User: flenvcenter Topic: Biodiversity-Independent
Category: Specific Organisms :: Plants
Last updated: Jan 17 2017 01:01 IST RSS 2.0
 
1 to 20 of 1,499    
Pee for Plants 17.1.2017 Green on HuffingtonPost.com
Lately there has been a whole lot of talk about golden showers. For most people, showers are something that come in April and fall from the clouds in the sky, not something you go to Russian hotel rooms to find. That is as it should be. Instead we are focusing on urine and its relationship to our soon to be inaugurated PEEOTUS. In general, urine is something we think about only when we have to find a bathroom. Some exceptions: If you are into water conservation you may ascribe to the 'if it's yellow let it mellow' school of toilet flushing. If you have prostate issues, well, you have my sympathies. But there is a good way that urine can go with showers. Urine comes out of you sterile- so even if you are a 'germaphobe' it is safe to use. It also contains all of the necessary plant nutrients. So- with a little dilution- you can combine that urine with those April showers (or water from the hose or tap) and get truly spectacular May flowers ...
Also found in: [+]
On wildness: Community and control in urban green space 13.1.2017 rabble.ca - News for the rest of us
Friday, January 13, 2017 The city is a structured place. Roads and sidewalks follow mainly straight lines, while houses, apartment buildings, offices and shops march dutifully alongside them, one after the other. Many of us live structured lives within our concrete, highly controlled world, following the schedules, routines, and norms of our workplaces and leisure activities. Urban green space is often no different -- processions of trees stand on manicured turf and garden beds are filled with neat lines of annuals. Community use of park space is defined and limited by a stifling array of municipal policies, bylaws, permits and red tape. The wild and wayward life of a tiny, disproportionately lively square of parkland in Toronto's west end has a lesson to teach us about the rewards of relinquishing ...
Also found in: [+]
PRESSURE FROM GRAZERS HASTENS ECOSYSTEM COLLAPSE FROM DROUGHT 12.1.2017 Environmental News Network
Extreme droughts, intensified by a warming climate, are increasingly causing ecosystem collapse in many regions worldwide. But models used by scientists to predict the tipping points at which drought stress leads to ecosystem collapse have proven unreliable and too optimistic.A new study by scientists at Duke University and Beijing Normal University may hold the answer why.   The researchers found that these tipping points can happen much sooner than current models predict because of the added pressures placed on drought-weakened plants by grazing animals and fungal pathogens.
Also found in: [+]
They Lost Their Jungles to Plantations, but These Indigenous Women Grew Them Back 11.12.2016 Truthout - All Articles
It is early morning in Dhepagudi, a sleepy hamlet nestled in the green hills of Odisha, India. Admai Kumruka is sifting millet in a traditional sieve made of bamboo strips. Children mill around, playing on a mud and sand mound. A few huts down, Rello Dindika is sorting through harvested corn. A group of women are chopping fresh pumpkin leaves and flowers for a stir-fry dish. They have finished morning chores and farming work and are now preparing breakfast. Some of the corn will be ground to a powder for a wholesome porridge. The rest will be popped in clay vessels for evening snacks. "We have mandya or kosla [varieties of millets] or maka [corn] porridge in the mornings sometimes with roots and tubers or gondri saag [a variety of greens] foraged from the jungles," Kumruka says. "In the afternoons and evenings, we make rice with tubers, vegetables and legumes. Sometimes we add wild mushrooms or jhotta [okra] and holud [turmeric roots]." The women belong to the Khond community, a large indigenous tribal ...
Also found in: [+]
Awesome Is What The 2016 National Geographic 'Nature Photographer Of The Year' Winners Are 10.12.2016 Green on HuffingtonPost.com
Just like last year , the winners of the 2016 National Geographic Nature Photographer of the Year Contest  amaze and astound us.  This year the Grand Prize goes to Greg Lecoeur ’s jaw-dropping shot of the feeding frenzy that accompanies sardine migration along the Wild Coast of South Africa.  Additional prizes are given in four categories: Action, Animal Portraits, Landscapes and Environmental Issues.  Check out the rest of the awesome  photography  below: -- This feed and its contents are the property of The Huffington Post, and use is subject to our terms. It may be used for personal consumption, but may not be distributed on a ...
Also found in: [+]
How You Can Help Save The Bees -- Even In Winter 25.11.2016 Green on HuffingtonPost.com
America’s bees haven’t had the best year. Last month, seven species of Hawaiian bees were declared endangered in the United States — a first for the insect. There are fears that the rusty-patched bumble bee , endemic to North America, is also nearing extinction. Researchers discovered earlier this year that U.S. beekeepers had lost more than 42 percent of their honeybee colonies since 2015. “What we’re seeing with this bee problem is just a loud signal that there’s some bad things happening with our agro-ecosystems,” said study co-author Keith Delaplane in May. Bees are vital to our food supply. About 65 percent of plant species rely on the creatures for pollination. “A world without bees would be almost impossible to contemplate ,” wrote entomologist Mark Winston in his 2014 book Bee Time. Worryingly, however, in the past decade, there’s been a “precipitous drop” in bee populations around the world, Winston said. The insects are under threat from a range of perils, including pesticides and other ...
Also found in: [+]
What's the best way to improve bee habitats? 24.11.2016 Energy & Climate | Greenbiz.com
There’s more to making pollinators happy than planting lots of flowers.
Also found in: [+]
Latest: Feds plan sagebrush survey 21.11.2016 High Country News Most Recent
The data could provide a blueprint for science-based decisions.
Also found in: [+]
What's the Best Way to Improve Bee Habitat? 20.11.2016 Truthout.com
Each morning last summer, Michael Roswell walked through restored meadows and abandoned New Jersey farm fields, where leggy grasses and weeds grew unchecked and thick patches of bee balm, black-eyed Susans, mountain mints, goldenrod and purple-loosestrife added shots of magenta, yellow, and white. Each time a bee landed, Roswell would swing his sweep net, capturing the insect so he could identify it by species. A doctoral student at Rutgers University, he was trying to answer a seemingly simple question: What kinds of flowers do bees like? The answer may be complicated. A  recent analysis  by researchers at the US Geological Survey detected genetic material from more than 260 different flowering plant groups in the pollen of North Dakota honeybees. And honeybees are just one species: All told, the  US Department of Agriculture estimates  there are  more than 4,000 bee species  in the United States alone. A field bursting with blooms is a bee's delight. Researchers are working to identify how to optimize ...
Also found in: [+]
Friday's Morning Email: Trump Picks National Security Adviser And Attorney General 18.11.2016 Politics on HuffingtonPost.com
TOP STORIES TRUMP OFFERS RETIRED GENERAL MIKE FLYNN POSITION AS NATIONAL SECURITY ADVISER The job means that Flynn would be Trump’s safeguard in final decisions about encounters in the South China Sea or flyovers with Russia . Take a look at the retired three-star general’s controversial remarks during the campaign, which included defending the Muslim ban proposal and waterboarding . Trump has also offered Alabama Sen. Jeff Sessions the position of attorney general , the nation’s top law enforcement officer.  John Bolton and Mitt Romney are the top contenders for secretary of state. [ Marina Fang, HuffPost ] TRUMP CLAIMS CREDIT FOR KEEPING FORD PLANT FROM CLOSING IN KENTUCKY Only problem? The plant was never closing. [ Arthur Delaney, HuffPost ] JAPANESE-AMERICAN LAWMAKERS CALL ON TRUMP TO DENOUNCE INTERNMENT CAMP COMMENTS FROM SUPPORTER And to condemn the suggestion to return to “one of the darkest chapters in American history.” [ Carla Herreria, HuffPost ] THE NORTH POLE IS 36 DEGREES WARMER THAN IT ...
Also found in: [+]
Saving seeds in the North Pole 18.11.2016 Business Operations | GreenBiz.com
With American climate policy now highly uncertain, the founder of the Svalbard Global Seed Vault talks about his efforts to protect our agricultural future.
Also found in: [+]
Arup designs a living wall scaffold for London renovation 4.11.2016 TreeHugger
It looks a lot better than the usual kind, cleans the air and absorbs noise.
Also found in: [+]
Headlines for October 27, 2016 27.10.2016 Democracy Now!
Airstrike Hits Syrian School, Killing 22, Mostly Children, U.S., Britain Pledges Troops in NATO Buildup on Russian Border, U.S. Adds Secret Drone Base in Tunisia, Pipeline Guards Could Face Charges for Unleashing Dogs on Protesters, Authorities Shut Down Roads & Airspace Near Pipeline, 15 Arrested at Sen. Schumer's Office Protesting Spectra Energy AIM Pipeline, Hacked Emails Reveal Clinton Aides Worried About Foundation Activity, Hundreds of Residents of Trump Place in NYC Sign "Dump the Trump Name" Petition, Ex-GOP Congressmember: "If Trump Loses, I'm Grabbing My Musket", For First Time U.S. Abstains U.N. Vote Condemning Cuban Embargo, WWF: Two-Thirds of World's Wildlife Could Be Gone by 2020 in "Sixth Extinction", Ten Immigrant Rights Arrested After Chaining Themselves to GW Bridge, Green Party Senatorial Candidate in Maryland Disrupts Debate After Being Excluded
Also found in: [+]
Molecular signature shows plants are adapting to increasing atmospheric carbon dioxide 26.10.2016 Environmental News Network
Plants are adapting to increasing atmospheric carbon dioxide according to a new study from the University of SouthamptonThe research, published in the journal Global Change Biology, provides insight into the long-term impacts of rising CO2 and the implications for global food security and nature conservation.Lead author Professor Gail Taylor, from Biological Sciences at the University of Southampton, said: “Atmospheric CO2 is rising – emissions grew faster in the 2000s than the 1990s and the concentration of CO2 reached 400 ppm for the first time in recorded history in 2013.
Also found in: [+]
The Monarch Migration in Peril! 16.10.2016 Green on HuffingtonPost.com
In partnership with The Monarch Butterfly Fund, Monarch Watch and other partners, The Nobelity Project is releasing my new short film on the Monarchs and how we can all help save the migration. Watch the film; read the story; do your part. Monarchs: The Milkweed Mission from The Nobelity Project on Vimeo . When I was kid, the bi-annual migrations of Monarch butterflies through Texas was pure joy - blue skies filled with clouds of giant, orange butterflies winging south in the Fall and north in the Spring. We knew the Monarchs went to Mexico for the winter, but not much more as this was years before the decades old mystery of the monarchs was solved by the 1975 discovery of the Monarch's winter retreat atop forested mountains in Michoacan. I first saw the winter spectacle twenty-plus years ago when writing a story about the Monarchs for Texas Monthly magazine. Levels of tourism in the Butterfly reserves were still low, and my adventure began with an old man pointing an ancient Spanish blunderbuss at me in ...
Also found in: [+]
One university's fight against invasive species 12.10.2016 TreeHugger
How Cornell University is protecting its nature preserves from the threat of invasive plants and animals.
Also found in: [+]
Create a viral grassroots sustainability program in 7 steps 20.9.2016 Small Business | GreenBiz.com
Sponsored article: The passions of our employees can be your greatest asset when launching a major sustainability effort. Here's a case study from CH2M.
Also found in: [+]
Chasing the rarest bumblebee in the world 15.9.2016 Writers on the Range
A group of Oregonians searches for the disappearing Franklin’s bee.
Also found in: [+]
Climbers Are Scaling The World's Tallest Trees In An Effort To Save Them 7.9.2016 Politics on HuffingtonPost.com
A group of dedicated tree-climbers are scaling towering trees in an effort to help heal the planet. Protected with little more than a harness and some rope,arborist Jake Milarch has scaled redwoods topping 300 feet — that’s as tall as the Statue of Liberty. “It’s a humbling experience being next to something so big and so old,” said Milarch from his home in Copemish, Michigan, last month. “Some of these trees have survived for 4,000 years. It’s pretty cool.” Climbing these enormous trees is electrifying, but Milarch’s ascents aren’t for mere thrill-seeking. His family runs the nonprofit  Archangel Ancient Tree Archive , which has attempted to preserve some of America’s biggest and most ancient old-growth trees since its founding seven years ago. The arborists climb these trees to collect genetic material from their branches. The goal: to clone this material for safekeeping and reforestation elsewhere . “Old-growth trees are some of the largest, oldest things on Earth,” said David Milarch, Jake Milarch’s ...
Also found in: [+]
Defense bill threatens sage grouse survival 7.9.2016 Writers on the Range
A sneaky amendment would block protection under the Endangered Species Act.
Also found in: [+]
1 to 20 of 1,499