User: flenvcenter Topic: Biodiversity-Independent
Category: Specific Organisms :: Plants
Last updated: May 27 2015 18:41 IST RSS 2.0
 
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New York Court To Hear Chimp Personhood Case 27.5.2015 Green on HuffingtonPost.com
NEW YORK (AP) — Lawyers for two chimpanzees are heading to court to argue that the animals have "personhood" rights and should be freed from the Long Island university where they are kept. The Nonhuman Rights Project has filed the petition in state supreme court in Manhattan on behalf of Leo and Hercules. The chimps are kept at Stony Brook University, where they are used in locomotion studies. Stony Brook is part of the State University of New York system. Their lawyers say in their petition that the court should recognize the chimps as "autonomous and self-determining beings" who have the right to bodily liberty. They want to see them sent to a sanctuary in Florida that they say is as close to living in nature as chimps can get in North America. The state attorney general's office is representing SUNY, and says the courts should dismiss the petition because it should properly have been filed in Suffolk County, not New York City. And if not for that reason, the petition should be dismissed for reasons ...
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Controversy lingers at Missouri Breaks in Montana 25.5.2015 High Country News Most Recent
Ranchers, landowners, environmentalists still disagree over the designation.
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Obama's preemptive strike to reform Endangered Species Act 20.5.2015 High Country News Most Recent
The administration's proposal is aimed at warding off a GOP overhaul of the law.
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Burt's Bees Mobilizes America's Farms for Honey Bees 20.5.2015 ENN Network News - ENN
Burt’s Bees, through its The Greater Good Foundation, joined forces with the Pollinator Partnership to launch the United States Bee Buffer Project. The project’s goal is to establish critical honey bee forage throughout the country, and, after participating in the White House Stakeholder Panel on pollinator health, plans to impact over 6,000 acres over the next year.
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Women and Biodiversity Feed the World, Not Corporations and GMOs 20.5.2015 Commondreams.org Views
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Extremely Rare Hawaiian Monk Seal Dies In 'Perplexing' Propeller Accident 20.5.2015 Green on HuffingtonPost.com
A young Hawaiian monk seal, one of the world's most endangered species, was killed by a boat's propeller -- the first such accident in at least 20 years, according to the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration. The year-old male was found dead last week on a beach on the Hawaiian island of Kauai, local news station KHON2 reported . A necropsy of the 150-pound seal , identified as RF22, revealed head trauma and evenly spaced slashes across the right side of its face . “There were slices across the front of the muzzle headed toward the eye," Schofield told local news station KITV4. There was a "lot of blood," he said, "which is indicative of a propeller wound." Although this wasn't the first time a monk seal has been seen with wounds from a boat propeller, it's the first time in NOAA's 20 years of tracking marine mammals that one has been killed by such wounds , according to Schofield. Rachel Sprague, NOAA's Hawaiian monk seal recovery coordinator, told KHON2 that the death appears to be purely ...
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The Forest, The Farms and the Finance: Why the Tolo River People Turned to Carbon Finance 18.5.2015 Green on HuffingtonPost.com
Part Four: Getting Down To Business: The Tolo River People Shift From Building Their Carbon Project To Selling The Offsets tells the surprisingly challenging story of finding and cultivating offset buyers. You can also find the REDD Desk Project summary of this project here . The Tolo River People of Colombia were in a bind: dependent on nearby cattle ranches to make a living, they were helping destroy the forest that sustained them and their way of life. Here’s a look at the economics that drove them to embrace carbon finance. This story is the second in a four-part series to initially run on Ecosystem Marketplace, and has been edited for a mainstream audience. Click here to view the full, unedited version . 18 May 2015 | Every morning, Jorge Vergara drives his motorcycle from the village of Acandí to the Builes Ranch, where he tends the nearly 400 cows and cattle. The ranch is just a ten-minute walk from Tolo River village of Peñaloza and one of many bordering their forest. On this day, two boys from ...
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Giggles The Pig Runs For Mayor Against 2 Convicted Felons 17.5.2015 Politics on HuffingtonPost.com
Politics in Flint, Michigan, got a whole lot dirtier with the announcement that Giggles the pig has put her curly tail into the ring as candidate for mayor against two convicted felons, including one who served nearly 20 years for murder. "If she wins, they'll have to build her a little fence outside city hall," Giggles' owner and campaign manager, Michael Ewing, told The Huffington Post. "She really enjoys grass and there's a lot of grass out there. I think she could get used to it." Ewing, a trial attorney, said his candidate has an impressive resume for a 9-month-old and, unlike some of her opponents, has a clean criminal record. Candidate Wantwaz Davis, who made headlines in 2013 when he was elected to city council, served 19 years in prison after he pleaded guilty to second-degree murder in 1991, according to The Flint Journal . Eric Mays, also a city councilman running for mayor, reportedly pleaded guilty to felonious assault in 1987. In November 2013, Mays was charged with drunken driving, ...
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Poachers Are On Track To Kill More Rhinos This Year Than Ever 16.5.2015 Politics on HuffingtonPost.com
They may look like tanks, but sadly, they're far from bulletproof. Poachers in South Africa, home to some 20,700 rhinos, are on track to top last year's record slaughter of the creatures as the country struggles to halt the growing scourge. In the first four months of the year, 393 animals were killed across the country, an 18 percent increase over the same time period in 2014. A majority of those rhinos, 290, were gunned down in Kruger National Park, according to South Africa's national parks service. The battle between park rangers and poachers has grown deadly over the past year. Rangers killed several armed poachers in the country's flagship national park in both December and January as a spokesman for the national parks service warned criminals were “redirecting their attentions” to rhinos, The New York Times reported. At least 62 poachers have been arrested in Kruger this year, many coming from neighboring Mozambique. Yet the animals are still being killed by poachers looking to make a quick ...
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Solar-Powered ATMs Will Cut Waste, Bring Clean Water To Pakistanis In Need 14.5.2015 Green on HuffingtonPost.com
By Aamir Saeed LAHORE, Pakistan, May 14 (Thomson Reuters Foundation) - Punjab province is set to launch an innovation for water-short Pakistan: Solar-powered ATMs that dispense clean water when a smart card is scanned. The two-foot-square prototype machine looks and functions like an ATM, but dispenses water instead of cash. Users are issued a card they can use to claim a daily share of water. The project, a collaboration between the Punjab Saaf Pani (Clean Water) Company and the Innovations for Poverty Alleviation Lab (IPAL), a research center in Lahore, aims to install a water ATM on each of a series of water filtration plants being established in rural and urban fringe areas of Punjab province. The machine is designed to help the government cut water waste and ensure people have access to clean water, said Jawad Abbasi, a program manager at IPAL. "The innovative machines will help the government maintain a record of the exact quantity of clean drinking water being dispensed in a day in a ...
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Fierce Love for the Planet? Step Up to Your Plate 8.5.2015 Green on HuffingtonPost.com
I grew up in Oklahoma, in a big, raucous family, with dreams of being an equine veterinarian. Yet at age 17, opportunity took a dramatically different shape, and instead of saddling up horses, I was walking down fashion runways in Paris and traveling the world. Fast-forward several decades to today, and I'm a mother of five, a founder of a school and several nonprofits focused on the environment, and my modeling and acting days are well behind me. Through it all, I have cared deeply -- okay, some might say fiercely! -- about the health of our planet. Most everything I do, as a parent or advocate, circles around the environment. Which is why I was thrilled recently when the new USDA Dietary Guidelines made the link between health, diet and the environment. Finally, it seems that we are embracing good, common sense backed up by definitive, hard science -- all confirming that a healthy diet and a healthy planet go hand in hand. In particular, they are recommending: • That the average American's health would ...
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Senate Republicans Take Aim at Endangered Species Act 6.5.2015 Commondreams.org Newswire
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10 Animals Whose Fates Rest In Our Hands 6.5.2015 Green on HuffingtonPost.com
Our beautiful planet is a diverse and resilient place, filled with countless creatures who stir our hearts and imaginations. But sadly, human activities and the global climate change we're precipitating threaten that diversity and resiliency. In honor of The Huffington Post's 10th anniversary, here are 10 animals you should care about (if you don't already). Bluefin Tuna Bluefin tuna, which have been described as the " Ferrari of the ocean ," are remarkable creatures. They are fast and efficient swimmers, and the Atlantic species can grow to be 10 feet in length and weigh more than a horse. They are also a very popular seafood, especially in sushi, and are very valuable commercially. But stocks of all three bluefin species have declined from overfishing. All are now listed as vulnerable , endangered or critically endangered . In December 2014, Pacific fishing nations reached a consensus agreement on limiting takes of Pacific bluefin to aid conservation efforts. Scientists advising the session of the ...
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As Vegetarian Giants Rapidly Disappear from Earth, 'Empty Landscape' Threatens 4.5.2015 CommonDreams.org Headlines
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Emergency Endangered Species Act Protection Sought for Two Grand Canyon Species Threatened by Tusayan Development 1.5.2015 Commondreams.org Newswire
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Planting school gardens, growing futures 1.5.2015 TreeHugger
Growing STEM Gardens to benefit kids' learning and connect them to nature.
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Philippine eagle helped by Whitley Award 1.5.2015 The Earth Times Online Newspaper - Health News
Conservation is not only about the big animals. The plants, their consumers and the rest of an ecosystem may not catch headlines, but involving them and indigenous populations is crucial to our last ditch efforts to keep these organisms alive in their habitat.
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One In Six Species Could Disappear Due To Climate Change, New Study Finds 1.5.2015 Green on HuffingtonPost.com
16 percent. Remember that number. If climate change continues unabated, 16 percent -- one in six -- plant and animal species will go extinct, according to a new study published in Science . The report, "Accelerating Extinction Risk From Climate Change," analyzed 131 other studies that diverged widely in their estimates of the rate of extinction that will occur if climate change continues unabated. Some of the underlying studies found that very few, if any, species would disappear, while others placed the number close to 54 percent. Humans still have time to prevent widespread extinction caused by climate change, but the window of opportunity is closing, said Mark Urban, a professor at the University of Connecticut and the study's lead author . "We haven't seen many extinctions yet, and I think that's because we're still in the area where climate is [playing] a contributing role, but not the final element," Urban told The Huffington Post. "Extinctions due to climate change will emerge out of the noise of ...
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Experts Warn of "Cataclysmic" Changes as Planetary Temperatures Rise 27.4.2015 Truthout.com
Two unprecedentedly high temperatures were recorded in Antarctica, providing an ominous sign of accelerating ACD as one of the readings came in at just more than 63 degrees Fahrenheit. (Photo: Iceberg via Shutterstock) As California's epic drought worsens, every day is considered "fire season," record temperatures are set in the Antarctic and the majority of glaciers in Canada are expected to be gone by the end of the century. According to recent studies, we are at the very beginning of a period of "abrupt" climate disruption. Two unprecedentedly high temperatures were recorded in Antarctica, providing an ominous sign of accelerating ACD as one of the readings came in at just more than 63 degrees Fahrenheit. (Photo: Iceberg via Shutterstock) This month's anthropogenic climate disruption (ACD) dispatch begins with the fact that recently released National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration data show that this March was, by far, the hottest planetary March ever recorded, and the hottest January to March ...
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Common Insecticide Affects Bees Like Cigarettes Affect Humans, Studies Find 23.4.2015 Green on HuffingtonPost.com
Bees may be getting buzzed on a harmful insecticide contributing to their massive decline, researchers reported Wednesday. Two studies released by the journal Nature found that neonicotinoids, a common type of insecticide chemically related to nicotine , are both harmful and attractive to bees, much like cigarettes are to humans. “What I think is happening is that neonicotinoids are essentially having a pharmacological effect on the neurons in the bees’ brains,” study author Geraldine Wright said at a press conference, Take Part reported. “Like nicotine, they’re essentially amplifying the rewarding qualities of the sucrose solution. The bees think it’s more rewarding so they go back to that tube to drink more of it ... As soon as it gets into their blood, they are getting a ‘buzz.’ ” The other study echoed findings from past research that indicate insecticides may be contributing to bee decline, known as colony collapse disorder. Researchers compared 16 rapeseed fields, eight treated with neonicotinoids ...
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