User: flenvcenter Topic: Biodiversity-Independent
Category: Protection :: Policy
Last updated: Oct 21 2014 23:03 IST RSS 2.0
 
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The Antiquities Act and the San Gabriel Mountains 21.10.2014 Green on HuffingtonPost.com
What would it be like if Chimney Rock in Colorado, the ancestral home of the Pueblo People, was open to modern development? What if the Giant Sequoias of Northern California had no protection from lumber companies or wood poachers? What if Fossil Butte in Wyoming, one of the best paleontological records of aquatic life in North America, could be tapped by the fossil fuel industry? Fortunately, these places, and many other pristine landscapes and historical sites throughout the country, are protected as national monuments for all Americans to enjoy. Recently we celebrated the designation of another national monument: the San Gabriel Mountains of California. It is because of the Antiquities Act that all of our national monuments exist. Under the Antiquities Act, the president has the authority to protect "historic landmarks, historic and prehistoric structures, and other objects of historic or scientific interest" by declaring them national monuments. Nearly every president has used this legislation since ...
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Broad Coalition of Groups Call On Governor Cuomo To Stop Exploding Oil Trains 21.10.2014 Commondreams.org Newswire
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Hunters and Conservationists Join Forces to Protect Imperiled Wolverines 21.10.2014 Commondreams.org Newswire
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Can We Earn a Living on a Living Planet? 17.10.2014 Commondreams.org Views
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Failing Humans and Planet, EPA Greenlights 'Agent Orange' Herbicide 16.10.2014 CommonDreams.org Headlines
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Dog Of Nurse Hospitalized For Ebola 'Wagging His Tail,' Safely In Quarantine 16.10.2014 Politics on HuffingtonPost.com
Nina Pham, the Dallas nurse being treated for Ebola, has at least one thing she can stop worrying about: Her dog is being well cared for, according to city officials. Bentley, a 1-year-old Cavalier King Charles spaniel, is in quarantine for three weeks at a former military complex , now decommissioned and owned by the city of Dallas. "He's adorable. Clearly a little puzzled by what's going on. But he's in good hands now and will be taken care of," Sana Syed, a city spokeswoman, said in a tweet this week. Pham, who had been treating Ebola patient Thomas Eric Duncan, was hospitalized Friday. The dog was alone in Pham's apartment until Monday, when "workers in protective gear could remove him," per Yahoo News. This Oct. 13, 2014, photo released via Twitter by the City of Dallas Public Information Managing Director Sana Syed shows Bentley, the 1-year-old King Charles spaniel belonging to Nina Pham, the nurse who contracted Ebola. (AP Photo/Courtesy of Sana Syed/PIO, City of Dallas) Unlike the dog of a ...
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EPA Approves Dangerous Combination of 2,4-D and Glyphosate Pesticides 16.10.2014 Commondreams.org Newswire
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Starbucks Customers Demand Company Switch To Eggs Laid In Less Cruel Conditions 15.10.2014 Green on HuffingtonPost.com
A new petition by a nonprofit animal rights group asks Starbucks to stop using eggs produced by hens that live in cramped cages. Though some of the eggs Starbucks sells are laid by cage-free hens -- those used in the company's spinach and feta breakfast wrap and in a handful of its other breakfast sandwiches -- the petition alleges that the coffee retail giant gets most of its eggs from farms that use cramped battery cages to house egg-laying hens. "Despite claims made on their website to be offering 'ethically purchased and responsibly produced products,' Starbucks continues to purchase the majority of their eggs -- mostly used in their baked goods -- from cruel farms that confine egg laying hens in battery cages," The Humane League, the organization responsible for the petition, said in a statement to media. "These cages are so small that laying hens are unable to move around, spread their wings, or engage in any natural behaviors. Battery cages are illegal in several states and banned as criminal ...
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Plantation Level Conservation to Stop Extinction 10.10.2014 Green on HuffingtonPost.com
Did you hear that the sloth bear was officially declared as extinct in Bangladesh last week? The news came around the same time that the World Wildlife Fund issued its new report on the status of biodiversity on planet earth. Not surprisingly, the report pegged the loss of biodiversity at 50% from 1970 to 2010. We're talking about losing half the earth's biodiversity in forty years. A UN conference held in Korea further warned that the biodiversity goals set in 2010 through the Aichi Biodiversity Targets are not being met. The Aichi Targets called for halving the loss of habitats but that is now being seen as inadequate to prevent the extinction of many species. Meanwhile, out of New York city, a new agreement to continue deforestation was announced with much fanfare. Countries like Peru and Liberia scored big loot bags with promises of funding to protect their forests but the one announcement that bugged me most was the talk of restoring 150 million hectares of degraded lands while accepting the loss ...
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Rewilding Our Hearts: Ecocide Is Suicide 10.10.2014 Green on HuffingtonPost.com
We're killing a very tired and less resilient planet at alarming rates. It's common knowledge that we're losing species and habitats at an unprecedented rate in a geological epoch known as the "anthropocene" -- the age of humanity. While the term has not been formally recognized as official nomenclature, we know we're deep into a time when humans are devastating numerous species and their homes and we are behaving in the most inhumane and selfish ways. Simply put, we humans are the cause of such massive and egregious ecocide because as big-brained, big-footed, overproducing, overconsuming, arrogant and selfish mammals we freely move all over the place recklessly, wantonly and mindlessly trumping the interests of countless nonhuman animals (animals). Every second of every day we decide who lives and who dies; we are that powerful. Of course, we also do many wonderful things for our magnificent planet and its fascinating inhabitants, but right now, rather than pat ourselves on the back for all the good ...
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Loon, Interrupted: Chicks Dying, Social Chaos; Is Their Comeback Unraveling? 8.10.2014 Truthout - All Articles
A common loon. (Photo: Matthew / Flickr ) Holderness, New Hampshire - Tiffany Grade sweeps her binoculars over tangled tree roots at water’s edge. She spots a black and white checkerboard of feathers in a lichen-covered crease in the shoreline – a loon sitting on a nest. Just offshore, a second loon glides past, dives, then disappears. Also see: Heavy Metal Songs: Contaminated Songbirds Sing the Wrong Tunes To the untrained eye, it’s an idyllic summer scene on Squam Lake. But to a loon biologist like Grade, it’s trouble. “Do you see the way he stretches his neck up?” Grade says, pointing to the diving bird. “He knows he’s some place he shouldn’t be.” The male intruder is biding his time until the nesting loon leaves. This vying for territory imperils the unhatched chick: Its parents can be killed or distracted, leaving the egg undefended or the chick unfed. And if one parent is ousted, the intruder kills the chick. At Squam Lake, it’s social chaos. Chicks are dying. Eggs aren’t hatching. It’s a scenario ...
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Piping Plover Bird At Center Of Sandy Recovery Controversy 8.10.2014 Green on HuffingtonPost.com
BAY SHORE, N.Y. (AP) — A court fight over a protected bird called the piping plover is holding up a $207 million plan to replenish the sand along a 19-mile stretch of New York's Fire Island. The small, sparrow-like bird that lives on the island is listed as threatened under the federal Endangered Species Act and, elsewhere in the country, is classified as endangered. Besides arguing that the bird's habitat is in jeopardy, critics say the project would be a huge waste of money. Elected officials have decried the delay, saying human lives are in danger if a repeat of 2012's Superstorm Sandy strikes the region and work is not completed to bulk up Fire Island as a barrier for heavily populated parts of Long Island. During the storm, dunes as high as 20 feet were credited with absorbing the brunt of Sandy's fury and preventing wider damage. Fire Island is a long, thin barrier island that runs parallel to the south shore of Long Island. A federal court conference on the dispute was held Wednesday in Central ...
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An Appeal From Okinawa to the US Congress 8.10.2014 Truthout.com
"No More Futenma!" Protesters at the "No Base Okinawa" demonstration in Ginowan, Japan. (Photo: Chris Davis / Flickr ) Introduction Much has been written on this site on recent developments in the long-running saga over the US and Japanese governments’ plan to construct a US military air base, the Futenma Replacement Facility (FRF), in Henoko, Okinawa, Japan (Henoko plan). [1]  On July 1, 2014, 17 years after the plan was first conceived, the Okinawa Defense Bureau (the government of Japan) started the “construction phase” amid protest from local citizens and municipal governments. Just over a month later, on August 14, the US Congressional Research Servicereleased a report, The US Military Presence in Okinawa and the Futenma Base Controversy (the CRS Report). [2]  The CRS Report provides a useful and up-to-date (though, as noted below, in one major respect incomplete) file of information, paying for the most part due attention to local, national, and international factors. As warned in the CRS Report, ...
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Loon, Interrupted: Chicks Dying, Social Chaos. Is Their Comeback Unraveling? 8.10.2014 Truthout.com
A common loon. (Photo: Matthew / Flickr ) Holderness, New Hampshire - Tiffany Grade sweeps her binoculars over tangled tree roots at water’s edge. She spots a black and white checkerboard of feathers in a lichen-covered crease in the shoreline – a loon sitting on a nest. Just offshore, a second loon glides past, dives, then disappears. Also see: Heavy Metal Songs: Contaminated Songbirds Sing the Wrong Tunes To the untrained eye, it’s an idyllic summer scene on Squam Lake. But to a loon biologist like Grade, it’s trouble. “Do you see the way he stretches his neck up?” Grade says, pointing to the diving bird. “He knows he’s some place he shouldn’t be.” The male intruder is biding his time until the nesting loon leaves. This vying for territory imperils the unhatched chick: Its parents can be killed or distracted, leaving the egg undefended or the chick unfed. And if one parent is ousted, the intruder kills the chick. At Squam Lake, it’s social chaos. Chicks are dying. Eggs aren’t hatching. It’s a scenario ...
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How Do You Make Republicans Care About Animal Testing? Anthony Bellotti Has A Plan 7.10.2014 Green on HuffingtonPost.com
Anthony Bellotti's day job is working as a Republican strategist specializing in opposition research, with clients that have included Gov. Arnold Schwarzenegger’s re-election campaign, anti-Obamacare efforts and various pro-life campaigns. "But by night I advocate for animals trapped in the government’s taxpayer-funded experimentation laboratories," he says. "Ending forced taxpayer-funded animal experimentation is my life’s work. It’s my calling. It’s what gets me out of bed in the morning, it’s the first thing I think about when I wake up and the last thing I think about when I go to sleep." A few years ago, Bellotti merged these two paths with White Coat Waste , a nonprofit whose aim is making folks on the right care about the estimated 25 million vertebrates used every year in U.S.-based laboratories -- many in horrific-sounding experiments, many of which are funded with taxpayer dollars. How many dollars? Bellotti estimates at least $12 billion in tax funding per year goes toward animal testing; PETA ...
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Finding Funding for our Nation's Wildlife 7.10.2014 Green on HuffingtonPost.com
Our nation has a tremendous conservation history. We have created a national park system that is the envy of the world; we have a national wildlife refuge system that spans more than 150 million acres; we have thoughtful laws like the Endangered Species Act that step in when wildlife becomes imperiled and needs help to recover. And we have hunting and fishing regulations that keep our game species safe from overharvesting. Wildlife conservation laws and regulations only cover about 5% of the species that need our help. Urgent work remains to manage and safeguard the 95% of all species that are neither hunted nor fished. These species continue to fall through the cracks until they are in trouble and then it takes more resources, more funding and more cooperation to try to bring them back from the brink of extinction. Today, state fish and wildlife agencies receive the majority of their budgets from taxes on hunting and fishing gear and licenses. Consequently, these agencies have focused their work on ...
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Biodiversity Progress Today 7.10.2014 Earth Times
Here is the promised simple report on the first day of the big Korean Biodiversity convention. We’ll have to wait longer for anything more concrete.
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Humanity Failing the Earth’s Ecosystems 6.10.2014 CommonDreams.org Headlines
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Rusty-Patched bumble bee "re-discovered" in Virginia state park 4.10.2014 Environmental News Network
The rusty-patched bumble bee (Bombus affinis), which has not been seen in the eastern United States in five years, has been found by a Smithsonian Conservation Biology Institute research team at Sky Meadows State Park in Delaplane, Va. This formerly common bee has disappeared from 87 percent of its range in the Upper Midwest and Eastern Seaboard and is feared headed for extinction. The research team, led by Bill McShea and Tom Akre of the Smithsonian Conservation Biology Institute and T'ai Roulston from the University of Virginia, surveyed bee populations at 17 Virginia sites from May through August to study the influence of land management on bee diversity. Only one individual of this now rare species was found among nearly 35,000 bees belonging to 126 species collected and examined by the study.
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'Honey Badger' Narrator Wants You To Care About Controversial Baby Monkey Experiment 4.10.2014 Green on HuffingtonPost.com
Remember Randall, the sassy narrator from the " Honey Badger Don't Care " video? Well, he's back as the narrator of a new video, put out by the Animal Legal Defense Fund, that calls for an end to controversial baby monkey experiments at the University of Wisconsin-Madison. The Wisconsin Center for Investigative Journalism describes the National Institutes of Health-funded research as follows: The experiment by UW psychiatrist Ned Kalin, approved in April, calls for removing 20 newborn monkeys from their mothers and subjecting them to anxiety-inducing tests [such as introducing them to live snakes]. After just over a year, the monkeys will be euthanized so that their brains, along with those of 20 animals in a control group, can be studied with newly developed brain-imaging equipment. ALDF's blog post about the video quotes Randall on why he's come out against the monkey experiments. "I want everyone to know we live in a world which has a very hard time learning from its past," he says. "I created this ...
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