User: flenvcenter Topic: Biodiversity-Independent
Category: Protection :: Policy
Last updated: Feb 26 2015 20:37 IST RSS 2.0
 
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Oregon Gray Wolf Population Rebounding, But Remains Fragile 26.2.2015 Green on HuffingtonPost.com
By Courtney Sherwood PORTLAND, Ore., Feb 25 (Reuters) - Oregon's once decimated gray wolf population has rebounded to at least 77 animals, and the wolves are now pairing off and breeding across a wide region, state officials with the state's Department of Fish and Wildlife said on Wednesday. Gray wolves, native to Oregon but wiped out in the state by an eradication campaign in the early 20th century, first returned there in 2008 and have now spread out to multiple parts of the Pacific Northwest state. "The wolf population continues to grow and expand, and for the first time we've had wolf reproduction in southern Oregon," said Michelle Dennehy, spokeswoman for the state wildlife department. "And we had eight breeding pairs last year. We also documented six new pairs of wolves, and 26 pups." But as population growth triggers a review of state Endangered Species Act restrictions on harassing or killing wolves that threaten livestock, conservationists cautioned it remained too early to ...
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Pangolin conservation corrupted/immense losses explained. 24.2.2015 The Earth Times Online Newspaper - Health News
So does Vietnam rehabilitate its wildlife in reserves, or just sneak back and eat them later? It is a question that every international worker has to ask themselves in every corrupt regime, for every single expensive effort to improve lives and wildlife. It is our joint responsibility to improve the environment, but our partners must be suspect in many cases.
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New Conservation Science Is Misguided and Too Much About the Major Problem -- Us 24.2.2015 Green on HuffingtonPost.com
Doing conservation "in the name of us" is narrow-minded, short-sighted and misguided. A recent essay published in the Huffington Post by noted scientist and ethicist John Vucetich and his colleagues called " Should We Conserve Nature for Nature's Sake, or for Our Own? " centers on different views of where the focus of conservation biology and conservation science should lie. It's a brief summary of another excellent essay authored by Dr. Vucetich and his colleagues Jeremy Bruskotter and Michael Nelson with the more "academic" title, " Evaluating whether nature's intrinsic value is an axiom of or anathema to conservation ," just published in the prestigious journal called Conservation Biology. When I read these two essays I felt a glimmer of hope in countering other views on why we should value and conserve nature. Because both essays are readily available to interested parties my purpose here is to call attention to them because they are must reads for anyone who is interested in what we are doing and ...
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REDD and Neocolonialism in the Land of the Pataxo Warriors 22.2.2015 Truthout - All Articles
It’s 5 o’clock in the morning, southern cone time, on Oct. 13, 2014. The Pataxo indigenous people of the far southern region of the state of Bahía, in the northeast of Brazil, form three barricades across the BR101 Highway in the region of Monte Pascoal, in the city of Itamaraju, one of the main roads connecting the northern and southern parts of the country. They have blocked the highway that runs along the edge of their territory with branches, sticks, and old tires,  stopping hundreds of trucks transporting merchandise from transnational corporations. It doesn’t take police long to arrive. The indigenous people are aware of the possibility of repression. Some have painted their bodies with a mixture of colors– yellow, red, black–colors that their grandfathers used to announce war. Others contrast in white, the sign of peace. Indelible colors on the skin of these people, survivors of an unjust war that has lasted for over five centuries. The atmosphere grew tense as Federal Police came in, although ...
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The One Thing Conservation Groups Are A Little Excited About This Congress 21.2.2015 Politics on HuffingtonPost.com
WASHINGTON -- As the new chair of the House Natural Resources Committee, Rep. Rob Bishop may be ready to spar with the Obama administration on some key public lands and energy issues. But he's also setting a different tone from that of his predecessor, encouraging conservation advocates to think they may be able to find common ground this Congress. Bishop, a seven-term Republican representing Utah's 1st District, took over the chairmanship in January from retiring Rep. Doc Hastings (R-Wash.), who had held that post since 2011. Hastings had an openly hostile relationship with environmental groups, recording a 3 percent lifetime score from the League of Conservation Voters and prompting one environmental lobbyist to declare "good riddance" when he announced his retirement. Some of Bishop's early moves have raised environmental hackles, including some personnel changes that suggest the committee will take a more aggressive oversight role . But many in the conservation world say they are optimistic about ...
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The Small Town Boy Who Charted a New Course for Our Oceans 19.2.2015 Green on HuffingtonPost.com
As a North Carolina graduate student, Bill Hogarth remembers fishermen proudly hanging giant marlin high on the wharf at Morehead City so people could admire and photograph the prized catch. But after the crowds lost interest, it was Hogarth's job to cut down the nearly half-ton behemoths and watch their lifeless bodies float out to sea. Some 50 years ago, many people saw the ocean's bounty as limitless. But those images of wasted fish made a lasting impression on Hogarth, who eventually brought a conservation ethic to his role as the country's head of ocean fisheries under President George W. Bush. "You could see the impact of the waste. I remember thinking that this couldn't last," recalled Hogarth, now 75 and director of the Florida Institute of Oceanography at the University of South Florida in St. Petersburg. I caught up with him recently when I went to Florida to oversee planning for The Pew Charitable Trusts' ocean conservation work in the Southeast. Bill Hogarth (right), former head of the ...
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Lawsuit Filed to Save Three Freshwater Species From Extinction in Alabama, Georgia, North Carolina, Tennessee, Virginia 19.2.2015 Commondreams.org Newswire
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Feds Propose Protection of Calving, Foraging Areas of Last 450 Right Whales on East Coast 18.2.2015 Environmental News Network
In response to the efforts of conservation and wildlife protection groups, the National Marine Fisheries Service today proposed to protect 39,655 square miles as critical habitat for North Atlantic right whales. Only about 450 of the critically endangered whales exist today, and without additional protections the species faces a serious risk of extinction.
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Feds Propose to Protect 39,655 Square Miles for Endangered Whales Along East Coast 17.2.2015 Commondreams.org Newswire
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Tiny Oregon Minnow Is Now First Fish Taken Off Endangered Species List 17.2.2015 Politics on HuffingtonPost.com
GRANTS PASS, Ore. (AP) — It's official. A tiny minnow that lives only in backwaters in Oregon's Willamette Valley is the first fish to be formally removed from Endangered Species Act protection because it is no longer in danger of extinction. U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service Director Dan Ashe was to make the announcement Tuesday afternoon at a wildlife refuge outside Corvallis. The action comes 22 years after the 3-inch-long fish was first listed as an endangered species, and five years after it was upgraded to threatened. Paul Henson, Oregon director of U.S. Fish and Wildlife, said the Oregon chub demonstrates that a lot of species can be brought back from the brink of extinction, if key needs are met, such as a safe place to live, even in an urban landscape. "This doesn't mean that all of a sudden it's hands off, and we never need to do anything for them," Henson said. "But we can at least put them back in the group of species that need attention, but don't need to go into the emergency room of the ...
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Conservation, Climate, and CAFOs 14.2.2015 Commondreams.org Views
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Aldo Leopold explains it all 13.2.2015 High Country News Most Recent
Should nature be protected for humans or from humans?
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India's Indigenous Evictions - the Dark Side of the Jungle Book 13.2.2015 Truthout - All Articles
While the world gears up for Jungle Book fever, something sinister is afoot in the forests of India, writes Tom Linton. No, not Shere Khan, but zealous officials illegally evicting indigenous communities from their ancestral forests in the name of 'conservation' - and to make way for tiger tourism. And it's happening across India putting millions of people under threat. With two new blockbuster remakes scheduled for consecutive release next year, Hollywood's opportunistic eye has once again fallen on Kipling's famous jungle jaunt. Amidst the industry frenzy, celebrity hype and accompanying hullabaloo, the stage is set for what promises to be a sensational showdown, pitting Disney against Warner Bros. in a battle to be crowned King of the Swingers ... On the other side of the world, however, in the forests of Madhya Pradesh that once provided the setting and inspiration for Kipling's work, a very different battle has been underway for decades - far less trivial, and with far graver implications. Touted by ...
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Lawsuit Challenges Feds' Failure to Assess Impacts of Three Harmful Pesticides on Two Bay Area Endangered Species 13.2.2015 Commondreams.org Newswire
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Rare Desert Lizard in California Protected by State 13.2.2015 Commondreams.org Newswire
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Spider monkey Valentine that you can help. 12.2.2015 The Earth Times Online Newspaper - Health News
The survival of wild species in South America is critical to any world effort at conservation, while the sad state of many zoo animals and others there caused legislation to be introduced in 2012. Here we have a chance to help a magnificent effort to save both wild and other animals, foully-abused , but now only in the past, we hope.
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Crude tactics worked against the sage grouse 10.2.2015 High Country News Most Recent
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Rainforest Alliance claims paper industry helps conservation. 10.2.2015 ypipesc
Who is right? The avid deforester who seems to have converted to conservation, or the NGOs who claim that corruption and illegal encroachment will devastate what is left of the rainforests.
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Inside Out 10.2.2015 Green on HuffingtonPost.com
Excerpt from Inside Out: In the days of Teddy Roosevelt, conservation was a word that spoke of national pride. Conservation took another step forward in 1973, when President Nixon signed the Endangered Species Act, which was passed by Republicans and Democrats. But, only a decade later, the pendulum swung dramatically in the opposite direction, and that same act divided Oregon by causing people to lose their forest jobs due to overriding concerns that logging levels were too high to sustain the spotted owl. I believe that was the critical moment when partisanship stepped in because people stopped listening to each other, and I understand. Because I had friends whose fathers lost their mill jobs in the 1980s, and I remember saying goodbye when those friends moved out of state because their families had to find work elsewhere. I also remember all the bumper stickers about spotted owls and fear of what would happen to rural Oregon if a Democrat got elected. Many places in rural Oregon have not healed from ...
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Compassionate Conservation: More than "Welfarism Gone Wild" 10.2.2015 Politics on HuffingtonPost.com
Conservation is ethically challenged The evolving field called compassionate conservation , in which the guiding principle "First do no harm (link is external)" stresses the importance of individual nonhuman animals (animals), is gaining increasing global attention because almost animals need considerably more protection than they are currently receiving and many people, including researchers, can no longer justify or stomach harming and killing animals "in the name of conservation." It builds on an agenda that calls for "doing science while respecting animals" and for protecting animals because they are intrinsically valuable, and do not only have instrumental value because of what they can do for us. As science writer Warren Cornwall points out in his excellent essay called " There will be blood ," conservation has a bloody history and compassionate conservation strives to change these practices. An excellent discussion of ways in which conservation is ethically challenged can be found in John Vucetich ...
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