User: flenvcenter Topic: Biodiversity-National
Category: Specific Organisms :: Insects
Last updated: Nov 13 2017 17:21 IST RSS 2.0
 
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Forest lives are changing, with combined human/insect threats. 13.11.2017 Earth Times
From Myanmar, through the Congo to the Atlantic forests of Brazil, we are neglecting our rainforests, but temperate forests are also suffering, often from pest influences as global warming really takes hold in certain regions. How to help prevent a treeless future - as always, take these pieces of well-informed, well-rounded and interesting advice.
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Urban Refuge: How Cities Can Help Rebuild Declining Bee Populations 9.11.2017 Environmental News Network
The billowing stainless steel forms of Frank Gehry’s Pritzker bandshell seem to float up from behind the 3.5-acre Lurie Garden in Millennium Park, backed by Chicago’s celebrated skyline. Another landmark in a city long a laboratory for innovation in architecture and landscaping, the garden has been called a “model of responsible horticulture.” Masses of flowering perennials and grasses are a striking counterpoint to the surrounding walls of concrete and glass. Perhaps most unexpected, at a place that sits atop a 4,000-vehicle underground parking garage and railroad depot in the inner city, are the bees that flit from flower to flower.
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How did these creepy critters achieve Halloween super stardom? 31.10.2017 TreeHugger
Halloween just wouldn’t be spookacular without spiders, owls, toads, bats, and other creatures of the night. But how did these specific animals make the cut?
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Detailed photos reveal the magical wilderness of a native garden in LA 30.10.2017 TreeHugger
Scott Logan's macro photographs of the famed Gottlieb Native Garden show how biodiversity can thrive in an urban oasis.
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Scientists Warn of "Ecological Armageddon" Amid Waves of Heat and Climate Refugees 30.10.2017 Truthout - All Articles
A dirt berm is maintained along the coast of Utqiaġvik, the northernmost city in Alaska, in an effort to slow seawater intrusion from increasingly severe Arctic storms. (Photo: Dahr Jamail) Scientists are sounding the alarm of an "ecological Armageddon" as insect populations across Germany collapse, wildfires scorch California and Portugal, record heat waves swelter the US late into fall, and 14 million people become climate refugees annually -- including Indigenous residents of Alaska's northern coast. While most of the world is finally acknowledging the dangers of anthropogenic climate disruption, the White House remains willfully clueless. A dirt berm is maintained along the coast of Utqiaġvik, the northernmost city in Alaska, in an effort to slow seawater intrusion from increasingly severe Arctic storms. (Photo: Dahr Jamail) As the summer Arctic sea ice melts and continues to recede further, the fragile coastline resting atop thawing permafrost is made more vulnerable to the warming waters of the ...
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Bee hotels are all the buzz. Here are five in the West where you can meet these pollinators 30.10.2017 LA Times: Commentary
You'll learn why bees are important, and you may get to sample their honey or help to keep the bees at these resorts.
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Where’s the buzz? German study finds dramatic insect decline 20.10.2017 Washington Post: World
The number of flying insects in Germany has been dropping at an “alarming” rate that could signal serious trouble for ecosystems and food chains in the future, scientists say.
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‘This is very alarming!’: Flying insects vanish from nature preserves 19.10.2017 Washington Post
‘This is very alarming!’: Flying insects vanish from nature preserves
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Tropical beetles face extinction threat 18.10.2017 Environmental News Network
Climate change is putting many tropical high altitude beetles at risk of extinction, warn an international team of scientists.
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How Bees Find Their Way Home 17.10.2017 Wildlife and Habitat Conservation News - ENN
How can a bee fly straight home in the middle of the night after a complicated route through thick vegetation in search of food? For the first time, researchers have been able to show what happens in the brain of the bee.
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Is Climate Change Affecting Northern California's Devastating Fires? 12.10.2017 Climate Change News - ENN
On Monday I woke to the terrifying smell of smoke. From my home south of San Francisco, I could see the entire Bay Area covered in a thick layer, obscuring the sun.
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Best places on California's coast to see monarch butterflies this fall and winter 11.10.2017 LA Times: Commentary

Tourists love to visit California’s coast in winter. So do monarch butterflies. Thousands of these hardy travelers flock to coastal areas on an annual migration from Central California to Mexico’s Baja Peninsula, though their numbers have been thinning dramatically.

In California, butterflies arrive...

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The dark side of digitally tracking endangered species 11.10.2017 Energy & Climate | Greenbiz.com
The data could make it easier for poachers to find animals and plants that scientists are trying to protect.
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It's time to nix neonics 11.10.2017 rabble.ca - News for the rest of us
David Suzuki The Canadian government is banning plastic microbeads in toiletries. Although designed to clean us, they're polluting the environment, putting the health of fish, wildlife and people at risk. Manufacturers and consumers ushered plastic microbeads into the marketplace, but when we learned of their dangers, we moved to phase them out. Why, then, is it taking so long to phase out the world's most widely used insecticides, neonicotinoids? Scientists have proven they're harming not only the pests they're designed to kill, but also a long list of non-target species, including pollinators we rely on globally for about one-third of food crops. Neonics are systemic pesticides. Plants absorb and integrate them into all tissues -- roots, stems, leaves, flowers, pollen and nectar. First introduced in the 1990s, they now account for one-third of the global pesticide market. Agricultural applications include leaf sprays, and seed and soil treatments. They're also used for trees, turf products, and flea ...
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Photo: Tiger moth caterpillar shows its feline side 4.10.2017 TreeHugger
Our photo of the day comes from the cloudforest of Ecuador.
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Delta Dispatches: Bird and Fish in the Sportsman's Paradise 4.10.2017 Main Feed - Environmental Defense
On today’s show Chris Macaluso, Director of the Center for Marine Fisheries, Theodore Roosevelt Conservation Partnership joins the program to talk with Jacques & Simone about what they do and how the Mississippi River helps create Louisiana's unique habitats and fisheries. Erik Johnson, Director of The Bird Conservation at Audubon Louisiana stops by to talk with Jacques & Simone about what birds can be found along Louisiana’s coast, Audubon’s Plants for Birds Program, the Christmas Bird Count and more! Below ...
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Climate Disruption Could Pose "Existential Threat" By 2050 2.10.2017 Truthout - All Articles
(Photo: Billy Wilson ; Edited: LW / TO) Human-forced global warming is unraveling Earth: We've changed the composition of the atmosphere, acidified the oceans and caused massive ice melt. As epic rains warp Earth's crust and tree-killing beetles follow warmer temperatures northwards, scientists warn of an "existential threat" to humanity as early as 2050 as planetary heating continues apace. (Photo: Billy Wilson ; Edited: LW / TO)   This story was published because of support from readers like you. If you care about maintaining a free and independent media, make a donation to Truthout! It is often painful to write these monthly dispatches, chronicling what has happened to the Earth over the previous several weeks. Every month I'm taken aback by how rapidly the changes are unfolding. Take my word for this: These pieces are as emotionally challenging for me to write as they are for you to read. Over the several years I've been producing these climate disruption dispatches, I've mostly received messages of ...
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Scientists show molecular basis for ants acting as bodyguards to plants 28.9.2017 Environmental News Network
Though you might not think of ants as formidable bodyguards, some do an impressive job protecting plants from enemies. Now, scientists at the University of Toronto have determined what makes some better bodyguards than others.Examining the relationship between the Amazon rainforest plant Cordia nodosa in Peru and the Amazonian ant Allomerus octoarticulatus, they found the degree to which the ants express two genes significantly impacts the amount of protection they provide to their hosts.
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No, we can’t — and shouldn’t — stop forest fires 26.9.2017 Washington Post: Op-Eds
Contrary to what commercial interests claim, doing so would be bad for the environment.
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Monarch butterflies might vanish from Northwest summers 24.9.2017 Seattle Times: Top stories

“Western monarchs probably won’t be around as we know them in another 35 years,” said Cheryl Schultz, an associate professor at Washington State University, Vancouver, and lead author of a new study.
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