User: flenvcenter Topic: Biodiversity-National
Category: Biodiversity
Last updated: Nov 22 2017 19:01 IST RSS 2.0
 
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We don’t need to save endangered species. Extinction is part of evolution. 22.11.2017 Washington Post: Op-Eds
The only creatures we should go out of our way to protect are Homo sapiens.
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The Energy 202: Keystone XL pipeline seems like a done deal for Trump. But it's not. 21.11.2017 Washington Post
The Energy 202: Keystone XL pipeline seems like a done deal for Trump. But it's not.
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Five reasons we’re hopeful on World Fisheries Day 21.11.2017 Main Feed - Environmental Defense
By EDF Oceans The fortunes of people everywhere are inextricably linked to the oceans.  Overfishing remains one of the world’s most pressing environmental challenges, but around the world we are seeing incredible progress toward sustainable fishing. On World Fisheries Day, we wanted to share fives stories from the past year that inspire us:   1) Belize continues to be a leader when it comes to ocean sustainability after announcing bold new commitments at the United Nations Oceans Conference in June. This announcement included voluntary commitments from the government of Belize which will secure their fisheries as an engine for sustainable development and poverty alleviation. Belize has already made major steps to protect its magnificent barrier reef, and the biodiversity and fisheries that live there. In doing so it has established itself as a global leader in small-scale fisheries management. These new commitments will secure those gains and strengthen the foundation for good governance of fisheries so ...
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Hunters are livid over Trump’s delaying of a decision to end the ban on elephant hunting trophies 21.11.2017 Washington Post
In voicing their indignation, hunters were careful not to blame the president. Instead, they faulted animal rights advocates, “hysterical anti-hunters and news media outlets.”
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The Importance of Biodiversity in Forests Could Increase Due to Climate Change 17.11.2017 Climate Change News - ENN
Leipzig. Forests fulfil numerous important functions, and do so particularly well if they are rich in different species of trees. This is the result of a new study. In addition, forest managers do not have to decide on the provision of solely one service – such as wood production or nature conservation – as a second study demonstrates: several services provided by forest ecosystems can be improved at the same time. Both studies were led by scientists from Leipzig University and the German Centre for Integrative Biodiversity Research (iDiv), and published in the prestigious journal Ecology Letters.
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Billions or bust: New genetic clues to the extinction of the passenger pigeon 17.11.2017 Washington Post
Billions or bust: New genetic clues to the extinction of the passenger pigeon
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Pacific Island Countries Could Lose 50-80% of Fish in Local Waters Under Climate Change 15.11.2017 Environmental News Network
Many Pacific Island nations will lose 50 to 80 percent of marine species in their waters by the end of the 21st century if climate change continues unchecked, finds a new Nippon Foundation-Nereus Program study published in Marine Policy. This area of the ocean is projected to be the most severely impacted by aspects of climate change.
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Environmental group sues for records of wolf killings 15.11.2017 AP Washington
SPOKANE, Wash. (AP) -- An environmental group is suing the Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife over its failure to release some public records on wolf deaths in the state....
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This endangered snail lives only in the L.A. area. Can the little creatures be saved? 14.11.2017 LA Times: Commentary

Before Los Angeles was developed, the San Gabriel chestnut snail was a common sight from Compton to the San Gabriel Mountains. But today, experts say, it survives only in the Angeles National Forest and on adjacent private lands between Glendora and Altadena after being threatened by development,...

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Over 15,000 Scientists Just Issued a "Second Notice" to Humanity. Can We Listen Now? 14.11.2017 Truthout - All Articles
Yikes. Over 15,000 scientists hailing from more than 180 countries just issued a dire  warning  to humanity: "Time is running out" to stop business as usual, as threats from rising greenhouse gases to biodiversity loss are pushing the biosphere to the brink. The new warning was published Monday in the international journal  BioScience , and marks an update to the "World Scientists' Warning to Humanity" issued by nearly 1,700 leading scientists 25 years ago. The 1992 plea, which said Earth was on track to be "irretrievably mutilated" baring "fundamental change," however, was largely unheeded. "Some people might be tempted to dismiss this evidence and think we are just being alarmist," said William Ripple, distinguished professor in the College of Forestry at Oregon State University, and lead author of the new warning. "Scientists are in the business of analyzing data and looking at the long-term consequences. Those who signed this second warning aren't just raising a false alarm. They are acknowledging ...
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Photo: Darner dragonfly clasps a bristled branch 10.11.2017 TreeHugger
Our photo of the day comes from a native garden oasis in Los Angeles.
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Dinosaurs would have survived if asteroid hit Earth elsewhere, scientists claim 9.11.2017 Washington Post
A research team argues that only a few locations on Earth could create soot clouds that killed the dinosaurs.
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Organic food won't reduce your carbon footprint, study says 7.11.2017 TreeHugger
It's a disappointing conclusion, but surely there are other reasons why Earth-friendly food production is a good idea.
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An Environmental and Public Health Disaster Awaits -- if USDA Gives Organic Label to Hydroponics 31.10.2017 Truthout.com
Choose journalism that empowers movements for social, environmental and economic justice: Support the independent media at Truthout! Whether food production entails acres of mono-crops, livestock shuttled through assembly lines or orderly tracks of plastic pipelines in factory-scale hydroponics spaces, streamlined production techniques tempt food producers to improve on nature, without necessarily assessing the long-term health or environmental costs. Even an apparently benign innovation, like hydroponics, may convey unexpected downsides. Despite each new agricultural novelty, 17 years after the  US Department of Agriculture  established the Organic Standards, earth-based farming remains the oldest and most proven method for cultivating organic food. A coalition of farmers, sustainability advocates and foodies wants to keep it that way. "If we want to protect the integrity of the organic seal, we will have to fight for it," says Lisa Stokke, founder of  Next7 , which has launched a campaign to raise ...
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New Study Suggests the United States' Power Supply Has the Capacity to be More Adaptable to Climate Change than Previously Predicted 30.10.2017 Environmental News Network
Climate change scientists warn that the continued burning of fossil fuels is likely to cause major disruptions to the global climate system leading to more extreme weather, sea level rise, and biodiversity loss. The changes also will compromise our capacity to generate electricity. In recent decades, capacity losses at United States power plants occurred infrequently, but scientists warn that the warming climate may increase their regularity and magnitude. This instability could interrupt power supply to homes, hospitals, transportation systems, and other critical institutions and infrastructure at a potentially high financial cost.
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Red Sea is Warming Faster Than Global Average 30.10.2017 Environmental News Network
“The global rate of ocean warming has many consequences for life on this planet. Now we are learning that the Red Sea is warming even faster than the global average,” says KAUST PhD student of marine science, Veronica Chaidez.
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Detailed photos reveal the magical wilderness of a native garden in LA 30.10.2017 TreeHugger
Scott Logan's macro photographs of the famed Gottlieb Native Garden show how biodiversity can thrive in an urban oasis.
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Assessing The Damage To Puerto Rico's Rain Forest 28.10.2017 NPR: Saturday
The trees in the El Yunque National Forest in Puerto Rico were raked bare by Hurricane Maria. Grizelle Gonzalez from the International Institute of Tropical Forestry talks with NPR's Melissa Block.
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Coal Burying Goa: All along the road route, the black dust settles 27.10.2017 Front Page – The Indian Express
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Europe’s first underwater restaurant to open in Norway 26.10.2017 Lifestyle – The Indian Express
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