User: flenvcenter Topic: Biodiversity-Independent
Category: Protection :: Policy
Last updated: Jul 31 2015 02:50 IST RSS 2.0
 
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Peter Kareiva, Transformative Conservation Scientist, to Lead UCLA Institute 31.7.2015 Green on HuffingtonPost.com
By Phil Hampton and Alison Hewitt, UCLA Newsroom Peter Kareiva, a leading environmental scientist and vocal advocate for using multiple disciplines to inform conservation, is the new director of the UCLA Institute of the Environment and Sustainability . Kareiva, a member of the National Academy of Sciences and the American Academy of Arts and Sciences, has published more than 100 widely cited papers on a range of topics and co-authored a textbook on new approaches in conservation science. He will be a professor in the department of ecology and evolutionary biology in the UCLA College. Prior to joining UCLA, Kareiva was chief scientist for the Nature Conservancy, where he developed and carried out conservation programs for the world's largest environmental non-profit organization and forged partnerships with government, non-profit and private-sector partners. In a career spanning more than 20 years, he also has directed regional fisheries conservation programs for the National Oceanic and Atmospheric ...
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Outdoors for All 30.7.2015 Green on HuffingtonPost.com
Eli the Elk with Montana Conservation Corps in the Bob Marshall Wilderness On September 30th, just 61 days from now, one of the most important funding streams supporting the conservation of our public lands and waters is set to expire. Created by an Act of Congress in 1965 , the Land and Water Conservation Fund (LWCF) is critical to the maintenance of our parks and the protection of outdoor recreation access. LWCF has provided funds to nearly every state and every county in the country for the creation of parks, the protection of natural treasures and the expansion of outdoor recreational opportunities. There's a good chance that your local playground, public park, or community ice rink benefited from LWCF . Congress established the LWCF as a way to do something positive for the environment with revenue from oil and gas drilling. The idea was to protect natural places for all Americans as a counterbalance to the depletion of natural resources. Now, unless Congress reauthorizes the fund, our public lands ...
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In honor of Cecil: 7 lion conservation organizations to support 30.7.2015 TreeHugger
Outrage over the heartless killing of an iconic lion is understandably escalating, but you can turn your anger into action by supporting big cat conservation efforts.
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Humpback Whale conservation is working in Australia 29.7.2015 Environmental News Network
Australia has one of the highest rates of animal species that face extinction, decline or negative impacts from human behavior in the world. However, over the last decade, there have been rare occurrences of animals that are rebounding and thriving. One example is the conservation success story of the recovery of the humpback whales that breed in both East and West Australian waters. This new study, published in Marine Policy and led by Dr. Michelle Bejder, reviews data collected in past studies and proposes a revision of the conservation status for the humpback whales found in Australian waters.In Australia, the east and west coast humpback whale populations are listed as a threatened species with a 'vulnerable' status as defined by the Environment Protection and Biodiversity Conservation Act 1999 (EPBC Act). However, according to Professor Lars Bejder at Murdoch University Australia, School of Veterinary and Life Sciences and his international co-authors, data reveals that these whale populations are ...
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Analysis: Republican Attacks on Endangered Species Up 600 Percent Per Year 28.7.2015 Commondreams.org Newswire
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LULAC Asks Congress to Save Land and Water Conservation Fund 25.7.2015 Politics on HuffingtonPost.com
Sometimes it's easy to take things for granted. We may spend a Saturday with our families at a soccer game or cookout in a park, not always thinking about the peaceful setting we are in or how it came to be set aside for the public to use and enjoy. Same goes for other outdoor activities, like taking our children fishing or camping on the weekends. The memories of those times last forever, but what we often forget are the magical public places we all share that make these memories possible. Imagine how hard it would be to break away from the stress of day-to-day life without the public parks and lands we can escape to with our family and friends. These too, are the places where our children can enjoy safe, healthy exercise and outdoor recreational opportunities. Sadly, our nation is about to lose a critical program that helped pay for many of the parks, ball fields and public lands we all enjoy if it is not renewed before September 30th. The Land and Water Conservation Fund was created by Congress in ...
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Building a Pathway for Aquatic Restoration Careers through Waders in the Water 17.7.2015 Green on HuffingtonPost.com
By Mary Ellen Sprenkel, President & CEO of The Corps Network Dating back to the Great Depression-era Civilian Conservation Corps, one of the great aspects of the Conservation Corps model is its ability to help young people develop work skills through tangible projects and with the guidance of mentors. Working collaboratively with other young people also provides Corpsmembers with the chance to learn, grow, and build confidence and experience that they can apply toward a future career. That's why I am excited to write about a public-private training partnership that The Corps Network and Trout Headwaters, Inc. have been working to implement. Called Waders in the Water , the training helps Corpsmembers learn about the fundamentals of aquatic restoration science. Christopher Gomon of the Texas Conservation Corps is among those who have participated. After the training Christopher said that "real world, practical advice was given. It gave me the baseline knowledge and certification I need to be successful as ...
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Turtle Hotspots Identified Around the World Contain Diverse Species and Richness 15.7.2015 Environmental News Network
Global biodiversity is becoming more threatened as the human population continues to grow and use the world’s resources. Turtles have the misfortune of being on the leading edge of biodiversity decline and serve as an indicator of ecosystem degradation.Researchers have identified 16 turtle “hotspots” around the world. These regions host the many native species of tortoises and freshwater turtles. By focusing on such areas, conservationists can target preservation efforts where the greatest effects can be achieved.Scientists from the Chelonian Research Foundation, Conservation International, and State University of New York at Stony Brook recently published an article in the journal Chelonian Conservation and Biology that names three types of hotspots—biodiversity hotspots, high-biodiversity wilderness areas, and turtle priority areas. Taxon richness and endemism values are offered for the 16 identified hotspots, which host 262 species, or 83 percent of all turtle ...
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China's Rapidly Changing Views on Wildlife Conservation in Africa 15.7.2015 Politics on HuffingtonPost.com
A dramatic shift in Chinese public opinion about animal welfare and global wildlife conservation appears to be underway. Supported by high-profile celebrity campaigns by NBA legend Yao Ming and actress Li Bing Bing , there is growing awareness in China over the country's role in the illicit African wildlife trade. On Chinese social media , evolving public opinion is reflected in the emerging consensus among young people that eating sharks from Mozambique or consuming ivory from Kenya is no longer "cool." It is very likely that this increased public opinion pressure, both at home and in Africa, played a role in the Chinese government's decision to phase out its domestic ivory trade . About 30 volunteers joined the Africa Network for Animal Welfare (ANAW) in a de-snaring project that aims to remove snares that have been set, rescue trapped animals and report injured animals. That change is not only taking place online but also on the ground in places like Kenya. A group of young Chinese expats is now ...
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Why Some Republicans Don't Want Legal Protection For This Unique Bird 13.7.2015 Green on HuffingtonPost.com
WASHINGTON, July 13 (Reuters) - A wildlife protection fight over a quirky ground-dwelling bird highlights how two U.S. environmental groups have increasingly dominated the process of species protection, sparking a backlash from pro-business Republicans. A Reuters review of hundreds of federal records over a 10-year period shows how the non-profit groups have had success by inundating Washington with petitions for new protected-species listings and lawsuits designed to compel regulators to respond. Photo: vividcorvid/Flickr Many of the new listings achieved by the Center for Biological Diversity (CBD) and WildEarth Guardians have been for relatively obscure species, such as snails and fish with compact habitats. But their effort to protect a wide-ranging bird called greater sage grouse has now sparked a backlash from critics who say the Endangered Species Act is being manipulated and abused by environmentalists through aggressive legal actions and closed-door settlements. The federal government must ...
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Texas Bans Shark Fin Trade: A Red State's Stand for Endangered Species 11.7.2015 Green on HuffingtonPost.com
Last month, Governor Greg Abbott signed H.B. 1579 into law, making Texas the 10th state, and the first red state, to prohibit the sale, trade, purchase and transportation of shark fins. The law that grew out of a bill introduced by Rep. Eddie Lucio III, D-District 38, ensures that Texas no longer participates in the trade that is driving the global decline of shark species. "Shark finning is not only an inhumane and illegal act, but it also puts the sustainability of our marine ecosystem at stake," said Rep. Lucio . "This law will prevent profiting from this heinous practice, and I want to thank to members of the legislature and Governor Abbott for understanding the critical role that sharks place in our ecosystem." The Humane Society of the United States and Oceana spearheaded the legislative push, but this groundbreaking initiative to save sharks in Texas actually began with a children's book. In 2011, I read that 100 million sharks are killed each year by humans, while human deaths by sharks averaged ...
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The Pros And Cons Of Shark Week -- If You're A Shark 10.7.2015 Green on HuffingtonPost.com
As the longest-running cable programming event in history, Shark Week is good for the Discovery Channel. But is it good for sharks? “For shark conservation to gain traction, we need a supportive public,” Suzannah Evans, a doctoral student in science communication at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, told The Huffington Post. Evans said she fears that support might be harder to come by “if people are constantly being exposed to images that portray sharks as violent and dangerous.” Evans is the co-author of two papers examining how Shark Week might contribute to the public’s general fear of sharks, as well as the public’s interest in promoting shark conservation. “Shark Week provides access to audiences who are interested in sharks, yet the image of sharks presented by the Discovery Channel emphasizes their potential violence over their declining numbers,” Evans and co-author Jessica Gall Myrick wrote in “ Do PSAs Take a Bite Out of Shark Week? The Effects of Juxtaposing Environmental ...
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This Is How A Species Goes Extinct: More Than A Ton Of Frozen Pangolin Meat Seized In Indonesia 9.7.2015 Green on HuffingtonPost.com
Pangolins are one of the most trafficked animals in the world. Pangolins are one of the planet's most unique and adorable species. The scaly, anteater-like creatures live in parts of Asia and Africa, and there's an entire task force dedicated to their protection. A popular Pokemon character, Sandslash , was even based on these " artichokes on legs ." And yet, humans can't seem to stop killing them. Authorities in Indonesia recently busted smugglers trying to transport 1.3 tons worth of dead pangolins into Singapore. Heart-wrenching photos taken by a Getty photographer show dozens of the animals frozen in their trademark armored ball before they were burned by customs officials on Wednesday. Warning: The pictures below may be upsetting to some readers. Pangolins are the world's " most-trafficked " mammal. The International Union for Conservation of Nature classifies the Chinese pangolin -- one of eight species of pangolins -- as " critically endangered ." But despite this designation, consumers in parts ...
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CHEMICAL IN PLASTIC BAGS THREATENS MARINE CONSERVATION AND HUMAN HEALTH 8.7.2015 ENN Network News - ENN
Clifford, Virginia - Plastic bags can be poisonous. A scientific study published by researchers at Haereticus Environmental Laboratory and the University of Maine shows that a chemical in plastic bags made to U.S. FDA food-grade specifications can leach from the bag into seawater at such high concentrations that it can be deadly to fish.
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Inappropriate Appropriations 8.7.2015 Green on HuffingtonPost.com
I am not sure at what point Congress and some of our political leaders decided they wanted to wage an all-out war against our nation's lands, water and imperiled wildlife, and the laws that protect them - or why, for that matter - but Americans who care about wildlife seem to be fighting battles on a near weekly basis. The FY 2016 House Interior, Environment and Related Agencies appropriations bill is proving to be no exception to this trend, with multiple crosshairs trained on the Endangered Species Act (ESA). The extreme nature of the more than 25 anti-environmental riders that have been inserted into the bill in Committee cannot be overstated. One in particular would block badly needed regulatory controls to crack down on the sale of illegal ivory. This "elephant extinction rider," would have far-reaching consequences. It would facilitate the continued slaughter of Asian and African elephants--driving them closer to extinction--while allowing an illegal, terroristic trade to flourish. This is ...
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Doubling Down on Shark Conservation as Jaws Turns 40 6.7.2015 Politics on HuffingtonPost.com
As Shark Week arrives for 2015, movie goers have the opportunity to relive a thrilling moment in cinema history with the re-release of the first bona fide summer blockbuster and the celebration of one of the ocean's (and this planet's) most magnificent set of creatures. By now, we all know the sad story of sharks and rays. Through directed fishing, by-catch, surging demand for shark and ray products, and misaligned incentives, the world's shark and ray populations have been decimated over the past four decades and now a quarter are at risk of extinction . In the worst cases they have gone locally extinct; in many others, up to 90 percent of populations have been lost. I am spending the beginning of Shark Week viewing the world's largest whale shark aggregation in Isla Mujeres, Mexico, where living sharks contribute millions of dollars annually in ecotourism dollars to the local economy. Photo by Caleb McClennen ©WCS. Sharks and rays' vulnerability also derives from their specific life cycle. Most shark ...
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California Just Cut Its Water Use In A Major Way 2.7.2015 Politics on HuffingtonPost.com
In the households of drought-stricken California, something finally clicked. This May, the last month in which water conservation was voluntary, urban water users consumed 28.9 percent less water than in May 2013, the State Water Resources Control Board announced Wednesday. This surpasses the 25 percent mandatory cutbacks that went into effect June 1. The major drop marks the steepest water-use decline in year-over-year comparisons since Gov. Jerry Brown asked residents to restrict their water use last year , the Sacramento Bee noted. The conservation effort is shocking in contrast with how little Californians cut back on water in March and April, when residents decreased water use compared to those months of 2013 by just 3.6 percent and 14 percent respectively. “The numbers tell us that more Californians are stepping up to help make their communities more water secure, which is welcome news in the face of this dire drought,” water board chair Felicia Marcus said in a statement. “That said, we need all ...
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U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service Rejects Plan to Reclassify Wolves, Keep Wolf Recovery Going 1.7.2015 Commondreams.org Newswire
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An Extraordinary Hope Spot: Sylvia Earle on the 20th Anniversary of Cabo Pulmo Marine Park and the Future of the World's Oceans 30.6.2015 Green on HuffingtonPost.com
by Joy E. Stocke Over the past 50 years, humans have put an enormous amount of pressure on coral reef environments by altering their waters and tearing up their foundations. From dynamite fishing to global warming, we are rapidly sending the world's reefs into oblivion. The latest reports state that as much as 27 percent of monitored reef formations have been lost and as much as 32 percent are at risk of being lost within the next 32 years. -- Earth Observatory, NASA, 2015 "The Earth is a unique system in the universe, the only planet we know of that's hospitable for humankind. And that's because we have oceans." -- Dr. Sylvia A. Earle, Marine Biologist Cabo Pulmo Marine Park, Baja Sur, Mexico, Photo by Joy E. Stocke On a deceptively serene Saturday morning in June, as Hurricane Blanca churns in the Pacific Ocean off the southern Baja Peninsula, Judith Castro Lucero, Director of ACCP (Amigos Para la Conservacion de Cabo Pulmo) and I watch the yacht Maranatha motor into Marina La Paz. The night before, ...
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Red Panda Cubs Born At The Smithsonian Conservation Biology Institute Are A Whole Load Of Cute 29.6.2015 Green on HuffingtonPost.com
Cue the squeals. The Smithsonian Conservation Biology Institute in Front Royal, Virginia, welcomed seven teeny furballs red panda cubs into the world over the past month -- and they're precious beyond measure. The cubs were born to mothers Nutmeg, Regan and Leo Mei. Five of the babies are now being painstakingly hand-reared. “Our animal care team is always hopeful that new moms will raise their own cubs, but that’s not always possible,” the Institute wrote in a Facebook post on June 20 . Of the three mothers, one was reportedly diagnosed with an aggressive cancer and had to be euthanized. Another has reportedly been having difficulty nurturing her babies. Despite the challenges, the cubs are said to be doing very well. CBS News reports the keepers feed the babies by hand up to seven times a day ...
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