User: flenvcenter Topic: Biodiversity-Independent
Category: Protection :: Policy
Last updated: Sep 01 2015 20:49 IST RSS 2.0
 
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Latinos to Congress: Save the Land and Water Conservation Fund and Preserve the Antiquities Act! 1.9.2015 Green on HuffingtonPost.com
Latinos have an intimate connection with nature. Many who emigrated to the U.S. grew up in rural environments, poor in material goods but rich in nature's bounty. Because of this, experiencing and honoring the natural environment -- what Latinos call Madre Tierra, or Mother Earth -- has always been of central significance, a way to collectively express who we are as a people. Latinos who did not farm wound up living in urban centers, surrounded by asphalt, steel and concrete. Where could families and children find respite from city life? Enter the nation's parks, preserves and national monuments. Whether local community parks or national parks like Yellowstone , parks offer Latinos a way to reconnect to something central to our culture and identity. These green spaces are ideal for family gatherings and for facilitating community connections, not unlike the plazas in towns across Latin America. In this way, the nation's parks brings Latinos together. The benefits of our nation's parks are many. Parks ...
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Setting Aside Half the Earth for "Rewilding": The Ethical Dimension 30.8.2015 Truthout - All Articles
Wildlife corridors: four propsals to "rewild" portions of North America. (Photo: Smithsonian Institute ) A much-anticipated book in conservation and natural science circles is EO Wilson's Half-Earth: Our Planet's Fight for Life , which is due early next year. It builds on his proposal to set aside half the Earth for the preservation of biodiversity. The famous biologist and naturalist would do this by establishing huge biodiversity parks to protect, restore and connect habitats at a continental scale. Local people would be integrated into these parks as environmental educators, managers and rangers - a model drawn from existing large-scale conservation projects such as Area de Conservación Guanacaste ( ACG ) in northwestern Costa Rica. The backdrop for this discussion is that we are in the sixth great extinction event in earth's history. More species are being lost today than at any time since the end of the dinosaurs. There is no mystery as to why this is happening: it is a direct result of human ...
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The Forgotten History Of 'Violent Displacement' That Helped Create The National Parks 27.8.2015 Green on HuffingtonPost.com
Tuesday marked the 99th anniversary of the National Park Service, perhaps the most-loved division of the federal government. For many Americans, excursions to the national parks conjure up memories of family road trips, camp songs and hikes set in some of the country's most beautiful locales. Ken Burns called the parks, "America’s best idea." Cue Woody Guthrie: "This Land Is Your Land." But what's often left unmentioned is that for the parks to become the protected lands of public imagination, their prior inhabitants -- such as indigenous peoples and the rural poor -- had to be evicted. To shed light on this history and its perpetuation abroad, indigenous rights advocacy organization Survival International launched a new campaign  this month called "Stop the Con," protesting what it describes as the "violent displacement" of indigenous peoples in the name of conservation. The campaign aims to raise awareness about problematic conservation practices. The campaign began two weeks ago when Tesia Bobrycki, ...
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Idaho and BLM flout conservation laws for fallen officers 26.8.2015 Writers on the Range
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Yosemite Black Bears' Diet Surprises Researchers 25.8.2015 Environmental News Network
Black bears in Yosemite National Park that don’t seek out human foods subsist primarily on plants and nuts, according to a study conducted by biologists at UC San Diego who also found that ants and other sources of animal protein, such as mule deer, make up only a small fraction of the bears’ annual diet.
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The Best Birthday Present for Our Parks 25.8.2015 Green on HuffingtonPost.com
The National Park Service turns 99 this week, and in honor of its birthday, we all get a present: free admission to any national park of our choosing, from the Grand Canyon, to Yosemite, to Shenandoah . But our parks deserve a present, too, and the best birthday gift Congress could give is renewing and fully funding the Land and Water Conservation Fund before it's too late. Grand Canyon National Park, Credit: Shutterstock, Anton Foltin For 50 years, the Land and Water Conservation Fund has spurred the creation and expansion of some of our most treasured national parks, wildlife refuges, and other public lands. Millions of visitors hike, camp, and take in breathtaking views at Maine's Acadia National Park and the Great Smoky Mountains National Park thanks to the program. The Land and Water Conservation Fund helped create the nation's first wildlife refuge, the Pelican Island National Wildlife Refuge in Florida. Left: Great Smoky Mountains National Park, Credit: Shutterstock, Dave Allen Right: Pelican ...
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U.S.-based Center for Biological Diversity Opens Its First Office in Mexico 25.8.2015 Commondreams.org Newswire
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The Colonial Origins of Conservation: The Disturbing History Behind US National Parks 24.8.2015 Truthout - All Articles
The year 2016 will mark the 100th anniversary of the United States National Park Service. It's time to recognize that conservation dogmas were originally rooted in colonial conquest and inextricably bound up in the genocide committed against Native Americans.       Iconoclasm - questioning heroes and ideals, and even tearing them down - can be the most difficult thing. Many people root their attitudes and lives in narratives that they hold to be self-evidently true. So it's obvious that changing conservation isn't going to be an easy furrow to plow. However, change it must. Conservation's achievements don't alter the fact that it's rooted in two serious and related mistakes. The first is that it conserves "wildernesses," which are imagined to be shaped only by nature. The second is that it believes in a hierarchy, with superior, intelligent human beings at the top. Many conservationists still believe that they are uniquely endowed with the foresight and expertise to control and manage so-called ...
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Compassionate Conservation, Cecil the Murdered Lion, and Blaze the Slaughtered Yellowstone Bear 21.8.2015 Green on HuffingtonPost.com
"More than ever conservation needs new ideas, risky ventures to find out what will work and what won't; biodiversity doesn't benefit from us calling each other stupid as a substitute for rational discourse." (Harry Greene, 2015, Pleistocene rewilding and the future of biodiversity, in Ben Minteer and Stephen Pyne (editors), After Preservation: Saving American Nature in the Age of Humans ) The broad and interdisciplinary field of conservation biology has received a good deal of attention in the past two weeks that has stimulated researchers and others to weigh in on what sorts of human-animal interactions are permissible as we try to save nonhuman animals (animals) and their homes. For example, some of the challenging questions that arise are: Should we kill in the name of conservation? Is it okay to trade off the lives of animals of one species for the good of their own or other species? Is seeking the "most humane" way of killing animals the only way to move forward? Is it possible to stop the killing ...
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Help the Monarch recover 19.8.2015 Wildlife and Habitat Conservation News - ENN
Jode Roberts has spent a lot of the summer checking out ditches and fields along the sides of roads, railways and trails. At first, he didn’t like what he was seeing. Roberts, who is leading the David Suzuki Foundation’s effort to bring monarchs back from the brink, was searching for signs that the butterflies had visited patches of milkweed plants. Despite the bleak start, he recently hit the jackpot: a half-dozen eggs and a couple of monarch caterpillars, calmly munching on milkweed leaves.Over the past millennium, eastern monarch butterflies have migrated northward from Mexico in spring, arriving in southern Ontario, Quebec and the Maritimes in early summer, where they lay eggs on the undersides of milkweed leaves. In the following weeks, their caterpillars hatch and eat a steady milkweed diet. In late summer, they form chrysalises and undergo the amazing transformation into butterflies. They then begin fattening themselves for the arduous return to the Mexican alpine forests where they ...
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Tony Abbott and Co. Declare War on 'Vigilante' Green Groups 19.8.2015 CommonDreams.org Headlines
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Tour de Turtles: The Race to Save the Turtles and Maybe Humans as Well 17.8.2015 Green on HuffingtonPost.com
This is the third year I participated in the Tour de Turtles event and the 8th year of the race. Each year I have learned more about the challenges facing the sea turtles who all are either on the threatened, endangered, or critically endangered list. Perhaps more importantly, I am learning that the strategies that are being used to save the sea turtles are a good metaphor for the strategies needed to save human beings as well. Photo courtesy of Walt Disney World This year 13 turtles began the race from Florida (6), Panama (1), Costa Rica (4), and Nevis (2). Each turtle is racing 90 days for a different cause. A summary of the causes are as follows: Boat Strikes - turtles killed from boats or their propellors striking turtles as they surface. Water Quality - turtles can become sick or infected from water pollution particularly chemical fertilizers from lawns, and agriculture that run off into the streams that feed the bays, estuaries, and oceans. Plastic Debris - 90% of the ocean's pollution comes from ...
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Long-term Protection Achieved for the Sumatran Forest 14.8.2015 Environmental News Network
One of the last places on Earth where Sumatran elephants, tigers and orangutans coexist in the wild has received long-term protection. The Indonesian Ministry of Forestry approved a conservation concession – a lease of the land – covering 40,000 hectares of forest on the island of Sumatra.
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Conservation group gets into the rubber business to save the rainforest 13.8.2015 TreeHugger
100,000 acres of Sumatran rainforest to be protected in Indonesia by a new type of zoning, which will generate sustainable revenue from non-timber forest products.
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Military and enviros align in Arizona's public lands debate 7.8.2015 High Country News Most Recent
Demand for housing, recreation and energy development means military bases could lose essential buffer land.
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What Every Environmentalist Needs to Know About Time Security 7.8.2015 Green on HuffingtonPost.com
Time is a finite, non-renewable resource. There are twenty-four hours in the day. Each and every day we have to accomplish certain things in order to survive and to ensure that our children are able to grow and, hopefully, thrive. We have to find food and water. We need to ensure that we have energy in order to cook, clean and stay warm. We need access to medicine when we are sick. In development lingo we call the ability to consistently access and benefit from these resources 'security', i.e. food security, water security, energy security, and health security. While the need to obtain food, water, energy and medicine is shared by the more than 7 billion of us alive today, the amount of time it takes for each of us to achieve these tasks varies considerably. For example, poor rural women in developing countries are most frequently charged with water security and must walk for hours to obtain water . Comparatively, those of us in developed regions walk to a sink, a water cooler, or a refrigerator for a ...
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Long Trails and Wild Spaces 7.8.2015 Green on HuffingtonPost.com
Co-authored by Nicole Wooten, Masters of Environmental Management graduate student, Yale School of Forestry and Environmental Studies. The sign at the trailhead stated: "Beware of mountain lions." Next to it another sign was posted that warned about the dangers of and correct behavior in a bear encounter. I paused before I passed the sign to officially enter the Continental Divide Trail: one of America's longest and most challenging trails. The view of ragged peaks beyond a major highway was a reminder of just how physically close but experientially far I was going from my office around the Denver metropolis. Here on the Continental Divide Trail, mountain lions, bears, wolves--and even the occasional wolverine--are as welcome along the trail as hikers. Maintaining a healthy environment for hikers to pass through requires supporting diverse wildlife populations. It requires supporting the entire ecosystem--not just a niche--at the largest scale possible. "We're interested in the integrity of the whole ...
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Can habitat protection save our disappearing bats? 5.8.2015 Environmental News Network
In summertime, bats are a common feature in the night sky, swooping around backyards to gobble up mosquitos. Bats also help with crops: they act as a natural pesticide by feeding on harmful insects. But these winged mammals are now under threat. As agricultural intensification expands across the world, the conversion of their natural habitats has caused a dramatic decline in population. 
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New Cecil The Lion Beanie Baby Sales To Be Donated To Wildlife Conservation 4.8.2015 Green on HuffingtonPost.com
A toy company hopes the legacy of Cecil the lion will live on in a might way -- through a plushy animal that's raising donations. Toy manufacturer Ty has created a Cecil the Lion Beanie Baby to honor the late lion and raise funds for wildlife conservation , with all profits from the toys’ sales going to the organization WildCRU, according to a press release. "Hopefully, this special Beanie Baby will raise awareness for animal conservation and give comfort to all saddened by the loss of Cecil," said Ty Warner, the company’s founder and chairman.   The Cecil Beanie Baby will retail for $5.99 , according to the Chicago Tribune, and 100 percent of sales will be donated to WildCRU  -- a wildlife conservation and research organization at the University of Oxford, in England. The toy’s production joins a number of other initiatives around the globe in response to the great lion’s killing by American dentist Walter Palmer in July. Four Democratic senators on July 31 introduced the Conserving Ecosystems by ...
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Citizens United: The Cash Cow That's Killing Endangered Species 4.8.2015 Green on HuffingtonPost.com
The Supreme Court's Citizens United decision isn't just bad for democracy, it's fueling an unprecedented attack on America's endangered species. Campaign contributions from polluters and other would-be defilers of the environment have been flooding into Congress since the 2010 decision -- and apparently these deep-pocketed special interests are getting results. Nowhere is this more apparent than in the steady barrage of attacks levied at endangered species and the Endangered Species Act by congressional Republicans. A new study I co-authored called "Politics of Extinction" reveals that over the past five years, Republicans in Congress have launched 164 attacks on the Endangered Species Act or an average of 33 per year. That's a 600 percent increase in the rate of legislative attacks on endangered species since Citizens United. By comparison, in the 15 years prior (1996-2010), there were only 69 attacks on endangered species or about five a year. Their campaign shows no signs of letting up. Just seven ...
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