User: flenvcenter Topic: Biodiversity-Independent
Category: Protection :: Policy
Last updated: Jun 28 2016 16:37 IST RSS 2.0
 
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How do Trump and Clinton differ on conservation? 28.6.2016 High Country News Most Recent
Presidential campaigns offer a sneak peek into natural resource policies.
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U.S. Charity Loophole Enabled Trading Of 1,300 Endangered Animals 27.6.2016 Green on HuffingtonPost.com
By John Shiffman WASHINGTON (Reuters) - Last year, after a Minnesota dentist sparked an uproar by killing a popular lion named Cecil while on safari in Zimbabwe, the U.S. Fish & Wildlife Service placed similar African lions on the endangered species list, making it illegal to import them as trophies to the United States. But for African lions and other threatened and endangered species, there’s an exception to this rule: Hunters, circuses, zoos, breeders and theme parks can get permits to import, export or sell endangered animals if they can demonstrate that the transactions will “enhance the survival” of the species. Often, records show, this requirement is met in part by making a cash contribution to charity - usually a few thousand dollars. The practice has angered both animal-rights activists who say it exploits wildlife and exhibitors who describe the process as unfair and arbitrary. In the last five years, the vast majority of the estimated 1,375 endangered species permits granted by the Fish & ...
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A new generation of warriors for the wild 27.6.2016 High Country News Most Recent
Sierra Club rec head Stacy Bare sees a role for veterans in conservation.
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Meet the new advocates for the West 27.6.2016 High Country News Most Recent
A generation of young Western activists are using outdoor sports as a step towards conservation.
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This Rabbit May Be Conservation's Newest, Cutest Success Story 25.6.2016 Green on HuffingtonPost.com
New England’s only native rabbit species may soon be hopping in the wild in abundant numbers once again. The New England cottontail population has declined by more than 75 percent since 1960, mostly from habitat loss caused by development, according to the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service. There are now only five small populations across a range from Maine to New York. (Yes, technically New York is not part of New England, but apparently no one told the New England cottontail that.) But conservation efforts for the bunnies are proving to be promising, the Associated Press reports. Captive breeding and reintroduction efforts has helped the population on Rhode Island’s Patience Island double to more than 150 rabbits. And two dozen rabbits released at a managed wildlife area in New Hampshire are thriving and expanding in numbers. Of course, since the habitat loss was the problem in the first place, it’s crucial to ensure the growing population actually has a place to live. New England cottontails live in the ...
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Women's rights in protected areas: Championing gender equality in environmental conservation policy 24.6.2016 Green on HuffingtonPost.com
In a small village near Xuan Thuy National Park in Vietnam, Pham Thi Kim Phuong bikes seven kilometers every morning to the mudflats by the park's mangroves. There, she joins hundreds of other women who take advantage of the early morning low tide to manually gather clams and snails. The mudflats where Pham works are part of a protected area and since 2013, an initiative to strengthen park management has engaged local women in co-management of the mangrove forests. Women and men living in and utilizing protected areas differ in their relationships to their ecosystems; they have differentiated roles and responsibilities, unequal access to and control over resources, unique knowledge bases and unbalanced participation in decision-making processes. Gender inequality in biodiversity conservation and management restricts women's access to benefits, perpetuating poverty and undermining sustainable resource use and management. However, gender equality in this field is rarely measured or written into policy. To ...
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Of bears and biases: scientific judgment and the fate of Yellowstone's grizzlies 21.6.2016 Green on HuffingtonPost.com
The grizzly, or brown, bear in the Greater Yellowstone Ecosystem is posed to lose protections under the Endangered Species Act. Jim Peaco, Yellowstone National Park via flickr By Jeremy T. Bruskotter , The Ohio State University ; John A Vucetich , Michigan Technology University , and Robyn S. Wilson , The Ohio State University In March, the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service (USFWS) announced its intent to remove protections afforded by the U.S. Endangered Species Act (ESA) to grizzly bears in the Greater Yellowstone Ecosystem (GYE). Citing four decades of growth in the bear population, the USFWS Director Dan Ashe heralded the decision as "a historic success for partnership-driven wildlife conservation ." However, conservation organizations oppose "delisting" GYE grizzlies. They cite persistent threats to grizzlies, public opposition to delisting and ongoing scientific uncertainty regarding the population's viability. Indeed, scientific uncertainty, especially threats posed by a changing climate, is one ...
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The Last Fish Eaten 21.6.2016 Green on HuffingtonPost.com
Famine in Sub-Saharan Africa does not make for pleasant news, but fortunately it does not affect us directly. Neither does the news of rising deaths of the penguins in the Antartica. Closer home, some of the recent headlines also fail to evoke the desired reaction for the same reason: Feb 17: 'Chhattisgarh Govt. cancels tribal rights over forests to facilitate coal mining' June 10: 'After Bihar's Nilgai culling, HP announces plan to start culling Shimla's 2500 Monkeys' Yet these stories have a vital link to our existence. They are all, in fact, pointers to a devastatingly challenging era when all debates on development versus conservations are to be about bitter survival. But where, increasingly, we stand to lose more than we gain, if we think only about ourselves. And so, just as Odisha's resource-rich Sukinda valley coughed up lungful of polluted air, Chattisgarh will be left to lick its own deep wounds, perhaps never to heal again. After nilgais and monkeys, a far more severe vermin epidemic, from ...
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Endangered Sonoma County Tiger Salamander Gets Recovery Plan 21.6.2016 Commondreams.org Newswire
Center for Biological Diversity In accordance with a settlement with the Center for Biological Diversity, the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service today released a final recovery plan for the endangered Sonoma County population of the California tiger salamander . The plan calls for purchase and permanent protection of approximately 15,000 acres of the salamander’s breeding ponds and adjacent ...
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The Great Seed Piracy 21.6.2016 Commondreams.org Views
Vandana Shiva

A great seed and biodiversity piracy is underway and it must be stopped. The privateers of today include not just the corporations — which are becoming fewer and larger through mergers — but also individuals like Bill Gates, the “richest man in the world”.

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Harambe the Gorilla -- Symptom Of Our Deeper Dysfunction 19.6.2016 Green on HuffingtonPost.com
It's ironic that the shooting death of Harambe, a western lowland gorilla at the Cincinnati Zoo, has sparked a debate over zoos . It's odd because: 1) Zoo shootings are so exceptionally rare that most zoos will never face any event calling for a gun, 2) Therefore, everyday conditions at zoos -- not exceptional tragic events -- are more appropriate reason to reconsider zoos' role, 3) Shooting deaths of free-living animals are rampant, constant and institutionalized, 4) Domestic animals in the food system live incomparably more miserable lives than animals in zoos who usually are, at worst, securely bored, 5) Yet, many people appalled by Harambe's death still buy meat, cheese, eggs, leather and so on -- proving that we tend to be used to what we're used to, so we miss various forests because we love trees. Male western lowland gorilla at San Francisco Zoo. Credit: Brocken Inaglory Before going further, I'd hasten to say that I do not think that Harambe had to be killed. Harambe lived amidst humans his ...
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Environmental Groups Launch Court Challenge over NEB’s Kinder Morgan Report 18.6.2016 Commondreams.org Newswire

The National Energy Board (NEB) broke the law when it failed to apply the Species at Risk Act in its final report on Kinder Morgan’s Trans Mountain pipeline project, environmental groups say.

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Dear Obama, Trudeau and Peña Nieto: Act Now to Save the Monarch Butterfly 17.6.2016 Green on HuffingtonPost.com
MEXICO CITY -- More than 200 scientists, writers and artists have signed a letter addressed to Mexican President Enrique Peña Nieto, U.S. President Barack Obama and Canadian Prime Minister Justin Trudeau, in advance of the North American Leaders' Summit in Ottawa later this month. The signers urge that swift and energetic actions be taken to save the monarch butterfly from the threats that endanger its survival. All three countries must work together to mitigate the loss of the butterflies' breeding habitat and to terminate all logging and mining in the Monarch Butterfly Biosphere Reserve in Michoacan, Mexico. Among the many signers are Margaret Atwood, Robert F. Kennedy, J.M.G. Le Clézio (Nobel Prize), Bill McKibben, Michael Ondaatje, Lawrence Ferlinghetti, John Ashbery, Yann Martel and Simon Schama. The letter is reproduced in full below. A guide holds up a damaged and dying butterfly at the monarch butterfly reserve in Piedra Herrada, Mexico, on Nov. 12, 2015. (AP Photo/Rebecca Blackwell) President ...
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Harambe, Cecil Tragedies Challenge Traditional Conservation Definition 17.6.2016 Green on HuffingtonPost.com
The one-year anniversary of the death of Cecil the Lion and the recent killing of Harambe, a Western Low Land Gorilla in a zoo in the United States, has ignited the fury of some and baffled just as many others. Those baffled by the outcry over both deaths tend to fall into the camp which believes that conservation efforts must always focus on the overall health of a population and that individual animals are only as valuable as their contribution to the species. At IFAW, our guiding principles are firmly grounded in animal welfare and conservation philosophies. The death of Cecil has prompted renewed discussions of what wildlife conservation really means and the death of Harambe has enlivened discussions around the function of zoos and their conservation value. We believe that animals have intrinsic value and that means that their lives have meaning whether or not they are valuable, or considered valuable, to humans for economic or other reasons. It is not a rights argument; it is a belief that humans ...
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A Coalition Of Hope For Saving Imperiled Iguanas 16.6.2016 Green on HuffingtonPost.com
Collaborative post by Charles Knapp , Vice President of Conservation Research, John G. Shedd Aquarium ; Stesha Pasachnik , Conservation Research Postdoctoral Associate, San Diego Zoo Global ; Tandora Grant , Senior Research Coordinator, San Diego Zoo Global ; John Iverson , Biology Research Professor, Earlham College ; and Allison Alberts , Chief Conservation and Research Officer, San Diego Zoo Global This week the online journal Herpetological Conservation and Biology published a compilation of research papers titled Iguanas: Biology, Systematics, and Conservation . The compilation highlights the diversity and unique ecology of iguanas, while emphasizing the threats to their survival and need for conservation action. Though the Green Iguana, most commonly seen in pet stores, often comes to mind when people think of these lizards, researchers have described 44 unique species of iguanas, with more on the way. Iguanas are found throughout the New World including Central and South America, the islands of ...
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Thousands Ask Feds to Protect West Coast's Beloved Orcas Before It's Too Late 11.6.2016 Environmental News Network
Thousands of people spoke out this week to ask for more protection for a highly endangered and beloved population of orcas, otherwise known as the Southern Resident killer whales who live in the Pacific Northwest.Thanks to whale watching tours, and organizations like the Orca Network and Center for Whale Research, which keeps an official census of their population, we have had the opportunity to glimpse into their daily lives. We’ve been able to celebrate births, mourn deaths and root for the elders among them, like Granny, who has been around long enough to see how drastically our actions have changed their home and families.
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Good news for the Giant Panda! 6.6.2016 Wildlife and Habitat Conservation News - ENN
Due to a breeding boom over the past few years, giant pandas are making a strong recovery. Some experts argue that the species should be removed from the critically endangered list — but is it too soon?This comes as the International Union for the Conservation of Nature undertakes an official reassessment of the panda’s status. The Swiss-based organization uses a seven-point scale to gauge the risk facing animal populations. 
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North America is Failing to Make a Splash on Ocean Conservation 1.6.2016 Commondreams.org Newswire
Canadian Parks and Wilderness Society

In the first ever joint assessment of progress on marine protected areas (MPAs) in North America, the Canadian Parks and Wilderness Society (CPAWS) and the Marine Conservation Institute (MCI) find Canada, Mexico and the USA have a long way to go to collectively and individually reach international and national targets to protect at least 10% of the continental ocean estate.*

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Can California’s water agencies keep up the conservation momentum? 1.6.2016 High Country News Most Recent
Without mandatory regulations, some local districts fear a return to water waste.
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Earth Feels What WE Eat 27.5.2016 Green on HuffingtonPost.com
Have you ever stopped mid-bite and wondered if what you are eating affects Earth? I'm sure we have all thought about how a particular food or meal might affect ourselves, but when we think of Earth, we think of a planet that sustains life, our life, animal life, and plant life, and will always do so, because it has always done so. Yet, scientists know that there have been mass global extinctions. Five. There have been five times in Earth's history where there have been mass die-offs of species. Scientists now believe we have entered the sixth mass extinction . The difference this time is that this extinction is instigated by humans. In the past 150-200 years, humans have changed the evolution and ecosystems of our planet through development, industrialization, economic and population growth, and greed. This sixth extinction has been coined: "The anthropocene-era extinction." According to this paper by Harvard's Center for Health and the Global Environment, in a natural state of homeostasis, Earth ...
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