On December 31 2020, the newsrack service will be shut down permanently.

It has been a nice long run from the Sarai days in 2004 to being hosted on its own domain around 2006. Beside maintenance, there has been no real active development on the code or the features since early 2008. Since 2015, even all that maintenance was pretty bare bones. A lot of news sources no longer provide reliable RSS feeds and since mid 2018, there were growing issues with the service and I only kept it alive to assist a handful of users.

So, it is time to shut this down. The internet world in 2020 is vastly differently from 2003 when I first conceptualized this service. Thanks for using this all these years.

If you need to access any data, email me: subbu at newsrack.in

 
User: flenvcenter Topic: Biodiversity-National
Category: Specific Organisms :: Insects
Last updated: Dec 04 2020 15:51 IST RSS 2.0
 
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An answer to aquaculture's unsustainable fish feed habit? 4.12.2020 Business Operations | GreenBiz.com
An answer to aquaculture's unsustainable fish feed habit? Jim Giles Fri, 12/04/2020 - 00:15 Sustainability can be a game of Whac-A-Mole: We roll out a promising solution to an environmental problem, only to discover that the solution generates problems of its own. It certainly feels that way in aquaculture. On paper, fish farms should be a win for sustainability. A third of wild stocks are overexploited , and sourcing seafood from farms should allow ocean biodiversity to recover. In practice, the industry has spent years chasing a sustainable solution for feeding the fish that it farms.  Aquaculture companies already have gone through two rounds of Whac-A-Mole for the fishfeed challenge. The question now is whether the third solution — which I’ll admit looks pretty exciting — will prove better than the first two. Solution No. 1 was to catch a bunch of wild fish and feed them to farmed fish. This works great if fattening fish is all that matters — so well, in fact, that around a fifth of the global wild ...
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Mountain pine tree that feeds grizzlies is threatened by climate change, beatles 2.12.2020 Denver Post: News: Local
Climate change, voracious beetles and disease are imperiling the long-term survival of a high-elevation pine tree that’s a key source of food for some grizzly bears and found across the West, U.S. officials said Tuesday.
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It's Time to Invest in Ethiopia's Forest Sector 23.10.2020 WRI Stories
Print In Tigray, people are growing trees to restore the country’s forests. Photo by Aron Simeneh/WRI A version of this blog first appeared in The Reporter . To learn more about the economic potential of Ethiopia’s forest sector, read the new report Trees, Forests and Profits in Ethiopia . Billions of bees are hard at work in Kaffa, producing honey and beeswax for a business that employs 3,500 people. Another company in Addis Ababa harvests bamboo to build furniture, contributing $2.6 million (91 million birr) to the national economy. Together, forest products like these, grown by businesses and communities, add more than $2.6 billion (91 billion birr) to Ethiopia’s GDP. It’s clear that trees are crucial to the future of Ethiopia, but forest cover has fallen to 15.7% today from 40% two centuries ago. That devastation, though, isn’t irreversible. Local communities have grown millions of trees and bamboo clusters since the 1980s to restore their farms, forests and pasture. For decades, the yearly soil and ...
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Illinois launches statewide plan to boost monarch butterfly population: ‘If enough people get on board, we can turn this thing around’ 23.10.2020 Chicago Tribune: Popular
In a 2014 petition to list the monarch butterfly under the Endangered Species Act, the number of monarchs was estimated at 35 million, down from 1 billion butterflies east of the Rockies less than 20 years earlier.
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State of Illinois takes pledge to protect monarch butterfly habitat as numbers dwindle 27.9.2020 Chicago Tribune: Popular
Four state agencies have signed a pact to protect monarch butterflies and other important pollinators whose numbers are dwindling.
Column: Have you become obsessed with bugs or hummingbirds? In the pandemic, you’re not alone. 11.9.2020 Chicago Tribune: Popular
There are a lot of bugs and birds out there, and during the pandemic we have more time to appreciate them.
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The Relative Abundance of Bumblebees In North America Is Estimated to Have Crashed by 97 Percent 5.9.2020 Mother Jones
This piece was originally published in Canada’s National Observer and appears here as part of our Climate Desk Partnership. Jack Bates’ blueberries rely on “non-union” bees. The Delta, British Columbia, farmer is not alone. Blueberries, raspberries, and tree fruits are some of BC’s most important crops, worth about $370 million combined—and they all depend on bees, […]
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‘Jurassic Park Experiment’: 750 Million Genetically Engineered Mosquitoes To Be Released in Florida 2.9.2020 Organic Consumers Association News Headlines

US authorities have approved a plan to release more than 750 million genetically modified mosquitoes across the Florida Keys, despite objections from local residents.British-based firm Oxitec are behind the project, that will test whether the altered mosquitoes can work as an alternative to pesticides to control the spread of diseases, such as Zika, dengue, chikungunya and yellow fever, according to CNN.

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Ecology and COVID-19 #5: Coronavirus, Human Hubris, and Life in the Coevolving Biosphere 25.8.2020 EcoTone
This blogpost originally appeared on the website for Bruce Byers Consulting. by Bruce Byers The novel coronavirus is holding up a mirror for our species, giving us an opportunity to consider our place in the evolution of life on Earth and question our anthropocentrism. What I’ve missed during this pandemic and shutdown of our usual ...
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Terreform ONE’s plans to upend cities and suburbs in a post-pandemic world 10.8.2020 Energy & Climate | Greenbiz.com
Terreform ONE’s plans to upend cities and suburbs in a post-pandemic world Joel Makower Mon, 08/10/2020 - 02:11 And now for some serious fun. Last week, I had the opportunity to facilitate an  online conversation with  Terreform ONE , a Brooklyn, New York-based nonprofit architecture and urban design research group whose humble mission is “to combat the extinction of planetary species through pioneering acts of design.” It was a refreshing jolt of inspiration and hopefulness during this otherwise dreary moment. The conversation was hosted by the San Francisco-based Museum of Craft and Design , which recently housed an exhibition titled  “Survival Architecture and the Art of Resilience,” in which visionary architects and artists were asked to create artistically interpretative solutions and prototypes for survival shelter in a warming world. (My wife, Randy Rosenberg, executive director of the nonprofit  Art Works for Change , created the exhibition, which has traveled North America the past few ...
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Planting tiny urban forests can boost biodiversity and fight climate change 7.8.2020 Energy & Climate | Greenbiz.com
Planting tiny urban forests can boost biodiversity and fight climate change Alex Thornton Fri, 08/07/2020 - 00:30 How much space do you think you need to grow a forest? If your answer is bigger than a couple of tennis courts, think again. Miniature forests are springing up on patches of land in urban areas around the world, often planted by local community groups  using a method inspired by Japanese temples. The idea is simple — take brownfield sites, plant them densely with a wide variety of native seedlings and let them grow with minimal intervention. The result, according to the method’s proponents , is complex ecosystems perfectly suited to local conditions that improve biodiversity, grow quickly and absorb more carbon dioxide. The Miyawaki method The method is based on the work of Japanese botanist Akira Miyawaki . He found that protected areas around temples, shrines and cemeteries in Japan contained a huge variety of native vegetation that co-existed to produce resilient and diverse ecosystems. ...
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'Wear a damn mask.' And remain stylish. Here are 31 of our favorite masks 7.8.2020 LA Times: Health

We're still in a pandemic. Cover up with some of our favorite face masks.

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A Privately Funded Border Wall Was Already at Risk of Collapsing. Hurricane Hanna Made it Worse. 1.8.2020 Mother Jones
This story was published originally by ProPublica, a nonprofit newsroom that investigates abuses of power. Sign up for ProPublica’s Big Story newsletter to receive stories like this one in your inbox as soon as they are published. Intense rain over the weekend from Hurricane Hanna left gaping holes and waist-deep cracks on the banks of the Rio Grande that threaten the […]
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Samantha Bee on What That C-Word Controversy Taught Her About Trump-Era Comedy 29.7.2020 Mother Jones
Samantha Bee doesn’t think comedy will take Trump down. She calls her craft “impotent beyond belief” in the face of the daily presidential wrecking ball. But then, the creator and star of Full Frontal With Samantha Bee on TBS thinks preaching to the choir is absolutely fine—moral, even. “Talking to the people that you agree […]
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Dramatic decline found in Western bumblebee populations 25.7.2020 Headlines: All Headlines
A federal review of existing data unveils an alarming trend for the western bumblebee population, which has seen its numbers dwindle by as much as 93% in the last two decades.
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Some Insects Are Very Social. They Also May Offer Hints for Controlling Disease. 25.7.2020 Mother Jones
This piece was originally published in Undark and appears here as part of our Climate Desk Partnership. Given that she infects ant colonies with deadly pathogens and then studies how they respond, one might say that Nathalie Stroeymeyt, a senior lecturer in the school of biological sciences at the University of Bristol in the UK, […]
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Debbie Harry on Blondie, Bowie, #MeToo, and the Plight of the Honeybees 22.7.2020 Mother Jones
Debbie Harry, icon, is worried about bees.  “I have a couple of hives,” the Blondie frontwoman says. “But mostly, I feel like I’m a spokesperson.” The plight of the honeybee and its perilous population collapse—a “fundamental issue,” Harry warns—requires a high-profile advocate, and who better than this original punk rocker. At this stage in her […]
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Why Bats Are Ecological Superheroes 9.7.2020 Organic Consumers Association News Headlines

Bats are sometimes feared and greatly misunderstood. They’ve been particularly vilified in the wake of the COVID-19 pandemic, as many are falsely pushing the narrative that bats, and the sale of bats and other animals in wet markets, are to blame for the outbreak. We now have proof that’s simply not true. For more information, be sure to check out tomorrow’s interview with virologist and molecular biologist Jonathan Latham, Ph.D. 

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YouTube star Coyote Peterson goes face-to-face with Colorado gray wolves 29.6.2020 Denver Post: News: Local
YouTube star Nathaniel Peterson, who has lately parlayed his billions of video views into a hosting gig for Animal Planet, has a simple message about education in the age of coronavirus -- or any age, for that matter.
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Save the Insects, Save the Farmers, Save Ourselves: New Global Report Calls for End of Industrial Agriculture 11.6.2020 Organic Consumers Association News Headlines

A new report released Tuesday draws attention to the worldwide decline in insects and calls for global policies to boost the conservation of both agriculture and the six-footed creatures. The publication, entitled Insect Atlas, comes from two progressive networks: Brussels-based Friends of the Earth and Berlin-based Heinrich Böll Foundation.

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