User: flenvcenter Topic: Biodiversity-Independent
Category: Specific Organisms :: Plants
Last updated: Feb 05 2016 06:34 IST RSS 2.0
 
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Rare Footage Captures America's Only Known Wild Jaguar 5.2.2016 Green on HuffingtonPost.com
In the Santa Rita Mountains outside of Tucson, Arizona, roams a lonely and unlikely predator.  His name is El Jefe, Spanish for "the boss" -- and he is  America's only known wild jaguar . While scientists have been tracking the animal for about three years, the big cat is making his video debut after the nonprofits Conservation CATalyst and the Center for Biological Diversity unveiled dramatic footage of the predator in his natural environment. " A lot of people have no idea that we have jaguars in the United States or that they belong here," said the center's Randy Serraglio, according to The Associated Press. "In bringing this video, we hope to inspire people to care about these animals and support protection for their homes." Jaguars once roamed throughout the American Southwest , with historical reports putting them as far north as the Grand Canyon and as far east as Louisiana, the center said in a statement. But over the last 150 years, these large, majestic felines vanished from their U.S. range as ...
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Mangroves Slow Climate Change By Sequestering Massive Amounts of Carbon. Why Aren't We Working Harder to Save Them? 2.2.2016 Green on HuffingtonPost.com
This story first appeared on Ecosystem Marketplace. Click here to view the original. It's hard to imagine a more valuable ecosystem than a mangrove forest.  These wooded coastal wetlands protect the shoreline from both sudden storms and gradual erosion; they provide shelter for young fish , breeding grounds for shrimp, and wood for local villagers - all of which are the fruits of clearly delineated  ecosystem services , each of which has clear human beneficiaries. This should, in theory, make it easy to find money for mangrove protection. Tourism operators and industrial fishers, for example, both have an interest in keeping coral reefs alive, and mangroves support them too, while anyone along the shore has an interest in keeping the sea at bay, as the people of Louisiana  and coastal Indonesia can attest. Unfortunately, in most developing countries, the people who depend the most on mangroves don't have the money or political clout to protect them.  This leaves the carbon market as an intriguing way to ...
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Montana rancher looks to the past to prepare for tomorrow’s climate 25.1.2016 High Country News Most Recent
Can re-engineering the family ranch help it survive climate change?
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"Gene-Editing" Produces GMOs That Must Be Regulated 24.1.2016 Truthout - All Articles
Just like traditional genetic engineering, gene-editing techniques can cause unintended alterations in DNA. (Image: GMO seeds via Shutterstock) Fight back against the spread of misinformation perpetuated by the mainstream media. Help Truthout grow stronger by making a tax-deductible donation today! The EU is considering the exclusion of gene-edited plants and animals from GM regulations. However, gene-edited organisms clearly fall within the definition of GMOs in both European and international law. They also present real risks to the environment and human health - and must be regulated like any other GMOs. There has been a lot in the news recently about the ethics of gene editing in humans. But, as yet largely unnoticed is that the European Commission is considering whether the gene-editing of plants and animals, for example in agriculture, be exempted from regulation or even  falls outside the scope of EU law governing genetically modified organisms (GMOs). In other words, whether the products of ...
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Questions I'm Most Often Asked About Geese 23.1.2016 Green on HuffingtonPost.com
Photo: Karen Rosenow Over the last 10 years, I've been besieged with questions about geese. "Are they from Canada?" is the most frequent, followed by the inevitable"How do you tell them apart?" Children always ask if you can pet them. Here are the answers to these questions and others that arise when geese surprise us with the unexpected, as these unbridled spirits are prone to do. Are they from Canada? No. The true migratory goose was almost driven to extinction from over-hunting some 50 years ago when scientists found some nesting pairs at Silver Lake, Minn., and placed them in captivity. Coincidentally, wildlife officials began a national recovery program by taking and incubating nest eggs from "decoy" geese they had captured to lure other geese (coming down from Canada). Eventually the young were deposited throughout the U.S., sometimes in locations where there had never been geese. Thus the resident goose was born. Resident geese don't migrate to Canada in part because they don't know the way. ...
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Climate change triggers triage in Northwest forests 11.1.2016 High Country News Most Recent
Siuslaw National Forest managers must decide whether to save meadows or let trees encroach.
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African Women Organize to Reclaim Agriculture Against Corporate Takeover 6.1.2016 Truthout - All Articles
Mphathe, kneeling bottom row on right, with women of Dzomo la Mupo. (Photo courtesy of Mphathe Makaulele) Beverly Bell and Simone Adler conducted the following interview with Mphatheleini Makaulele from which this text is drawn. Makaulele is an award-winning indigenous leader, farmer, and activist, and Director of  Dzomo la Mupo , a community organization in rural South Africa. She is also part of the  African Biodiversity Network . Everybody originated with indigenous ways of living and the way of Mother Earth. The real role of women is in the seed. It is the women who harvest, select, store, and plant seeds. Our seeds come from our mothers and our grandmothers. To us, the seed is the symbol of the continuity of life. Seed is not just about the crops. Seed is about the soil, about the water, and about the forest. When we plant our seeds, we don't just plant them anytime or anywhere. We listen to our elders, who teach us about the ecological calendar. The seed follows this natural ecological flow. When ...
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Can plant-based feeds make aquaculture sustainable? 6.1.2016 High Country News Most Recent
Soybeans and corn are beginning to replace sardines and anchovies as food for farmed fish.
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Malheur occupation, explained 5.1.2016 High Country News Most Recent
The deep history behind the Bundy brothers’ takeover of a wildlife refuge in Oregon.
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Forty years of Sagebrush Rebellion 4.1.2016 High Country News Most Recent
The Oregon occupation, the 2014 Bundy standoff and many other stories are all related to a long-simmering movement.
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Yurok Tribe Adopts Ordinance Banning Frankenfish and GMOs 3.1.2016 Truthout - All Articles
The Yurok ban comes in the wake of the FDA decision to approve genetically engineered salmon, dubbed "Frankenfish," as being fit for human consumption, in spite of massive public opposition. In this photo, the Yurok Tribe wraps up commercial fishing for 2014. The tribe has banned genetically engineered salmon on their reservation on the Klamath River. (Photo: Beau Finley / Flickr ) The Yurok Tribe, the largest Indigenous Tribe in California with over 6,000 members, has banned genetically engineered salmon and all Genetically Engineered Organisms (GEOs) on their reservation on the Klamath River in the state's northwest region.  The Yurok ban comes in the wake of the federal Food and Drug Administration (FDA) decision on November 19 to approve genetically engineered salmon, dubbed "Frankenfish," as being fit for human consumption, in spite of massive public opposition to the decision by fishermen, Tribes, environmental organizations and public interest organizations.  On December 10, 2015, the Yurok Tribal ...
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Ten Foods That May Disappear Thanks to Climate Change 3.1.2016 Truthout - All Articles
Climate change is making the world a different place. There are more floods, droughts, wildfires, heat waves and other extreme weather events. Animal species around the world are either shifting habitat locations or simply dying off. Even humans are migrating due to a warmer world. But there is one effect that will hit many of us right in the gut: Certain foods could disappear thanks to our changing climate. Brace yourself: here are 10 foods you'll probably be sad to see go. 1. Guacamole Around 8 million pounds  of guacamole are consumed during the Super Bowl, but football fans might soon have to find something else to dip their tortilla chips into. Scientists from the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory predict as much as a 40 percent decrease  in avocado production over the next 30 years due to increasing temperatures brought on by climate change. As a result, the fast food chain Chipotle, which goes through 97,000 pounds of avocados a day — 35 million pounds every year — has warned that if climate ...
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In Idaho, rancher buyouts take a big step forward 29.12.2015 High Country News Most Recent
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The Endangered Species Act Has Been Protecting Imperiled Animals And Plants For 42 Years 29.12.2015 Green on HuffingtonPost.com
The Endangered Species Act turned 42 on Monday, marking over four decades of plant and animal conservation in the United States. The act was signed into law on Dec. 28, 1973 by President Richard Nixon, who had urged Congress to expand the protection of imperiled species. Under the ESA, species deemed in danger of extinction qualify for strict protections , including bans or limitations on imports and hunting, as well as severe penalties for violation. "Nothing is more priceless and more worthy of preservation than the rich array of animal life with which our country has been blessed," Nixon said after the law's passage . "It is a many-faceted treasure, of value to scholars, scientists, and nature lovers alike, and it forms a vital part of the heritage we all share as Americans." There are now around 2,215 species listed as endangered or threatened under the act, including 650 found outside of the United States. The most recent additions to the ESA, made earlier this month, were the two primary subspecies ...
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Number of Species on Waiting List for Endangered Species Act Protection Drops to Historic Low 24.12.2015 Commondreams.org Newswire
Center for Biological Diversity The number of animals and plants on the waiting list for Endangered Species Act protection has dropped to its lowest levels since the “candidate” list was begun in the 1970s, according to an updated list released today by the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service. Triggered by a settlement with the Center for Biological Diversity and other groups in 2011, the agency has made great progress in addressing the backlog of species in need of ...
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What You Should Know About The Drastic Decline Of Wild Bees 24.12.2015 Green on HuffingtonPost.com
We owe a lot to wild bees. The buzzing insects are crucial pollinators for many agricultural crops, from pumpkins and squashes to peaches and apples. It turns out, however, that wild bee populations are on the decline in some of the main U.S. farmlands that need them the most. A team of researchers across the country identified these at-risk regions this month in the first national map of dwindling bee populations , which was published Tuesday in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences. HuffPost Science recently posed a series of questions about wild bee populations and why we should be concerned to Dr. Insu Koh, a post-doc research associate at the University of Vermont who led the team. What follows is a lightly edited version of our discussion. Your research showed that populations of wild bees have declined significantly since 2008 in many of the nation's key agricultural areas. Where was the decline most severe? We identified 139 counties in key agricultural areas, including California ...
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WaterDrop tote captures shower & bath warmup water for reuse 19.12.2015 TreeHugger
This Spanish startup is offering a simple solution for one common home water conservation challenge.
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Breaking News: Omnibus Bill Bars U.S.-Based Horse Slaughter, Tosses Out Language to Remove Federal Protections for Wolves and Elephants 17.12.2015 Green on HuffingtonPost.com
The $1.1 trillion omnibus spending bill , released early this morning and set for final action in the House and Senate later this week, turned out extraordinarily well for animal protection advocates. The negotiations were led by Senate leaders Mitch McConnell, R-KY, and Harry Reid, D-NV, and House leaders Paul Ryan, R-WI, and Nancy Pelosi, D-CA, along with the chairmen and ranking members of the House and Senate appropriations committees. Negotiators did the right thing and included language to forbid anyone from setting up a horse slaughter plant on American soil. We don't round up dogs and cats, butcher them, and ship them to foreign markets, and it should be unthinkable to do that with a species that helped us settle the nation. We've secured this language in nine of the last 11 year-end agriculture spending bills, but the measure was in jeopardy this year, with a key House committee blocking it in a tie vote 24 - 24 during consideration of the FY2016 agriculture bill. Yet in final negotiations on ...
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Message from Paris: We Can Reverse Global Warming 4.12.2015 Commondreams.org Views
Ronnie Cummins

“Humanity stands at the edge of an abyss. We have destroyed the planet, its biodiversity, our water and the climate, and through this destruction, we have destroyed the ecological context for our survival as a species. Ecological destruction and resource grab are generating conflicts, which are being accelerated into full-blown wars and violence. A context of fear and hate is overtaking the human imagination.

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Should we say goodbye to cacti? 2.12.2015 Environmental News Network
It’s hard not to think of a cactus as a resilient plant. Living in hot, drought-stricken climates, if it can survive there, surely it can make it through anything. Sadly, this assumption is not reality for the cactus. As an international team of researchers discovered, nearly one-third of all cactus species face a looming threat of extinction.
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