, and they have been stored in lightly regulated, water-filled basins since at least the 1950s. OO China Pledged To Curb Coal Plants. Greenpeace Says It's Still Adding Them. The construction boom would result in about 400 gigawatts of excess capacity and waste more than $150 billion on building unneeded plants, said the new a report. But ... OO Record Growth In Chinese Renewable Energy Markets OO Coal India Accused Of Bulldozing Human Rights Amid Production Boom says Amnesty International report. <> OO Fossil Fuel Industry Risks Losing $33 Trillion in revenue in the next 25 years due to global ...
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Frogs that can take the heat expected to fare better in a changing world 8.7.2016 Environmental News Network
Amphibians that tolerate higher temperatures are likely to fare better in a world affected by climate change, disease and habitat loss, according to two recent studies from the University of California, Davis.Frogs are disappearing globally, and the studies examine why some survive while others perish. The studies reveal that thermal tolerance -- the ability to withstand higher temperatures -- may be a key trait in predicting amphibian declines.HEAT-TOLERANT FROGS ESCAPE DEADLY FUNGUSOne of the world's deadliest wildlife pandemics is caused by a fungus, Batrachochytrium dendrobatidis, or Bd. The fungus is linked to several amphibian extinctions and global declines.
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As deadly bat disease takes hold in Minn., scientists focus on future 23.6.2016 Minnesota Public Radio: News
White nose syndrome threatens to decimate Minnesota's bat population. Researchers are working now to learn more about the bats' summer habitat and reproduction before the full effects of the disease hit.
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Hundreds of toads hop free, offering hope for at-risk animal 2.6.2016 Seattle Times: Local

CHEYENNE, Wyo. (AP) — Wildlife officials are releasing more than 900 toads in Wyoming, saying they could help researchers find ways for the endangered species and other amphibians to resist a devastating fungus. The U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service are freeing the toads Wednesday at three places, including the Mortenson Lake National Wildlife Refuge. The […]
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Saving salamanders: Searching for signs of a deadly fungus 27.5.2016 Seattle Times: Local

SUNDERLAND, Vt. (AP) — Holding a sandwich bag containing a squirming, Eastern red-spotted newt, Evan Grant inspects its shiny skin for signs of a killer. If he finds what he’s looking for, a gruesome fate awaits the amphibian. Ulcers would cover its body, eating away the skin and killing it outright or leaving it vulnerable […]
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Saving salamanders: Searching for signs of a deadly fungus 27.5.2016 AP National
SUNDERLAND, Vt. (AP) -- Holding a sandwich bag containing a squirming, Eastern red-spotted newt, Evan Grant inspects its shiny skin for signs of a killer....
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Why You Must Devote Time and Investment in Waste 25.4.2016 Yahoo: Business

Restoring Hope in the Juvenile Justice SystemIf you are thinking of entering in the waste market, it is not at all waste of time. It is much larger than expected. Environment Research and Education Foundation (EREF) research reveals that recycling in U.S. is creating a positive impact on the economy. According to this comprehensive study, there are 8,828 waste and recycling operations. It...


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Genetically modified mushrooms cleared by the USDA 16.4.2016 Technology
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Colorado biologists concerned by latest spread of fungal disease in bats 5.4.2016 Steamboat Pilot
Biologists in Colorado are on high alert after a deadly fungal disease that has killed millions of bats in the Eastern United States suddenly jumped 1,300 miles and killed a bat on the West Coast near Seattle. For the first time, the bats in this state are surrounded by white nose syndrome on two fronts, and the scientists who are racing to learn more about the small and elusive animals are worried. Find out more about white-nose syndrome and how it is spreading here . Catch up on the latest efforts to conserve bats by following the Colorado Bat Working Group here . Read up on how the state of Colorado is preparing for the possible arrival of white-nose here . “We're all kind of nervous,” Rob Schorr, a bat researcher with the Colorado Natural Heritage Program, said Monday after sitting in on an emergency phone call with a working group of bat biologists from western states who were discussing the latest case in Washington. “How do you control this when you don't know how it got to where it is now? The ...
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Fungus that has killed roughly 7 million bats has now reached the West Coast 1.4.2016 LA Times: Science

Federal biologists on Thursday confirmed the presence of a lethal fungus known as white-nose syndrome in Washington, the first occurrence in western North America of the disease that has killed roughly 7 million bats.

The discovery of white-nose syndrome in a little brown bat in North Bend, Wash.,...

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