User: flenvcenter Topic: Biodiversity-Independent
Category: Specific Organisms :: Plants
Last updated: Feb 27 2015 04:39 IST RSS 2.0
 
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Dog Who Was Homeless For 10 Years Moves Into A Warm, Loving Home 27.2.2015 Green on HuffingtonPost.com
Donations are pouring in to make sure that a dog who spent the last decade outside in a New York City park will never want for anything, ever again. Charlie -- who is also known as Ricky -- had been seen around Highbridge Park in upper Manhattan for about 10 years before a group of residents banded together to save him this month. Post by Ricky Charlie Highbridge Park Dog . Neighbors like Yuliya Avezbakiyeva and her mother, who'd been bringing Charlie food for years, thought the dog seemed more vulnerable after the pack he used to spend time with disappeared over the last half-decade. Dog walker Denise Lauffer told The Huffington Post that recently, she'd felt Charlie seemed to be having trouble with his hips, too. They and and others grew even more concerned this winter after noticing their favorite wild canine wasn't eating the food that folks in the area left out for him. With the weather growing harsher -- the average minimum temperature in New York was 9 degrees the week that Charlie was finally ...
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Oregon Gray Wolf Population Rebounding, But Remains Fragile 26.2.2015 Green on HuffingtonPost.com
By Courtney Sherwood PORTLAND, Ore., Feb 25 (Reuters) - Oregon's once decimated gray wolf population has rebounded to at least 77 animals, and the wolves are now pairing off and breeding across a wide region, state officials with the state's Department of Fish and Wildlife said on Wednesday. Gray wolves, native to Oregon but wiped out in the state by an eradication campaign in the early 20th century, first returned there in 2008 and have now spread out to multiple parts of the Pacific Northwest state. "The wolf population continues to grow and expand, and for the first time we've had wolf reproduction in southern Oregon," said Michelle Dennehy, spokeswoman for the state wildlife department. "And we had eight breeding pairs last year. We also documented six new pairs of wolves, and 26 pups." But as population growth triggers a review of state Endangered Species Act restrictions on harassing or killing wolves that threaten livestock, conservationists cautioned it remained too early to ...
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Friendly Fungi Could Help Barley Growers 24.2.2015 Environmental News Network
Botanists from Trinity College Dublin have made a breakthrough discovery that could save barley farmers sleepless nights and millions of Euro each year: naturally occurring plant-friendly fungi prevent crop-ravishing diseases from spreading, and also aid plant survival in testing environmental conditions. Importantly, these amazing little organisms cause no harm to the plant roots in which they take up their abode. However, their gift of immunity against common seed diseases greatly reduces the need for farmers to spray environmentally damaging chemicals, which can affect ecosystems in a plethora of negative ways.
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Watch Adorable Baby Otters Adorably Eating Breakfast 24.2.2015 Green on HuffingtonPost.com
Breakfast has never been cuter. Just look at bits of food get stuck on the chin of one of these rescued baby otters! OK, so it's the pups who really supply the charm, but you get the message. The little critters can make anything more adorable. Post by Conservancy of Southwest Florida . This particular pair was found unresponsive in Naples, Florida, and taken to von Arx Wildlife Hospital at the Conservancy of Southwest Florida by the hospital director herself, Joanna Fitzgerald. Both are doing much better , CSF staff wrote on Facebook. If breakfast isn't the most important meal of the day, these two have certainly made it the most ...
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Lions Rescued From Circuses In Peru Get Their Teeth Fixed 21.2.2015 Green on HuffingtonPost.com
LIMA, Peru (AP) — King was unable to chew normally because most of his teeth had been pulled by the circus owners. Simba's front claws had been removed and his fangs broken. The lions were among 21 rescued from Peruvian circuses in 2014 by members of Los Angeles-based Animal Defenders International. Activists say the lions were kept in appalling conditions. "In the circuses they often break their teeth and remove their claws," said Eva Chomba, a Peruvian veterinarian with Animal Defenders. "It's a painful process in which they do not use anesthesia and those doing it are not veterinarians." On Friday, a team of veterinarians sedated King and Simba to perform dental surgery on the big cats, which weigh more than 160 kilograms (352 pounds) and are 17 and 7 years old, respectively. U.S. veterinarian Peter Emily, founder of the Peter Emily International Veterinary Dental Foundation, said a previous oral surgery on King had created a small hole between his mouth and nose that had become badly infected. The ...
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Unprecedented California Sea Lion Strandings Linked To Warmer Pacific 19.2.2015 Green on HuffingtonPost.com
By Mary Papenfuss SAN FRANCISCO, Feb 18 (Reuters) - The strandings of a record number of sea lion pups along the California coast this year are linked to a puzzling weather pattern that has warmed their Pacific Ocean habitat and likely impacted fish populations they rely on for food, federal scientists said on Wednesday. Some 940 stranded sea lions, mostly pups, have been treated by marine mammal centers in California so far this year, according to Justin Viezbicke, West Coast Stranding Coordinator for the U.S. National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration. That is well above the 240 strandings typically seen through April, and scientists suspect the emaciated pups are prematurely leaving Southern California sea lion rookeries to seek food on their own after their mothers failed to return swiftly from hunting trips to nurse. "These little pups, so desperate and so thin, are leaving the rookeries long before they're capable of hunting effectively," said Shawn Johnson, director of ...
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9 Great Reasons to Grow Fruits and Vegetables In the City 18.2.2015 Green on HuffingtonPost.com
1. For their taste Famous chefs, such as the ones who fill Paris's hotels and Michelin-starred restaurants, have vegetable gardens on their roofs to provide supremely fresh produce. Tomatoes, strawberries, aromatics, salad greens, or edible flowers are fragile and easily damaged in trucks, cold rooms, or stalls. Gourmets know that the taste of produce and its nutritional value are far better when they are freshly harvested. 2. To intelligently recycle our garbage Organic waste constitutes 30 percent of our garbage, and most of it is incinerated and placed in landfills. Instead, this mineral-rich waste could be transformed into compost and used to fertilize soil for urban farming. In Paris alone, we could avoid dealing with 400,000 tons of waste every year and thus decrease associated environmental hazards (garbage trucks, garbage dumps, incinerators) and their associated costs. 3. Because we can grow crops (almost) everywhere To grow aromatics, strawberries, or radishes you only need a window and a ...
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Tiny Oregon Minnow Is Now First Fish Taken Off Endangered Species List 17.2.2015 Politics on HuffingtonPost.com
GRANTS PASS, Ore. (AP) — It's official. A tiny minnow that lives only in backwaters in Oregon's Willamette Valley is the first fish to be formally removed from Endangered Species Act protection because it is no longer in danger of extinction. U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service Director Dan Ashe was to make the announcement Tuesday afternoon at a wildlife refuge outside Corvallis. The action comes 22 years after the 3-inch-long fish was first listed as an endangered species, and five years after it was upgraded to threatened. Paul Henson, Oregon director of U.S. Fish and Wildlife, said the Oregon chub demonstrates that a lot of species can be brought back from the brink of extinction, if key needs are met, such as a safe place to live, even in an urban landscape. "This doesn't mean that all of a sudden it's hands off, and we never need to do anything for them," Henson said. "But we can at least put them back in the group of species that need attention, but don't need to go into the emergency room of the ...
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Endangered Monkey Deaths At Louisiana Zoo Blamed On Worker's Negligence 13.2.2015 Green on HuffingtonPost.com
An employee's negligence on the coldest night of the year in central Louisiana killed two tiny endangered tropical monkeys last month, says the spokeswoman for the city of Alexandria. The employee had worked at the Alexandria Zoological Park since 2008 and admitted failing to properly check the cotton top tamarins on Jan. 7, Cynthia Jardon said. The black-and-white monkeys, which have a fan of white hair on their heads, are among the smallest new-world monkeys, topping out at a bit over a pound. They need temperatures of 76 to 85 degrees. The overnight low early Jan. 8 was in the teens. "As a result of this single person's act of negligence we lost Kate, 12 years old, and her 2-year-old baby girl," Jardon wrote in an email to The Associated Press. The 14-year-old male, Eddie, survived, Jardon said. Eddie was the largest of the three, and that bit of extra bulk may have saved his life, she said. He has been at the zoo since May 2008, joining Kate, who arrived in November 2007. Their daughter was called ...
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New Study Predicts Plant Responses to Drought 11.2.2015 Environmental News Network
A new U.S. Geological Survey study shows how plants’ vulnerability to drought varies across the landscape; factors such as plant structure and soil type where the plant is growing can either make them more vulnerable or protect them from declines. Recent elevated temperatures and prolonged droughts in many already water-limited regions throughout the world, including the southwestern U.S., are likely to intensify according to future climate model projections.
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Wolf Shot In Utah Was Previously First Wolf Spotted In Northern Arizona In More Than 70 Years 11.2.2015 Green on HuffingtonPost.com

SALT LAKE CITY (AP) — Federal wildlife officials say DNA tests confirm a wolf accidently shot by a hunter in Utah was the same one seen in the Grand Canyon area last year.


The U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service said Wednesday the 3-year-old female killed in late December was the first wolf seen in northern Arizona in more than 70 years.


Spokesman Steve Segin says geneticists at the University of Idaho compared the DNA from the northern gray wolf killed in southwestern Utah with samples taken from the wolf seen near the Grand Canyon last fall.


Officials have said the Utah hunter mistook the wolf for a coyote. Wolves are protected in Utah under the Endangered Species Act, and officials are investigating the death.


The wolf had worn a radio collar since January 2014.

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Australian Mammal Extinctions Blamed On Cats And Foxes 10.2.2015 Green on HuffingtonPost.com
SYDNEY (AP) — Australia has always been unique, from its geographical isolation at the bottom of the Earth to its infamous bevy of venomous creatures. Now, scientists have uncovered another unique — and disturbing — facet of Australian life: the country's mammals are going extinct at an alarmingly high rate, due in large part to a couple of critters with voracious appetites. A study published by the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences on Monday shows that more than 10 percent of the land mammal species endemic to Australia have been wiped out since European settlement. The main culprit? Cats and foxes brought to the continent by those settlers. Australia's extraordinary extinction rate has long been a source of puzzlement. In the rest of the world, the extinction of various species is generally blamed on humans who have overhunted the animals or destroyed their habitat. But in sparsely populated Australia, much of the vast, desert interior remains virtually untouched by people. By global ...
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4 Climate-Friendly Valentine's Day Gifts 7.2.2015 Green on HuffingtonPost.com
It's hard to ignore the sea of red gifts and boxes of chocolates lining the aisles in most stores this time of year. Valentine's Day is upon us. While we ponder how to best surprise our loved ones, many areas in the country are being hammered with multiple blizzards. It's hard to imagine, with several feet of snow on the ground, that winters have, on average, been getting warmer since the 1970s . According to Climate Central , there has been an overall drop in the number of nights below freezing in most cities. This increase in warmer weather throughout the world is becoming the new normal. Climate change is real. With  61 Senators (a large majority of the Senate including 15 Republican senators) admitting the scientific reality of man-made climate change, now is the time to move forward and find solutions. While discussions of political solutions to climate change are beginning to circulate, we can continue with our own personal efforts to reduce our individual carbon footprints. This Valentine's Day, ...
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Rare Golden Lion Tamarin Monkey Eaten By Otters In Accident At Britain's Bristol Zoo Gardens 6.2.2015 Green on HuffingtonPost.com

LONDON (AP) — A British zoo says an endangered monkey that accidentally fell into a pond was eaten by otters.


Bristol Zoo Gardens say the rare golden lion tamarin monkey, a squirrel-sized species native to Brazil, was climbing on a branch when it fell and became trapped in the otter enclosure last month. The zoo said staff arrived too late to intervene.


The zoo made the statement after a whistleblower disclosed a series of animal deaths at the institution, including an endangered Visayan warty piglet that was eaten by its father shortly after it was born in December. The zoo said the male pig, Elvis, also attacked and killed the piglet's mother.


The zoo's director of conservation Christoph Schwitzer said despite their best efforts, keepers are unable to prevent unforeseen accidents.

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Saving the Least Protected Habitat on Earth 4.2.2015 Green on HuffingtonPost.com
In the second episode of the new PBS series, EARTH: A New Wild , which debuts on PBS tonight, we learn about radical new ideas for restoring the planet's iconic grasslands. It may seem counterintuitive, but adding more grazing animals to damaged grasslands can restore the land to health. In tonight's episode, my former colleague Sanjayan visits the African plains, the Russian saiga, the Arctic tundra and the North American prairie to explore this idea. In each of these places we see that the plains support much more than wildlife. Grasslands are the world's breadbasket. They are where we grow our food and raise our livestock. They protect freshwater resources and regulate our climate by storing carbon dioxide. They provide an increasing number of our pharmaceuticals. And of course they provide habitat for multitudes of plants and animals. Yet grasslands are the planet's least protected and most altered terrestrial habitat. Intensive agriculture has replaced 41 percent of the world's temperate grasslands ...
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Why Dedicating Land to Bioenergy Won't Curb Climate Change 3.2.2015 Environmental News Network
This post originally was published on WRI.org.How does bioenergy contribute to a sustainable food and climate future?A new WRI paper finds bioenergy can play a modest role using wastes and other niche fuelstocks, but recommends against dedicating land to produce bioenergy. The lesson: do not grow food or grass crops for ethanol or diesel or cut down trees for electricity.Even modest quantities of bioenergy would greatly increase the global competition for land. People already use roughly three-quarters of the world’s vegetated land for crops, livestock grazing and wood harvests. The remaining land protects clean water, supports biodiversity and stores carbon in trees, shrubs and soils -- a benefit increasingly important for tackling climate change. The competition for land is growing, even without more bioenergy, to meet likely demands for at least 70 percent more food, forage and wood.
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Losing our ocean life? 1.2.2015 The Earth Times Online Newspaper - Environment News
The damage afforded by our emissions on changing the climate are compounded by large-scale pollution of the oceans and overfishing as if they are going out of fashion. And they are! The realisation here is that we are going to lose many more marine plants and animals than we thought, unless the stress of conservation shifts to less-known animals and plants.
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Oregon Snowpack At Miserable Lows As State Stares Climate Change 'Right In The Eye' 30.1.2015 Green on HuffingtonPost.com
GRANTS PASS, Ore. (AP) — Oregon's mountain snowpack, vital for farms, fish and ski resorts, is in the midst of another miserable year, posting record low depths despite normal precipitation. The reason is persistent warm weather, which is turning into the new normal as the climate heats up. "We are really kind of staring climate change right in the eye right now," said Kathie Dello, associated director of the Oregon Climate Change Institute at Oregon State University. While there will still be plentiful snowpacks in some years, overall the trend is for them to decline as average temperatures continue to rise, she said. "Last year we had a bad fire season, and that is in part due to the lack of snow," which left the ground bare, and prone to dry out, she added. Snow that builds up in the mountains serves as a natural reservoir, feeding streams and replenishing groundwater as it melts. Natural Resources Conservation Service hydrologist Julie Koeberle says there is time for things to improve, but ...
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Record Sea Lion Pup Strandings Reported In Southern California 29.1.2015 Green on HuffingtonPost.com
By Marty Graham SAN DIEGO, Jan 28 (Reuters) - California sea lions - mainly pups - are turning up stranded and starved on Southern California beaches in record numbers this year, leaving experts worried that this winter may be the worst season ever documented for the marine mammals. The precise cause is not clear, but scientists believe the sea lions are suffering from a scarcity of natural prey that forces nursing mothers to venture farther out to sea for food, leaving their young behind for longer periods of time. Experts theorize that this winter's mild El Nino effect, which alters ocean currents and temperatures, may be compounding the shortage of fish that sea lions rely on for food, said Keith Matassa, executive director of the nonprofit Pacific Marine Mammal Center in Laguna Beach. That group's pup rescues for the month are already running 20 percent above the same period in 2013, when the National Marine Fisheries Service declared an "unusual mortality event" in which five times the ...
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Rare Sierra Nevada Red Fox Caught On Camera In Yosemite National Park 29.1.2015 Green on HuffingtonPost.com
One of the rarest mammals in North America, the Sierra Nevada red fox , was recently caught on camera twice inside Yosemite National Park. The two sightings on remote wildlife cameras, on Dec. 13, 2014 and Jan. 4 of this year, mark the first time the Vulpes vulpes necator has been seen inside the park in nearly a century, the National Park Service said in a news release. The animal, a subspecies of the red fox that's native to the Sierra Nevada mountains, is so rare that no one is certain just how many are left. They are solitary creatures, nocturnal, do not travel in groups and avoid people, making them even harder to track and study. However, it's believed the total population is less than 50. “ We are thrilled to hear about the sighting of the Sierra Nevada red fox , one of the most rare and elusive animals in the Sierra Nevada,” Yosemite National Park superintendent Don Neubacher said in a news release. “National parks like Yosemite provide habitat for all wildlife and it is encouraging to see that ...
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