User: flenvcenter Topic: Biodiversity-National
Category: Specific Organisms :: Fungi
Last updated: Sep 02 2014 13:44 IST RSS 2.0
 
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Don’t lose your lid! (the green roof argument) 2.9.2014 The Earth Times Online Newspaper - Health News
Life is changing. Now we can have a garden on our roof, but the wildlife and energy-transforming possibilities are really building up. I doubt if you’ll like some of our ideas here, but there may be some way you can imagine a green roof being of benefit and fitting in to your local landscape.
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Community Agriculture Alliance: Soil health 28.8.2014 Steamboat Pilot
Soil health — you may have heard this latest descriptor and wondered what it is. Hopefully, by now you are aware that soil is not just dirt. It’s a complicated ecosystem that takes place beneath our feet to support the environment that we see above ground. Plants often are portrayed as the one of the most important organism in our ecosystem, but without good soil, there would be no plants. So while you may not consider soil as “pretty” as a plant, I would argue that it is more important. A healthy soil consists of billions of micro-organisms and thousands of macro-organisms that all work together to better the soil. Glomalin is a micro-organism that stores carbon in its protein and carbohydrate (glucose or sugar) subunits. Arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi, found living on plant roots around the world, appear to be the only producers of glomalin. The fungi use carbon from the plant to grow and make glomalin. In return, the fungi's hair-like filaments, called hyphae, extend the reach of plant roots. Hyphae ...
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As fungus kills bats, MN timber industry winces 19.8.2014 Star Tribune: Business
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The Secret Bataclysm: White Nose Syndrome and Extinction 12.8.2014 Wired Top Stories
In just 8 years, bats have gone from the most common mammal in the US to endangered species candidates.
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What Are Pesticides, and Why Do We Use Them on the Farm? 12.8.2014 Green on HuffingtonPost.com
When people talk about using chemicals on the farm, oftentimes they use the word "pesticides." To people outside agriculture, pesticides tends to be the catch-all category for any and all chemical compound we spray on our crops. And honestly, that is far from the truth. We don't have a jug labeled "pesticides" that goes on anything and everything. In agriculture we call any sort of chemical we use on the farm "crop-protection products." The truth about the crop-protection products we use on the farm is that we use specific chemicals labeled for very specific uses and at very specific amounts. I've written before that as farmers we have a choice in what seed to select. We also have a choice when it comes to what we put on our crops. It varies depending on crop, soil, crop rotation, current condition of the crop, pests, and moisture. The choices we make regarding what to spray are careful, calculated, and measured out. It is not something we do haphazardly or thoughtlessly like many websites will ...
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Deadly fungus spreads in Everglades, killing trees 26.7.2014 Seattle Times: Nation & World
A fungus is felling trees across the Everglades and the damage may be leaving Florida’s fragile wetlands open to even more of an incursion from exotic plants.
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Moose Drool Detoxifies Fungus 25.7.2014 Wildlife and Habitat Conservation News - ENN
Saliva contains important substances helps us digest food. It also plays a part in keeping our mouths clean and healthy. Another newly discovered use? Making toxic plants less toxic. Not for us of course, but according to new research, moose and reindeer saliva can help can slow the growth of a toxic grass fungus, and subsequently make it less toxic for them, allowing the animals to graze on the grass without negative effects.
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Deadly fungus spreads in Everglades, killing trees 25.7.2014 Twincities.com: Nation
MIAMI (AP) — A fungus carried by an invasive beetle from southeast Asia is felling trees across the Everglades, and experts have not found a way to stop the blight from spreading.
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Deadly fungus spreads in Everglades, killing trees 25.7.2014 AP National
MIAMI (AP) -- A fungus carried by an invasive beetle from southeast Asia is felling trees across the Everglades, and experts have not found a way to stop the blight from spreading....
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Fungus spread by exotic beetle killing Everglades trees, adding to Fla's invasive species woes 25.7.2014 Star Tribune: Nation
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Deadly fungus spreads in Everglades, killing trees 25.7.2014 Yahoo: Top Stories
MIAMI (AP) — A fungus carried by an invasive beetle from southeast Asia is felling trees across the Everglades, and experts have not found a way to stop the blight from ...
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Hints Of Hope Emerge In Deadly American Bat Plague 13.7.2014 Green on HuffingtonPost.com
This story originally appeared on Mother Nature Network. About 6 million American bats have died from white-nose syndrome since its mysterious 2006 debut, and the disease's rapid spread still threatens the survival of some species. But if scientists are right about a few little brown bats in the U.S. Northeast, there may finally be a light at the end of the tunnel. A new study from Vermont suggests up to 96 percent of little brown bats survived last winter's hibernation in Aeolus Cave, a major bat hangout that has been riddled with white-nose syndrome (WNS) since 2008. First reported by the Associated Press, this is at least the third known case of WNS seemingly losing its grip on a bat colony. Two caves in New York have shown similar hints of recovery, and biologists in Vermont also recently found the rate of that state's bat die-off may be slowing down . The Aeolus Cave researchers radio-tagged 442 little brown bats before hibernation began last fall, then installed equipment to record how many tagged ...
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Increasing the Fragmentation of Natural Landscapes May Help Spread Disease 12.6.2014 Wired Top Stories
The modern natural world is an increasingly fragmented one, with islands of ecological integrity isolated in vast sprawls of human development. An environment arranged such a fashion, suggests a new study, may inadvertently fuel the spread of ...
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Fungus that causes deadly bat disease found for 1st time in Mississippi; no disease yet 12.6.2014 Star Tribune: Nation
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Open your mind to the gene-modified American chestnut 4.6.2014 New Scientists HIV
The American chestnut tree is on the brink of a genetically engineered comeback. Evidence, not fear, must decide the US public ...
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American chestnut set for genetically modified revival 30.5.2014 New Scientist: Being Human
New strains of American chestnuts are resistant to a devastating fungus and pass on resistance to their offspring, suggesting that the trees can be ...
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Climate Change As a Weapon of Mass Destruction 23.5.2014 Mother Jones
This story first appeared on the TomDispatch website. Who could forget? At the time, in the fall of 2002, there was such a drumbeat of "information" from top figures in the Bush administration about the secret Iraqi program to develop weapons of mass destruction (WMD) and so endanger the United States. And who—other than a few suckers—could have doubted that Saddam Hussein was eventually going to get a nuclear weapon? The only question, as our vice president suggested on "Meet the Press," was: Would it take one year or five? And he wasn't alone in his fears, since there was plenty of proof of what was going on. For starters, there were those " specially designed aluminum tubes " that the Iraqi autocrat had ordered as components for centrifuges to enrich uranium in his thriving nuclear weapons program. Reporters Judith Miller and Michael Gordon hit the front page of the New York Times with that story on September 8, 2002. Then there were those "mushroom clouds" that Condoleezza Rice, our national security ...
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Fungi Clean Contaminated Soil 22.5.2014 Environmental News Network
A new system for cleaning soils contaminated with industrial toxins harnesses the power of White rot - a common fungus that decays fallen wood in forests. Research in Finland shows it can also destroy dioxins and poly-aromatic hydrocarbons.
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Long-Eared Bat Could Be Endangered 14.5.2014 WCCO: National
(credit: CBS)A disease infecting the northern long-eared bat could place it on the endangered species list. The disease, called white-nose syndrome, has impacted bats in a number of states. Rich Baker, endangered species coordinator with the Department of Natural Resources, says a large number have died off.
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New frog species found in troubled Indian habitat 8.5.2014 AP Top News
NEW DELHI (AP) -- Scientists have discovered 14 new species of so-called dancing frogs in the jungle mountains of southern India - just in time, they fear, to watch them fade away....
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