User: flenvcenter Topic: Biodiversity-Independent
Category: Protection :: Policy
Last updated: Jul 19 2014 21:19 IST RSS 2.0
 
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Snooty The Manatee To Celebrate 66th Birthday, Remains As Important And Adorable As Ever 19.7.2014 Green on HuffingtonPost.com
On July 21, Snooty the manatee will turn 66, a huge milestone for the elderly sea cow and his kind. Snooty, who lives at the South Florida Museum in Bradenton, is the oldest manatee in captivity and may be one of the oldest ever to have lived . (Story continues below.) To mark Snooty’s special day, the South Florida Museum will host a grand celebration for the manatee on Saturday . According to local outlet Bay News 9, the museum is “expecting record crowds” to attend the birthday bash, which will be held in conjunction with a Wildlife Awareness Festival . Snooty was born in captivity in 1948 after his pregnant mother was captured by fishermen in Miami. Though Snooty has never spent time in the wild, he has become -- as Bay News 9 puts it -- “an ambassador of the environment, a king of conservation.” A beloved fixture in the community, Snooty has for decades been central to efforts in the region to raise awareness about Florida manatees -- listed as “ endangered ” by the International Union for ...
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An Experiment 'Goes Wild' in Kenya: Locally-Run Conservancies Are Meeting the Needs of Wildlife, Livestock, and People 18.7.2014 Green on HuffingtonPost.com
Written by Kathleen A. Galvin and Robin Reid A revolution is occurring in Kenya. Or perhaps 'transformation' better fits. What's happening is an explosion in the number (and fast-growing maturity) of community-based wildlife 'conservancies' in Kenya, which, although famous for its wildlife 'parks' and tourist businesses, has been losing its wildlife at alarming rates in recent decades. Community conservancies are different than national parks and other forms of wildlife conservation because they include local people. From a handful of conservancies started in Kenya just a few years ago, some 200 of them have now sprung up across the country. You may have missed this good news, what with Al Shabab causing havoc in parts of this East African country and elephants and rhinos still being illegally slaughtered for their tusks and horns. But over 10 million acres of this country have been formally set aside in just the last few years for community-based conservation benefiting people and wildlife alike. Among ...
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Diverse worlds of animals and plants disappearing 18.7.2014 The Earth Times Online Newspaper - Health News
We need help to preserve the fantastic variation found in some areas of the world, alongside a full-blooded conservation effort for all plants and animals such as the widespread but unique Echidna here !
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Think Big, Act Now for Nature: Unexpected Common Ground Between Montana, Azerbaijan and the Middle East 18.7.2014 Green on HuffingtonPost.com
My wife Kayla and I, after decades of living in Montana, made a rookie mistake last week as we tried, on a week's notice, to secure a three-night spot at one of our favorite camping areas. The snow in Yellowstone Park, just an hour south of our home in Bozeman, had finally receded after an unusually cool and wet spring. We figured the second week of July would be a perfect time for relaxing and wildlife watching. Apparently so did hoards of other nature seekers that had booked up more than a thousand campsites at seven campgrounds spread throughout the 2.2 million acre park. (We know better than to try to get a reservation on a week's notice but we keep forgetting it is not the 1970s anymore when a same-day inspiration was fine; just pack the truck and go.) A quick try of Glacier Park's campgrounds -- a few hours to the north -- as well as other myriad Montana lake and river-based sites came up with the same thing; all booked. After a few hours of re-trying, luck prevailed and the Park Service ...
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18 Green Artists Who Are Making Climate Change And Conservation A Priority 15.7.2014 Green on HuffingtonPost.com
"The quality of place, the reaction to immediate contact with earth and growing things that have a fugal relationship with mountains and sky, is essential to the integrity of our existence on this planet," the famous American photographer Ansel Adams wrote in his autobiography . From the romantic painters of the late 18th century to Adams to contemporary figures like Pedro Reyes and Agnes Denes, artists have long had a fascination -- and deep respect -- for the planet on which we exist. With the words "global warming" and "climate change" never far from the headlines , artists like Adams and co. are more relevant than ever. Tying together the scientific and creative worlds in acts of beauty and activism, sculptors, painters, photographers and more have the power to make environmentalism a priority and bring green initiatives to the forefront of cultural conversations. Behold, 18 green artists who are making climate change and conservation a priority. 1. Olafur Eliasson's Icebergs Olafur Eliasson. Your ...
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Enormous School Of Anchovies Makes Rare Appearance At Scripps Pier In San Diego 12.7.2014 Green on HuffingtonPost.com
Nope, that's not a beachside oil spill (thank goodness!). That's millions -- possibly billions -- of anchovies swimming unusually close to shore. Scientists and graduate students at University of California, San Diego's Scripps Institution of Oceanography were surprised by a massive school of Northern anchovies that swarmed waters near Scripps Pier in La Jolla, California. The school contained anywhere between 10 million to more than 1 billion anchovies, Scripps professor David Checkley told The Huffington Post, which he noted is probably a "larger than usual" school. A crowd gathered at the pier to watch the phenomenon. Graduate students and surfers swam near the traveling fish to take video and gather samples. At one point, a California sea lion dove into the anchovy aggregation -- even a leopard shark joined in on the action. Story continues below... The entire swarm reached about 10 feet deep, 100 meters from inshore to offshore, and was around one mile long. It's unclear why the school came so close ...
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Cell Phone Conservation 9.7.2014 Sustainable Ecosystems and Community News - ENN
Some of the world's most endangered forests may soon benefit from better protection, thanks to discarded treasures from the consumer society - mobile phones. A Californian technology startup, Rainforest Connection (RFCx), has developed a tool - made from recycled smartphones - that it says will pilot new ways to monitor and stop illegal logging and animal poaching throughout Africa's equatorial forests. RFCx has formed a partnership with the Zoological Society of London (ZSL), an international scientific charity that works for the worldwide conservation of animals and their habitats. The two organisations are planning to install the anti-deforestation, anti-poaching technology in Cameroon this year.
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Cell Phone Conservation 9.7.2014 Wildlife and Habitat Conservation News - ENN
Some of the world's most endangered forests may soon benefit from better protection, thanks to discarded treasures from the consumer society - mobile phones. A Californian technology startup, Rainforest Connection (RFCx), has developed a tool - made from recycled smartphones - that it says will pilot new ways to monitor and stop illegal logging and animal poaching throughout Africa's equatorial forests. RFCx has formed a partnership with the Zoological Society of London (ZSL), an international scientific charity that works for the worldwide conservation of animals and their habitats. The two organisations are planning to install the anti-deforestation, anti-poaching technology in Cameroon this year.
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Cell Phone Conservation 9.7.2014 Environmental News Network
Some of the world's most endangered forests may soon benefit from better protection, thanks to discarded treasures from the consumer society - mobile phones. A Californian technology startup, Rainforest Connection (RFCx), has developed a tool - made from recycled smartphones - that it says will pilot new ways to monitor and stop illegal logging and animal poaching throughout Africa's equatorial forests. RFCx has formed a partnership with the Zoological Society of London (ZSL), an international scientific charity that works for the worldwide conservation of animals and their habitats. The two organisations are planning to install the anti-deforestation, anti-poaching technology in Cameroon this year.
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Cell Phone Conservation 9.7.2014 Green Technology and Environmental Science News - ENN
Some of the world's most endangered forests may soon benefit from better protection, thanks to discarded treasures from the consumer society - mobile phones. A Californian technology startup, Rainforest Connection (RFCx), has developed a tool - made from recycled smartphones - that it says will pilot new ways to monitor and stop illegal logging and animal poaching throughout Africa's equatorial forests. RFCx has formed a partnership with the Zoological Society of London (ZSL), an international scientific charity that works for the worldwide conservation of animals and their habitats. The two organisations are planning to install the anti-deforestation, anti-poaching technology in Cameroon this year.
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Conservation Needs Palm Oil Companies to Become Active Stakeholders 8.7.2014 Green on HuffingtonPost.com
One of the most memorable email replies I received this year came from the head of a plantation in Indonesian Borneo. The brutally honest answer was: "Mr. Hii, we are in the plantations business. We don't know anything about conservation." Since that chat, the plantation involved has agreed to take on "active conservation" so I won't name names as they figure out what needs to be done in that plantation. There were several reasons I went after that plantation out of the dozens of new plantations being developed by Roundtable for Sustainable Palm Oil( RSPO ) members. The High Conservation Value (HCV ) assessment of the concession indicated that there was some two thousand hectares of good forests present. More importantly, the assessment showed the presence of several endangered animals including orangutans, sunbears and pangolins that lived in these forests. So, rather than leaving it up to the plantation to "monitor and manage " these forests, I asked them for details of their conservation plan. ...
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Condors vs. the NRA 7.7.2014 Wildlife and Habitat Conservation News - ENN
Recently scientists from the Zoological Society of London and Yale University assessed the world's 9,993 bird species according to their evolutionary distinctiveness and global extinction risk. At number three on the list is the Critically Endangered California condor (Gymnogyps cali­fornianus) - weighing as much as 25 pounds, standing over four foot tall, with a wingspan of almost 10 feet, it is the largest land bird in North America.
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Leaked Document: Scientists Ordered to Scrap Plan to Protect Wolverines 7.7.2014 Commondreams.org Newswire

According to a leaked memo obtained by the Center for Biological Diversity, scientists with the U.S.

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These Adorable Animals Understand What It Means To Have A Friend's Back 6.7.2014 Green on HuffingtonPost.com
It's such a special feeling to have a friend whom you know will always have your back. These animals understand first hand: Big Dog was nervous for his big date, so Little Dog whispered a tiny pep talk on the way to dinner. Little Camel made sure his older sister's sarong didn't get wrinkled while they traveled to the farmer's market. Duck looks like she's freeloading, but she actually just gave Dog some valuable swimming advice. (Glide, don't paddle.) John Phillips / Time Life Pictures / Getty Images Egret ensured Elephant he didn't need to waste his cash on Rogaine. Bald is beautiful, after all. Karel Prinsloo / AP Tortoise has always been a little shy. Meerkat's taken it upon himself to help her come out of her shell. Antonija Simunovic / AP Pigaloo and Pigalee love to get a little punny. Warthog scavenged for berries while Bird sat as lookout for any crazy hyenas. Independent Picture Service / Getty Images "OK," Turtle said. "We can slide just this once." Dog just complimented Donkey's pin straight ...
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Battle Over Protection Of Obscure Bird Could Decide Fate Of Senate This November 5.7.2014 Green on HuffingtonPost.com
DENVER (AP) — An obscure, chicken-sized bird best known for its mating dance could help determine whether Democrats or Republicans control the U.S. Senate in November. The federal government is considering listing the greater sage grouse as an endangered species next year. Doing so could limit development, energy exploration, hunting and ranching on the 165 million acres of the bird's habitat across 11 Western states. Apart from the potential economic disruption, which some officials in Western states discuss in tones usually reserved for natural disasters, the specter of the bird's listing is reviving the centuries-old debates about local vs. federal control and whether to develop or conserve the region's vast expanses of land. Two Republican congressmen running for the U.S. Senate in Montana and Colorado, Steve Daines and Cory Gardner, are co-sponsoring legislation that would prevent the federal government from listing the bird for a decade as long as states try to protect it. "Montanans want locally ...
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Third Party Certification Needed for Sustainable Tourism 5.7.2014 Green on HuffingtonPost.com
There are many laws and principles governing the environment but collectively they do not provide any guarantee that a tourism business will be sustainable. While there are some national and international laws that impact tourism, such as the climate change convention, biodiversity convention, endangered species act, clean water act, clean air act, and protected areas legislation, they are only a small part of the overall sustainability issues that tourism faces. International laws are often hard to enforce, and national laws don't usually address the day to day operations of a tourism business that makes it sustainable. One way to address this issue is through voluntary initiatives such as sustainable certification programs. In this way a tourism business can set itself apart from other tourism businesses who do not feel a need to act in an environmentally friendly or ethical way. Not all certification programs however are equal. In fact, some are little more than "green washing" and fail to even ...
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World’s Protected Areas Not Protecting Biodiversity 1.7.2014 Environmental News Network
Scientists from James Cook University, the Wildlife Conservation Society, the University of Queensland, Stanford University, BirdLife International, the International Union for Nature Conservation, and other organizations have warned that the world's protected areas are not safeguarding most of the world's imperilled biodiversity, and clear changes need to be made on how nations undertake future land protection if wildlife is going to be saved. These findings come at a time when countries are working toward what could become the biggest expansion of protected areas in history. The authors of the new study found that 85 percent of world's 4,118 threatened mammals, birds, and amphibian species are not adequately protected in existing national parks, and are therefore vulnerable to extinction in the near term. The new study appears in the esteemed international journal PLOS ...
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Gorillas see tourists by appointment 29.6.2014 The Earth Times Online Newspaper - Environment News
We need to help critically endangered species urgently.One of the most deserving and endearing is the mountain gorilla, although a real choice would be near-impossible. In Bwindi, the organisation-level is ensuring a growing population, so investment as a tourist seems one of the better prospects, given the difficulties many other species face. In some cases, your visit could conceivably cause their extinction!
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Endangered Species Act may be significantly weakened by new policy 28.6.2014 Environmental News Network
The Center for Biological Diversity will file a legal challenge to an Obama administration policy, finalized today, that severely limits when a species qualifies for protection under the Endangered Species Act - a change that ignores both broad legal precedent and congressional intent. Under the Act a species qualifies for protection when it is "in danger of extinction in all or a significant of portion of its range." Both Congress and the courts have explained that the "significant portion of range" provision is vital for important conservation because it allows federal wildlife agencies to protect species before they are at risk of going extinct globally. But the newly finalized policy sharply restricts the use of this part of the Act, defining "significant" to mean that only when the loss of a part of a species' range threatens the survival of the whole species would wildlife agencies protect that species under the ...
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Conservation Group Will Challenge in Court 28.6.2014 Commondreams.org Newswire

The Center for Biological Diversity will file a legal challenge to an Obama administration policy, finalized today, that severely limits when a species qualifies for protection under the Endangered Species Act — a change that ignores both broad legal precedent and congressional intent. Under the Act a species qualifies for protection when it is “in danger of extinction in all or a significant of portion of its range.”

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