User: flenvcenter Topic: Biodiversity-Independent
Category: Specific Organisms :: Plants
Last updated: Nov 30 2017 02:58 IST RSS 2.0
 
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Higher Plant Species Richness May Not Be Enough To Protect Ecosystems From The Worst Impacts Of Climate Extremes 29.11.2017 Environmental News Network
Studies on mild fluctuations in weather have provided support for the idea that higher biodiversity results in more stable functioning of ecosystems, but critical appraisal of the evidence from extreme event studies is lacking. 
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Detailed photos reveal the magical wilderness of a native garden in LA 30.10.2017 TreeHugger
Scott Logan's macro photographs of the famed Gottlieb Native Garden show how biodiversity can thrive in an urban oasis.
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How an ancient potato helped people survive climate shifts 30.10.2017 High Country News Most Recent
Utah-area tribes explain the continuing relevance of North America’s oldest spud.
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Deforestation Linked to Palm Oil Production is Making Indonesia Warmer 25.10.2017 Environmental News Network
In the past decades, large areas of forest in Sumatra, Indonesia have been replaced by cash crops like oil palm and rubber plantations. New research, published in the European Geosciences Union journal Biogeosciences, shows that these changes in land use increase temperatures in the region. The added warming could affect plants and animals and make parts of the country more vulnerable to wildfires.
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Tropical beetles face extinction threat 18.10.2017 Environmental News Network
Climate change is putting many tropical high altitude beetles at risk of extinction, warn an international team of scientists.
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Nearly 400 new species discovered in the Amazon 28.9.2017 Planet Ark News
A fiery-orange tailed monkey, a new species of pink river dolphin and a stingray resembling a cross between a pancake and honey comb are among the hundreds of new species discovered in the Amazon over the past two years.
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Cereals that defy the drought 19.9.2017 Agricultural and Biofuel News - ENN
Genome decoding provides information about dry and heat-resistant cereals
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Cereals that defy the drought 19.9.2017 Environmental News Network
Genome decoding provides information about dry and heat-resistant cereals
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The Seri adapt to climate change in the desert 18.9.2017 Current Issue
Researchers are working to document traditional ecological knowledge.
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A human-caused wildfire burns Oregon’s Columbia Gorge 8.9.2017 High Country News Most Recent
In the Pacific Northwest, data shows people burn the places they love.
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Could switchgrass help China's air quality? 5.9.2017 Green Technology and Environmental Science News - ENN
Researchers from the United States and China have proposed an idea that could improve China’s air quality, but they’re not atmospheric scientists. They’re agronomists.“China’s poor air quality is caused by a combination of coal burning and particulates from soil erosion. The Loess Plateau is the major source of erosion in China, and air quality there is just terrible. If erosion in the Loess Plateau can be improved, air quality will improve,” says D.K. Lee, an agronomist in the Department of Crop Sciences at the University of Illinois.
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Diverse Landscapes Are More Productive and Adapt better to Climate Change 5.9.2017 Environmental News Network
The dramatic, worldwide loss of biodiversity is one of today's greatest environmental problems. The loss of species diversity affects important ecosystems on which humans depend. Previous research predominantly addressed short-term effects of biodiversity in small experimental plots planted with few randomly selected plant species. These studies have shown that species-poor plant assemblages function less well and produce less biomass than species rich systems.
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Under new Interior Department plan, sage grouse will suffer 15.8.2017 High Country News Most Recent
New policies will prioritize oil and gas leasing over habitat.
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How farmers can help keep salt out of the Colorado River 11.8.2017 High Country News Most Recent
The solution to a basin-wide problem may fall to individual irrigators.
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Planting Resilience to Climate Change 6.8.2017 Truthout - All Articles
Aurelia Arzú inspects the cocoplum patch and reaches in to pluck the ripest fruits. It’s early in the year, and the season is just beginning, so the bush is loaded with edible, plum-sized fruit ripening from yellow to pink in the unrelenting afternoon sun. Arzú bites into the cocoplum, quite literally eating the fruits of her labor. Together with other local Garifuna women, she planted cocoplum, seagrape, and other native coastal plants on and around the sand dunes in an effort to halt their advance and prevent further displacement of Santa Rosa de Aguán community residents. Aurelia Arzú inspects a cocoplum bush planted by local Garifuna women, selecting the ripest fruit to eat. (Photo: Sandra Cuffe) "It fills me with pride to see this and to know that the women helped protect our community," says Arzú, looking out at the burgeoning vegetation. Arzú's footprints crisscross the sandy expanse, tracing a path from the Caribbean Sea lapping at the northern coast of Honduras to the dunes now dotted with ...
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Connecting the dots on biodiversity and agriculture 3.8.2017 Resource Efficiency | GreenBiz.com
Tasting a termite inspires hope that farming can align better with ecosystems.
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How indoor plants can give city-slickers a literal breath of fresh air 3.8.2017 Planet Ark News
Making time for nature can be a hard ask for people living in metropolitan areas, but new research has found that even inner-city apartment dwellers can get the benefits of being near nature with indoor plants.
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Australians celebrate 22 years of National Tree Day 1.8.2017 Planet Ark News
Green thumbs were out in force to help celebrate Planet Ark's 22nd National Tree Day, planting to support the natural environment and enjoying spending time in nature with family, friends, neighbours and colleagues.
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Trump Administration Plans to Skip Border Wall Environmental Review 31.7.2017 Truthout.com
On the long list of terrible ideas for nature preserves, a giant wall running through the middle of a vulnerable area ranks pretty high. The plants and animals of the Santa Ana National Wildlife Refuge  face just that, though, as the Trump administration aims to construct its ambitious border wall on these lands -- and sidestep the environmental review that could put the brakes on the project. The border wall project has been plagued with a host of problems , starting with the fact that it's racist and xenophobic -- as well as too expensive and logistically complex to realistically build. The government has struggled to access private land along the border, with numerous condemnation suits lingering in court. So the Trump administration came up with a bright idea: Why not start the wall with a segment on land it already owns? That land happens to lie within the Santa Ana National Wildlife Refuge, a diverse, beautiful and unique 2,088 acres in Texas initially set aside for migratory birds in the 1940s. ...
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Too many visitors, not enough awareness: Report highlights threat to Kaas plateau 22.7.2017 Pune – The Indian Express
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