User: flenvcenter Topic: Biodiversity-Independent
Category: Specific Organisms :: Birds
Last updated: Feb 10 2018 21:49 IST RSS 2.0
 
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Why the private sector must protect tourist destinations 10.2.2018 Design & Innovation | GreenBiz.com
Businesses, resident and authorities must recognize the cycles of tourism that can lead to the destruction of the most beautiful places on Earth.
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Trump's Financial Arsonists: The Next Financial Crisis May Well Be Around the Corner 1.2.2018 Truthout.com
(Image: Erhui1979 / Getty Images)   No ads, no subscription fees -- instead, Truthout is fueled by generous donations from readers. Want to support our work? Click here to donate. There's been lots of fire and fury around Washington lately, including a brief government shutdown. In Donald Trump's White House, you can hardly keep up with the ongoing brouhahas from North Korea to Robert Mueller's Russian investigation, while it already feels like ages since the celebratory mood over the vast corporate tax cuts Congress passed last year. But don't be fooled: none of that is as important as what's missing from the picture. Like a disease, in the nation's capital it's often what you can't see that will, in the end, hurt you most. Amid a roaring stock market and a planet of upbeat CEOs , few are even thinking about the havoc that a multi-trillion-dollar financial system gone rogue could inflict upon global stability. But watch out. Even in the seemingly best of times, neglecting Wall Street is a dangerous ...
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Why aren’t marbled murrelets recovering? 31.1.2018 High Country News Most Recent
The enigmatic bird’s populations have not increased despite conservation efforts.
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Interior cancels decades-old protections for migratory birds 26.1.2018 High Country News Most Recent
The rollback prompts broad opposition from former officials from both political parties.
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New Study Suggests Coastal and Deep Ocean Sharks Have Different Feeding Patterns 22.1.2018 Environmental News Network
An international team of researchers studying globally declining shark populations report today that they used carbon isotopes as biochemical markers in shark muscle tissue to identify where in the oceans the mobile predators have been feeding, in the hope that such analyses provide a useful tool for conservation. Details appear in the current issue of Nature Ecology & Evolution.
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We Cannot Survive a Nuclear Apocalypse by Ducking and Covering 21.1.2018 Truthout - All Articles
Seemingly well-intentioned newspaper columns have been inadvertently normalizing the use of nuclear weapons, depicting nuclear attacks as events we will have the agency and capacity to respond to meaningfully. But nuclear weapons are a threat to all living beings -- let's not be distracted by discussions of all the clever ways we can dance our way out of the apocalypse. (Image: Paul Campbell / iStock / Getty Images Plus) Current fears of the potential use of nuclear weapons -- partly resulting from the North Korean weapon program and accompanying threats by President Trump, and mishaps like the errant ballistic missile alert notification in Hawaii recently -- have led to a new flush of articles on what to do if there is a nuclear weapon detonation nearby. Articles, such as " What to do in case of a nuclear attack ," in the Washington Post, and " How to survive a missile attack: What's the official advice? " on the BBC website, offer thoughtful and pragmatic guidance to those who are anxious about ...
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Fanged Friends: Study Says the World's Most Vilified and Dangerous Animals May be Humankind's Best Ally 19.1.2018 Environmental News Network
An international review led by the University of Queensland and WCS (Wildlife Conservation Society) says that many native carnivores that live in and around human habitation are declining at an unprecedented rate – spelling bad news for humans who indirectly rely on them for a variety of beneficial services.
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Researchers find post-fire logging harms Spotted owls 18.1.2018 Environmental News Network
Wildlife ecologists studying the rare Spotted owl in the forests of California have discovered that large, intense wildfires are not responsible for the breeding territory extinction that has been reported recently.
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Wind energy sets sail on the Great Lakes 18.1.2018 GreenBiz.com
Proposals to build turbines in North America’s Great Lakes have stalled in recent years — but a new initiative aims to break through the barriers.
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In Montana, houses are replacing farmland 15.1.2018 High Country News Most Recent
Can lessons from Vermont keep local agriculture alive?
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More energy development slated for prime sage grouse habitat 12.1.2018 High Country News Most Recent
The Trump administration will allow oil and gas leasing in key sagebrush lands.
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California Is Preparing to Defend Its Waters From Trump Order 12.1.2018 Truthout - All Articles
In its first act to shield California from the Trump administration's repeal of regulations, the state's water board has prepared its own rules protecting wetlands and other waters. The proposed new rules could insulate the state from President Donald Trump's executive order to roll back the reach of the Clean Water Act. Landscapes from Point Reyes National Seashore, a stretch of federally protected Pacific Ocean coastline, on July 6, 2017, outside of the town of Inverness, California. (Photo: Andrew Lichtenstein / Corbis via Getty Images)   Ready to make a difference? Help Truthout provide a platform for exposing injustice and inspiring action. Click here to make a one-time or monthly donation. This story was originally published by Reveal from The Center for Investigative Reporting, a nonprofit news organization based in the San Francisco Bay Area. Learn more at  revealnews.org  and subscribe to the Reveal podcast, produced with PRX, at  revealnews.org/podcast . In its first act to shield California ...
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Marijuana Farms Expose Spotted Owls to Rat Poison in Northwest California 12.1.2018 Green Technology and Environmental Science News - ENN
Wildlife species are being exposed to high levels of rat poison in northwest California, with illegal marijuana farms the most likely source point, according to a study led by the University of California, Davis, with the California Academy of Sciences.
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Can Hunters and Activists Team Up to Phase Out Lead Bullets? 11.1.2018 Truthout - All Articles
Truthout takes zero advertising money -- instead we rely on readers to sustain our site. Will you join the thousands of people who fund our work? Make a donation by clicking here! For centuries, hunters have relied on lead ammunition to quickly and humanely kill game, but with each shot they release a potentially lethal poison into the environment, threatening vulnerable animal populations. While harmless to humans, the gut piles and carcasses hunters regularly leave behind often contain lead fragments, which can be deadly for scavengers who eat them, particularly raptors like bald and golden eagles, California condors and turkey vultures. Consequently, a seemingly unlikely alliance between sportspeople and environmental activists has formed to tackle the issue by advocating for copper and other non-lead options and promoting hunters as environmental stewards.  Hunter Russell Kuhlman, who serves as the Institute for Wildlife Studies' non-lead ammunition outreach coordinator for California, says, "I think ...
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Meet the man who flies with the birds in order to save them (video) 11.1.2018 TreeHugger
A former meteorologist, Christian Moullec flies an ultralight to guide vulnerable birds on safe migration routes.
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The Endangered Species Act itself could go extinct 9.1.2018 Writers on the Range
Congress and the Trump administration threaten an act vital to wildlife and habitat.
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Noise Pollution Causes Chronic Stress in Birds, with Health Consequences for Young 9.1.2018 Environmental News Network
Birds exposed to the persistent noise of natural gas compressors show symptoms remarkably similar to those in humans suffering from post-traumatic stress disorder, new research shows.
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Photo: Noble beauty is a bird at risk 8.1.2018 TreeHugger
The gorgeous and unique Lewis's woodpecker will be gone forever if significant conservation actions aren't taken to save it.
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The birds we've lost: 10 incredible avian species that are gone forever 3.1.2018 TreeHugger
From the passenger pigeon to the laughing owl, here is but a small sampling of the mighty birds that are now extinct.
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Five Ideas for Creating a Sustainable Future 2.1.2018 Truthout.com
Join the movement for independent media -- no ads, no corporate pressure, just the facts. Click here to make a tax-deductible donation to Truthout today! Much news about the environment in 2017 focused on controversies over Trump administration actions, such as proposals to promote more use of coal and budget cuts at relevant federal agencies. At the same time, however, many scholars across the United States are pursuing innovations that could help create a more sustainable world. Here we spotlight five examples from our 2017 archives. 1. Restoring the Rio Grande Although many Americans may not realize it, the United States and Mexico work together on many environmental issues along their joint border, including drinking water, sanitation and flood control. Gabriel Diaz Montemayor, assistant professor of landscape architecture at the University of Texas at Austin,  proposes a bolder vision : greening the entire Rio Grande Valley, which forms more than half of the border. Restoring vegetation along the ...
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