User: flenvcenter Topic: Biodiversity-Independent
Category: Protection :: Policy
Last updated: Nov 19 2014 05:01 IST RSS 2.0
 
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Conservation and Reintroductions 19.11.2014 The Earth Times Online Newspaper - Environment News
With the elephant and rhino populations deeply depressed (as we are), reintroduction must be the real aim of conservation of the endangered. Once we have disposed of the poachers and pet traders, a real habitat with a real life must exist in some special somewhere for every species. The science of how to do it is still in its infancy, but here is a strong beginning.
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Landscape-scale conservation gains ground 15.11.2014 High Country News Most Recent
The Nature Conservancy just announced its largest Washington land purchase to date.
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This Rescued Bunny's Incredible Recovery Is Testament To Hard Work Of Pet Shelters Everywhere 15.11.2014 Green on HuffingtonPost.com
Had it taken even one more day for little Ping to be discovered, it certainly would have been too late. Instead, the tiny rabbit, found among tall grass in Chicago’s Ping Tom Park, will be ready for adoption in a matter of weeks, thanks to the animal shelter that rescued him and the donors who chipped in more than $1,000 to cover the cost of his treatment. The rabbit was just 3 or 4 weeks old when a group of volunteers and employees from the Red Door Animal Shelter found him in the park, located in the city's Chinatown neighborhood, after receiving a tip. He was in terrible shape. The rabbit, who has since been named Ping Tom, was severely dehydrated, overheated and covered in a sticky, dried-up “fly slime,” as well as more than 200 ticks and “a fountain of fleas.” Ten bot fly larvae had burrowed under his skin, and he required surgery at Chicago Exotics Animal Hospital . (Story continues below.) Ping was found in very rough shape, and immediately ready for a snack. On a scale of 1 to 10, in terms of ...
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5 Measures of Conservation to Affordably Monitor Our Effectiveness 15.11.2014 Green on HuffingtonPost.com
Let's face it. Most conservation practitioners would rather spend the next dollar raised on reducing threats than monitoring the effectiveness of their actions. Not surprisingly, few have ever attempted to gather scientifically credible data on any of the numerous exhaustive lists of indicators. Gathering even baselines for such lists is costly and few conservationists have the financial resources to repeat data collection over time to establish trends. To evaluate the status of target wildlife, we keep track of the area they occupy over time within a landscape or seascape. Photo ©Mike Kock. Is there an alternative to all this indicator overload? The arrival of 6th IUCN World Parks Congress, which opened this week in Sydney, presents an opportune time to talk about how we might credibly and affordably measure and report our conservation progress in national, state and community protected areas. In the last decade there has been a proliferation of well-meaning attempts to identify what indicators we ...
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Gunnison sage grouse gets divisive 'threatened' listing 14.11.2014 High Country News Most Recent
The decision upsets enviros and industry alike.
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Saving the World One Park at a Time 13.11.2014 Green on HuffingtonPost.com
Five thousand people have gathered in Sydney, Australia to save the world. Not in some metaphorical or whimsical way but in the real sense. The secret weapon being discussed at the IUCN 2014 World Parks Congress: protected areas. Currently, there are about 200,000 terrestrial and marine protected areas. These parks cover 15 percent of the land on earth and 3 percent of the world's oceans; they harbor approximately 80 percent of all threatened bird, mammal, and amphibian species. To the conservation world, these designated areas are the last great hope for biodiversity - where elephants, tigers, gorillas, and sharks can roam free without the threat of their habitats being destroyed or being poached by criminals. With support and guidance from the Cambodian government's Forestry Administration, USAID, WCS, and the local elephant conservation group ELIE, the Seima Protection Forest now boasts one of the largest elephant populations in Indochina. Photo © WCS Asia Program. Protected areas also support human ...
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Obama Administration and Arch Coal Decline to Appeal Judgment Requiring “Hard Look” at Environmental Impacts of Coal Mining in Colorado 13.11.2014 Commondreams.org Newswire
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Gunnison Sage Grouse's Threatened Species Listing Could Restrict Some Oil And Gas Drilling 12.11.2014 Green on HuffingtonPost.com
DENVER (AP) — Federal officials granted protection to the Gunnison sage grouse on Wednesday, a move that could bring restrictions on oil and gas drilling and other land uses to preserve the bird's habitat in parts of Colorado and Utah. Colorado Gov. John Hickenlooper immediately renewed the state's threat to sue to block the measures. He said the decision by the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service ignores 20 years of work by state and local officials to protect the bird. Some environmental groups praised the decision, while others said it did not go far enough. Fish and Wildlife Director Dan Ashe said the bird qualifies as a threatened species under the Endangered Species Act, meaning it's likely to be pushed to the brink of extinction in the near future. Threatened status is less serious than endangered, which means a species is on the verge of extinction now and requires tighter restrictions to protect it. An estimated 5,000 Gunnison sage grouse remain in southwestern Colorado and southeastern Utah. About ...
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Saving the Last Wild Bison 12.11.2014 Green on HuffingtonPost.com
Thirty million bison reduced to just 1,000 - 99.997 percent of all bison perished- a loss so great it staggered the imaginations of Americans in the 1880s. This near total annihilation of a native wildlife species left the Great Plains without wild bison for over 100 years. Saved from extinction through our country's first major conservation effort, its complete recovery and restoration to its former range remains elusive. This week, 139 healthy, genetically pure, wild bison will reclaim a small part of their historic home on the Great Plains when they arrive at the Fort Peck Indian Reservation in Northeast Montana on November 13. I was fortunate to witness the first historic transfer of Yellowstone bison to Fort Peck in 2012, when 61 bison were relocated there. I remember how the ground shook as the anxious bison poured out of the transport trailers. The Assiniboine and Sioux tribal members had assembled to welcome them home, and the deep meaning of the reunion of the bison and the Fort Peck Tribes ...
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You shall have a (very little) fishy. 11.11.2014 Earth Times
We are told we need fish, but for most now, there simply won’t be any. Nutrition and sustainability hit yet another block, while not even the very rich will dine on sushi.
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Kids Make an Elephant-Sized Impact on Conservation 11.11.2014 Green on HuffingtonPost.com
If you ask almost anyone involved in the conservation movement for the main reason why they fight to save endangered wildlife, they will often mention their children or the need to save threatened species for future generations. Chelsea Clinton spoke of this at September's annual meeting of the Clinton Global Initiative, at which African heads of state, world leaders, and conservation groups reaffirmed their pledge to stop the ivory trade. She worried that her newborn child "could grow up on a planet without elephants." In many ways, children are the bedrock of a conservation movement. A love of animals is one thing that unites almost all kids, and their voices can be very effective. They are the ones most impacted by a future without these iconic species. They also have an undeniable ability to speak with a genuine and heartfelt sincerity that is difficult to dismiss. The Boy Scouts of America New York Council collaborates with 96 Elephants through a letter writing campaign and other advocacy efforts. ...
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15 Baby Chickens Now Safe And Warm After Being Used As Props In Awful Prank 11.11.2014 Green on HuffingtonPost.com
A letter carrier turned up earlier this month with 15 baby chickens and a strange, disturbing story. The chickens, the postal worker said, had been sent to a woman on his delivery route in the nation's capital. Accompanying the tiny birds was a note, from the recipient's ex, making a crude comparison between the animals and the woman. Insulted, and perhaps feeling heartlessly flummoxed upon receiving 15 unexpected baby chickens in the mail, the woman said she was going to throw the animals in the garbage. That's when the letter carrier took back the birds and delivered them to the D.C. offices of the Humane Society, which then brought them to the Washington Humane Society , which in turn contacted the Poplar Spring Animal Sanctuary in nearby Poolesville, Maryland. "I was very surprised by this story, I thought I had heard everything, but this was a new one," says Terry Cummings, one of Poplar Spring's co-founders. "Definitely had never heard of baby chicks being used as a spiteful statement after a ...
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Conservation Groups File Lawsuit to Protect Struggling Walruses from Arctic Drilling 10.11.2014 Commondreams.org Newswire
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In Sydney: Recommitting to Wildlife and Parks 10.11.2014 Green on HuffingtonPost.com
One highlight of my childhood growing up in California was a family vacation to Yosemite National Park. For the first time in my life, I was awed by the splendor of nature. In that magnificent setting - with its wildlife and vast open spaces - I remember learning that national parks existed because the U.S. government had agreed to protect them for future generations. Since then, as a conservation biologist and wildlife professional, I have been fortunate to visit dozens of national parks around the world. In so many cases, these places are sources of both natural splendor and tremendous pride to the countries that have established them. The American bison of Yellowstone National Park are descended from herds that numbered in the tens of millions in the 19th century before uncontrolled hunting brought it close to extinction. Since then, conservation efforts by government, NGOs, and native tribes have brought the bison back from the brink. Photo by Cristián Samper ©WCS. The world conservation community ...
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Navy Plans Electromagnetic War Games Over National Park and Forest in Washington State 10.11.2014 Truthout - All Articles
An EA 18G Growler from the Shadowhawks of Electronic Attack Squadron (VAQ) 141 takes off. (Photo: Mass Communications Specialists 3rd Class Bradley J. Gee / US Navy ) The US Navy is planning to hold its Northwest Electromagnetic Radiation Warfare training program over Olympic National Park and Olympic National Forest in Washington State, despite concerns over potentially severe impacts on human health, wildlife and the environment. An EA 18G Growler from the Shadowhawks of Electronic Attack Squadron (VAQ) 141 takes off. (Photo: Mass Communications Specialists 3rd Class Bradley J. Gee / US Navy ) Olympic National Park and Olympic National Forest in Washington State are two of the most beautiful wilderness areas in the United States. Majestic glacier-clad peaks rise above temperate rainforest-covered hills. Gorgeous rivers tumble down from the heights and the areas are home to several types of plants and animal species that exist nowhere else on earth. These protected national commons are also the areas in ...
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Two perspectives on the biosphere. 9.11.2014 The Earth Times Online Newspaper - Environment News
Can these 2 people influence those whose job it is to change our direction? They are very different, but can agree on one decision that we all need to make: the way we fail to sustain the earth has to be reversed. Then we can achieve survival, let alone that of all the other species we need in this environment we shame so much.
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Sea Lion Attacks Diver Off Santa Barbara Coast (VIDEO) 8.11.2014 Green on HuffingtonPost.com
Sea lions may be adorable -- they surf , they snuggle , they even boogie -- but they can also be terrifying. One freediver had a close call with an aggressive sea lion while spearfishing off the coast of Santa Barbara, California. Chris Okamoto was using his GoPro to film the open ocean when a colony of sea lions swam around him , according to the Daily Mail. " At first, it looked like they were just curious ," Okamoto told the Daily Mail. He said he had been in similar situations before, "but this one came much closer and as soon as it rushed toward me, I swung the butt of my gun up and it stopped ...
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Is the world moving backwards on protected areas? 7.11.2014 Environmental News Network
Protected areas are undoubtedly the world's most important conservation success story, and recent research shows that protected areas are effective—housing more biodiversity and greater abundances of species inside rather than out. But, despite this, progress on protected areas is stalling and in some cases even falling behind. According to a sobering new paper today in Nature, only 20-50 percent of the world's land and marine protected areas are meeting their goals, while the rest are hampered by lack of funding, poor management, and government ambivalence. The paper arrives just a few days before the opening of the IUCN World Parks Congress 2014, a global event that happens once a decade. "Protected areas offer us solutions to some of today's most pressing challenges, but by continuing with 'business as usual,' we are setting them up for failure," said lead author James Watson of the Wildlife Conservation Society and the University of Queensland. "A step-change in the way we value, fund, govern and ...
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The Ecosystem That Is Disappearing Faster Than Any Other on Earth 7.11.2014 Green on HuffingtonPost.com
Mangrove forest Mangroves--the uniquely salt-adapted trees and shrubs that line our tropical and subtropical coasts, the critical membrane between land and sea--are disappearing at faster rates than virtually any other ecosystem on Earth. Mangroves are some of the most productive, complex, and beneficial natural wonders of our planet. They act as filters for our water supply, reduce erosion, serve as nurseries for commercial fisheries, provide opportunities for recreation, nurture vital marine biodiversity, and can act as "carbon sinks," which reduce greenhouse gas emissions. The destruction and degradation of these natural systems--because of factors such as climate change, development, tourism, wood extraction, and non-sustainable farming--bring about tremendous ecological, social, and economic losses, the extent of which we are only now just realizing. But there is hope for mangroves. The world is starting to notice just how important they are and is beginning to take steps to prevent further ...
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30-year study reveals startling decline in European birds 7.11.2014 Environmental News Network
Bird populations across Europe have experienced sharp declines over the past 30 years, with the majority of losses from the most common species, according to the findings of a new study. However, the research conducted by the University of Exeter, the RSPB and the Pan-European Common Bird Monitoring Scheme (PECBMS), found numbers of some less common birds have risen.
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