User: flenvcenter Topic: Biodiversity-Independent
Category: Specific Organisms :: Plants
Last updated: Jun 22 2017 09:51 IST RSS 2.0
 
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Dugong Numbers on the Rise Again in the Great Barrier Reef 22.6.2017 Planet Ark News
Dugongs - or sea cows - are the only marine mammals that live mostly on plants, grazing on seagrass, which forms meadows in sheltered coastal waters. The world's largest population resides in northern Australia where their numbers are surging according to recently released aerial surveys.
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World's largest vertical garden hosts 115,000 plants to create "living building" (Video) 8.6.2017 TreeHugger
This vertical garden on a residential high-rise in Bogotá reuses greywater from its residents and helps to clean the air.
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How Grizzlies, Monarchs and Even Fish Can Benefit From US Highways 4.6.2017 Truthout.com
Late last August, armed with a sweep net and identification guides, Sarah Piecuch was looking for butterflies. She trudged through waist-deep grasses, trying to keep her footing steady while tallying those she found fluttering through the sky or perched on nearby flowers. But Piecuch isn't an entomologist, and she wasn't walking in a pristine meadow. Rather, she's a wildlife biologist for the New York State Department of Transportation, and she was surveying the land beside busy highways in hopes of learning what kind of management can make these long, thin strips of habitat most beneficial for pollinators. Her work is just one of a number of projects across the country aimed at using the space along interstate highways to help wildlife. Threats and Opportunities In 1956, the U.S. Congress passed the Federal-Aid Highway Act creating the nation's interstate highway system. This legislation connected the country, creating a web of freeways that now totals some 47,000 miles -- nearly enough to circle the ...
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10 Great trees for small yards 23.5.2017 TreeHugger
Even small yards and gardens can be home to a variety of trees, without crowding out everything else, and provide fruit, shade, wildlife habitat, or all three.
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Fungal Diseases Are on the Rise -- Is Environmental Change to Blame? 21.5.2017 Truthout - All Articles
Scientists and physicians are looking for clues to a worrying increase in fungal infections and exploring ways to reduce the threat. (Photo: Pixabay ) Why doesn't this site have ads? In order to maintain our integrity, Truthout doesn't accept any advertising money. Help us keep it this way -- make a donation to support our independent journalism. Fungi are everywhere -- from the mushrooms that decompose fallen logs in the forest, to the mold that grows in your bathtub, to the microscopic fungal cells that reside naturally on your skin. Scientists estimate there are 1.5 million species of fungi on the planet. They're a diverse group, bunched together by their ability to use digestive enzymes to break down and absorb nutrients from their surroundings -- a characteristic that makes some of them great decomposers. Fungi are, in essence, nature's first compost bin. Many of them also help plants grow or carry out other important ecosystem functions. And some fungi are pathogens, causing disease in plants and ...
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It's time to make soil great again 6.5.2017 Resource Efficiency | GreenBiz.com
Restoring soil fertility is one of humanity’s best options for making progress on three daunting challenges: Feeding everyone, weathering climate change and conserving biodiversity.
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New peer-to-peer seed sharing platform aims to facilitate a diverse seed supply 3.5.2017 TreeHugger
The Center for Food Safety's recently launched network is a bid to preserve global plant biodiversity and work toward food security around the globe.
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Why Scientists Named These Plants After Arnold Schwarzenegger And Danny DeVito 28.4.2017 Green on HuffingtonPost.com
When a research team in Australia made a fascinating discovery about a pair of plants, they immediately thought of Arnold Schwarzenegger and Danny DeVito  ― and their 1988 movie “Twins.”  That’s because the scientists found out that two “twin” plants they had studied for years, known as egg and bacon pea flowers, are even more different  than they previously believed. Schwarzenegger and DeVito’s roles in the ‘80s comedy ― about an experiment to create the perfect embryo that goes awry and results in two very different people  ― inspired scientists to rebrand the two plants “Daviesia schwarzenegger” and “Daviesia devito.” They’re two of 131 sub-species within the Daviesia genus. “We discover early on in the movie that the embryo split in two, but it didn’t split equally. All the purity and strength went into Schwarzenegger’s character, Julius, while the dregs went into Vincent, DeVito’s character,” Australian National University researcher Professor Mike Crisp told Deutsche Welle . The two Daviesia plants ...
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Technology is cropping up in our lettuce fields 30.3.2017 High Country News Most Recent
In Yuma, Arizona, agriculture has embraced technology to increase yield.
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Making Cows More Environmentally Friendly 29.3.2017 Green Technology and Environmental Science News - ENN
Research reveals vicious cycle of climate change, cattle diet and rising methane 
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California’s desert wildflowers burst into bright ‘super bloom’ 24.3.2017 High Country News Most Recent
Following the ideal combination of rain, sun and wind, blossoms abound.
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Beyond Wetiko Agriculture: Saving Ourselves from the Soil Up 16.3.2017 Commondreams.org Views
Tom Newmark, Steven Farrell

How much longer do you hope to live? How long do you hope your children or grandchildren will live?  Do you think you or your loved ones will live 60 more years? If so, you’ll be around to witness the end of food production on the planet.  Unless, that is, we become conscious of the crisis and evolve. 

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Energy crop production on conservation lands may not boost greenhouse gases 11.3.2017 Environmental News Network
Growing sustainable energy crops without increasing greenhouse gas emissions, may be possible on seasonally wet, environmentally sensitive landscapes, according to researchers who conducted a study on Conservation Reserve Program (CRP) land.Debasish Saha, postdoctoral scholar in plant sciences, Penn State College of Agricultural Sciences, and colleagues measured the amount of nitrous oxide, a potent greenhouse gas, emanating from plots of biofuels-producing switchgrass — a native perennial grass — and miscanthus — a non-native grass species — growing in an experimental area in eastern central Pennsylvania and compared it to emissions from adjacent, undisturbed CRP acres. The experiment took place in a long-term monitoring site managed by the U.S. Department of Agriculture's Agricultural Research Service.
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700+ native bee species spiraling toward extinction 6.3.2017 TreeHugger
North American bees are at risk of disappearing thanks to severe habitat loss and increasing pesticide use, among other threats, new report reveals.
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MORE WARM-DWELLING ANIMALS AND PLANTS AS A RESULT OF CLIMATE CHANGE 21.2.2017 Environmental News Network
Since 1980, populations of warm-dwelling species in Germany have increased. The trend is particularly strong among warm-dwelling terrestrial species, as shown by the most comprehensive study across ecosystems in this regard to date. The most obvious increases occurred among warm-dwelling birds, butterflies, beetles, soil organisms and lichens according to the study published recently in the scientific journal “Nature Ecology & Evolution” led by Senckenberg scientists. Thus, it appears possible that rising temperatures due to the climate change have had a widespread impact on the population trends of animals in the past 30 years.
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New Data Finds Climate-Friendly, Healthy Meals Within Reach for Public Schools 15.2.2017 Commondreams.org Newswire
New Data Finds Climate-Friendly, Healthy Meals Within Reach for Public Schools
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Imagine a world reliant on robot bees to roam the fields and meadows 11.2.2017 TreeHugger
Welcome to your dystopian nightmare installment #4692.
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Hedgehogs mirror wildlife problems around the world. 6.2.2017 The Earth Times Online Newspaper - Health News
Have we got the answer to urban living when we solve the huge losses of hedgehogs in suburban neighbourhoods? The adoption of wild roofs and city ecoscapes in general brings some species to the new city. We have forgotten some animals that might just help clear the pests from our gardens or maintain plants and birdlife in some ways that we have found impossible. Natural habitat has been replaced largely with novel human solutions that need time to prove themselves. Emotionally, many would give the hedgehog their garden-vote, but the population has decreased so much, it could be too late to bring them back.
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Study: How Climate Change Threatens Mountaintops (and Clean Water) 30.1.2017 Environmental News Network
Mountains are far more than rocks. They also confer various natural benefits—for example, about half of the world’s drinking water filters through their high-elevation forests, plants, and soils.Now, a new, first-of-its kind study, in the journal Nature, shows how these mountain ecosystems around the globe may be threatened by climate change.Rising temperatures over the next decades appear likely to “decouple” key nutrient cycles in mountain soils and plants, an international team of sixteen scientists reports. Their study suggests that this is expected to disrupt the function of mountaintop ecosystems, as plant communities above and at treeline are thrown into turmoil faster than trees can migrate uphill in a warmer world.
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High-Tech Maps of Tropical Forest Diversity Identify New Conservation Targets 27.1.2017 Environmental News Network
New remote sensing maps of the forest canopy in Peru test the strength of current forest protections and identify new regions for conservation effort, according to a report led by Carnegie’s Greg Asner published in Science.Asner and his Carnegie Airborne Observatory team used their signature technique, called airborne laser-guided imaging spectroscopy, to identify preservation targets by undertaking a new approach to study global ecology—one that links a forest’s variety of species to the strategies for survival and growth employed by canopy trees and other plants. Or, to put it in scientist-speak, their approach connects biodiversity and functional diversity.
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