User: flenvcenter Topic: Biodiversity-Independent
Category: Protection :: Policy
Last updated: Aug 23 2014 03:56 IST RSS 2.0
 
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D.C.'s Famous Snowy Owl Found Dead In Minnesota 23.8.2014 Green on HuffingtonPost.com
Washington, D.C.'s snowy owl famously survived being hit by a bus this past winter , but it seems our migratory friend couldn't steer clear of danger. After her accident, our wings were crossed for this tough bird. She was treated at City Wildlife -- the only urban wildlife rehabilitation center in the nation's capital -- then at the National Zoo, before she was ferreted off to the University of Minnesota's Raptor Center for feather transplants and further care. In mid-April, when the owl was released near Superior, Wisconsin , we rather hoped that'd be the last we'd see of her. But on Friday, a message on Minnesota's Raptor Center's website read: Sadly, we're writing today to let you know that The Raptor Center has learned the snowy owl's body has been recovered from the shoulder of a Minnesota highway, near where [she] had been released last spring. The snowy's cause of death is uncertain, but the placement of the body indicates [she] may have been hit by a vehicle. The body was in good condition, ...
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Judge Halts Plan to Eliminate Secure Grizzly Bear Habitat in Northwest Montana 23.8.2014 Commondreams.org Newswire
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Demand response keeps energy use low at Chicago high-rise 22.8.2014 Business Operations | GreenBiz.com

Load-shifting and other technologies save energy while helping tenants stay comfortable, no matter what the weather.

Demand response keeps energy use low at Chicago high-rise
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This (Really, Really) Little Cutie May Be The Smallest Dog In Britain 22.8.2014 Green on HuffingtonPost.com
World, meet Tyson — a teeny chihuahua-mix who might just be Britain’s smallest dog. ‘Britain’s smallest dog’ is four inches tall and weighs less than a bag of sugar: http://t.co/OWKNkZPtoS pic.twitter.com/5QZ2f9AHnf — Yahoo UK News (@YahooNewsUK) August 21, 2014 Born earlier this year, Tyson was reportedly so tiny at birth that his owner Rosemarie McLinden had to feed him with a dropper . “I had to start feeding him myself as he couldn't latch on to his mother," McLinden told Yahoo! News UK. “He was so small he just could not breastfeed due to the tiny size of his mouth.” Though McLinden and her husband initially worried about Tyson, who hasn’t grown much since he was born, it seems the little pup is now fit and healthy — though he remains teeny-weeny, as you can see in the video above. According to the Boston Standard, Tyson — who was named after boxer Mike Tyson "because he is such a little fighter,” McLinden told the news outlet — weighs just a little more than half a pound and is just five inches ...
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Conservation Is a Winning Conversation With Latinos 21.8.2014 Politics on HuffingtonPost.com
I visited Shenandoah River State Park on a recent sunny weekend with my family and was pleasantly surprised to see so many fellow Hispanics enjoying the outdoors. The park offers scenic views of the Blue Ridge Mountains, and river-front picnicking, fishing, hiking trails and boating. It was rewarding to see so many children enjoying the outdoors, as my team and I have spent years educating and encouraging Latino families to visit and enjoy their public lands, like this Virginia state park. Now, a new research brief from leading pollster Latino Decisions and Hispanic Access Foundation indicates that Latinos aren't just appreciating and increasingly advocating for our environment - they may even vote for candidates who will see it protected. Our research brief, " Hispanic Voter Perspectives on Conservation and Environmental Issues ," analyzes nine major public opinion polls from the last three years. It finds Latinos overwhelming support greater environmental protections, such as preserving parks and ...
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The Nature of Humans 21.8.2014 Green on HuffingtonPost.com
By Rod Fujita and Nya Van Leuvan, co-founders of Root Solutions Many of us joined the conservation movement because while studying nature, we fell in love with it. Or maybe we signed up because we loved nature growing up, and deepened our relationship by studying its many mysteries. In either case, it's safe to say that most conservationists know a lot more about why fish, birds and plants do the things they do, than about human behavior. But it is human behavior that now shapes the destiny of life on earth. For example, even the ocean -- which covers most of the planet -- is heavily impacted by human activity over roughly 40 percent of its surface. Our influence extends even into the most remote regions of the planet. The conservation movement has made great strides, but there is an urgent need to scale conservation solutions so that they are commensurate with the global scale of environmental impact. We created a new organization, Root Solutions , to help conservationists achieve this scale by ...
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'Beautiful Little Soul': Therapy Bunnies Help Alzheimer's, Dementia Patients 20.8.2014 Green on HuffingtonPost.com
It sounds almost too hopping cute to be true, but Teddy the therapy rabbit's first job was tending to his little sister Lulu. Lulu is the most recent addition to Minnesotan bunny enthusiast Jennifer Smith's multi-rabbit household. The animal had been left in a cardboard box next to a dumpster on a cold night this past winter. "A woman saw the box and opened it to find a beautiful rabbit freezing to death," Smith says. Lulu was brought to a local animal shelter, where -- against all odds -- she survived. Smith adopted her soon after that, but the rabbit clearly wasn't well, and Teddy was determined to help. "Our tiny house rabbit Teddy Graham would spend his days lying next to her pen. He rarely left her side," she says. "Lulu just laid there in her sick, broken kind of way. Teddy went right up to her and started kissing her face. ...Teddy saved Lulu, and Lulu adores Teddy for his devotion to her." Teddy Graham and Lulu. Photo credit: Jennifer Smith As of early August, Lulu and Teddy Graham are able to ...
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Primary forests-the action and the policy 19.8.2014 Earth Times
The animals and plants of the primary forests are those we are desperately trying to save. Their habitats are the primary forest, whether taiga or tropical. To conserve those myriad habitats, these policies and actions are recommended for immediate use by you, the people who can turn the tide and keep the last 5% of the once-great green forest.
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Wrestling Climate Change to the Ground 19.8.2014 Green on HuffingtonPost.com
It's July 2010, at state-of-the-art Dwight Center for Conservation Science at Pepperwood Preserve in the Mayacamas range east of Santa Rosa. The place is surrounded by some 3,000 acres of iconic Bay Area Coast Range habitat: sunny skies, untrammeled oak woodlands, gorgeous views. Inside, 23 palpably excited scientists introduce themselves and rattle off their disciplines: climate change modeler, spatial ecologist, physicist, soil physicist, ecologist focused on global carbon cycling and probabilistic vegetation modeling. Uh oh. Is this conference going to be all about graphs, equations and incomprehensible hypotheses presented with wild enthusiasm? (Yes.) A fire ecologist announces himself as "Discoverer of the Previously Unknown." Everybody laughs. "The whole town's here to paint the fence," says Lorrie Flint, a hydrologist from the U.S. Geological Survey. "And David's our Tom Sawyer." The tall, slim master of ceremonies is Dr. David Ackerly, professor of integrative biology at UC Berkeley. In buoyant ...
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People In North Texas Just Adopted More Than 2,200 Animals In One Day 19.8.2014 Green on HuffingtonPost.com
Post by City of Arlington, TX - Animal Services . All in all, "Empty the Shelter Day" was a huge win in many ways, said both organizers and participants. Not only did the event help to increase the visibility of animal shelters in their communities, but — given that overcrowding is an especially urgent problem in shelters during the summer — it was also critical in the saving of many, many lives. KXAS-TV reported, for instance, that one participating shelter, Dallas Animal Services, was euthanizing 50 to 60 animals every single day this summer because it simply didn't have space for them; on Saturday, however, the shelter found homes for 149 of its 150 animals . The day's success could perhaps be best summed up in a photograph posted by the Texas chapter of the Society for the Prevention of Cruelty to Animals, one of the event’s co-sponsors, at the end of the adoption effort. “Look at those empty kennels,” the organization wrote on Instagram. “#emptytheshelter...#savealife.” Encouraging pet adoption by ...
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Poll shows strong Latino support for conservation 18.8.2014 From the Blogs
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Pangolin, Star Tortoise Vanishing As Indian Poachers Target Lesser-Known Animals 18.8.2014 Green on HuffingtonPost.com
NEW DELHI (AP) — Wildlife poachers, hindered by India's efforts to protect majestic endangered animals including tigers and rhinos, have begun to think smaller. And activists say scores of the country's lesser-known species are vanishing from the wild as a result. The Indian pangolin — a scaly critter whose defense mechanism of rolling up into a ball is no help against humans — and the star tortoise — a popular pet that maxes out at a foot in length — are just two of the species that are being killed or smuggled in increasing numbers while conservation efforts focus on such iconic animals such as tigers and elephants. "The problem is that we were turning a blind eye to all lesser-known species and suddenly this very lucrative trade has been allowed to explode," said Belinda Wright, director of the Wildlife Protection Society of India, an advocacy group. Wildlife specialists say the growing affluence of China, Vietnam and other Southeast Asian countries has helped drive the demand for exotic animals. Some ...
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546,335 Acres in 9 Western States Proposed as Protected Critical Habitat for Yellow-billed Cuckoos 15.8.2014 Commondreams.org Newswire
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Meet The 'Zombie Chicken' That Apparently Made It Out Of A Freezer Alive 14.8.2014 Green on HuffingtonPost.com
Kat Gullahorn didn't even want the chickens to begin with. About a year ago, one of Gullahorn's neighbors just outside Albuquerque, New Mexico, decided it was time to kill his birds. "He chose to use a BB gun and shot the chickens in the heads," she says. He gave two to Gullahorn and her husband, Evan, who wrapped them in plastic bags and stuck them in the freezer to de-feather and otherwise deal with later. But what happened next, she says, caught Evan by surprise. About a day later, he opened the freezer and found one of the chickens still in repose, while the other was sitting there, looking "fully alive, very cold, and pissed off," Gullahorn wrote in a June 2013 Facebook post . Evan was surprised, says Gullahorn -- and a little stymied. What does one do with such an animal? Evan holding the "blind undead guard chicken." Photo by Kat Gullahorn Gullahorn, with her daughter and husband, let the chicken into the yard and tried to feed her some corn meal while they considered the bird's future. The family ...
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Feds Ignore Science, Imperiling Wolverines 14.8.2014 CommonDreams.org Headlines
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Dog Tries To 'Save' Fish; The Internet Melts A Little Inside 14.8.2014 Green on HuffingtonPost.com
When a video of a dog seemingly trying to rescue some fish -- by splashing water on them -- began making the rounds this week, netizens everywhere let out a collective “ aww .” (Watch the video, above, to see why.) Though we’d love to believe the cute pup is showing a whole lot of compassion for his floundering friends, it’s possible the dog isn’t doing that at all. As many skeptical Redditors have pointed out, the pooch may actually be trying to bury the fish with the water. Addressing the question of why a dog would try to bury anything with water, Redditor "munificent" said: “My dog has done the ‘bury with nose thing’ on a bare carpet floor, on top of a bed, and on hardwood floors. … Once she tried to hide a toy by burying it under a sleeping baby.” After watching the clip via Buzzfeed, a Facebook user noted the following: "A dog does not understand that a fish needs water to breathe . ... People need to stop putting human emotions onto animals." Last year, an animal behavior expert said something ...
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duh DUN... It's Shark Week! 13.8.2014 Wildlife and Habitat Conservation News - ENN
It's time for the 27th annual Shark Week on the Discovery Channel, featuring a solid week of shark-centric programming for viewers who just can't get enough of ... factually incorrect fear-mongering stories about sharks. Sharks are the villain everyone loves to hate, from Jaws to endless B-movies on the SyFy Channel, but in fact, the real enemy is humans. Worldwide, sharks are in critical danger, and we're the only ones who can save them. It's time to put down the remote and take up the cause of shark conservation, because it won't be too long before Shark Week is little more than a series of antique horror films about a superorder of fish that used to be abundant in the world's oceans.
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U.S. Denies Endangered Species Protection For Wolverines, Despite Declining Populations 13.8.2014 Green on HuffingtonPost.com
By Laura Zuckerman SALMON, Idaho, Aug 12 (Reuters) - U.S. wildlife managers on Tuesday denied federal protections for rare wolverines, outraging conservationists but pleasing Western states that opposed adding the reclusive but feisty member of the weasel family to the endangered and threatened species list. Last year the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service proposed applying Endangered Species Act safeguards for the estimated 300 wolverines left in the Lower 48 states, most of which inhabit the high country of Idaho, Montana and Wyoming. The service had said global warming was reducing mountain snows the animals use to dig dens and store food. But on Tuesday federal wildlife managers said there was "insufficient evidence" that climate change would harm wolverines, which resemble small bears with bushy tails and which are known for their ferocious defense of their young. "After carefully considering the best available science, the Service has determined that the effects of climate change are not ...
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Federal Agency Ignores Best Available Science In Decision Not To List Wolverine 13.8.2014 Commondreams.org Newswire
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What Ecologists Are Most Worried About Right Now: 5 Emerging Trends in Climate Change Ecology 11.8.2014 Green on HuffingtonPost.com
When scientists publish an analysis of the impacts of climate change on species, ecosystems and people, the language used can sound terribly distant and cold. In truth, the tone of these studies reflects the tone of science but not the feelings of scientists. Ecologists studying the impacts of climate change today know that change is not coming at some point in the future; change is here, with much more to come. And most of us are pretty worried -- a heat reflected even in the cool questions we as scientists are now asking. In this post, I highlight findings drawn from recent science published by the Open Access publisher, PLOS (Public Library of Science), titled The 2014 Ecological Impacts of Climate Change Collection, 18 studies published in PLOS Biology and PLOS ONE over the past year, covering everything from the effects of global warming and other climate-related changes on penguin, frog, butterfly and human communities to proposed models for deciding which species might be moved to improve their ...
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