User: flenvcenter Topic: Biodiversity-Independent
Category: Protection :: Policy
Last updated: Sep 23 2017 15:56 IST RSS 2.0
 
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The fight to save vaquitas from extinction 23.9.2017 High Country News Most Recent
Through a tangle of corruption and overfishing, a marine species hangs in the balance.
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Rural communities can coexist with wolves. Here’s how. 20.9.2017 High Country News Most Recent
The success of Washington’s collaborative wolf management is seldom celebrated.
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Team Trump's Plan For America's National Monuments: Shrink Size And Expand Hunting 16.9.2017 Green on HuffingtonPost.com
An order by Interior Secretary Ryan Zinke aims to increase fishing access on national monuments and other public lands.
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New study shows banning shark fin in the U.S. won't help save sharks 15.9.2017 Wildlife and Habitat Conservation News - ENN
A new study published today in the scientific journal Marine Policy shows that banning the sale of shark fins within the United States can actually harm ongoing shark conservation efforts.David Shiffman of SFU’s Earth2Ocean research group and Robert Hueter from the Center for Shark Research at Mote Marine Laboratory in Florida say that a proposed nationwide ban on shark fin sales within the United States is a misguided and ineffective approach to protecting sharks.
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The end of an epic butterfly journey? 15.9.2017 High Country News Most Recent
As the Western monarch population declines, survivors may become stranded in a growing sea of houses and farm fields.
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Water Conservation Can Have Unintended Consequences 14.9.2017 Green Technology and Environmental Science News - ENN
Conventional wisdom dictates water conservation can only benefit communities affected by drought. But researchers at the University of California, Riverside have deduced that indoor residential conservation can have unintended consequences in places where systems of wastewater reuse have already been implemented, diminishing both the quantity and quality of influent available for treatment.
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Unnatural Surveillance: How Online Data Is Putting Species at Risk 6.9.2017 Environmental News Network
In the arid far-western region of South Africa is a vast flatland covered with white quartzite gravel known as the Knersvlakte – Afrikaans for “Gnashing Plain” – because it sounds like grinding teeth when you walk across it. It’s a good place to watch unpeopled horizons vanish into ripples of heat haze, but to appreciate its real value you must get down on your knees. The Knersvlakte holds about 1,500 species of plants, including 190 species found nowhere else on earth and 155 that are Red-Listed by conservation biologists as threatened with extinction. To protect them, 211,000 acres have been set aside as the Knersvlakte Nature Reserve.
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Money-for-water programs work — but for how long? 30.8.2017 High Country News Most Recent
In the Colorado River Basin, a pilot project wins over skeptical farmers and ranchers.
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There’s success in money-for-water programs — but for how long? 30.8.2017 High Country News Most Recent
In the Colorado River Basin, a pilot project wins over skeptical farmers and ranchers.
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The North Sea totally explored (twice) by OCEANA. 28.8.2017 Earth Times
OCEANA are fishing closer to home on this occasion, hoping to catch governments and those who wish to destroy our precious, and decreasing stocks of habitats , fish and even sea grass, mud and bivalves.
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Interior overhauls sage grouse conservation 24.8.2017 High Country News Most Recent
How big a role do industry concerns play in potential rewrite of management plans?
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Why Tiger Snakes Are on a Winner 22.8.2017 Environmental News Network
Australian tiger snakes have “hit the jackpot” because prey cannot evolve resistance to their venom.
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Sage grouse changes; Superfund funding; Sacrificial sea lions 21.8.2017 Current Issue
HCN.org news in brief.
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Under new Interior Department plan, sage grouse will suffer 15.8.2017 High Country News Most Recent
New policies will prioritize oil and gas leasing over habitat.
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Monkey Species Not Seen Alive for 80 Years Rediscovered in the Amazon 15.8.2017 Environmental News Network
Scientists have rediscovered a species of monkey in the Brazilian Amazon not seen alive since 1936, according to reporting by Mongabay.The species, the bald-faced Vanzolini saki, was first discovered along the Rio Eiru more than 80 years ago by Alfonzo Olalla, an Ecuadorian naturalist. But scientists had found no other living evidence of the monkey since then. Earlier this year, a team of seven primatologists, led by Laura Marsh of the Global Conservation Institute, began a three-month expedition aboard a boat through the Upper Jurua River and its tributaries to search for the missing monkey and survey other wildlife in the remote region of Brazil.
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Whitley Award winner ornithologist’s claims on conservation of Great Indian Bustard raise doubts 8.8.2017 Pune – The Indian Express
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Deforestation and Climate Disruption Are Degrading the Amazon, Endangering Our Survival 7.8.2017 Truthout.com
The Amazon Rainforest, the most biologically diverse place on Earth, is threatened by deforestation and anthropogenic climate disruption. (Photo: CIAT ; Edited: LW / TO) As human beings, our survival depends upon respecting the complexity of the Earth's ecosystems and protecting them, say the experts in Brazil tasked with protecting the Amazon rainforest from the effects of human-caused climate disruption. The Amazon is one of the most important and biodiverse ecosystems, and it is being deforested at an astonishing rate. The Amazon Rainforest, the most biologically diverse place on Earth, is threatened by deforestation and anthropogenic climate disruption. (Photo: CIAT ; Edited: LW / TO) Sao Paolo and Brasilia, Brazil -- Warwick Manfrinato, the director of Brazil's Department of Protected Areas, has a deep understanding of biological interdependence, as well as its importance. "If we are of utter service to nature, then we provide the benefits to all other living things on the planet," Manfrinato told ...
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Wildlife royalties – a future for conservation? 4.8.2017 Environmental News Network
Writing in the journal Animals, they muse on whether organisations that profit in some way from wildlife imagery and popularity, could establish a corporate responsibility to contribute a portion of this income to the conservation of the animals represented.
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How a ruling on gray wolves could impact grizzlies 3.8.2017 High Country News Most Recent
A precedent-setting decision on endangered species recovery echoes East to West.
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Financial Incentives Could Conserve Tropical Forest Diversity 2.8.2017 Green Technology and Environmental Science News - ENN
The past few decades have seen the rise of global incentive programs offering payments to landowners to help reduce tropical deforestation. Until now, assessments of these programs have largely overlooked decreases in forest diversity. In what might be a first of its kind study, University of Missouri researchers have integrated forest imaging with field-level inventories and landowner surveys to assess the impact of conservation payments in Ecuador’s Amazon Basin forests. They found that conservation payment programs are making a difference in the diversity of tree species in protected spaces. Further, the species being protected are twice as likely to be of commercial timber value and at risk of extinction.
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