User: flenvcenter Topic: Biodiversity-Independent
Category: Specific Organisms :: Plants
Last updated: May 04 2016 03:19 IST RSS 2.0
 
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EPA Finds Atrazine Likely Harming Most Species of Plants, Animals in U.S. 4.5.2016 Commondreams.org Newswire
Center for Biological Diversity The amount of the herbicide atrazine that’s released into the environment in the United States is likely harming most species of plants and animals, including mammals, birds, amphibians and reptiles, according to a preliminary risk assessment by the Environmental Protection Agency. Atrazine is well known as a hormone disruptor that has been linked to birth defects and cancer in humans and contamination of ground-, surface- and drinking-water ...
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In Utah, the fight for a Bears Ears monument heats up 3.5.2016 High Country News Most Recent
In a place where history, culture and geography intermingle, ‘local’ can be hard to define.
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Cheerios Giving Bees A Buzz-Worthy 3,300 Acres Of Flowers To Pollinate 3.5.2016 Green on HuffingtonPost.com
Honey Nut Cheerios is the bee’s knees. On April 26, General Mills announced that the farms that supply oats for Honey Nut Cheerios will plant approximately 3,300 acres of habitat for bees and other pollinators by 2020. It’s a size of land that is equivalent to “3,000 football fields,” Tom Rabaey, principal agronomist for General Mills, said in a video  for Cheerios. “I think everybody can agree that by planting more habitat, we’re going to do a lot of good,” Rabaey said. The habitats will be filled with nectar and pollen-rich wildflowers and planted in partnership with the University of Minnesota and Xerces Society, a leading pollinator and wildlife conservation organization. The loss of bees can be really stinging. According to the Intergovernmental Science-Policy Platform on Biodiversity and Ecosystem Services , 75 percent of the world's food crops depend at least in part on pollination. "Without pollinators, many of us would no longer be able to enjoy coffee, chocolate and apples, among many other ...
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Islands and their biodiversity 28.4.2016 The Earth Times Online Newspaper - Environment News
A new theory on why we have such biodiverse islands, while some are literally desert has been long in coming, but it’s here.
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Mobile "half-plant, half-machine" cybernetic geodesic garden preserves native plant species 26.4.2016 TreeHugger
A cybernetically enhanced garden that is able to move on its own, to fulfill its mission of protecting local plant species.
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Climate Change Alters Genes of a Mustard Plant 14.4.2016 Green on HuffingtonPost.com
California got a bit more rain and snow this year thanks to El Niño, but is still suffering the effects of many years of drought. This drought is one example of the many extreme events, including storms and fires, that are increasing in frequency as the global climate continues to change. Not only does the drought in California affect the lives of millions of people, but it also has major impacts on many other living things. While some species are declining or going extinct as a result of climatic changes, others may be able to adapt. Understanding how they do so is profoundly important for conservation. Furthermore, examining how climate change alters species gives us the opportunity to increase our understanding of the process of evolution, particularly when we can catch them in the act of evolving. In an article my collaborators and I recently published in the journal Molecular Ecology , we examined how a drought that occurred in southern California between 1997 and 2004 influenced genetic changes in ...
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5 ways to connect with nature this spring 13.4.2016 TreeHugger
Spring has sprung so get outside, get dirty and connect with the nature you love!
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This Is What Dessert Would Look Like Without Bees 13.4.2016 Politics on HuffingtonPost.com
Slide the bar over the image above to reveal what the dessert counter would look like without pollinators. Bad news for those with a sweet tooth: the absence of pollinators such as bees and butterflies would signal the end of dessert as we know it. Whole Foods Market recently removed all products from an area of the supermarket reliant on the creatures, mirroring past initiatives in the diary aisle and the produce section . The results, seen above in the bakery department for the company's Share the Buzz campaign, are dramatic. Without pollinators , 95 percent of dessert items the grocery chain stocks would either disappear completely or need to be drastically altered. Pollinators including hummingbirds, flies, beetles and moths help in the production of nearly 75 percent of crops and an equal proportion of flowering plants. Foods like chocolate , vanilla, coffee , almonds and berries wouldn't be available without them. Even dairy products used in desserts like cheesecake and creme brulee would be harder ...
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Why You Should Plant Milkweed Right Now 12.4.2016 Green on HuffingtonPost.com
I don't usually tell people what to do (probably because very few people would do what I say anyway), but I'm going to tell you what to do... plant some milkweed! Spring is here, and it's time to plant milkweed (if you haven't already). If you're planting your garden... plant some milkweed too. If you're planting flowers... plant some milkweed too. If you aren't planting anything, plant some milkweed anyway! At this point, you may be wondering, what is milkweed, and what's my obsession with it? You might not be familiar with milkweed, but you're probably familiar with the iconic orange and black Monarch butterfly. Milkweed (a weed) is the ONLY plant the Monarch caterpillar can eat, and thus is it's only food source. Unfortunately, today in the US there is a lot less milkweed, which means there are a lot fewer Monarch butterflies. In fact, the population of Monarch butterflies has dropped so much in the past twenty years, it is possible that the Monarch butterfly could face quasi-extinction in our ...
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These Photos Capture The Startling Effect Of Shrinking Bee Populations 7.4.2016 Green on HuffingtonPost.com
In parts of rural China, humans are doing the work bees once did.  Striking new photos show farm workers in Hanyuan county, in China's Sichuan province, painstakingly applying pollen to flowers by hand.  Hanyuan county is known as the "world's pear capital." But pesticide use has led to a  drastic reduction in the area's bee population, threatening the fruit crop. Workers now pollinate fruit trees artificially, carefully transferring pollen from male flowers to female flowers to fertilize them. For photographer Kevin Frayer, the images of human pollinators tell a story of both loss and human creativity.  "On the one hand it's a story about the human toll on the environment, while on the other it shows our ability to be more efficient in spite of it all," Frayer told The Huffington Post.  Bee populations are declining worldwide, according to a February report from the United Nations. Shrinking numbers of bees could result in the loss of "hundreds of billions of dollars" worth of crops every year. But in ...
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Monarch butterflies face substantial risk of extinction 7.4.2016 rabble.ca - News for the rest of us
Thursday, April 7, 2016 Like this article? rabble is reader-supported journalism. Chip in to keep stories like these coming. Preventing monarch extinction will require active intervention by humans on a variety of fronts. It's an opportunity for those of us who believe that abundant nature enhances the quality of our ...
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Got milkweed? Monarchs still need your help 6.4.2016 rabble.ca - News for the rest of us
Like this article? rabble is reader-supported journalism. Chip in to keep stories like these coming. Three years ago, the eastern monarch butterfly population plummeted to 35 million , a drop of more than 95 per cent since the 1990s. More than a billion milkweed plants, which monarchs depend on for survival, had been lost throughout the butterfly's migratory range -- from overwintering sites in Mexico to summer habitat in ...
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Calls for Billions of People to Plant Billions of Trees 31.3.2016 Green on HuffingtonPost.com
"At first, I thought I was fighting to save rubber trees, then I thought I was fighting to save the Amazon rainforest. Now I realize I am fighting for humanity." -- Chico Mendes, Martyred Brazilian environmentalist (Right to left), Mary Evelyn Tucker, co-director of the Forum on Religion and Ecology at Yale University, Diana Beresford-Kroeger, botanist and forest activist, Joanne Campell, Graton Rancheria Tribal Council, and Wendy Johnson, ordained lay dharma teacher. Photo 2016 by Elizabeth Fenwick for Point Reyes Books. Diana Beresford-Kroeger appears to be following the dictum, "Make no little plans." The 71-year-old self-described "renegade scientist" has a plan to put everyone on Earth to work planting trees. Her "Bioplan" calls on every able-bodied person to plant a tree a year for six years to bring back the world's lost forests. Her work was the inspiration for a recent day-long, " Call of the Forest: Water, Climate, Spirit " conference attended by more than 200 people in the Northern California ...
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8 easy food swaps that help the planet 26.3.2016 TreeHugger
Ditch the resource-hogging foods for these delicious switches that leave a lighter footstep.
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Prickly business: Illegal trafficking now threatens the cactus more than mammals or birds 17.3.2016 rabble.ca - News for the rest of us
Like this article? rabble is reader-supported journalism. Chip in to keep stories like these coming. It's prickly business for cactus researchers, thanks to a host of threats facing the species. Though cacti are known best to many Canadians as drought-tolerant houseplants, their wild members are in big trouble -- and it's likely to get ...
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Honey Nut Cheerios Wants You To Know About Our Threatened Bee Population 15.3.2016 Green on HuffingtonPost.com
With a smartly redesigned cereal box, Honey Nut Cheerios in Canada is calling attention to the massive decline of the bee population . The brand has removed its iconic mascot, Buzz the bee, from its box and is calling for a solution to stabilize the honey bee species with its new campaign #BringBackTheBees . "Buzz is missing because there’s something serious going on with the world’s bees ," the campaign website reads. "With deteriorating bee colony health, bees everywhere have been disappearing by the millions and it’s time we all did something about it." Along with the striking design that will bring the issue to consumers' attention, General Mills is giving away free wildflower seed packs (you can request yours here ) for people to plant. "One third of the foods we depend on for our survival are made possible by the natural pollination work that bees provide ," Emma Eriksson, Director of Marketing for General Mills Canada, said in a press release. "With ongoing losses in bee populations being reported ...
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Desert cactus purifies contaminated water for aquaculture, drinking and more 14.3.2016 Environmental News Network
Farm-grown fish are an important source of food with significant and worldwide societal and economic benefits, but the fish that come from these recirculating systems can have unpleasant tastes and odors. To clean contaminated water for farmed fish, drinking and other uses, scientists are now turning to an unlikely source -- the mucilage or inner "guts" of cacti.
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Beyond the Birds and the Bees: Recognizing the Fundamental Link Between Women and Biodiversity on International Women's Day 7.3.2016 Green on HuffingtonPost.com
March 8 is International Women's Day -- a time to stop, reflect, appreciate and champion women around the globe. Women are leaders, professors, engineers and farmers, they are core to human existence. Women also make up make up significant majorities of the world's poorest populations and produce more than half of the food that is grown , yet their voices are rarely heard when decisions are made on biodiversity and the environment. For many women, biodiversity is the foundation of their livelihoods, their cultural beliefs and even their basic survival. In addition to the obvious ecological services that biodiversity provides, collection and use of natural resources is of critical importance. Women around the world predominate as wild plant gatherers, guardians of biodiversity, plant domesticators, herbalists and seed custodians. Often however, the indivisible link between women and biodiversity goes ignored or undervalued. Although nature is important to all humankind, women and men rely on it in diverse ...
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"A Democracy Problem": As Debate Brings Attention to Flint, a Look at the Roots of the Water Crisis 7.3.2016 Democracy Now!
The Democratic candidates for president faced off Sunday night in Flint, Michigan, which has been in the national spotlight over the poisoning of the city's water. The crisis began in 2014, when an unelected emergency manager appointed by Michigan Governor Rick Snyder switched the source of the city’s drinking water from the Detroit system to the corrosive Flint River. Last month, Democracy Now! went to Flint and spoke to residents on the front lines of Michigan’s water wars. Lead contamination in the water supply has forced residents to drink, cook with and even bathe in bottled water, while still paying some of the highest water bills in the country. We then went from Flint to Mecosta County, Michigan, where Nestlé, the world’s largest water bottling company, is pumping millions of gallons of water from aquifers that feed Lake Michigan.
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Monarch Butterfly Population Soars, Thanks To Conservation Efforts 3.3.2016 Green on HuffingtonPost.com
Social butterflies, indeed. The World Wildlife Fund has announced that upon the monarch butterflies’ return to its winter grounds -- a cluster of mountain forests in Mexico City -- last October , the population had increased dramatically over the past year. The orange-and-black winged beauties are counted by the amount of area a rabble (their cute collective noun) covers. This year they have blanketed 10 acres of land -- a huge jump from 2014 when they took up only 2.8 acres. "The good news coming from Mexico makes me enormously enthusiastic," Dan Ashe, the director of the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, said in a press conference this week, according to  CNN . "It indicated that we have the capacity to save the monarch butterfly of North America." Though this is a massive improvement from 2013, when the monarch butterfly population hit an all-time low at 1.66 acres according to The AP , 10 acres still isn’t as much as the population covered 20 years ago. According to World Wildlife Fund, in 1996, the ...
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