User: flenvcenter Topic: Biodiversity-Independent
Category: Protection :: Policy
Last updated: Jan 18 2018 22:34 IST RSS 2.0
 
3,796 to 3,815 of 3,828    
Feds Stall as State Moves Forward on Increased Legal Protections for Endangered Delta Fish 24.3.2009 Commondreams.org Newswire

The Bay Institute and Center for Biological Diversity today filed a notice of intent to sue the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service for failing to make final determinations on federal Endangered Species Act listing petitions submitted for two critically imperiled San Francisco Bay-Delta fish species: longfin smelt and delta smelt.

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13 Countries Join to Study Living Whales in the Wild 24.3.2009 ENS
13 Countries Join to Study Living Whales in the Wild
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Book examines environmental justice through pollution in low-income communities 24.3.2009 ENN Network News - ENN
(Washington) The community-based environmental justice (EJ) movement, which took root in the late 1970s, is based on the general principle that the protection of human health from environmental harms and risks is important, and that minority and low-income communities disproportionately suffer the ill effects of pollution. The movement is a synthesis of civil rights protest methods, legal principles and doctrines, and environmental protection theories, techniques, and approaches that are aimed at redressing these social wrongs.
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One-third of US birds are endangered, says conservation report 23.3.2009 Science / Technology News

Nearly one-third of US birds are endangered, threatened or in significant decline, according to a government conservation report.

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The Fall and Rise of the Right Whale 20.3.2009 Wildlife and Habitat Conservation News - ENN
North Atlantic right whales, which can grow up to 55 feet long and weigh up to 70 tons, were the "right" whales for 18th- and 19th-century whalers because they are rich in oil and baleen, move slowly, keep close to shore and float when they die. They were long ago hunted to extinction in European waters, and by 1900 perhaps only 100 or so remained in their North American range, from feeding grounds off Maritime Canada and New England to winter calving grounds off the Southeastern coast.
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Nearly a third of U.S. bird species in trouble 20.3.2009 Environmental News Network
Nearly one-third of all U.S. bird species are endangered, threatened or in significant decline, with birds in Hawaii facing a "borderline ecological disaster," scientists reported on Thursday.
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U.S. Birds Struggling to Survive Habitat Loss, Climate Change 20.3.2009 ENS
U.S. Birds Struggling to Survive Habitat Loss, Climate Change
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Several US Bird Populations Plummet Due to Habitat Loss 20.3.2009 Truthout.com

    Several major bird populations have plummeted over the past four decades across the United States as development transformed the nation's landscape, according to a comprehensive survey released today by the Interior Department and outside experts, but conservation efforts have managed to stave off potential extinctions of others.

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Obama Administration Lists Its First Endangered Species 18.3.2009 ENS
http://www.ens-newswire.com/ens/mar2009/2009-03-17-093.asp
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APP’s forest clearing linked to 12 years of human and tiger deaths in Sumatra 17.3.2009 Environmental News Network
Pekanbaru, Indonesia – Most violent incidents between people and tigers in Sumatra’s Riau Province in the past 12 years have occurred near forests being cleared by paper giant Asia Pulp & Paper (APP) and associated companies, according to a new analysis of human-tiger conflict data. The analysis, conducted by the group Eyes on the Forest, found that since 1997, 55 people and 15 Sumatran tigers (Panthera tigris sumatrae) have been killed during conflict encounters in Riau Province. Another 17 tigers have been captured and removed from the wild.
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Whaling Commission Political Deal Could Overturn Moratorium 17.3.2009 ENS
http://www.ens-newswire.com/ens/mar2009/2009-03-13-03.asp
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Misconceptions about water pricing 17.3.2009 Gristmill
By Robert Stavins Throughout the United States, water management has been approached primarily as an engineering problem, rather than an economic one. Water supply managers are reluctant to use price increases as water conservation tools, instead relying on non-price demand management techniques, such as requirements for the adoption of specific technologies and restrictions on particular uses. In my March 3 post, " ," I wrote about how -- in principle -- price can be used by water managers as an effective and efficient instrument to manage this scarce resource. In a white paper, " ," [PDF] published by the Pioneer Institute for Public Policy Research, and I analyzed the relative merits of price and non-price approaches to water conservation. ...
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House Rejects Massive Public Lands Protection Package 12.3.2009 ENS
http://www.ens-newswire.com/ens/mar2009/2009-03-11-092.asp
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Wolf Delisting: The Neverending Story 12.3.2009 NewWest.Net All Headlines
There isn't much agreement when it comes delisting the wolf from the protection of the Endangered Species Act (ESA), but alas, it seems there might be one point pro-wolfers, anti-wolfers, wolf agencies, and a whole lot of people who'd like to see something different in the news can agree on. We should call it, "The Neverending Story." Or perhaps, more apropos, "The Neverending Story--Because Wyoming Keeps Helping Enviros Make It So." The subtitle could be: "Wyoming's Livestock Industry Continues Helping Colorado Establish Its Wolf Population."
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End Unsustainable Commercial Harvest of Wild Turtles 12.3.2009 Commondreams.org Newswire

The Center for Biological Diversity and two dozen other conservation and health groups today filed emergency petitions with eight Midwestern and southern states, seeking to end unsustainable commercial harvest of freshwater turtles.

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Conservationists deciding which species to survive 10.3.2009 Environmental News Network
WOULD the animal have made it into the ark? That's the kind of question conservationists have been asking when it comes to the thorny issue of picking which threatened species to save. Kerstin Zander of the Charles Darwin University in Darwin, Australia, and her colleagues looked at conserving cattle - the species with the most number of breeds to have gone extinct. They turned to an approach first outlined by economist Martin Weitzman at Harvard University.
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Same Bad Plan to Delist Wolves in the Northern Rockies 7.3.2009 Commondreams.org Newswire

Today, Secretary of the Interior Ken Salazar announced he has decided to follow the Bush administration's flawed decision to remove the protections of the Endangered Species Act from wolves in Idaho and Montana.

The following is a statement by Rodger Schlickeisen, president for Defenders of Wildlife:

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State Endangered Species Protection Sought for the Kittlitz's Murrelet 6.3.2009 Commondreams.org Newswire

 Today the Center for Biological Diversity filed a scientific petition with the Alaska Department of Fish and Game to protect the imperiled Kittlitz’s murrelet under Alaska’s Endangered Species Act due to threats from global warming, oil pollution, and fisheries bycatch mortality that have placed this seabird on a trajectory to extinction.

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Pacific Fisher One Step Closer to Protection Under California Endangered Species Act 6.3.2009 Commondreams.org Newswire

 In response to a petition from the Center for Biological Diversity, and in a stark departure from an August 2008 decision, the California Fish and Game Commission voted to designate the Pacific fisher, a rare forest carnivore that is one of the few species that preys on porcupines, a candidate for protection as a threatened or endangered species under the California Endangered Species Act and initiated a review of the species to determine if full protection is warranted.

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Parks that can move when the animals do 5.3.2009 Environmental News Network
When scientist Dee Boersma first arrived to Punta Tombo, Argentina, in the early 1980s, the colony of Magellanic penguins there was 300,000 breeding pairs strong. Since then, they've declined by more than 20 percent. Dr. Boersma faults competition from fishermen, pollution in the form of oil dumped at sea, and climate change for the decline. But while the Punta Tombo colony is shrinking, others farther north are growing. The penguins' shifting range underscores how climate change isn't always a drop-dead-from-the-heat affair. And it raises questions about how to protect threatened – and mobile – marine species as they adjust.
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