User: flenvcenter Topic: Biodiversity-National
Category: Specific Organisms :: Fungi
Last updated: Jul 30 2014 02:12 IST RSS 2.0
 
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Deadly fungus spreads in Everglades, killing trees 26.7.2014 Seattle Times: Nation & World
A fungus is felling trees across the Everglades and the damage may be leaving Florida’s fragile wetlands open to even more of an incursion from exotic plants.
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Moose Drool Detoxifies Fungus 25.7.2014 Wildlife and Habitat Conservation News - ENN
Saliva contains important substances helps us digest food. It also plays a part in keeping our mouths clean and healthy. Another newly discovered use? Making toxic plants less toxic. Not for us of course, but according to new research, moose and reindeer saliva can help can slow the growth of a toxic grass fungus, and subsequently make it less toxic for them, allowing the animals to graze on the grass without negative effects.
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Deadly fungus spreads in Everglades, killing trees 25.7.2014 Twincities.com: Nation
MIAMI (AP) — A fungus carried by an invasive beetle from southeast Asia is felling trees across the Everglades, and experts have not found a way to stop the blight from spreading.
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Deadly fungus spreads in Everglades, killing trees 25.7.2014 AP National
MIAMI (AP) -- A fungus carried by an invasive beetle from southeast Asia is felling trees across the Everglades, and experts have not found a way to stop the blight from spreading....
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Fungus spread by exotic beetle killing Everglades trees, adding to Fla's invasive species woes 25.7.2014 Star Tribune: Nation
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Deadly fungus spreads in Everglades, killing trees 25.7.2014 Yahoo: Top Stories
MIAMI (AP) — A fungus carried by an invasive beetle from southeast Asia is felling trees across the Everglades, and experts have not found a way to stop the blight from ...
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Hints Of Hope Emerge In Deadly American Bat Plague 13.7.2014 Green on HuffingtonPost.com
This story originally appeared on Mother Nature Network. About 6 million American bats have died from white-nose syndrome since its mysterious 2006 debut, and the disease's rapid spread still threatens the survival of some species. But if scientists are right about a few little brown bats in the U.S. Northeast, there may finally be a light at the end of the tunnel. A new study from Vermont suggests up to 96 percent of little brown bats survived last winter's hibernation in Aeolus Cave, a major bat hangout that has been riddled with white-nose syndrome (WNS) since 2008. First reported by the Associated Press, this is at least the third known case of WNS seemingly losing its grip on a bat colony. Two caves in New York have shown similar hints of recovery, and biologists in Vermont also recently found the rate of that state's bat die-off may be slowing down . The Aeolus Cave researchers radio-tagged 442 little brown bats before hibernation began last fall, then installed equipment to record how many tagged ...
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Increasing the Fragmentation of Natural Landscapes May Help Spread Disease 12.6.2014 Wired Top Stories
The modern natural world is an increasingly fragmented one, with islands of ecological integrity isolated in vast sprawls of human development. An environment arranged such a fashion, suggests a new study, may inadvertently fuel the spread of ...
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Fungus that causes deadly bat disease found for 1st time in Mississippi; no disease yet 12.6.2014 Star Tribune: Nation
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Open your mind to the gene-modified American chestnut 4.6.2014 New Scientists HIV
The American chestnut tree is on the brink of a genetically engineered comeback. Evidence, not fear, must decide the US public ...
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American chestnut set for genetically modified revival 30.5.2014 New Scientist: Being Human
New strains of American chestnuts are resistant to a devastating fungus and pass on resistance to their offspring, suggesting that the trees can be ...
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Climate Change As a Weapon of Mass Destruction 23.5.2014 Mother Jones
This story first appeared on the TomDispatch website. Who could forget? At the time, in the fall of 2002, there was such a drumbeat of "information" from top figures in the Bush administration about the secret Iraqi program to develop weapons of mass destruction (WMD) and so endanger the United States. And who—other than a few suckers—could have doubted that Saddam Hussein was eventually going to get a nuclear weapon? The only question, as our vice president suggested on "Meet the Press," was: Would it take one year or five? And he wasn't alone in his fears, since there was plenty of proof of what was going on. For starters, there were those " specially designed aluminum tubes " that the Iraqi autocrat had ordered as components for centrifuges to enrich uranium in his thriving nuclear weapons program. Reporters Judith Miller and Michael Gordon hit the front page of the New York Times with that story on September 8, 2002. Then there were those "mushroom clouds" that Condoleezza Rice, our national security ...
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Fungi Clean Contaminated Soil 22.5.2014 Environmental News Network
A new system for cleaning soils contaminated with industrial toxins harnesses the power of White rot - a common fungus that decays fallen wood in forests. Research in Finland shows it can also destroy dioxins and poly-aromatic hydrocarbons.
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Long-Eared Bat Could Be Endangered 14.5.2014 WCCO: National
(credit: CBS)A disease infecting the northern long-eared bat could place it on the endangered species list. The disease, called white-nose syndrome, has impacted bats in a number of states. Rich Baker, endangered species coordinator with the Department of Natural Resources, says a large number have died off.
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New frog species found in troubled Indian habitat 8.5.2014 AP Top News
NEW DELHI (AP) -- Scientists have discovered 14 new species of so-called dancing frogs in the jungle mountains of southern India - just in time, they fear, to watch them fade away....
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The coolest biology is under the microscope 22.4.2014 New Scientist: GM Organisms
Almost everything important takes place in the microbial world, argues Nicholas Money in his lively but rather disorganised book The Amoeba in the ...
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A fungus is devastating area's bat populations 21.4.2014 Philly.com News
They have voracious appetites. Each can devour more than 1,000 insects an hour, up to its entire body weight in a single night.
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White-Nose Syndrome, Fatal Fungal Disease, Reaches Bats In Wisconsin and Michigan 11.4.2014 Green on HuffingtonPost.com
By Brendan O'Brien April 10 (Reuters) - Bats in Wisconsin and Michigan have been infected with a disease that has killed millions of the mosquito-eating mammals elsewhere in the U.S. and could have a detrimental impact on farming and forestry, wildlife officials said on Thursday. White-nose syndrome appeared in five small brown bats collected in February and March in northern Michigan during routine surveillance, the state's Department of Natural Resources said in a statement. "Even though we've known this disease was coming, it is a disappointing day," said Dan O'Brien, a department wildlife veterinarian. Two bats in Wisconsin tested positive for the fungal disease after they were collected in a mine during winter surveillance in Grant County, near the Illinois border, where the disease was confirmed in 2012. White-nose syndrome is mainly spread from bat to bat, but it is also possible for humans to transport spores via clothing and gear from fungus contaminated sites such as caves and ...
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Fungal disease fatal to bats spreads to half of US 11.4.2014 Yahoo: US National
TRAVERSE CITY, Mich. (AP) — A fungal disease that has killed millions of North American bats is spreading and now has been detected in half of the United States, officials said ...
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Baby Porcupine Rescued From Dead Mother's Womb After Car Accident (VIDEO) 30.3.2014 Green on HuffingtonPost.com
A Maine man went to look for mushrooms, but instead, came home with something much cuter and charismatic.

Jared Buzzell was driving with a friend when he saw a car hit a porcupine ahead of him. He then decided to approach the critter and search for its bezoar -- a stone-like material that some think has medicinal value. Instead of the bezoar, he found an adorable baby porcupine that he is now rearing and rehabilitating at his house.

Until the Buzzells give him away to a licensed wildlife rehabilitator, they are enjoying the extra guest and feeding it every few hours with a baby doll bottle. Could this lucky little porcupine get any cuter!?
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