User: flenvcenter Topic: Biodiversity-Independent
Category: Protection :: Policy
Last updated: Mar 28 2015 24:49 IST RSS 2.0
 
1 to 20 of 3,165    
Scaling up the War on Elephant Poaching 28.3.2015 Green on HuffingtonPost.com
For more than a year, WCS and our conservation partners have focused on three essential prongs in the battle to end the illegal ivory trade: stop the killing, stop the trafficking, and stop the demand. Today we must scale up those efforts if we want to truly end the elephant crisis--to give the elephants of Africa a chance to recover, to help ensure that the peoples of Africa do not lose this majestic part of their heritage, and to help prevent a growing crisis undermining sustainable development. For many countries in Africa, elephants are not only a part of their natural heritage, but their very patrimony.Credit: Julie Larsen Maher ©WCS. A major meeting was held this week in Botswana on the conservation needs of the African elephant given the ongoing poaching crisis across the continent. This meeting followed a summit held in the country fifteen months earlier, at which governments agreed to 14 "Urgent Measures" to address the catastrophic decline of African elephants. The meeting this week sought to ...
Also found in: [+]
Conservation Groups Appeal Old-Growth Logging in Big Thorne Sale and Tongass Forest Plan 27.3.2015 Commondreams.org Newswire
Also found in: [+]
Camera trap captures first video of lion in Gabon in 20 years 27.3.2015 TreeHugger
Good news from Gabon: Conservation efforts in Batéké Plateau National Park are rewarded with a sighting of an animal thought to have disappeared from the region.
Also found in: [+]
El Lobo's Uncertain Future 27.3.2015 Green on HuffingtonPost.com
Lobo Week, March 23-30, 2015, marks the 17th anniversary of the Mexican gray wolf's return to the wild. However, this wolf subspecies' tortuous recovery journey actually began over 40 years ago, when the 1973 Endangered Species Act inspired Americans to build an ark. One of the first creatures we welcomed onto our ark was the gray wolf. But arks and best-laid plans sometimes don't work as intended. In 1977, the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service (USFWS) contracted Roy McBride to capture wild Mexican wolves in Mexico to begin a breeding program for this nearly extinct subspecies of gray wolf. Ironically, McBride, who for years had lethally trapped wolves, now applied his considerable skills to wolf conservation. In three years he caught five animals. Just in the nick of time, too, because by the early 1980s the Mexican gray wolf had gone completely extinct in the wild. Mexican Gray Wolf, California Wolf Center. Photo by Cristina Eisenberg In 1990, USFWS hired David Parsons to lead the Mexican Gray Wolf ...
Also found in: [+]
Lawsuit Filed to Protect Rare Colorado, Utah Wildflowers Threatened by Oil Shale Mining 27.3.2015 Commondreams.org Newswire
Also found in: [+]
Conservation Groups Ask Government of Canada to Classify Microbeads "Toxic" 23.3.2015 Commondreams.org Newswire
Also found in: [+]
Zoos Boost Biodiversity Understanding 17.3.2015 Environmental News Network
Zoos and aquariums around the world have a crucial role to play in helping people understand how they can protect animals and their natural habitats, new research from the University of Warwick, the World Association of Zoos and Aquariums (WAZA) and Chester Zoo has found.
Also found in: [+]
The Great Amazonian Pantry: How Eating the Products of the Rainforest Could Save the Earth 17.3.2015 Green on HuffingtonPost.com
A glass of camu camu juice at Malabar restaurant, Lima, Peru There is a type of river snail -- a churo -- in the Peruvian Amazon, large and meaty, that is especially delicious when slow-braised and served in the shell with a bright sauce of golden tapioca pearls. Indigenous people harvest the giant snail when the forest is flooded and transformed into an otherworldly realm where, because of the rising water level, fish swim among the majestic kapok tree and through the umbrella-like branches of the cecropia tree. "People go through the middle of the flooded forest in their canoes, where the churos have laid their eggs in the treetops," explains biologist Miguel Tang, of the Association of Amazonians for the Amazon (AMPA). They pluck the snails right off the trees as the canoes glide by, harvesting only the fully grown specimens to ensure that the snail population will continue. "It's as if they're collecting fruit from the trees, no?" Tang says with a smile. He's chatting with Pedro Miguel Schiaffino, ...
Also found in: [+]
A half dozen projects that are for the birds 16.3.2015 TreeHugger
The Sustainable Forestry Initiative fosters relationships and awards grants to improve bird habitat management throughout the U.S. and Canada.
Also found in: [+]
An Imperfect Safety Net for Carnivore Conservation 16.3.2015 Green on HuffingtonPost.com
In the mid-2000s, I began doing research on wolves in Waterton-Glacier International Peace Park . This peace park is composed of two national parks: Glacier National Park in the U.S. and Waterton Lakes National Park in Canada. Glacier, established in 1910, comprises 1 million acres. Waterton, established in 1895 as a forest preserve, comprises 124,000 acres contiguous to Glacier. 170 such peace parks exist world-wide, but Waterton-Glacier was the first. Dedicated to protecting biodiversity and natural and cultural resources, peace parks help maintain connectivity across boundaries. In 1995, the United Nations designated Waterton-Glacier a World Heritage Site. Waterton-Glacier International Peace Park. Photo Courtesy of Brent Steiner At the Chief Mountain port of entry within this park, a granite obelisk and narrow clearcut demarcate the border crossing and provide a strong reminder that legal boundaries are very real in terms of land management and for the large carnivores who cross them regularly. ...
Also found in: [+]
The Politics of Extinction 16.3.2015 Politics on HuffingtonPost.com
Cross-posted with TomDispatch.com Maybe baby steps will help, but the world needs a lot more than either the United States or China is offering to combat the illegal traffic in wildlife, a nearly $20-billion-a-year business that adds up to a global war against nature. As the headlines tell us, the trade has pushed various rhinoceros species to the point of extinction and motivated poachers to kill more than 100,000 elephants since 2010. Last month China announced that it would ban ivory imports for a year, while it “evaluates” the effectiveness of the ban in reducing internal demand for ivory carvings on the current slaughter of approximately 100 African elephants per day. The promise, however, rings hollow following a report in November (hotly denied by China) that Chinese diplomats used President Xi Jinping’s presidential plane to smuggle thousands of pounds of poached elephant tusks out of Tanzania. Meanwhile, the Obama administration has launched its own well-meaning but distinctly inadequate ...
Also found in: [+]
The Politics of Extinction 16.3.2015 Green on HuffingtonPost.com
Cross-posted with TomDispatch.com Maybe baby steps will help, but the world needs a lot more than either the United States or China is offering to combat the illegal traffic in wildlife, a nearly $20-billion-a-year business that adds up to a global war against nature. As the headlines tell us, the trade has pushed various rhinoceros species to the point of extinction and motivated poachers to kill more than 100,000 elephants since 2010. Last month China announced that it would ban ivory imports for a year, while it “evaluates” the effectiveness of the ban in reducing internal demand for ivory carvings on the current slaughter of approximately 100 African elephants per day. The promise, however, rings hollow following a report in November (hotly denied by China) that Chinese diplomats used President Xi Jinping’s presidential plane to smuggle thousands of pounds of poached elephant tusks out of Tanzania. Meanwhile, the Obama administration has launched its own well-meaning but distinctly inadequate ...
Also found in: [+]
An Introduction to the Most Beautiful Animal You'll Never See 16.3.2015 Truthout - All Articles
Maybe baby steps will help, but the world needs a lot more than either the United States or China is offering to combat the illegal traffic in wildlife, a nearly $20-billion-a-year business that adds up to a global war against nature. As the headlines tell us, the trade has pushed various rhinoceros species to the point of extinction and motivated poachers to kill more than 100,000 elephants since 2010. Last month China announced that it would ban ivory imports for a year, while it "evaluates" the effectiveness of the ban in reducing internal demand for ivory carvings on the current slaughter of approximately 100 African elephants per day. The promise, however, rings hollow following a report in November (hotly denied by China) that Chinese diplomats used President Xi Jinping's presidential plane to smuggle thousands of pounds of poached elephant tusks out of Tanzania. Meanwhile, the Obama administration has launched its own well-meaning but distinctly inadequate initiative to curb the trade. Even if you ...
Also found in: [+]
A Global War on Nature and the Politics of Extinction 16.3.2015 Commondreams.org Views
Also found in: [+]
It's time to end the grisly trophy hunt 11.3.2015 rabble.ca - News for the rest of us
Watching grizzly bears catch and eat salmon as they swim upstream to spawn is an unforgettable experience. Many people love to view the wild drama. Some record it with photos or video. But a few want to kill the iconic animals -- not to eat, just to put their heads on a wall or coats on a ...
Also found in: [+]
It’s time to end the grisly trophy hunt 11.3.2015 rabble.ca - News for the rest of us

read more

Also found in: [+]
Desert Renewable Energy Conservation Plan 'Phased Approach' Raises Concerns for CA Desert Conservation 11.3.2015 Commondreams.org Newswire
Also found in: [+]
What inspires people to support conservation? 10.3.2015 Environmental News Network
What inspires people to support conservation? As concerns grow about the sustainability of our modern society, this question becomes more important. A new study by researchers at Cornell University provides one simple answer: bird watching and hunting.
Also found in: [+]
Helmeted Hornbills on the Verge of Extinction 5.3.2015 Green on HuffingtonPost.com
From the majestic elephants in Africa to the tigers in South East Asia, much has been said about the mass extinctions of life on earth due to human activities. Many of these are expected to come from Southeast Asian countries where the rush to achieve developed nation status has dealt a heavy hand to nature. Loss of habitat to feed human needs for virgin paper and cheap vegetable oils in countries like Indonesia is one of the major drivers for wildlife extinction is this rich tropical landscape. As one of the hottest spots for biodiversity on planet Earth, Indonesia continues to try and find the balance between conservation and development. An added pressure on its wildlife however, comes not from the desire for clean white paper or cheap palm oil, but an insatiable demand for trinkets to show one's monetary status in countries like China. Meet one such victim of the trinket trade, the Helmeted Hornbill Prized for its ivory like skull or casque, a recent report from Environmental Investigations Agency ...
Also found in: [+]
Bipartisan Group of Lawmakers Supports Downlisting Gray Wolves Nationwide 5.3.2015 Commondreams.org Newswire
Also found in: [+]
1 to 20 of 3,165