User: flenvcenter Topic: Biodiversity-Independent
Category: Protection :: Policy
Last updated: May 25 2017 08:09 IST RSS 2.0
 
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Of Science And Religion - Can Spiritual Values Of Forests Inspire Conservation? 25.5.2017 Green on HuffingtonPost.com
In his recent book EO Wilson advocates conserving half of the planet for one species (Homo sapiens) and the other half for the remaining millions of species. His list of “best places on the biosphere” worthy of saving include several sacred sites: the church forests of Ethiopia, the Western Ghats in India, natural areas of Bhutan, remnant forests in the Congo and Ghana, the redwoods of California, and the tepuis of Venezuela. All of these forests have spiritual value for the native people in the region, which has contributed to the safe-guarding of these landscapes more effectively than walls or monetary metrics. Sacred forests are a critical component of biodiversity conservation, yet remain difficult to account for in most western calculations of global biodiversity management. Such sacred regions have been fiercely protected by cultural and religious beliefs and taboos for many centuries. Further, many sacred sites are successfully maintained through traditional means of community-based conservation ...
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In British Columbia, A Strange Pattern In Humpback Whale Behaviour Raises The Stakes For Conservation 22.5.2017 Green on HuffingtonPost.com
Eric Keen , University of California, San Diego In a fjord system of northern British Columbia, Canada’s westernmost province, a team of scientists, non-profits and an indigenous monitoring group have uncovered a curious humpback whale behaviour. Dubbed the “whale wave”, it suggests local displacement of the animals caused by humans may have more consequences than previously thought. By “wave”, researchers mean a seasonal shift in the habitats used by humpbacks. In the early summer, the whales concentrate in the outer channels of the fjord system nearest the open ocean. And, as the summer turns to autumn, they propagate further into the fjord system and deeper into the mainland. More than ten years of whale surveys indicate that this complex pattern occurs at roughly the same time every year. A wave that had gone undetected Though annually persistent and remarkably specific in structure, the whale wave is not the kind of pattern that is picked up in typical marine mammal surveys. That’s because such ...
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Myanmar shines with intact forest, but will this biodiversity be conserved? 19.5.2017 The Earth Times Online Newspaper - Environment News
How can we conserve the beauty of the largest remaining rainforest in Asia? This tract of land, divided by the dry interior, stretches across the Thai border at one end and connects with Indian reserves at the other. Answers to the everlasting problems of conservation must include governance, proper transparency and perhaps most important, grassroots participation at many levels.
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EPA Violated the Law When It Approved 59 Bee-Killing Pesticides 17.5.2017 Truthout - All Articles
The Environmental Protection Agency will have some work to do, now that a federal court has decided it didn't comply with the  Endangered Species Act . You see, the EPA approved the registrations for 59  pesticide products  without first consulting with the US Fish and Wildlife Service on whether those chemicals posed a risk to  endangered species . The  court held  that the EPA improperly approved  38 pesticides  containing Thiamethoxam, and  21 pesticides  containing Clothianidin. Oops. It's quite a big "oops," actually, because these pesticides are all  neonicotinoids . If that term sounds familiar, it's because that's the type of insecticide many scientists believe has been killing bees for the last decade. Neonicotinoids are thought to be responsible for the phenomenon called " colony collapse disorder ," in which entire bee colonies just disappear almost overnight. The worker bees leave their hives and their queen behind, but no one knows where they go. American beekeepers began reporting this ...
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Scientists May Be ‘Vastly’ Underestimating The Extinction Risk Facing Some Species 12.5.2017 Green on HuffingtonPost.com
The IUCN Red List paints a grim picture of the biodiversity loss we are facing as a planet. In 2016, tens of thousands of mammals, birds, insects, plants and other organisms were found to be under threat from extinction, according to the list. Of that number, more than 5,000 were considered critically endangered , including iconic species like the leatherback turtle, the Antarctic blue whale, and both subspecies of orangutan — all creatures right at the precipice of vanishing forever. But as staggering as those numbers may sound, they may still be vast underestimates, according to a recent study out of Columbia University that challenged the accuracy of methods used by the International Union for Conservation of Nature to determine the status of species.   Specifically, the researchers concluded that the IUCN has been “ systematically overestimating ” the size of the habitat in which species can thrive ― errors that have possibly led to an underestimation of the number of organisms under threat of ...
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Dingo rules - both kangaroos and nutrient supplies. 10.5.2017 The Earth Times Online Newspaper - Health News
Can we persuade sheep farmers to let in the dingo, so that kangaroos can stop noshing all the delicate vegetation? Now there is further evidence that the natural control of herbivores transfers nutrients around the whole landscape. The dingo seems to be a prime conservator too.
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Could Trump dismantle the American West? 9.5.2017 High Country News Most Recent
How the president’s ‘deconstruction’ doctrine threatens public lands.
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Giraffes Are Quietly Disappearing, but the US Can Help Stop Their Silent Extinction 2.5.2017 Truthout.com
Despite their stature as the tallest land animal on earth, and status as one of the most iconic and beloved species in the world, giraffes have been quietly disappearing from the landscape at an alarming rate. Now, however, there's hope the US will act to ensure their survival by  protecting them  as an endangered species. Since the mid-1980s, the population of giraffes has declined by a startling  40 percent , leaving only an estimated 97,560 individuals in the wild. There are now fewer giraffes left in existence than elephants. In December, concerns about the threat of extinction  prompted  the International Union for the Conservation of Nature (IUCN) to change their status from a species of Least Concern -- skipping right over Near Threatened -- to  Vulnerable  on the IUCN Red List of Threatened Species. Unfortunately, they continue to face mounting pressure from a growing human population, human-wildlife conflicts, disease, habitat loss and fragmentation, predators, civil unrest, drought, climate ...
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An end to Tucson’s growth wars 1.5.2017 Current Issue
A conservation plan puts science ahead of politics.
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Brazil Moves to Cut Amazon Conservation Units by 1.2 Million Hectares 23.4.2017 Truthout - All Articles
The Brazilian Congress is poised to slash the size of existing conservation units, removing federal protection from vast swaths of Amazon rainforest in Pará state. (Photo: Rhett A. Butler) With Brazil in political turmoil, the bancada ruralista agribusiness lobby that dominates Congress has quietly set in motion measures to dismember some of the country's most important conservation units in the eastern section of the Amazon basin. The move occurs at a time when the country is fully focused on the Supreme Court's recently announced plans to investigate corruption allegations made against leading politicians, including eight of President Temer's ministers. Congressmen have introduced amendments to two key provisional measures -- MP 756/2016 and MP 758/2016 -- which would remove conservation protection from by 1.2 million hectares (2,965,252 acres) of forest. Some of the affected units have received significant funding from foreign donors, including the European Union and the World Bank. On 11 April, a ...
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Scientists Launch Global Quest To Track Down Long-Lost Species 21.4.2017 Green on HuffingtonPost.com
WASHINGTON — The race is on to rediscover a list of 25 species that collectively have not been seen in more than 1,500 years.  There’s the Wondiwoi tree kangaroo , last spotted in 1928 in Indonesia; the pink-headed duck , missing since 1949; and the bullneck seahorse , a species native to Australia never before seen in the wild.  This week, Texas-based  Global Wildlife Conservation launched “ The Search for Lost Species ,” described as the “largest-ever global quest to find and protect” animals and plants missing for decades.  Don Church , GWC’s president and director of conservation, said the organization’s “most wanted” list includes “cute and cuddly” species, the kind people are drawn to and that provide an opportunity to raise awareness about today’s biodiversity crisis.  “It’s about raising the profile both of the species that we’re looking for, but more so the places where they occur,” he told The Huffington Post. “The reason those places are important is because they have extreme biodiversity ...
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What Cutting AmeriCorps Would Mean For Public Lands 20.4.2017 Green on HuffingtonPost.com
If Congress votes to eliminate AmeriCorps funding, our country’s public lands and waters will suffer. Every year, AmeriCorps members enrolled in service and conservation Corps spend thousands of hours serving at parks and forests. AmeriCorps members build trails, maintain campgrounds, remove invasive species, preserve historic structures, and even help prevent and fight wildfires. Without the help of AmeriCorps members, a lot of important work at federal, state and local parks would not get done. Corps are locally-based organizations that engage young adults and recent veterans in environmental and community service. Most Corps are non-profits, and the majority of the more than 130 organizations that are part of The Corps Network – the national association of service and conservation Corps – receive AmeriCorps funding. This funding enables Corps to enroll participants and leverage additional funding to complete projects on public lands. Where exactly does the AmeriCorps funding go? In exchange for their ...
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Leaked Documents Reveal Trump Administration Prepping to Ramp up Drilling, Mining, Grazing on Public Land 20.4.2017 Truthout.com
Bureau of Land Management (BLM) administrators have drafted a " Priority Work List " that reveals BLM's focus on oil, gas and coal development on federal land as well as the security of the U.S.-Mexico border.  E&E News  obtained the internal documents, which had not yet been shared with BLM staff.  The list was "assembled by the team at the BLM to clearly lay out our continued commitment to ensure opportunities for commercial, recreation and conservation activities on BLM-managed lands," BLM spokeswoman Megan Crandall told E&E News.  In the first of five subsections, "Making America Safe through Energy Independence," the following are identified as key components of "BLM Priority Work":   Make additional lands available for "all of the above" energy development Address backlog of Applications for Permit to Drill (APDs) and Expressions of Interest (EOIs) Streamline Federal coal leasing and permitting, and address backlog Streamline oil and gas leasing and permitting Streamline rights-of-way processing ...
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Listen to squeaking baby pandas and see how China is saving them 12.4.2017 TreeHugger
The China Conservation and Research Center for the Giant Panda is the only place in the world that successfully breeds pandas and releases them into the wild. Here's how they do it.
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At Least 15 Percent Of The World’s Tree Species Are Under Threat Of Extinction 8.4.2017 Green on HuffingtonPost.com
The planet is on the brink of the sixth mass extinction , an epoch that scientists say could see humans wiping out at least 75 percent of the Earth’s species. Much has already been made of humans’ impact on wildlife . Last year, a damning World Wildlife Fund report revealed that people were on track to killing off two-thirds of the world’s vertebrates . But it’s not just birds and bears that are facing extinction due to human activity. Thousands of tree species are under threat as well, according to the first global database of the world’s trees, unveiled this week by Botanic Gardens Conservation International. The UK-based organization, whose members include hundreds of botanical institutions worldwide, said it pulled data from more than 500 published sources to create the online database GlobalTreeSearch , the world’s first “global, authoritative list of tree species.” BGCI, in collaboration with the International Union for Conservation of Nature, identified 60,065 tree species currently living on ...
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California's Drought Emergency Is Officially Over 8.4.2017 Green on HuffingtonPost.com
California Gov. Jerry Brown (D) on Friday  issued an executive order  that ends the drought emergency in most parts of the state.   “This drought emergency is over, but the next drought could be around the corner,” he said in a statement. “Conservation must remain a way of life.” Brown’s order maintains many of the conservation practices put in place in 2015, including mandatory reports on water usage, restrictions on using nonrecirculated water in fountains and bans on watering lawns within 48 hours of significant rainfall.   “Increasing long-term water conservation among Californians, improving water efficiency within the State’s communities and agricultural production, and strengthening local and regional drought planning are critical to California’s resilience to drought and climate change,” the order says.  The drought had a significant impact on groundwater supplies in Fresno, Kings, Tulare and Tuolumne counties, and the state of emergency will remain in effect in those areas.   You can read ...
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Wildlife Safari Defends Its Elephant Car Wash 6.4.2017 Environmental News Network
During the summer at the Wildlife Safari zoo in Oregon, visitors can pay $25 to have elephants “wash” their vehicles. The elephants use their trunks as sponge holders and hoses.
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Manatees Just Lost Their Status as Endangered Species 4.4.2017 Environmental News Network
Manatees have just been downlisted from endangered to threatened; and while some are celebrating their recovery, many advocates are fearing that the move puts their future survival in jeopardy.
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Senate Republicans Attack Scientific Foundation of Endangered Species Act 4.4.2017 Commondreams.org Newswire
Center for Biological Diversity Senate Republicans have introduced legislation to directly undermine one of the most basic aspects of the Endangered Species Act: reliance on the best available science to determine what animals or plants need federal protections.  Sen. John Barrasso (R-Wyo.) and Sen. Mike Enzi (R-Wyo.) introduced Senate Bill 735, which would automatically deem any and all information submitted by a state, tribal or county government as the best available science — even if that information is, in fact, outdated, incorrect, contradictory or not supported by peer ...
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Tigers, ready to be counted 31.3.2017 Environmental News Network
A new methodology developed by the Indian Statistical Institute, and WCS (Wildlife Conservation Society) may revolutionize how to count tigers and other big cats over large landscapes.
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