User: flenvcenter Topic: Biodiversity-National
Category: Specific Organisms :: Fungi
Last updated: Apr 26 2016 03:19 IST RSS 2.0
 
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Why You Must Devote Time and Investment in Waste 25.4.2016 Yahoo: Business

Restoring Hope in the Juvenile Justice SystemIf you are thinking of entering in the waste market, it is not at all waste of time. It is much larger than expected. Environment Research and Education Foundation (EREF) research reveals that recycling in U.S. is creating a positive impact on the economy. According to this comprehensive study, there are 8,828 waste and recycling operations. It...


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Genetically modified mushrooms cleared by the USDA 16.4.2016 Technology
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Colorado biologists concerned by latest spread of fungal disease in bats 5.4.2016 Steamboat Pilot
Biologists in Colorado are on high alert after a deadly fungal disease that has killed millions of bats in the Eastern United States suddenly jumped 1,300 miles and killed a bat on the West Coast near Seattle. For the first time, the bats in this state are surrounded by white nose syndrome on two fronts, and the scientists who are racing to learn more about the small and elusive animals are worried. Find out more about white-nose syndrome and how it is spreading here . Catch up on the latest efforts to conserve bats by following the Colorado Bat Working Group here . Read up on how the state of Colorado is preparing for the possible arrival of white-nose here . “We're all kind of nervous,” Rob Schorr, a bat researcher with the Colorado Natural Heritage Program, said Monday after sitting in on an emergency phone call with a working group of bat biologists from western states who were discussing the latest case in Washington. “How do you control this when you don't know how it got to where it is now? The ...
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Fungus that has killed roughly 7 million bats has now reached the West Coast 1.4.2016 LA Times: Science

Federal biologists on Thursday confirmed the presence of a lethal fungus known as white-nose syndrome in Washington, the first occurrence in western North America of the disease that has killed roughly 7 million bats.

The discovery of white-nose syndrome in a little brown bat in North Bend, Wash.,...

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Termites, Mushrooms and Cheetahs 18.3.2016 Green on HuffingtonPost.com
It's Termite Awareness Week. The National Pest Management Association (NPMA) uses this week, March 15-March 21, to educate people in the U.S. about termite prevention. Namibia may be known as "The Cheetah Capital of the World," but we also have our share of termites, too. Like their American counterparts, termites here can be destructive to human structures and strip farmlands of life-supporting vegetation. So what does this have to do with cheetah conservation? From the African farmer's perspective, cheetahs and termites have much in common. Historically both have been perceived as worthless vermin, pests that threaten human livelihoods. Species perceived to interfere with human livelihoods often become targets for mass eradication. During the 1970s and 1980s approximately 10,000 cheetah were removed from Namibia by farmers for posing predation threats to livestock. And for many years now, African farmers have been trying to rid the landscape of termites, because they perceive them to compete with ...
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Bat Fight: Environmentalists Sue Feds for Failing to Protect Bats 11.3.2016 American Prospect
AP Photo/Wisconsin Department of Natural Resources A northern long-eared bat.  Imagine if the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service decided to allow trees where bald eagles nest to be cut down as soon as this year’s baby eagles leave the nest. The public outcry would be enormous; it’s easy to picture activists forming human blockades to protect the trees. Yet that’s exactly the effect a recent Fish and Wildlife Service ruling has on a threatened species of North American bat—and almost nobody’s protesting. The explanation is simple: Bats are a species more feared than revered, associated in the public mind with rabies and vampires. Yet bats contribute billions of dollars annually to the U.S. economy in insect control, forest health, lower pesticide use, and pollination of important plants. That’s what makes the Fish and Wildlife Service’s failure to seize a recent, rare opportunity to protect American bats all the more disturbing—and why four environmental groups have announced plans to sue the service for ...
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Ignored Too Long: Kids' Health & The Crumbling Schoolhouse 3.3.2016 Green on HuffingtonPost.com
Co-Author Nsedu Obot-Witherspoon, MPH, Executive Director, Children's Environmental Health Network It seems like school children trying to learn in Detroit and Flint, MI can't catch a break, nor can they in Hoosick Falls, NY , and hundreds of other communities. We read daily about polluted drinking water ; then, about schools with black mold, failing heating systems, roaches and rats where children, by law , must spend their days. And behave. And take tests. We also know that it's unfair to single out schools in Detroit , a city that has come to represent the post-industrial collapse of manufacturing centers. Detroit simply is not the only city with mushrooms growing out of damp school building walls. In New York, the state education department cut staff responsible for addressing school facilities by half and has failed to improve school design standards . California and other states have suspended or slashed school construction funds . We also hear from parents and teachers about these conditions. For ...
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Frogs Are Really Cool. Too Bad Humans Are Killing Them All 15.2.2016 Wired Top Stories
In the age of human-induced mass extinction, frogs face great peril, which makes cataloging and understanding them of urgent ...
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The Fight To Save Panama's 'Symbol Of Hope' From Extinction 10.2.2016 Green on HuffingtonPost.com
I've lived in Panama for less than a month, and I've already become quite familiar with its celebrated golden frog. The little yellow guy is all over t-shirts and postcards and souvenirs. He's stamped on lottery tickets and grinning above the entrance to the aptly-named "La Rana Dorada" restaurant in downtown Panama City. Archaeologists have even discovered ancient gold relics sculpted in the shape of tiny amphibians. I asked both locals and scientists what the frog means to them; why you see its iconic face everywhere. "We're taught in school that it's a symbol Panama's biodiversity," journalist and entrepreneur Alfonso Grimaldo said. "It's a natural light; a reminder that the earth is sacred," said agriculture student Ericka Quiroz. "They were everywhere when we were kids; we used to catch them from the drain pipes," designer Ani Dillon recalled. Known for its striking day-glo coloring and the adorable waving motion it makes with its webbed hands, the golden frog represented hope and resilience and the ...
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Chaga boom: Health, cash drive northern Minnesota fungus hunt 25.1.2016 Minnesota Public Radio: Science
Chaga, a forest fungus, has become an alternative health sensation. Believers claim it helps everything from joint pain to Lyme disease. The $20 a pound it can fetch is leading chaga hunters into Minnesota's woods, and that worries the DNR.
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U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service Restricts Salamander Imports to Protect Native Species From Deadly Disease 13.1.2016 Commondreams.org Newswire
Center for Biological Diversity In response to a petition from the Center for Biological Diversity and Save The Frogs, the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service today announced a temporary rule restricting the importation of salamanders for the pet trade. The restriction is designed to prevent introduction of the deadly fungus Batrachochytrium salamandrivorans (Bsal) into the United ...
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Your Favorite Banana Is Facing Extinction As Deadly Fungus Spreads 2.12.2015 Green on HuffingtonPost.com
One of the world’s most popular fruits may go extinct -- yet again. Before 1960, your grandparents and great-grandparents were eating better bananas. Called Gros Michel, they were tastier, bigger and more resilient than the bananas found in supermarkets worldwide today. “ It has a more robust taste ,” said Dan Koeppel, author of “Banana: The Fate of the Fruit That Changed the World” of the yummier yellow fruit. “It’s more creamy.” So why can’t we too enjoy the robust creaminess of the Gros Michel, once the world's export banana? Turns out, the species went virtually extinct in the 1960s thanks to an invasive and incurable fungus that wiped out most Gros Michel plantations around the world. That explains how the Cavendish -- the blander banana we now eat -- grew in prominence. It tasted worse and was less hardy than the Gros Michel, but the species seemed able to resist the fungal invasion, known as “Panama disease.” That is, it was able to. Now, a newer, more virulent strain of Panama disease is wreaking ...
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Bat-killing Fungus Reaches Nebraska 13.11.2015 Commondreams.org Newswire
Center for Biological Diversity State and federal wildlife officials announced today that a bat-killing fungus that has swept across the eastern United States and Canada over the past eight years, killing millions of bats, has been confirmed by scientists in eastern Nebraska. Samples taken from bats in a mine in Cass County, Neb. at the end of last winter tested positive for the fungus that causes white-nose syndrome; the bat species found with the fungus were northern long-eared bats, tricolored bats and big brown ...
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Road kill will be served at a wild game dinner in Vermont 22.10.2015 Boston Globe: Latest
Road kill will be served at a wild game dinner in Vermont
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7 Fascinating Facts About Bats 19.10.2015 Mother Jones
Silhouetted against an orange harvest moon, fluttering out of a haunted house, or circling Count Dracula's cape: We often think of bats as creepy, especially this time of year. But actually, these maligned creatures are crucial to many ecosystems—and our economy. What's more, they're in trouble. A few important facts to know about our winged, insect-munching friends: Bats flying at sunset Umkehrer/Shutterstock Bats save us billions of dollars a year. Bats eat their bodyweight in insects every night. In 2011, researchers at the University of Tennessee, Knoxville used modeling techniques to calculate how much bats' amazing insect-eating abilities are worth to US farmers. The estimates included the value of prevented crop damage from pests that bats eat, as well as the amount of money farmers would have to spend on pesticides to do the same job. They came up with a wide—but staggering—range: between $3 billion and $53 billion dollars a year. A few years later, Josiah Maine, then a graduate student at ...
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Starbucks says it will buy coffee trees for rust-afflicted farmers 29.9.2015 Seattle Times: Business & Technology

The company said that for every bag of coffee purchased at participating U.S. stores, it will pay for providing a new coffee tree to a farmer whose crops have been affected by the voracious coffee rust fungus.
Mysterious fungus killing snakes in at least 9 states, including Illinois 9.8.2015 Chicago Tribune: Nation
Hidden on hillsides in a remote part of western Vermont, a small number of venomous timber rattlesnakes slither among the rocks, but their isolation can't protect them from a mysterious fungus spreading across the eastern half of the country that threatens to wipe them ...
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Mysterious fungus killing snakes in at least 9 states 9.8.2015 Yahoo: US National
NEW HAVEN, Vt. (AP) — Hidden on hillsides in a remote part of western Vermont, a small number of venomous timber rattlesnakes slither among the rocks, but their isolation can't protect them from a mysterious fungus spreading across the eastern half of the country that threatens to wipe them ...
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Mysterious fungus killing snakes in at least 9 states 9.8.2015 AP Top News
NEW HAVEN, Vt. (AP) -- Hidden on hillsides in a remote part of western Vermont, a small number of venomous timber rattlesnakes slither among the rocks, but their isolation can't protect them from a mysterious fungus spreading across the eastern half of the country that threatens to wipe them out....
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Mysterious fungus killing snakes in at least 9 states 9.8.2015 Seattle Times: Nation & World
NEW HAVEN, Vt. (AP) — Hidden on hillsides in a remote part of western Vermont, a small number of venomous timber rattlesnakes slither among the rocks, but their isolation can’t protect them from a mysterious fungus spreading across the eastern half of the country that threatens to wipe them out. In less than a decade, […]
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