User: flenvcenter Topic: Biodiversity-Independent
Category: Specific Organisms :: Plants
Last updated: Jul 23 2015 02:52 IST RSS 2.0
 
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Controlled burns and invasive grass 21.7.2015 Environmental News Network
Controlled burning is widely used to maintain biodiversity and enhance regeneration of important deciduous tree species such as oak and hickory, but a recent University of Illinois study found that this practice also increases the growth of an aggressive species of invasive grass.
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The Jewels in Oakland's Crown: In Defense of Eucalyptus Trees 20.7.2015 Green on HuffingtonPost.com
"A thousand leaves on every tree, and each a miracle to me" -- Joaquin Miller Take a hike in the forests of the Oakland hills, and sooner or later, you are likely to bump into a trail marker containing the image of Joaquin Miller, an early settler to the city responsible, in part, for the lush forests which blanket the hills. A colorful figure from the 19th century, famed in his day for his poems celebrating the West's spectacular natural beauty, Miller was called the "Poet of the Sierras" and today has the distinction of having an Oakland street, Oakland elementary school and Oakland park named in his honor. The founder of California's first Arbor Day , Miller planted the land that is now a park bearing his name with 75,000 trees, mostly Eucalyptus, Monterey Pine and Monterey Cypress, three of the very species of trees now slated for eradication across 2,059 acres of public lands in Oakland, Berkeley and surrounding cities . After timber hungry fortune seekers arrived in droves to the San Francisco Bay ...
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Mourning the Changes That Surround Us: Readers Speak Out on Climate 20.7.2015 Truthout - All Articles
Footage from the Carlton Complex wildfire in north and central Washington State. The fire burned for more than 10 days before it could be quelled by firefighters and rain. (Photo: Wildfire via Shutterstock) While no single abnormal weather event can be attributed solely to human-caused climate change, the frequency and intensity of most events can. We asked Truthout readers to share their observations of weather anomalies they are witnessing, and their answers reflect the on-the-ground realities of a rapidly changing planet. Footage from the Carlton Complex wildfire in north and central Washington State. The fire burned for more than 10 days before it could be quelled by firefighters and rain. (Photo: Wildfire via Shutterstock) In early July, I asked Truthout readers to share the weather anomalies they are witnessing on their home turf. Large numbers of readers responded with a range of harrowing observations, from vanishing snow, to shifts in seasons, to skyrocketing temperatures, to wildfires and ...
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EPA to study effects of Roundup on 1,500 endangered species 17.7.2015 High Country News Most Recent
300 million pounds of glyphosate are used in the U.S. each year, but its impacts are largely unknown.
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Brightwater: A Model of 21st Century Infrastructure 16.7.2015 Green on HuffingtonPost.com
Brightwater / Jared Green Imagine a wastewater treatment facility where people get married, amid 40-acres of restored salmon habitat with designed ponds and wetlands. It sounds far-fetched but it's reality in Snohomish County, Washington, near the border with King County, about an hour northeast from downtown Seattle. In a tour of the Brightwater facility during the American Planning Association (APA) conference by Michael Popiwny, the landscape architect who managed this $1 billion project for the King County government, we learn how wastewater treatment plants can become assets instead of drains on communities and the environment. The key to success was an interdisciplinary management, design, and construction team that was highly responsive to community feedback and deeply sensitive to environmental concerns. Plus, Brightwater was paid for by growth in the region. As new people are attracted to the quality of life the Seattle area offers, they move in and pay a $4,000 - $8,000 sewer hook-up fee. "The ...
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As species adapt to a warming climate, ecosystems change 15.7.2015 Environmental News Network
If it seems like you're pulling more bass than trout out of Ontario's lakes this summer, you probably are.Blame it on the ripple effect of climate change and warming temperatures. Birds migrate earlier, flowers bloom faster, and fish move to newly warmed waters putting local species at risk.To mitigate the trend and support conservation efforts, scientists at the University of Toronto (U of T) are sharing a way to predict which plants or animals may be vulnerable to the arrival of a new species.
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This Is How A Species Goes Extinct: More Than A Ton Of Frozen Pangolin Meat Seized In Indonesia 9.7.2015 Green on HuffingtonPost.com
Pangolins are one of the most trafficked animals in the world. Pangolins are one of the planet's most unique and adorable species. The scaly, anteater-like creatures live in parts of Asia and Africa, and there's an entire task force dedicated to their protection. A popular Pokemon character, Sandslash , was even based on these " artichokes on legs ." And yet, humans can't seem to stop killing them. Authorities in Indonesia recently busted smugglers trying to transport 1.3 tons worth of dead pangolins into Singapore. Heart-wrenching photos taken by a Getty photographer show dozens of the animals frozen in their trademark armored ball before they were burned by customs officials on Wednesday. Warning: The pictures below may be upsetting to some readers. Pangolins are the world's " most-trafficked " mammal. The International Union for Conservation of Nature classifies the Chinese pangolin -- one of eight species of pangolins -- as " critically endangered ." But despite this designation, consumers in parts ...
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Stupidity and Intelligence: Science, GMOs and Our Food 29.6.2015 Commondreams.org Views
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California Drought Leads To Inventive Water Conservation Methods In Long Beach 26.6.2015 Green on HuffingtonPost.com
The drought in California has reached a near- Tatooine level of dryness, and the state is looking for any way to conserve what's left of its water supply. To that end, officials in Long Beach have gotten creative about tracking down those who don't comply. As Long Beach Water Department director of operations Tai Tseng described to HuffPost Live on Wednesday, the city has been mostly successful thus far in its water conservation methods , but its also found a way to keep consumers honest. "Ninety-eight percent of our residents are complying with these restrictions, but there are a few that are not," Tseng said. "We have a comprehensive media system to determine who these residents are. Once we determine who these residents are, we can actually install a smart register on their water meter that allows us to have five-minute interval water usage data from that resident and then allows us to figure out if they're violating our water-use restrictions." There's clearly nowhere to hide your water-lavish ...
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Definitive Proof That There's Nothing Cuter Than A Baby Hippo Learning To Swim 24.6.2015 Green on HuffingtonPost.com
Baby pygmy hippo Obi might only be 3 weeks old, but he sure is getting the hang of this whole swimming thing. Obi and his mom, Petre, ventured into a large pool at the Melbourne Zoo last week for Obi's first real swim -- and, by the looks of it, he's a natural. As Obi bobs up and down and flicks his tiny hippo ears, we can't help falling in love. For the past few weeks, Obi -- whose name means "heart" in Igbo, a Nigerian language -- had been learning to swim in a shallow nursery pool, but zookeepers thought it was time for him to take the next step. Pygmy hippos, which grow to about one-quarter the weight of a regular hippopotamus , are highly endangered, with only a few thousand estimated left in the wild. Below are a few GIFs so you can watch Obi on an infinite loop: -- This feed and its contents are the property of The Huffington Post, and use is subject to our terms. It may be used for personal consumption, but may not be distributed on a ...
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New Guinea Flatworm, One Of The World's 'Worst' Invasive Species, Found In Florida 24.6.2015 Green on HuffingtonPost.com
A worm called one of the world's "worst" invasive species by conservationists has been found in the United States for the first time, an international team of researchers announced on Tuesday. The Platydemus manokwari , also called the New Guinea flatworm, poses a major threat to the planet's snail biodiversity, according to an article published in the scientific journal PeerJ. "It is considered a danger to endemic snails wherever it has been introduced," the report states. The flatworm is thought to originate in New Guinea, but researchers say it has spread to Florida, New Caledonia, Puerto Rico, Singapore, the Solomon Islands, and the Wallis and Futuna Islands. Jean-Lou Justine , who led the research team, said that scientists had previously found the animal in other Pacific islands and in France. Platydemus manokwari in Coral Gables, Florida. "Once the New Guinea flatworm arrives in a new territory, and providing the conditions are right, it reproduces quickly," Justine said in an email to The ...
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Climate-resistant restoration announced at NYC ecological treasure 23.6.2015 TreeHugger
A habitat restoration is planned for Jamaica Bay Wildlife Refuge.
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Why Tribal Peoples Are the Best Conservationists 19.6.2015 Truthout - All Articles
Awá man making arrows, Brazil. The Awá have an intimate knowledge of their rainforest and are extremely skilled hunters. (Photo: Survival International) Awá Indians  in Brazil’s north-eastern Amazon rainforest know at least 275 useful plants, and at least 31 species of honey-producing bee. Each bee type is associated with another rainforest animal like the tortoise or the tapir. In the 1980s, the Great Carajás Project opened up Awá lands to illegal loggers and ranchers. More than 30% of one of their territories has since been destroyed. The Baka have developed sophisticated codes of conservation yet face persecution by wildlife officers. (Photo: Selcen Kucukustel/Atlas) Baka “Pygmies” of Central Africa eat 14 kinds of wild honey and more than 10 types of wild yam. By leaving part of the root intact in the soil, the Baka spread pockets of wild yams – a favorite food of elephants and wild boar – throughout the forest. The Baka are taught not to overhunt the animals of the forest. A Baka woman said, “When ...
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Lawsuit Launched to Protect Endangered Wildlife From Dangerous New Chemical Cocktail 19.6.2015 Commondreams.org Newswire
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Eastern Puma Declared Extinct, Removed From Endangered Species List 17.6.2015 Commondreams.org Newswire
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GMOs or No GMOs -- Is That Really the Question? 12.6.2015 Green on HuffingtonPost.com
A quick review of some recent events shows public opinion saying no to genetically modified food. The USDA's establishment of a voluntary certification process to label foods free of GMOs, worldwide protests against Monsanto, and Chipotle's announcement to remove GMOs from their food menu are just a few examples. A recent Pew survey leads to the same conclusion, finding that while 88 percent of scientists agree GM foods are safe to eat , only 37 percent of the public believes this to be the case. The highly polarized GM debate too often devolves into good vs. evil, or corporate vs. small and organic farmers. The barrage of information and misinformation out there makes it difficult for people to separate fact from fiction and to think about the use of genetic technology on a case-by-case basis, as we should, rather than as an all or nothing proposition, as it is often presented. It also obscures a much more critical question about food security and the future of agriculture. Are global crops (GM or not) ...
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Merkel Presses G7 Leaders To Agree To Tough Climate Goals 8.6.2015 Green on HuffingtonPost.com
By Paul Carrel KRUEN, Germany, June 8 (Reuters) - German Chancellor Angela Merkel urged Group of Seven (G7) leaders to commit to tough goals to cut greenhouse gases on the final day of their summit in Bavaria on Monday, at which they also discussed the threat from Islamic militants. Merkel, once dubbed the "climate chancellor," hopes to revitalize her green credentials by getting the G7 industrial nations to agree specific emissions goals ahead of a larger year-end United Nations climate meeting in Paris. Climate change topped the agenda for Monday's sessions, at which the leaders were also set to discuss combating epidemics and other health issues, the fight against terrorism from Boko Haram to Islamic State, and African development. Merkel won support for her climate drive from French President Francois Hollande, who will host a U.N. summit on fighting climate change at the end of the year. Hollande was also looking for an ambitious G7 commitment to ending their dependence on fossil fuels ...
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Save the Bees: Eliminate Biofuel Mandates 6.6.2015 Green on HuffingtonPost.com
The Obama administration made a lofty promise with the launch of its National Strategy to Promote the Health of Honey Bees and other Pollinators . Over the next five years, the feds will implement an interagency campaign to restore and improve 7 million acres of “pollinator habitat.” That may be a laudable goal. But the strategy fails to address one of the biggest threats to pollinator habitat: federal biofuel mandates. This “National Strategy” emerged as a response to alarming news coverage about honeybee health. During the past couple of decades, beekeepers have experienced unusually high hive losses ranging more than 30 percent during winter hibernation. Fortunately, there is some good news: such over-winter losses have come down during the past few years particularly in Europe, and globally bee populations are doing well . Yet now some are concerned about losses during the summer , which have not been consistently measured. Researchers have identified factors that create significant challenges to ...
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Walking the Plank(ton) 29.5.2015 Green on HuffingtonPost.com
The extinction threat stemming from the rapid decrease of rhinos, elephants, and some other large, highly visible animals has received plenty of publicity. By comparison, much less attention has been paid to the even more concerning decline of the largely microscopic plant and animal organisms floating near and on the surface of the oceans. Make no mistake, loss of familiar species such as elephants and sharks would be a global tragedy, not to mention a blow to the planet's rich biodiversity that nurtures healthy, productive ecosystems. But these well-publicized large species are at the top of the food chain. Eradicate them and ecosystems will be thrown out of kilter. The way will be paved for the unchecked proliferation and domination of nuisance animal and plant species that would make for a very inhospitable environment. Still, the potential for damage is even greater with the loss of tiny sea organisms known as phytoplankton (plants) and zooplankton (animals). They are at the base of the food web ...
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Monarch Migration Gets a Boost from Ohio Collaboration 28.5.2015 ENN Network News - ENN
Ohioans Step Forward to Make a Difference
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