User: flenvcenter Topic: Biodiversity-Independent
Category: Specific Organisms :: Plants
Last updated: Mar 30 2017 17:45 IST RSS 2.0
 
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Technology is cropping up in our lettuce fields 30.3.2017 High Country News Most Recent
In Yuma, Arizona, agriculture has embraced technology to increase yield.
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Making Cows More Environmentally Friendly 29.3.2017 Green Technology and Environmental Science News - ENN
Research reveals vicious cycle of climate change, cattle diet and rising methane 
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California’s desert wildflowers burst into bright ‘super bloom’ 24.3.2017 High Country News Most Recent
Following the ideal combination of rain, sun and wind, blossoms abound.
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Beyond Wetiko Agriculture: Saving Ourselves from the Soil Up 16.3.2017 Commondreams.org Views
Tom Newmark, Steven Farrell

How much longer do you hope to live? How long do you hope your children or grandchildren will live?  Do you think you or your loved ones will live 60 more years? If so, you’ll be around to witness the end of food production on the planet.  Unless, that is, we become conscious of the crisis and evolve. 

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Energy crop production on conservation lands may not boost greenhouse gases 11.3.2017 Environmental News Network
Growing sustainable energy crops without increasing greenhouse gas emissions, may be possible on seasonally wet, environmentally sensitive landscapes, according to researchers who conducted a study on Conservation Reserve Program (CRP) land.Debasish Saha, postdoctoral scholar in plant sciences, Penn State College of Agricultural Sciences, and colleagues measured the amount of nitrous oxide, a potent greenhouse gas, emanating from plots of biofuels-producing switchgrass — a native perennial grass — and miscanthus — a non-native grass species — growing in an experimental area in eastern central Pennsylvania and compared it to emissions from adjacent, undisturbed CRP acres. The experiment took place in a long-term monitoring site managed by the U.S. Department of Agriculture's Agricultural Research Service.
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700+ native bee species spiraling toward extinction 6.3.2017 TreeHugger
North American bees are at risk of disappearing thanks to severe habitat loss and increasing pesticide use, among other threats, new report reveals.
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MORE WARM-DWELLING ANIMALS AND PLANTS AS A RESULT OF CLIMATE CHANGE 21.2.2017 Environmental News Network
Since 1980, populations of warm-dwelling species in Germany have increased. The trend is particularly strong among warm-dwelling terrestrial species, as shown by the most comprehensive study across ecosystems in this regard to date. The most obvious increases occurred among warm-dwelling birds, butterflies, beetles, soil organisms and lichens according to the study published recently in the scientific journal “Nature Ecology & Evolution” led by Senckenberg scientists. Thus, it appears possible that rising temperatures due to the climate change have had a widespread impact on the population trends of animals in the past 30 years.
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New Data Finds Climate-Friendly, Healthy Meals Within Reach for Public Schools 15.2.2017 Commondreams.org Newswire
New Data Finds Climate-Friendly, Healthy Meals Within Reach for Public Schools
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Imagine a world reliant on robot bees to roam the fields and meadows 11.2.2017 TreeHugger
Welcome to your dystopian nightmare installment #4692.
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Hedgehogs mirror wildlife problems around the world. 6.2.2017 The Earth Times Online Newspaper - Health News
Have we got the answer to urban living when we solve the huge losses of hedgehogs in suburban neighbourhoods? The adoption of wild roofs and city ecoscapes in general brings some species to the new city. We have forgotten some animals that might just help clear the pests from our gardens or maintain plants and birdlife in some ways that we have found impossible. Natural habitat has been replaced largely with novel human solutions that need time to prove themselves. Emotionally, many would give the hedgehog their garden-vote, but the population has decreased so much, it could be too late to bring them back.
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Study: How Climate Change Threatens Mountaintops (and Clean Water) 30.1.2017 Environmental News Network
Mountains are far more than rocks. They also confer various natural benefits—for example, about half of the world’s drinking water filters through their high-elevation forests, plants, and soils.Now, a new, first-of-its kind study, in the journal Nature, shows how these mountain ecosystems around the globe may be threatened by climate change.Rising temperatures over the next decades appear likely to “decouple” key nutrient cycles in mountain soils and plants, an international team of sixteen scientists reports. Their study suggests that this is expected to disrupt the function of mountaintop ecosystems, as plant communities above and at treeline are thrown into turmoil faster than trees can migrate uphill in a warmer world.
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High-Tech Maps of Tropical Forest Diversity Identify New Conservation Targets 27.1.2017 Environmental News Network
New remote sensing maps of the forest canopy in Peru test the strength of current forest protections and identify new regions for conservation effort, according to a report led by Carnegie’s Greg Asner published in Science.Asner and his Carnegie Airborne Observatory team used their signature technique, called airborne laser-guided imaging spectroscopy, to identify preservation targets by undertaking a new approach to study global ecology—one that links a forest’s variety of species to the strategies for survival and growth employed by canopy trees and other plants. Or, to put it in scientist-speak, their approach connects biodiversity and functional diversity.
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Pee for Plants 17.1.2017 Green on HuffingtonPost.com
Lately there has been a whole lot of talk about golden showers. For most people, showers are something that come in April and fall from the clouds in the sky, not something you go to Russian hotel rooms to find. That is as it should be. Instead we are focusing on urine and its relationship to our soon to be inaugurated PEEOTUS. In general, urine is something we think about only when we have to find a bathroom. Some exceptions: If you are into water conservation you may ascribe to the 'if it's yellow let it mellow' school of toilet flushing. If you have prostate issues, well, you have my sympathies. But there is a good way that urine can go with showers. Urine comes out of you sterile- so even if you are a 'germaphobe' it is safe to use. It also contains all of the necessary plant nutrients. So- with a little dilution- you can combine that urine with those April showers (or water from the hose or tap) and get truly spectacular May flowers ...
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On wildness: Community and control in urban green space 13.1.2017 rabble.ca - News for the rest of us
Friday, January 13, 2017 The city is a structured place. Roads and sidewalks follow mainly straight lines, while houses, apartment buildings, offices and shops march dutifully alongside them, one after the other. Many of us live structured lives within our concrete, highly controlled world, following the schedules, routines, and norms of our workplaces and leisure activities. Urban green space is often no different -- processions of trees stand on manicured turf and garden beds are filled with neat lines of annuals. Community use of park space is defined and limited by a stifling array of municipal policies, bylaws, permits and red tape. The wild and wayward life of a tiny, disproportionately lively square of parkland in Toronto's west end has a lesson to teach us about the rewards of relinquishing ...
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PRESSURE FROM GRAZERS HASTENS ECOSYSTEM COLLAPSE FROM DROUGHT 12.1.2017 Environmental News Network
Extreme droughts, intensified by a warming climate, are increasingly causing ecosystem collapse in many regions worldwide. But models used by scientists to predict the tipping points at which drought stress leads to ecosystem collapse have proven unreliable and too optimistic.A new study by scientists at Duke University and Beijing Normal University may hold the answer why.   The researchers found that these tipping points can happen much sooner than current models predict because of the added pressures placed on drought-weakened plants by grazing animals and fungal pathogens.
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They Lost Their Jungles to Plantations, but These Indigenous Women Grew Them Back 11.12.2016 Truthout - All Articles
It is early morning in Dhepagudi, a sleepy hamlet nestled in the green hills of Odisha, India. Admai Kumruka is sifting millet in a traditional sieve made of bamboo strips. Children mill around, playing on a mud and sand mound. A few huts down, Rello Dindika is sorting through harvested corn. A group of women are chopping fresh pumpkin leaves and flowers for a stir-fry dish. They have finished morning chores and farming work and are now preparing breakfast. Some of the corn will be ground to a powder for a wholesome porridge. The rest will be popped in clay vessels for evening snacks. "We have mandya or kosla [varieties of millets] or maka [corn] porridge in the mornings sometimes with roots and tubers or gondri saag [a variety of greens] foraged from the jungles," Kumruka says. "In the afternoons and evenings, we make rice with tubers, vegetables and legumes. Sometimes we add wild mushrooms or jhotta [okra] and holud [turmeric roots]." The women belong to the Khond community, a large indigenous tribal ...
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Awesome Is What The 2016 National Geographic 'Nature Photographer Of The Year' Winners Are 10.12.2016 Green on HuffingtonPost.com
Just like last year , the winners of the 2016 National Geographic Nature Photographer of the Year Contest  amaze and astound us.  This year the Grand Prize goes to Greg Lecoeur ’s jaw-dropping shot of the feeding frenzy that accompanies sardine migration along the Wild Coast of South Africa.  Additional prizes are given in four categories: Action, Animal Portraits, Landscapes and Environmental Issues.  Check out the rest of the awesome  photography  below: -- This feed and its contents are the property of The Huffington Post, and use is subject to our terms. It may be used for personal consumption, but may not be distributed on a ...
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How You Can Help Save The Bees -- Even In Winter 25.11.2016 Green on HuffingtonPost.com
America’s bees haven’t had the best year. Last month, seven species of Hawaiian bees were declared endangered in the United States — a first for the insect. There are fears that the rusty-patched bumble bee , endemic to North America, is also nearing extinction. Researchers discovered earlier this year that U.S. beekeepers had lost more than 42 percent of their honeybee colonies since 2015. “What we’re seeing with this bee problem is just a loud signal that there’s some bad things happening with our agro-ecosystems,” said study co-author Keith Delaplane in May. Bees are vital to our food supply. About 65 percent of plant species rely on the creatures for pollination. “A world without bees would be almost impossible to contemplate ,” wrote entomologist Mark Winston in his 2014 book Bee Time. Worryingly, however, in the past decade, there’s been a “precipitous drop” in bee populations around the world, Winston said. The insects are under threat from a range of perils, including pesticides and other ...
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What's the best way to improve bee habitats? 24.11.2016 Energy & Climate | Greenbiz.com
There’s more to making pollinators happy than planting lots of flowers.
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Latest: Feds plan sagebrush survey 21.11.2016 High Country News Most Recent
The data could provide a blueprint for science-based decisions.
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