User: flenvcenter Topic: Biodiversity-Independent
Category: Specific Organisms :: Plants
Last updated: Aug 29 2015 24:48 IST RSS 2.0
 
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Pretty DIY composting system doubles as a planter 28.8.2015 TreeHugger
Hil Padilla, who works with the Kadoorie Conservation China Department, designed this cool composer/planter system you can make yourself.
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Yosemite Black Bears' Diet Surprises Researchers 25.8.2015 Environmental News Network
Black bears in Yosemite National Park that don’t seek out human foods subsist primarily on plants and nuts, according to a study conducted by biologists at UC San Diego who also found that ants and other sources of animal protein, such as mule deer, make up only a small fraction of the bears’ annual diet.
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Wacky recycled rubber-covered stilted cabin "re-wilds" a meadow in Latvia 25.8.2015 TreeHugger
Built as way to improve a green space linking a town and a castle, this distinctive cabin looks like 'creature' walking out the of forest.
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BLM launches a native seeds strategy for damaged landscapes 21.8.2015 High Country News Most Recent
The initiative aims to restore burned ecosystems and target fire-prone invasives like cheatgrass.
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Creative Ways to Conserve Water During a Drought 21.8.2015 Green on HuffingtonPost.com
In a previous post , I threw myself and my “smelly kids” under the bus for contributing to California’s water woes. I also threw a lot of other folks under the bus (including one of my favorite breweries, golf courses, and my hometown for that matter), but I feel like many Californians are finally starting to get past the denial/anger/bargaining/depression stages of the drought and accepting conservation and sustainable water practices for the long haul. While we have a lot of work to do, our recent water bills show a drastic cut in the amount of water our family is using, so I thought it was worth sharing some of the creative ways we're cutting back to help further the conservation conversation. Here are some of the water-saving practices we’ve adopted, including a massive lawn-removal project that helped my parents reduce water use for the month of May by 70% over the same period last year. SEVENTY PERCENT! If we’ve learned anything after four years of drought, it’s that extreme weather is here to stay ...
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You can help bring monarchs back from the brink 19.8.2015 rabble.ca - News for the rest of us

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Tracking grazing’s impacts on bugs 17.8.2015 Current Issue
A Montana biologist studies how livestock influence a favorite sage grouse food source.
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The Endangered Species Act's biggest experiment 17.8.2015 Current Issue
Will an unprecedented collaborative effort and lots of tax dollars be enough to finally save sage grouse?
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Photographs of the sagebrush sea 17.8.2015 Current Issue
Review of ‘Sage Spirit: The American West at a Crossroads’ by Dave Showalter.
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Four Ways Mexico’s Indigenous Farmers Are Practicing the Agriculture of the Future 15.8.2015 Commondreams.org Views
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More Than 2,700 Acres Protected for Two South Florida Flowers 15.8.2015 Commondreams.org Newswire
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We Need Our Mighty Rivers to Save Salmon...And Whales 13.8.2015 Green on HuffingtonPost.com
Making a Connection: Salmon as Networker I have been watching Cosmos a lot. It's got wide appeal in my house--children and adults are equally enchanted. Cosmos reminds me of our connection to all living things--all of us born of stardust. I hadn't thought about that in a long time. Most of us don't dwell on the mysteries of the universe, but they matter. Our interconnectedness, in particular, matters for people--and for wildlife out there in those wild places. Some species are more linked than others. In Malcolm Gladwell 's world, we'd call them "connectors." In science, they're called " keystone species ." These animals, and even some plants, have a large impact on the creatures surrounding them--so large that the habitat would be fundamentally different without them. Salmon are amazing connectors; they connect to more than 190 plants and animals. So when salmon go missing, it's like the life of the party has suddenly disappeared--everyone feels it. It may not surprise you to learn that salmon are an ...
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More Than 5,000 Acres Protected for Rare Wildflower in Santa Barbara County 11.8.2015 Commondreams.org Newswire
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What Every Environmentalist Needs to Know About Time Security 7.8.2015 Green on HuffingtonPost.com
Time is a finite, non-renewable resource. There are twenty-four hours in the day. Each and every day we have to accomplish certain things in order to survive and to ensure that our children are able to grow and, hopefully, thrive. We have to find food and water. We need to ensure that we have energy in order to cook, clean and stay warm. We need access to medicine when we are sick. In development lingo we call the ability to consistently access and benefit from these resources 'security', i.e. food security, water security, energy security, and health security. While the need to obtain food, water, energy and medicine is shared by the more than 7 billion of us alive today, the amount of time it takes for each of us to achieve these tasks varies considerably. For example, poor rural women in developing countries are most frequently charged with water security and must walk for hours to obtain water . Comparatively, those of us in developed regions walk to a sink, a water cooler, or a refrigerator for a ...
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68 garden pesticides to avoid in order to help the bees 3.8.2015 TreeHugger
These insect-killing chemicals spell doom for important pollinators.
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The Fate of Greater Sage-grouse Is in Our Hands 1.8.2015 Green on HuffingtonPost.com
Fossil fuel development, livestock grazing, transmission corridors, off-road vehicles, roads, fences, invasive species, climate change -- these are just a few of the 26 threats facing the greater sage-grouse, an iconic bird in the American west. The species population has suffered steep declines over the last decade. Without strong conservation efforts, the future of the bird is bleak. So bleak in fact that the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service determined as recently as 2010 that the sage-grouse warrants protection under the Endangered Species Act, although listing was precluded at the time by other, higher priorities. The Service found that current threats -- and particularly the federal government's failure to address them -- could lead to the species extinction. The federal Bureau of Land Management and the U.S. Forest Service got the message. In 2011, the federal government launched the National Greater Sage-grouse Planning Strategy, an ambitious effort to improve management of more than 60 million ...
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Controlled burns and invasive grass 21.7.2015 Environmental News Network
Controlled burning is widely used to maintain biodiversity and enhance regeneration of important deciduous tree species such as oak and hickory, but a recent University of Illinois study found that this practice also increases the growth of an aggressive species of invasive grass.
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The Jewels in Oakland's Crown: In Defense of Eucalyptus Trees 20.7.2015 Green on HuffingtonPost.com
"A thousand leaves on every tree, and each a miracle to me" -- Joaquin Miller Take a hike in the forests of the Oakland hills, and sooner or later, you are likely to bump into a trail marker containing the image of Joaquin Miller, an early settler to the city responsible, in part, for the lush forests which blanket the hills. A colorful figure from the 19th century, famed in his day for his poems celebrating the West's spectacular natural beauty, Miller was called the "Poet of the Sierras" and today has the distinction of having an Oakland street, Oakland elementary school and Oakland park named in his honor. The founder of California's first Arbor Day , Miller planted the land that is now a park bearing his name with 75,000 trees, mostly Eucalyptus, Monterey Pine and Monterey Cypress, three of the very species of trees now slated for eradication across 2,059 acres of public lands in Oakland, Berkeley and surrounding cities . After timber hungry fortune seekers arrived in droves to the San Francisco Bay ...
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Mourning the Changes That Surround Us: Readers Speak Out on Climate 20.7.2015 Truthout - All Articles
Footage from the Carlton Complex wildfire in north and central Washington State. The fire burned for more than 10 days before it could be quelled by firefighters and rain. (Photo: Wildfire via Shutterstock) While no single abnormal weather event can be attributed solely to human-caused climate change, the frequency and intensity of most events can. We asked Truthout readers to share their observations of weather anomalies they are witnessing, and their answers reflect the on-the-ground realities of a rapidly changing planet. Footage from the Carlton Complex wildfire in north and central Washington State. The fire burned for more than 10 days before it could be quelled by firefighters and rain. (Photo: Wildfire via Shutterstock) In early July, I asked Truthout readers to share the weather anomalies they are witnessing on their home turf. Large numbers of readers responded with a range of harrowing observations, from vanishing snow, to shifts in seasons, to skyrocketing temperatures, to wildfires and ...
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EPA to study effects of Roundup on 1,500 endangered species 17.7.2015 High Country News Most Recent
300 million pounds of glyphosate are used in the U.S. each year, but its impacts are largely unknown.
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