User: flenvcenter Topic: Biodiversity-National
Category: Specific Organisms :: Insects
Last updated: Jan 15 2019 04:16 IST RSS 2.0
 
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How citizen scientists can save the world 15.1.2019 Minnesota Public Radio: News
Regular people can help professional researchers extend their reach.
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Exploding Ants, Rainbow Slugs, and Tiny Seahorses: 11 New Species Discovered This Year 30.12.2018 Mother Jones
Considering there are nearly eight billion people on Earth, and that more and more species are being pushed into extinction by climate change, habitat destruction, and pollution, it may seem like there would be few species left for humans to discover. In fact, there could be up to a trillion species on the planet, 99.999 percent of which have yet to […]
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Invasive insects hitch a ride to Minnesota, Wisconsin on holiday decorations 28.12.2018 Minnesota Public Radio: News
Agriculture officials in Minnesota and Wisconsin are working to stop the spread of an invasive evergreen tree-eating insect, after it was discovered in holiday decorations sold at big box stores in both states.
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Wisconsin wreaths carry invasive insects from eastern states 27.12.2018 Minnesota Public Radio: Law & Justice
Wisconsin residents are being asked to burn or bag some Christmas decorations after an infestation of highly invasive tree-eating insects were found on wreaths, swags and other holiday items made with real evergreen boughs.
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Climate change and corporate greed combine to destroy forests with fire and felling 26.9.2018 rabble.ca - News for the rest of us
Ed Finn The razing of millions of acres of forests by wildfires has been increasing in scale and intensity for the past few decades. This year has set new records for the number of trees and shrubs destroyed by fire -- not just in the United States and Canada, but also in many other countries, including England, Spain, Portugal, Greece, Sweden, Latvia, and North Korea. Wildfires, of course, have been a yearly occurrence in the summer months for centuries. Triggered mainly by lightning, they were nature's way of disposing of dead timber and providing fertile ground for new plant growth. That is still an important natural process, although many conflagrations today are unnaturally caused by human carelessness, such as poorly tended campfires and flipped-away cigarette butts. Far more devastating for the world's forests today, however, are the effects of global warming, mostly caused by the greenhouse gas emissions that emanate from the burning of fossil fuels. One of the detrimental effects of climate ...
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Drexel's Academy of Natural Sciences to reopen 80-year-old dioramas after restoration 19.9.2018 Philly.com News
Famed dioramas of gorillas and takin have undergone their first restoration since they were installed in the 1930s.
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Minnesota cities to Congress: Let us help the bees 19.9.2018 Minnesota Public Radio: Politics
The House version of the farm bill being debated in Congress would bar cities from placing stricter regulations on pesticides.
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Photos: A new market -- Keg and Case opens in St. Paul 15.9.2018 Minnesota Public Radio: Business
Keg and Case Market opened to the public Friday on the grounds of the former Schmidt Brewery on West Seventh Street in St. Paul. The market features a variety of retail, dining and drinking establishments.
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Impact of aquatic invasive species on Minnesota lakes and rivers 23.8.2018 Minnesota Public Radio: Law & Justice
The damage to Minnesota's lakes and rivers caused by invasive aquatic species.
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$10M question: Are counties' efforts to fight aquatic invasives working? 21.8.2018 Minnesota Public Radio: News
In 2014, the Legislature took the unusual step of setting aside $10 million each year to distribute to the counties fighting invasive species. Counties are using that money to expand boat inspection programs, but also trying some innovative approaches.
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For the next big innovation for agriculture, think small 17.8.2018 Small Business | GreenBiz.com
Companies large and small, and even the likes of Nicole Kidman, are increasingly finding insects appetizing and sustainable.
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Spring is springing sooner, throwing nature's rhythms out of whack 23.7.2018 Minnesota Public Radio: News
A warming climate is knocking nature's rhythms out of sync. High in the Rocky Mountains, scientists have been tracking the impact for decades
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Trump aims to end automatic protections for some species 20.7.2018 Minnesota Public Radio: Law & Justice
The Trump administration on Thursday proposed ending automatic protections for threatened animal and plant species and limiting habitat safeguards that are meant to shield recovering species from harm.
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To repel ticks, try spraying your clothes with a pesticide derived from mums 9.7.2018 Minnesota Public Radio: Law & Justice
Just in time for summer hikes and outdoor play: A study finds that the ticks that often convey Lyme disease become unable to bite, and soon die after exposure to clothing treated with permethrin.
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Climate Change Is Making It Harder to Revive Damaged Land 5.7.2018 Mother Jones
This story was originally published by High Country News and appears here as part of the Climate Desk collaboration. Carianne Campbell remembers the exact moment she fell in love with the Sonoran Desert. As a botany major in college, she joined a class field trip to Organ Pipe Cactus National Monument on the southern border of Arizona, arriving and […]
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These 8 nature-based startups from around the world are going to save it 13.6.2018 Energy & Climate | Greenbiz.com
And this environmental impact accelerator is going to help.
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Desert Bees Have Figured Out Something We’re All Going Need To Learn 25.5.2018 Mother Jones
This story was originally published by Undark and appears here as part of the Climate Desk collaboration.  A cluster of leafcutter bees are foraging for nectar and pollen on an unseasonably hot May morning in Bandelier National Monument, in northern New Mexico. Tiny, with few bright markings, they don’t look like bees at first—more like dark-colored buzzy insects. But […]
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A rare great ape, a 130-foot-tall tree and an extinct marsupial lion make the Top 10 New Species list for 2018 23.5.2018 LA Times: Science
The highest branches of a Brazilian forest. The permanent darkness of a cave in China. The deepest place on Earth. Meet the Top 10 new species that were described by science in the previous year.
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How air pollution, a dying river and swarms of defecating insects threaten the Taj Mahal 22.5.2018 L.A. Times - World News

India’s most famous poet, Rabindranath Tagore, once wrote that the Taj Mahal stood on the banks of the river Yamuna “like a teardrop suspended on the cheek of time.”

One wonders whether the late Nobel laureate could have found a lyrical description of the latest threat facing the grand, white-marble...

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A little extra global warming will mean a lot more habitat loss for plants and animals, study says 19.5.2018 LA Times: Science

What difference does half a degree Celsius of global warming make?

To many plants and animals, and especially insects, it could mean the difference between life and death, according to a new study.

In a paper published Thursday in Science, researchers report that limiting global warming to 1.5...

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