User: flenvcenter Topic: Biodiversity-Independent
Category: Protection :: Policy
Last updated: May 24 2015 20:36 IST RSS 2.0
 
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Shot and Gassed: Thousands of Protected Birds Killed Annually 24.5.2015 Truthout.com
Sandhill cranes are among more than 300 species of migratory birds that have been killed legally across the US since 2011 to protect a wide range of business activities and public facilities under what's called the "depredation permit" program. (Photo: Tom Knudson/Reveal) This story was originally published by Reveal from The Center for Investigative Reporting . Every spring, bird-watchers from across America gather in Nebraska for one of the continent’s great avian spectacles – the mass migration of sandhill cranes through an hourglass-like passage along the Platte River. The birds rarely disappoint: With enormous wingspans, they circle like hang gliders over the river valley, filling the air with raucous revelry. And according to fossil records, they’ve been carrying on like that for quite some time: 9 million years, in fact, making them North America’s oldest bird species. But some several hundred miles northeast in Wisconsin and Michigan, sandhill cranes are met with a different reception: They are ...
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With Friends Like the Obama Administration, Endangered Species Don't Need Enemies 21.5.2015 Green on HuffingtonPost.com
From gray wolves to Cheat Mountain salamanders, the more than 1,500 endangered species in the U.S. face threats like never before. In addition to the ever-present threat of habitat loss caused by our growing footprint on the planet, species now face growing threats from climate change, invasive species, over-exploitation and pollution. Given the growing magnitude of threat to endangered species, one would think the Obama administration would pull out all the stops to save our precious wildlife heritage. Instead, the administration and its U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service have quietly been rolling out a series of regulatory changes that threaten to cripple the Endangered Species Act, dramatic changes that would never have flown under the Bush administration. Here's a breakdown of those policies and why they matter: In July 2014, the administration finalized a policy first conceived under the Bush administration that severely limits when species qualify for endangered species protection. Under the Act, a ...
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Killing for Conservation? Outrage After Auction Winner Fells Endangered Black Rhinoceros 20.5.2015 CommonDreams.org Headlines
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Ag Lobby Paints Itself Into a Conservation Corner 20.5.2015 Green on HuffingtonPost.com
There's a growing public fight brewing over industrial agriculture's water pollution. The most prominent scuffle is the Environmental Protection Agency's highly contentious Waters of the US rule. At the local level much of the heat is centered on the recent lawsuit filed by the Des Moines' Water Works over fertilizer derived nitrate run-off. Minnesota is also in the throes of an intense debate over Governor Dayton's (D) mandatory buffer strip proposal that would require natural vegetative filters between farm fields and stream banks. In all of these instances the Grand Ole Farm Lobby ™ has reacted with the well-worn message of voluntary conservation as the only solution. Let farmers who know their land best make the choice to do what's right, have taxpayers fund it, and all will be well goes the thinking. By letting farmers choose whether or not to lower fertilizer use, or employ run-off reducing practices like cover crops is a far better alternative to regulation we're told. That message is the whole ...
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Obama's preemptive strike to reform Endangered Species Act 20.5.2015 High Country News Most Recent
The administration's proposal is aimed at warding off a GOP overhaul of the law.
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Anthropocene Boosters and the Attack on Wilderness Conservation 20.5.2015 Truthout - All Articles
A growing debate has serious consequences for our collective relationship to Nature. Beginning perhaps twenty years ago, a number of academics in disciplines such as history, anthropology, and geography, began to question whether there was any tangible wilderness or wild lands left on Earth. These academics, and others, have argued that humans have so completely modified the Earth, we should give up on the notion that there is any place wild and instead recognize that we have already domesticated, in one fashion or another, the entire planet for human benefit. These individuals and groups are identified under an umbrella of different labels, including "Neo Greens" Pragmatic Environmentalists" "New Conservationists" "Green Postmodernism" and Neo-environmentalists" but the most inclusive label to date is "Anthropocene Boosters" so that is the term I will use in this essay. The basic premise of their argument is that humans have lived everywhere except Antarctica and that it is absurd to suggest that Nature ...
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New Obama Administration Policy Will Make It Harder for Species to Get Endangered Species Protection Needed to Avoid Extinction 19.5.2015 Commondreams.org Newswire
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Endangered Species Act Caught in Congressional Crosshairs 18.5.2015 Politics on HuffingtonPost.com
The most powerful environmental law on Earth, the Endangered Species Act (ESA), is under the gravest assault it has ever faced. Last week I spent time in Washington, DC briefing US congressional leaders on ESA threats and brainstorming about how to safeguard this venerable law. The ESA has faced previous formidable challenges. While it has withstood some, it has succumbed to others. One of the most strident attacks occurred when Rep. Richard Pombo (R-Calif.) introduced the Threatened and Endangered Species Recovery Act of 2005. While his fulminations against the ESA failed, the 2011 gray wolf delisting quietly proposed by Montana Senator John Tester (D-Mont.) as a federal budget rider succeeded. This unorthodox pathway to delisting opened a Pandora's box of species attacks . Flash forward to 2015, when seven bills aimed at "reforming" the ESA (S 112, S 292, S 293, S 655, S 736, S 855, S 1036) are rapidly advancing through the 114th Congress. These bills, discussed on May 6, 2015 by the Senate Environment ...
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The Forest, The Farms and the Finance: Why the Tolo River People Turned to Carbon Finance 18.5.2015 Green on HuffingtonPost.com
Part Four: Getting Down To Business: The Tolo River People Shift From Building Their Carbon Project To Selling The Offsets tells the surprisingly challenging story of finding and cultivating offset buyers. You can also find the REDD Desk Project summary of this project here . The Tolo River People of Colombia were in a bind: dependent on nearby cattle ranches to make a living, they were helping destroy the forest that sustained them and their way of life. Here’s a look at the economics that drove them to embrace carbon finance. This story is the second in a four-part series to initially run on Ecosystem Marketplace, and has been edited for a mainstream audience. Click here to view the full, unedited version . 18 May 2015 | Every morning, Jorge Vergara drives his motorcycle from the village of Acandí to the Builes Ranch, where he tends the nearly 400 cows and cattle. The ranch is just a ten-minute walk from Tolo River village of Peñaloza and one of many bordering their forest. On this day, two boys from ...
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Recognizing Our Marine Wildlife on Endangered Species Day 18.5.2015 Green on HuffingtonPost.com
As we mark the 10th anniversary of Endangered Species Day, it's a time to reflect on how each of us -- individually and collectively -- can do our part to help reverse human impact on the environment that has resulted in what has been called the earth's sixth great extinction event. Being mindful of the way our lifestyle choices at home impact habitat and wildlife is a great first step. Reducing water use, limiting the use of pesticides and herbicides in our yards, limiting our use of plastics, and making every effort to recycle as much of our household waste stream as possible are just some of the small but meaningful changes we can make in our day-to-day lives. Together our small steps can make great strides, and our collective efforts can result in reduced pressure on threatened habitats and endangered species. Microbeads, the tiny plastics found in beauty products and toothpaste, harm the environment. Photo by Chip Weiskotten ©WCS. Many business and industry leaders now agree that efforts to conserve ...
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Happy Endangered Species Day! 15.5.2015 Wildlife and Habitat Conservation News - ENN
Started in 2006, Endangered Species Day is “a celebration of wildlife and wild places” intended to promote the “importance of protecting endangered species and everyday actions people can take to help protect them”. Every year on the third Friday in May — and throughout the month — zoos, aquariums, parks, botanical gardens, wildlife refuges, museums, schools, community centers, conservation groups and other organizations hold tours, speaker presentations, exhibits, children’s activities and more to commemorate the Day.
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House Republicans Vote to Strip Endangered Species Act Protections From Two Species Based on Fraudulent Claims About Military Readiness 15.5.2015 Commondreams.org Newswire
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You Can Be the Solution for Endangered Species 15.5.2015 Green on HuffingtonPost.com
Ten years ago, the United States Congress declared the first observance of Endangered Species Day -- an opportunity to turn our national attention to the wildlife and wild places that need our help the most. Today, we ponder what our planet might look like if America's most threatened flora and fauna disappeared forever, and take time to consider our responsibility in the fight for wildlife conservation. While Endangered Species Day celebrates the victories of some of our nation's most treasured wildlife -- such as the American bald eagle, or the grizzly bear -- our efforts to protect animals should not stop short of our borders. Our earth's ecosystems are vastly complex and interconnected, far beyond anything you or I could imagine. What happens to one of us affects all of us. I work to save the lemurs of Madagascar, the world's most critically threatened mammals, if not its most endangered species. Though Madagascar may seem like a world away, we're literally family as lemurs are humanity's oldest ...
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Preempting a Misleading Argument: Why Environmental Problems Will Stop Tracking with GDP 13.5.2015 Green on HuffingtonPost.com
I hate to say I told you so, and could be too dead to do so, so I'll tell you in advance: One decade soon, environmental problems will stop tracking with GDP. But the reasons? Well, they probably aren't what you think, especially if you've been drinking the green Kool-Aid . For decades, big-picture ecologists and eventually the "ecological economists" pointed out the fundamental conflict between economic growth and environmental protection. Every tick of GDP came with the tock of habitat loss, pollution, and, as we gradually realized, climate change. A growing GDP requires a growing human population or a growing amount of goods and services per person. In the American experience of the 20th century, it was easy to see both - population and per capita consumption - spiraling upward, and just as easy to see the environmental impacts reverberating outward. Much of the world saw the same, although in some countries GDP growth was driven almost entirely by population growth. Unfortunately, a lot of time was ...
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Endangered Facts: Sen. Inhofe's Attack on the Endangered Species Act 11.5.2015 Green on HuffingtonPost.com
The nation's climate-denier-in chief, Oklahoma Sen. James Inhofe, has apparently found a new target for his anti-science agenda: the Endangered Species Act. At a hearing last week, Inhofe recycled all the Tea Party tropes about the Act, including that it doesn't save species (it's saved 99 percent), is run by environmental groups (wrong again) and is unpopular (poll after poll says otherwise). Of course what Inhofe failed to mention -- how does he always forget to say this? -- is that he's one of the biggest recipients of campaign contributions from the oil and gas industry , some $1.7 million since 1989, including more than $100,000 just from the Koch brothers. And do you know what's funny? It's the oil and gas industry and other profiteers often leading the charge (or footing the bill) against efforts to protect wolves, sage grouse, grizzly bears and other wildlife whose survival depends on the Endangered Species Act. Inhofe, never shy about attacking science and the environment, rolled out some ...
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The Climate Post: States Challenge Clean Power Plan, Report Finds Health Benefits 7.5.2015 Green on HuffingtonPost.com
Attorneys for two-energy producing states spoke on the legal implications of the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency's Clean Power Plan--which aims to reduce carbon dioxide emissions from existing fossil fuel-fired power plants 30 percent below 2005 levels by 2030--at a Senate Environment and Public Works Subcommittee this week. West Virginia Attorney General Patrick Morrisey, whose state is involved in lawsuits filed against the proposed rule, argued that it is illegal and would cause a loss in jobs and raise electricity rates. "The proposed rule is actually causing real, tangible harm in the states, and also it's affecting power plant operations currently," said Morrisey. "If you go and look at our litigation, we have at least eight declarations from very experienced environmental regulators who talk about the cost of trying to comply with this rule. The other point that I would raise is that the time frames associated with this proposal are hyper-aggressive." The rule--set to be finalized this ...
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Senate Republicans Take Aim at Endangered Species Act 6.5.2015 Commondreams.org Newswire
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Fighting for Our Oceans 3.5.2015 Truthout - All Articles
In an era of seemingly unlimited threats to the environment, ocean health is one of the most urgent and severe challenges facing activists today. The oceans are under fire from almost uncountable ills, including rampant overfishing, ocean acidification, plastics pollution, oil spills and ocean dumping. Although the challenges are humbling, there are some activists who have faced them head-on, and with astounding success. (Image: Ocean biodiversity via Shutterstock) In an era of seemingly unlimited threats to the environment, ocean health is one of the most urgent and severe challenges facing activists today. The oceans are under fire from almost uncountable ills, including rampant overfishing, ocean acidification, plastics pollution, oil spills, and ocean dumping, to name a few. But although the challenges are humbling, there are some activists who have faced them head-on, and with astounding success. Jean Wiener and Howard Wood may live 4,000 miles apart, but their lives have taken many similar turns. ...
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WCS at 120: Then and Now, Conservation Action Takes a Movement 3.5.2015 Green on HuffingtonPost.com
In 1907 the American Bison Society arranged for 15 bison donated by the New York Zoological Society (NYZS) to be shipped by railway from the Bronx Zoo to the Wichita National Forest and Game Preserve in Oklahoma to begin the work of restoring the Western Plains' depleted bison population - reduced in the preceding half-century from well over 20 million to a mere 23 animals in the wild. In the late 19th century, bison numbers in the American West plummeted from well over 20 million to a mere 23 animals in the wild. Photo by Jeff Burrell ©WCS. The shipment was an extraordinary achievement - the start of what would become the first successful organized conservation effort to save a species from extinction. In the ensuing decades the wild bison population would rebound to close to 25,000, with another quarter million maintained as managed herds in every state in the union. So inspiring is the end result that one could be forgiven in forgetting the work required to make it happen. Two years earlier, in 1905, ...
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Emergency Endangered Species Act Protection Sought for Two Grand Canyon Species Threatened by Tusayan Development 1.5.2015 Commondreams.org Newswire
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