User: flenvcenter Topic: Biodiversity-Independent
Category: Specific Organisms :: Plants
Last updated: Aug 28 2016 21:52 IST RSS 2.0
 
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Climate Change Pledges Not Nearly Enough to Save Tropical Ecosystems 28.8.2016 Truthout - All Articles
US Secretary of State John Kerry signs the Paris Agreement at the UN in New York while holding granddaughter Dobbs Higginson on his lap. Scientists warn that the agreement is insufficient to prevent disastrous climate change. (Photo courtesy of US Department of State) The Paris Agreement marked the biggest political milestone to combat climate change since scientists first introduced us in the late 1980s to perhaps humanity's greatest existential crisis. Last December, 178 nations pledged to do their part to keep global average temperatures from rising more than 2 degrees Celsius (3.6 degrees Fahrenheit) over preindustrial levels -- adding on an even more challenging, but aspirational goal of holding temperatures at 1.5 degrees Celsius (2.7 degrees Fahrenheit). To this end, each nation produced a pledge to cut it's own carbon emissions, targeting everything from the burning of fossil fuels to deforestation to agriculture. It seems like a Herculean task, bound, the optimistic say, to bring positive ...
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Restoring the Climate: War Is Not the Answer 26.8.2016 Commondreams.org Views
Judith Schwartz

Author and climate activist Bill McKibben has published a manifesto to “declare war” on climate change. While I agree about the urgency, I question the wisdom of invoking warfare. For one, how well have our battles against vast, multifaceted problems worked out?

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Lawsuit Launched to Speed Endangered Species Act Protection for 417 Species 23.8.2016 Commondreams.org Newswire
Center for Biological Diversity The Center for Biological Diversity today filed a formal notice of intent to sue the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service for failing to act on petitions to protect more than 417 animals and plants under the Endangered Species Act. The notice includes species from across the United States, including Florida sandhill cranes, coastal flatwood crayfish, eastern diamondback rattlesnakes and many ...
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Delta flood’s carbon footprint, floodplain fallout and purple fungi fighters 22.8.2016 Current Issue
HCN.org news in brief.
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The Climate Catastrophe Cannot Be Reversed Within the Capitalist Culture 18.8.2016 Truthout.com
The biodiversity that supports the planetary ecosystem as we and our ancestors have known it is imperiled. We face a clear choice: radical political transformation or deepening mass extinction. Did you know that the Earth loses about one hundred species every day? In Extinction: A Radical History, Ashley Dawson ties together history, science and political theory to explain the impact of humans and capitalism on the world's ecosystems. Get your copy of this book by making a tax-deductible donation to Truthout! The following is the introduction to Extinction: A Radical History: His face was hacked off. Left prostrate in the red dust, to be preyed on by vultures, his body remained intact except for the obscene hole where his magnificent six foot long tusks used to be. Satao was a so-called tusker, an African elephant with a rare genetic strain that produced tusks so long that they dangled to the ground, making him a prime attraction in Kenya's Tsavo East National Park. These beautiful tusks also made him ...
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Flowering meadows benefit humankind 18.8.2016 Environmental News Network
The more it swarms, crawls and flies the better it is for humans. This is the finding of a study published in "Nature". More than 60 researchers from a number of universities were involved, including the Technical University of Munich, the Institute of Plant Sciences at the University of Bern and the Senckenberg Biodiversity and Climate Research Centre in Frankfurt. A diverse ecosystem populated by many species from all levels of the food chain provides higher levels of ecosystem services, the team reports. Even rather unpopular insects and invisible soil-dwelling organisms are important in maintaining a wide range of ecosystem services. The results underline the necessity of maintaining species-rich ecosystems for the good of humanity.
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18 Years of Data Links Neonics to Bee Decline 17.8.2016 CommonDreams.org Headlines
Nadia Prupis, staff writer

New evidence shows that the controversial pesticides known as neonicotinoids, or neonics, could be linked to bee population decline.

A new study, published Tuesday in the journal Nature Communications, looks at wild bee populations relative to the use of neonics on the oilseed rape plant in England over 18 years, from 1994-2011. The researchers found that population extinction rates went up along with the pesticide use on the plants, which are widespread throughout the country.

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Wildlife Conservation And Healthy Diet Are Closely Entwined 17.8.2016 Green on HuffingtonPost.com
Your Plant-Based Ambassador: Image by Dana Ellis Hunnes We all want to look our best, be our skinniest and healthiest selves, right? Well, I've got the secret. See, I've been a dietitian, working with individuals and patients for over 12 years. I've seen patients who eat every type of diet you have and have not heard of; from the Paleo, to the Atkins, to the Zone, to the blood-type diet. You know what? None of them worked long-term. Not only that, they never really helped the underlying disease or "problems" that the patients had; and believe me, I work with the sickest of the sick patients. I work with organ-transplant patients, cardiac patients, and all types of surgical-cancer patients. In all these years, and with all these patients, and with all my research. The one diet that works best for almost anyone**, whether you want to lose weight, reverse disease, lower your cholesterol levels, or just have clearer skin; is the plant-based diet. Not only that, but, the plant-based diet is the only diet ...
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Fueling Extinction: Fed's Protection of Endangered Species Moving At Snail's Pace 17.8.2016 Green on HuffingtonPost.com
An often cited standard response time for emergency workers in many localities is nine minutes or less. So you can only imagine the outrage, and additional loss of life, if first-responders routinely took six times longer to arrive - 54 minutes. A new peer-reviewed study suggests that's exactly what's happening when it comes to providing endangered species protections for the Nation's most critically imperiled species. Under the Endangered Species Act, the U.S. Fish and Wildlife is required to determine whether imperiled plants and animals need to be officially listed as threatened or endangered in no more than two years. But a new study I co-authored in the international scientific journal Biological Conservation found that over the past four decades, imperiled species have waited an average of more than 12 years to receive protection -- six times longer that the law allows. The study, co-authored with Fordham University postdoctoral associate Dr. Emily Puckett and Dr. Dylan Kesler, a research associate ...
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Study: Endangered Species Protection Taking Six Times Longer Than Law Allows 8.8.2016 Commondreams.org Newswire
Center for Biological Diversity A new study in the international scientific journal Biological Conservation finds that over the past 40 years, imperiled species have waited more than 12 years on average to receive protection under the Endangered Species Act, despite the fact that under the law, the process is supposed to take no more than two ...
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Inside a seed museum meant to track plant response to climate change 8.8.2016 High Country News Most Recent
Researchers have collected seeds from across the country in a quiet Colorado storage facility.
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'Bundy Militia' Pocket Constitution Tops Amazon Charts Amidst Trump-Khan Feud 4.8.2016 Commondreams.org Newswire
'Bundy Militia' Pocket Constitution Tops Amazon Charts Amidst Trump-Khan Feud
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Butterflies use differences in leaf shape to distinguish between plants 29.7.2016 Environmental News Network
The preference of Heliconius butterflies for certain leaf shapes is innate, but can be reversed through learning. These results support a decades-old theory for explaining the evolution of the exceptional diversity of leaf shapes in passionflowers.The tropical butterfly Heliconius eratodistinguishes between shapes, and uses them as a cue for choosing the plants on which to feed and lay eggs, shows new research by scientists from the University of Cambridge and the Smithsonian Tropical Research Institute. The butterfly has an innate preference for passionflowers with particular leaf shapes, but can learn to overcome this preference in favor of other shapes, especially those that are the most abundant in the local flora. These preferences can promote the evolution of plant biodiversity.
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Photo: Tule elk doesn't exactly hide in the grass 26.7.2016 TreeHugger
It's not easy being discreet when you have such an impressive set of antlers.
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What is an invasive species? 23.7.2016 TreeHugger
These organisms are destroying ecosystems across the globe, costing humans billions of dollars in damages.
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Investigation: EPA Approved Nearly 100 Pesticide Products Without Accounting for Dangers of Chemical Mixtures 19.7.2016 Commondreams.org Newswire
Center for Biological Diversity The Environmental Protection Agency has approved nearly 100 pesticide products over the past six years that contain mixtures that make them more poisonous and increase the dangers to imperiled pollinators and rare plants, according to an investigation by the Center for Biological Diversity. These “synergistic” combinations have been widely overlooked by the EPA in its approval of pesticides for food, lawns and other ...
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The 10 Most Sustainable Restaurants in America 19.7.2016 Green on HuffingtonPost.com
While taste is obviously huge when it comes to food, we are approaching an age where making food more sustainable is taking a front seat . If you were one of the millions of people that were sobbing hysterically when Leonardo DiCaprio won his well-deserved Academy Award, you got to hear him speak about how passionate he is about helping to save our Earth. Sustainability is all about moving in an eco-friendly direction by reducing waste, composting, recycling, and focusing on conservation. Many restaurants throughout the U.S. have been trying to become more sustainable and are now serving more organic food than ever before. Here are a few restaurant chains across the country that have been practicing sustainability and making food without harmful add-ons. 1.  Mixt Greens With two locations in Los Angeles and six in San Francisco, Mixt Greens offers healthy options like salads and sandwiches that are made only with organic ingredients. They also use compostable packaging, which is eco-friendly, while using ...
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Uttar Pradesh In India Planted Almost 50 Million Trees In Just 24 Hours 18.7.2016 Green on HuffingtonPost.com
A state in India got to the root of a serious problem. More than 800,000 government officials, students and volunteers from Indian’s most populous state planted 49.3 million trees in 24 hours on July 11, according to Popular Science . Officials in Uttar Pradesh passed out millions of saplings to be planted all over the state so it could increase its forest cover. The shade-surging drive was part of a pledge India made at 2015’s climate change summit in Paris to increase the nation’s forest cover by 235 million acres by 2030 . The government has also designated more than $6.2 billion to plant trees all over India. According to a May 2016 study published in the journal Geophysical Research Letters, air pollution in India contributes to more than half a million premature deaths each year. Planting the saplings won’t completely zap the country’s pollution problem but Uttar Pradesh’s top elected official, Chief Minister Akhilesh Yadav, hopes the event will raise awareness and get people pumped about ...
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A Growing Crisis: Insects are Disappearing — And Fast 14.7.2016 Environmental News Network
We all know about the huge declines in bee and monarch butterfly populations. Now, it turns out that in some areas nearly all insects are at risk of extinction. And if we don’t solve this problem soon, the repercussions could be huge.Insects are an important part of the global ecosystem. They not only provide important pollination services, but they also occupy an important place on the bottom of the food chain for many animals. Fewer insects means less food, leading to plant and animal population declines.“The growing threat to [insects], which play an important role in food security, provides another compelling example of how connected people are to our environment, and how deeply entwined our fate is with that of the natural world,” said Achim Steiner, the executive director of the United Nations Environment Program, in a press statement.
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Phosphorus pollution poses a major threat to the world's lakes 14.7.2016 TreeHugger
Humans dump millions of tons of phosphorus into lakes every year, and it's destroying their ecosystems.
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