User: flenvcenter Topic: Biodiversity-Independent
Category: Protection :: Policy
Last updated: Jul 02 2015 06:43 IST RSS 2.0
 
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California Just Cut Its Water Use In A Major Way 2.7.2015 Politics on HuffingtonPost.com
In the households of drought-stricken California, something finally clicked. This May, the last month in which water conservation was voluntary, urban water users consumed 28.9 percent less water than in May 2013, the State Water Resources Control Board announced Wednesday. This surpasses the 25 percent mandatory cutbacks that went into effect June 1. The major drop marks the steepest water-use decline in year-over-year comparisons since Gov. Jerry Brown asked residents to restrict their water use last year , the Sacramento Bee noted. The conservation effort is shocking in contrast with how little Californians cut back on water in March and April, when residents decreased water use compared to those months of 2013 by just 3.6 percent and 14 percent respectively. “The numbers tell us that more Californians are stepping up to help make their communities more water secure, which is welcome news in the face of this dire drought,” water board chair Felicia Marcus said in a statement. “That said, we need all ...
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U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service Rejects Plan to Reclassify Wolves, Keep Wolf Recovery Going 1.7.2015 Commondreams.org Newswire
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An Extraordinary Hope Spot: Sylvia Earle on the 20th Anniversary of Cabo Pulmo Marine Park and the Future of the World's Oceans 30.6.2015 Green on HuffingtonPost.com
by Joy E. Stocke Over the past 50 years, humans have put an enormous amount of pressure on coral reef environments by altering their waters and tearing up their foundations. From dynamite fishing to global warming, we are rapidly sending the world's reefs into oblivion. The latest reports state that as much as 27 percent of monitored reef formations have been lost and as much as 32 percent are at risk of being lost within the next 32 years. -- Earth Observatory, NASA, 2015 "The Earth is a unique system in the universe, the only planet we know of that's hospitable for humankind. And that's because we have oceans." -- Dr. Sylvia A. Earle, Marine Biologist Cabo Pulmo Marine Park, Baja Sur, Mexico, Photo by Joy E. Stocke On a deceptively serene Saturday morning in June, as Hurricane Blanca churns in the Pacific Ocean off the southern Baja Peninsula, Judith Castro Lucero, Director of ACCP (Amigos Para la Conservacion de Cabo Pulmo) and I watch the yacht Maranatha motor into Marina La Paz. The night before, ...
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Red Panda Cubs Born At The Smithsonian Conservation Biology Institute Are A Whole Load Of Cute 29.6.2015 Green on HuffingtonPost.com
Cue the squeals. The Smithsonian Conservation Biology Institute in Front Royal, Virginia, welcomed seven teeny furballs red panda cubs into the world over the past month -- and they're precious beyond measure. The cubs were born to mothers Nutmeg, Regan and Leo Mei. Five of the babies are now being painstakingly hand-reared. “Our animal care team is always hopeful that new moms will raise their own cubs, but that’s not always possible,” the Institute wrote in a Facebook post on June 20 . Of the three mothers, one was reportedly diagnosed with an aggressive cancer and had to be euthanized. Another has reportedly been having difficulty nurturing her babies. Despite the challenges, the cubs are said to be doing very well. CBS News reports the keepers feed the babies by hand up to seven times a day ...
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Growing Up to Make a Difference 24.6.2015 Green on HuffingtonPost.com
Ever since I was born, the love for wildlife and wild places has been in my blood. I live in the middle of Australia Zoo on the Sunshine Coast in Queensland, Australia, which means that every day brings a new and different adventure. I have the most incredible backyard on planet Earth and I'm able to share it with people who visit from around the world. We are one big family here at the zoo, trying to inspire others to get involved and want to make a difference in our world. As a family, our heart has always lied in conservation work and because of this we have been taken to the far corners of the Earth, to spread the message and make a difference. Through lots of filming work and talking to many people, we have been blessed to have the opportunity to follow our passion and hopefully influence others along the way to make a difference. My mum and dad truly are the original Wildlife Warriors. They have changed people's minds all over the world about conservation not only for the cute and cuddly creatures, ...
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Its Time to Finish the Largest Conservation Project in History 23.6.2015 Green on HuffingtonPost.com
A century ago, the Klamath River basin was the focal point of the greatest wildlife controversy of the day. Professional hunters were killing waterfowl and wading birds for meat and plumes, shipping 120 tons of duck and goose meat each year to the markets of San Francisco. Pioneering conservation leader William L. Finley worked to expose the dangers of this practice. Eventually, Congress outlawed market hunting and President Theodore Roosevelt established some of the nation's first national wildlife refuges in the basin. Today, the Klamath is again embroiled in controversy. There isn't enough water to meet the needs of farmers, ranchers, Indian tribes, fishermen and wildlife refuges. To make matters worse, the region is in the grip of a prolonged drought affecting both people and wildlife. More than a decade ago, concerned stakeholders worked together to develop a plan for the largest river restoration project in United States history. But that initiative languished due to lack of funding and political ...
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The sage grouse two-step 22.6.2015 Current Issue
Massive federal sage grouse conservation plans strike a delicate balance.
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US grants research chimps endangered species protection 19.6.2015 TreeHugger
Decision gives captive chips same protections as wild one and will prohibit most research on them.
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Why Tribal Peoples Are the Best Conservationists 19.6.2015 Truthout - All Articles
Awá man making arrows, Brazil. The Awá have an intimate knowledge of their rainforest and are extremely skilled hunters. (Photo: Survival International) Awá Indians  in Brazil’s north-eastern Amazon rainforest know at least 275 useful plants, and at least 31 species of honey-producing bee. Each bee type is associated with another rainforest animal like the tortoise or the tapir. In the 1980s, the Great Carajás Project opened up Awá lands to illegal loggers and ranchers. More than 30% of one of their territories has since been destroyed. The Baka have developed sophisticated codes of conservation yet face persecution by wildlife officers. (Photo: Selcen Kucukustel/Atlas) Baka “Pygmies” of Central Africa eat 14 kinds of wild honey and more than 10 types of wild yam. By leaving part of the root intact in the soil, the Baka spread pockets of wild yams – a favorite food of elephants and wild boar – throughout the forest. The Baka are taught not to overhunt the animals of the forest. A Baka woman said, “When ...
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San Francisco Is Using Sex To Sell Water Conservation 18.6.2015 Green on HuffingtonPost.com
It’s been said that sex sells when it comes to everything from cars to clothes , but can it actually change consumer behavior when it comes to something as, well, unsexy as water conservation? The San Francisco Public Utilities Commission seems to think so. The commission announced earlier month that it will extend an unusual water conservation campaign , which it says was responsible for helping the city’s residents surpass usage-reduction goals in the drought-plagued state , the San Francisco Chronicle reported. The campaign features a number of racy, double entendre-laden messages such as “Go full frontal,” “quick and easy” and “Short and steamy,” in an ad blitz that includes ads on billboards, buses and social media, plus television spots such as the clip below. The city is spending $300,000 on the latest campaign. “ This campaign worked ,” Tyrone Jue, SFPUC communications director, told KPIX, CBS’ San Francisco affiliate. “We want to use the same provocative theme to get people involved and engaged ...
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Pollinator Week 2015 Unites America in Conservation Action for Pollinators - All 50 State Governors Sign Proclamations! 16.6.2015 ENN Network News - ENN
The Pollinator Partnership (P2) announced today that its signature initiative, Pollinator Week, has reached significant new milestones in 2015.
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Valuing Nature: Q&A With Gretchen Daily 16.6.2015 Green on HuffingtonPost.com
Science superstar (and my friend) Gretchen Daily works with business leaders who don't just view saving nature as a way to manage risk; they realize it's one of the smartest investments they can make. Gretchen's organization, the Natural Capital Project (Nat Cap), is equipping decision makers to back initiatives that benefit both nature and the economy at the same time. Nat Cap, a partnership among the Nature Conservancy, Stanford, the University of Minnesota and WWF, develops practical approaches for valuing nature (that are available as free software) and works with governments, businesses, NGOs and community groups to make things happen. Gretchen, a member of the Nature Conservancy's Board of Directors, and I recently discussed her work and vision for the future. Tercek: You've been working for decades to convince leaders to consider the value of nature in their decision making. Are they getting the message? Daily: It's breathtaking to see the change. A decade or so ago, the poster children for ...
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Throwing a Lifeline for the High Seas 12.6.2015 Green on HuffingtonPost.com
Recently at the United Nations in New York, countries laid the ground work for a major shift in how we manage our relationship with the ocean. It's an important moment that comes at a critical hour for conservation. After almost a decade of dialogue, workshops, and speeches, a resolution is about to be tabled at the General Assembly to begin negotiating a new agreement that would be the first of its kind; one that protects biodiversity in ocean areas beyond national jurisdiction, known as the high seas. This region, covering about 45% of the surface of the earth and 64% of the ocean , is an incubator of wondrously diverse marine life and its health is integral to the viability of entire economies and the health of our planet. But while the high seas cover nearly half the planet, less than one percent is protected to any meaningful degree . Compare that to the land, where about 13 percent is protected around the world . Unlike conservation efforts on terra firma, which typically take place within the ...
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Can Ocean Conservation and Development Coexist in Cuba? 12.6.2015 Green on HuffingtonPost.com
Ninety miles south of the Florida Keys, where the Atlantic, Caribbean and Gulf of Mexico meet, Cuba's waters are still teeming with marine species that are now seldom seen in other parts of the Caribbean. The Nature Conservancy's partnership with Cuban conservation agencies is long-lasting: for more than 20 years, we have trained together for protected-area management and planning, coral-reef monitoring, climate adaptation, and sustainable tourism. Now, with loosening restrictions on U.S.-based organizations working in Cuba and growing pressures on Cuba's historically preserved marine environment, it's time to craft a bolder vision and take bigger actions. An Urgent Opportunity The Caribbean Sea has experienced large-scale environmental degradation since as early as the 1600s, when the overharvesting and loss of nesting habitats of sea turtles drove them nearly to extinction. Coral reefs have had a tough time, too, particularly in more recent decades with increased pollution, overfishing and poorly ...
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Cameras for Conservation: New Technology Helping Developing Countries 9.6.2015 Green on HuffingtonPost.com
False Bay, South Africa is a place where a growing human population collides with a dwindling biodiversity resource. The Castle Rocks no-take zone in the Table Mountain National Park is a marine protected area (MPA), which offers a refuge for the myriad of fish hiding in its kelp forests. These reserves may be controversial, but they are one of the most important tools we have for safeguarding our rapidly disappearing natural heritage. For scientists and resource managers, understanding the diversity and abundance of fish in our MPAs is critical to correctly design, expand and enforce a network of safe havens for vulnerable species and ecosystems. The challenge remains: how best do we monitor that? Some answers may lie in the advent of new, affordable technologies. Outside MPAs, the story is often bleak. South Africa recently added fish from the Sparidae family to the IUCN's Red List . These species make up 25% of South Africa's commercial fish stocks and are effectively protected by MPAs like Castle ...
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Palau: Reason for Ocean Optimism 9.6.2015 Green on HuffingtonPost.com
Efforts to conserve the world's oceans are continually challenged by both what people put into them , and the rates at which we are taking biodiversity out of them . Awareness of these problems is at an all-time high , and yet I often struggle to find examples of places where people have gone beyond awareness to actually adopt and practice ocean-friendly behaviors. But rest assured that there are still " hope spots " in the world's oceans, ones that remind us of the benefits that occur when people and governments prioritize marine conservation. The island nation of Palau is one of them. Consisting of approximately 250 islands, Palau is located in the Pacific Ocean region known as Micronesia. Though small in population (approximately 21,000), Palau has gained global prominence as a conservation leader in recent years through bold actions that redefine the value of the ocean to both Palau's people and to the world. In 2009, the government of Palau announced that it would make the entire nation a sanctuary ...
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House Bill to Fund Interior Department Would Strip Protections From Gray Wolves 9.6.2015 Commondreams.org Newswire
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How Barbuda Enacted One of the World's Most Successful Ocean Conservation Efforts 9.6.2015 Green on HuffingtonPost.com
By Dr. Ayana Elizabeth Johnson A certain level of idealism is needed when deciding to pursue ocean conservation work professionally. While idealism can serve as a kind of moral compass, it can quickly become a hindrance when conservationists attempt to convince foreign communities or governments to enact specific policies. When you look at the history of conservation efforts, too often Western conservationists with pre-determined views helicopter into a country and inform the local government of the policies it should pass. It shouldn't be surprising that foreign governments regard these outsiders with wariness and skepticism. It's difficult for a nation's citizens to welcome you with open arms when they don't know who you are or what your agenda is, so when conservationists immediately advocate for a specific course of action without even speaking to key stakeholders, they can be viewed as condescending, patriarchal (or even colonial), and arrogant. When the Waitt Institute developed the Blue Halo ...
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Genetic research lays foundation for bold new conservation strategies 8.6.2015 High Country News Most Recent
To save the greatest number of species, should conservationists focus on the most common?
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Sustainable Ocean Development Is Possible: Q&A With Maria Damanaki 5.6.2015 Green on HuffingtonPost.com
Healthy oceans, development and economic growth can coexist. That's the idea behind an emerging Nature Conservancy (TNC) strategy led by Maria Damanaki, TNC's new Global Managing Director for Oceans. Blue Growth by Design --which she and I are discussing this week at The Economist's World Ocean Summit--incorporates conservation principles into ocean development plans to ensure growth in marine and coastal regions is sustainable. Maria brings to TNC more than 30 years of public service in Europe, most recently serving as the European Union Commissioner for Maritime Affairs and Fisheries, a role through which she worked toward marine conservation and sustainable blue growth. I am delighted to welcome Maria to TNC. She and I recently discussed her views on marine conservation and sustainable ocean development. Tercek: What led you to marine conservation? To the Nature Conservancy? Damanaki: I was born on an island and spent most of my life next to Mediterranean. The sea is the background of my whole life. I ...
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