User: flenvcenter Topic: Biodiversity-Independent
Category: Specific Organisms :: Plants
Last updated: Aug 15 2017 21:37 IST RSS 2.0
 
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Under new Interior Department plan, sage grouse will suffer 15.8.2017 High Country News Most Recent
New policies will prioritize oil and gas leasing over habitat.
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How farmers can help keep salt out of the Colorado River 11.8.2017 High Country News Most Recent
The solution to a basin-wide problem may fall to individual irrigators.
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Planting Resilience to Climate Change 6.8.2017 Truthout - All Articles
Aurelia Arzú inspects the cocoplum patch and reaches in to pluck the ripest fruits. It’s early in the year, and the season is just beginning, so the bush is loaded with edible, plum-sized fruit ripening from yellow to pink in the unrelenting afternoon sun. Arzú bites into the cocoplum, quite literally eating the fruits of her labor. Together with other local Garifuna women, she planted cocoplum, seagrape, and other native coastal plants on and around the sand dunes in an effort to halt their advance and prevent further displacement of Santa Rosa de Aguán community residents. Aurelia Arzú inspects a cocoplum bush planted by local Garifuna women, selecting the ripest fruit to eat. (Photo: Sandra Cuffe) "It fills me with pride to see this and to know that the women helped protect our community," says Arzú, looking out at the burgeoning vegetation. Arzú's footprints crisscross the sandy expanse, tracing a path from the Caribbean Sea lapping at the northern coast of Honduras to the dunes now dotted with ...
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Connecting the dots on biodiversity and agriculture 3.8.2017 Resource Efficiency | GreenBiz.com
Tasting a termite inspires hope that farming can align better with ecosystems.
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How indoor plants can give city-slickers a literal breath of fresh air 3.8.2017 Planet Ark News
Making time for nature can be a hard ask for people living in metropolitan areas, but new research has found that even inner-city apartment dwellers can get the benefits of being near nature with indoor plants.
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Australians celebrate 22 years of National Tree Day 1.8.2017 Planet Ark News
Green thumbs were out in force to help celebrate Planet Ark's 22nd National Tree Day, planting to support the natural environment and enjoying spending time in nature with family, friends, neighbours and colleagues.
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Trump Administration Plans to Skip Border Wall Environmental Review 31.7.2017 Truthout.com
On the long list of terrible ideas for nature preserves, a giant wall running through the middle of a vulnerable area ranks pretty high. The plants and animals of the Santa Ana National Wildlife Refuge  face just that, though, as the Trump administration aims to construct its ambitious border wall on these lands -- and sidestep the environmental review that could put the brakes on the project. The border wall project has been plagued with a host of problems , starting with the fact that it's racist and xenophobic -- as well as too expensive and logistically complex to realistically build. The government has struggled to access private land along the border, with numerous condemnation suits lingering in court. So the Trump administration came up with a bright idea: Why not start the wall with a segment on land it already owns? That land happens to lie within the Santa Ana National Wildlife Refuge, a diverse, beautiful and unique 2,088 acres in Texas initially set aside for migratory birds in the 1940s. ...
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Mixed outcomes for plants and animals in warmer 2080s climate 20.7.2017 Environmental News Network
More than three quarters of plants and animals in England are likely to be significantly affected by climate change by the end of the century, say researchers.
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New Studies Show How The 2010 Gulf Oil Spill Still Starves Fish At Sea And Plants On Shore 18.7.2017 Politics on HuffingtonPost.com
One of the reports also sheds light on the effect on herring of a 1989 spill in Alaska.
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Climate change: Biodiversity rescues biodiversity in a warmer world 15.7.2017 Environmental News Network
The last month was recorded as the warmest June ever in many parts of the world. Last year, 2016, was the warmest year in the modern temperature record. Our planet is constantly heating up. This poses direct threats to humans, like extreme weather events and global sea-level rise, but scientists are concerned that it may also affect our well-being indirectly via changes in biodiversity. The variety of life, from plants and animals to microorganisms, is the basis of many services ecosystems provide to us, for example clean drinking water or food. Today, ecologists are challenged by the question: what does a warmer world mean for biodiversity? More species, less species, or no change?
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Worried about the planet? Avoid that extra kid 13.7.2017 TreeHugger
Forget light bulbs and cloth bags. The actions that will mitigate climate change most effectively are the ones nobody's talking about.
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Will the West’s newest species go extinct? 12.7.2017 High Country News Most Recent
Earlier this year, researchers confirmed the discovery of a new species of crossbill in Idaho’s South Hills.
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Why the Open Access Movement in Agriculture Matters 7.7.2017 Truthout - All Articles
Western discourse around open access has largely been restricted to academic, scholarly communications circles. In fact, many friends and colleagues have told me they first encountered open access when, after graduating from university, they were confronted with the fact they no longer had access to school databases; or when online article searches reached the dead-end prompt "click here to pay for access." The internet now provides a free platform for sharing knowledge. How is it possible -- or even socially just -- that so many of us can't get access to scholarly research? Isn't society propelled forward by access to the science, literature, and art of the world's scholars? What if that research is publically funded? These are the primary concerns that drive the open access movement. What would these concerns look like if we removed them from the scholarly communications circle and applied them to realms beyond the ivory tower like nature, society, technology, and ultimately the intersection of those ...
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Stefano Boeri reveals Liuzhou Forest City 29.6.2017 TreeHugger
But don't miss the forest for the trees: there is some very interesting urban design happening here.
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Climate Destabilization Causing Thousands of New Species Migrations: Plant, Animal, Insect, Bird 26.6.2017 Truthout - All Articles
A spate of new research studies has confirmed a disturbing pattern: climate disruption is confusing migratory birds, causing trees to relocate and allowing tropical diseases to spread northward. "Human society has yet to appreciate the implications of unprecedented species redistribution for life on Earth, including for human lives," states a study, " Divergence of Species Responses to Climate Change ," published May 17, 2017, in Science Advances. Imagine if you had to travel thousands of miles and arrive at a specific time each year, but you had no way of knowing the precise time you needed to get there. That's what it's like for many songbirds that migrate from Central and South America each spring to breeding grounds in the US and Canada. If they were to arrive too early, they wouldn't find food and could freeze to death. If they arrive late, the best nesting sites may be taken and there will be fewer opportunities to find a mate. For countless generations, these birds have been able to rely on ...
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Artists tinker with grass & photosynthesis to create huge living canvases (Video) 23.6.2017 TreeHugger
Humble grass is transformed into living works of art with a message, using light and a lot of patience.
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Dugong Numbers on the Rise Again in the Great Barrier Reef 22.6.2017 Planet Ark News
Dugongs - or sea cows - are the only marine mammals that live mostly on plants, grazing on seagrass, which forms meadows in sheltered coastal waters. The world's largest population resides in northern Australia where their numbers are surging according to recently released aerial surveys.
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World's largest vertical garden hosts 115,000 plants to create "living building" (Video) 8.6.2017 TreeHugger
This vertical garden on a residential high-rise in Bogotá reuses greywater from its residents and helps to clean the air.
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How Grizzlies, Monarchs and Even Fish Can Benefit From US Highways 4.6.2017 Truthout.com
Late last August, armed with a sweep net and identification guides, Sarah Piecuch was looking for butterflies. She trudged through waist-deep grasses, trying to keep her footing steady while tallying those she found fluttering through the sky or perched on nearby flowers. But Piecuch isn't an entomologist, and she wasn't walking in a pristine meadow. Rather, she's a wildlife biologist for the New York State Department of Transportation, and she was surveying the land beside busy highways in hopes of learning what kind of management can make these long, thin strips of habitat most beneficial for pollinators. Her work is just one of a number of projects across the country aimed at using the space along interstate highways to help wildlife. Threats and Opportunities In 1956, the U.S. Congress passed the Federal-Aid Highway Act creating the nation's interstate highway system. This legislation connected the country, creating a web of freeways that now totals some 47,000 miles -- nearly enough to circle the ...
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10 Great trees for small yards 23.5.2017 TreeHugger
Even small yards and gardens can be home to a variety of trees, without crowding out everything else, and provide fruit, shade, wildlife habitat, or all three.
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