User: flenvcenter Topic: Biodiversity-Independent
Category: Protection :: Policy
Last updated: Sep 21 2016 22:24 IST RSS 2.0
 
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Supreme Court of Canada Asked to Weigh In on Future of Environmental Assessment Law 21.9.2016 Commondreams.org Newswire

Environmental groups are asking Canada’s highest court to overturn a legal precedent that restricts the public’s ability to challenge flawed environmental assessments.

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Community and Conservation Groups Condemn FERC’s Review of Proposed Mountain Valley Pipeline 17.9.2016 Commondreams.org Newswire
Chesapeake Climate Action Network Federal regulators today released a draft environmental review for the proposed fracked-gas Mountain Valley Pipeline that public interest advocates say fails to adequately assess the public need for the project and the widespread threats to private property, public lands, local communities, water quality and the ...
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When it Comes to Natural Capital, it's Easy to Forget that We're on the Same Team 16.9.2016 Green on HuffingtonPost.com
This article has been submitted as part of the Natural Capital Coalition 's series of blogs on natural capital by Mark Gough, Executive Director of the Natural Capital Coalition We often feel safer when we're surrounded by people with complementary views. In few places is this more obvious than at the IUCN World Conservation Congress, where 10,000 passionate and dedicated individuals come together to rally around the conservation of the natural world. The event takes place every four years, and allows the IUCN, and the conservation community at large, to build consensus about the direction that conservation should take. As you may imagine, there are many different views as to what should and should not be done, and some fierce debate. At this year's Congress, the Guardian described a resolution to end the domestic trade in ivory as ' descending into acrimony ' as delegates and national representatives fought over the what they believed to be the most effective methods of protecting native elephants ...
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Who Are Tomorrow's Leaders in Ocean Conservation? 16.9.2016 Green on HuffingtonPost.com
By Julia Luthringer, Conservation Innovation Fellow at Conservation X Labs Photo: Alex Dehgan On World Oceans Day 2014, Nancy Knowlton and Elin Kelsey launched #OceanOptimism , a hashtag used by researchers and practitioners to share marine conservation successes globally. 60 million tweets later, there's a lot to be hopeful about. I spent the past few weeks "catching" hope at the IUCN World Conservation Congress in Hawaii. President Obama drastically expanded the Papahānaumokuākea National Monument to 582,578 square miles to serve as a sanctuary for endangered and imperiled marine species. The Russian Arctic National Park now protects Franz Josef Land , a group of 190 extremely biodiverse, northern islands. The pacific reef Coral Castles, once thought dead, is showing signs of new and revived life even despite 2016's record-breaking heat. The UK government plans to ban microbeads in all products by 2017 to stop the plastics from entering the oceans and potentially entering the marine foodweb. While ...
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Blue Whale and Salmon Farm in Southern Chile 15.9.2016 Green on HuffingtonPost.com
With its wealth of temperate rain forest, freshwater, and marine ecosystems, Southern Chile is a global conservation priority place that stands out for its high levels of endemism and marine biodiversity. Chile has one of the world's longest coastlines, stretching close to 4,300 km along the Pacific Ocean, and close to 80,000 km of shoreline around channels, fjords and coastal islands. It is home to unique species, including the endangered blue whale. However, a range of pressures on natural marine resources, including unsustainable exploitation, habitat degradation and other human induced impacts continue to be considerable threats to the marine biodiversity along the Pacific coast of southern Chile. The blue whale is the world´s largest animal on the planet and moves around Northern Chilean Patagonia during their feeding season in Austral waters, every summer. This area is also heavily used for salmon aquaculture, and this sharing of habitat is the crux of the problem. In order to contribute to the ...
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Obama To Designate First Marine Monument In Atlantic Ocean 15.9.2016 Green on HuffingtonPost.com
President Barack Obama will set aside a 4,900-square-mile stretch of ocean on Thursday to create the first protected marine monument in the Atlantic Ocean. The area will be called the Northeast Canyons and Seamounts Marine National Monument and lie about 150 miles off the coast of Cape Cod in New England. Environmentalists hailed the move, to be announced at an ocean conservation meeting in Washington, D.C., likening Obama’s efforts to those of former President Teddy Roosevelt, considered the father of American conservation . “Teddy Roosevelt had the foresight to protect the treasures of America’s landscape,” said Rhea Suh, president of the Natural Resources Defense Council, in a statement. “With that same boldness, President Obama is conserving the crown jewels of our nation’s seascape.” Philippe Cousteau, grandson of the famed explorer and scientist, Jacques Cousteau , called Obama’s efforts “the type of bold action our leaders must take to begin healing a resource that literally makes life on earth ...
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A Historic Moment for New England: A Marine National Monument in the Atlantic! 15.9.2016 Green on HuffingtonPost.com
With Marine National Monument designation in the Atlantic, President Obama seals environmental legacy President Obama is making history today, announcing the designation of the Northeast Canyons and Seamounts Marine National Monument, which will become the only fully protected large marine area in the U.S. Atlantic Ocean. Until today, zero miles of the U.S. Atlantic were fully protected from the imminent threats of climate change and increasing industrial activity. The announcement comes just as the third annual Our Ocean Conference is held in Washington, DC, hosted by the U.S. State Department. Thanks to the president's use of the century-old Antiquities Act, ancient coral formations will no longer face potential ruin from commercial fishing activity, and diverse and pristine habitats will allow an abundance of marine life to thrive. It is a good day to be a New Englander. So much of our region's history is rooted in the ocean; so much of our economic success depends on a healthy ocean off our coast. ...
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Fighting Wildlife Crime With Science And Technology 13.9.2016 Green on HuffingtonPost.com
It's hard to imagine a world without majestic wildlife roaming Africa's savannahs. More and more, however, the unimaginable seems to be taking root - and it is unsettling beyond belief. Years ago, I had the privilege of studying wildlife in Kenya as a graduate student. While I was researching Grevy's zebra, I observed other amazing species: elephant, gerenuk, and lion, as they searched for food and water while their land and water sources became more scarce. Habitat loss was one of the biggest threats to wildlife then, and it continues now to be a major threat: as agricultural activity and industry increase, there is less space for wildlife. Photo by Michiel Terellen We have the ability to maintain healthy wildlife populations in their habitats by marrying sustainable development with biodiversity conservation. Almost 20 years ago, I joined the U.S. Agency for International Development (USAID) as an American Association for the Advancement of Science Fellow to learn how to better integrate conservation ...
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Planet at the Crossroads: IUCN World Conservation Congress Takes Unprecedented Action to Save the Planet 13.9.2016 TreeHugger
Over 10,000 of the world’s leading conservationists came together at the International Union for Conservation of Nature (IUCN) World Conservation Congress last week to take immediate action against aggressive goals set by 200 nations in 2015.
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Lawsuit Launched to Protect West Coast Whales From Dying in Nets 12.9.2016 Commondreams.org Newswire

Conservation groups today filed a notice of intent to sue the National Marine Fisheries Service to protect endangered whales from mile-long drift gillnets and strings of sablefish pots off the West Coast.

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Leopards Need Our Protection: Conservationists 12.9.2016 Green on HuffingtonPost.com
Photos: Panthera/EKZNW/WILDLIFEACT A camera trap in South Africa captured something remarkable last month: In six brief images, a leopard, one of the planet’s most elusive cats, can be seen attacking, killing and moving off screen with a meal ― in this case, an unlucky impala. The images, looped into a gif above, were released by the conservation group Panthera and reflect an extraordinary moment in a grueling, years-long effort to figure out just how many of the big cats are left in the world. Guy Balme , the director of Panthera’s Leopard Program , said the cats ― known worldwide for their fashion-forward spots ― are a relatively “neglected species.” “Leopards have totally slipped off the conservation radar,” Balme said. “They still have a wide range, and often they’ve managed to persist in areas where these other cats have become extinct. But because [we] have this perception about leopards’ resilience, it’s almost like people believe they’re totally immune to persecution.” In fact, like many of their ...
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'A Good Day for Elephants': Ban on Domestic Ivory Trade Passes 11.9.2016 CommonDreams.org Headlines
- Common Dreams staff

In a bid to stop the killing of elephants for their tusks, world governments voted at a major conservation conference to urge the closure of all domestic ivory markets.

After fierce debate, disagreements and walkouts the motion was adopted on the final day of the International Union for Conservation of Nature World Conservation Congress, a 10-day meeting that drew 9,000 people to Honolulu, Hawaii this month.

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IUCN Congress Emerges with Global Goal to Close the Domestic Ivory Trade 11.9.2016 Green on HuffingtonPost.com
As thousands of conservationists gathered in Honolulu for the IUCN World Conservation Congress this week, it was more than clear that IUCN members needed to take a strong stand if Africa's elephants were to have a chance at survival. By the close of the congress, the global conservation community had stepped up to say: No more domestic ivory sales. Elephants have had enough of the ivory trade and so has the world. The final vote overwhelmingly approving Motion 007 calling for closure of domestic elephant ivory markets across the globe was vital, for the news about Africa's elephants is as bad as bad news gets. The 2016 IUCN World Conservation Congress passed a strong measure in Hawaii calling for the closure of global domestic ivory markets. Image: Cristián Samper/WCS. At the start of the meeting in Hawaii, WCS's Andrea Turkalo issued a scientific paper for which she served as lead author showing that it will take almost a century for Africa's forest elephants to recover from the intense poaching they ...
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DNA Surprise! Giraffes Are Four Species, Not One 9.9.2016 Green on HuffingtonPost.com
The Giraffe Conservation Foundation asked scientists to carry out a genetic analysis of giraffes in Namibia, southwest Africa, merely to understand how similar, or not, different populations were to each other, and how that could help in conservation efforts. But the scientists uncovered something unexpected. Though modern giraffes had long been recognized as a single species,  Giraffa camelopardalis , divided into a few subspecies, the researchers found four distinct species. “We were extremely surprised, because the morphological and coat pattern differences between giraffe are limited,” said study lead researcher Dr. Axel Janke, a geneticist at Germany’s Senckenberg Biodiversity and Climate Research Centre. Following a comprehensive genetic analysis using the DNA from 190 giraffes, Janke and his team discovered that the four species of giraffe had been separated for 1 to 2 million years , “with no evidence of genes being exchanged between them.” The four giraffe species are: the southern giraffe ...
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Conservation vs green growth, which is going to win? 9.9.2016 Energy & Climate | Greenbiz.com
Sustainability professionals talk about conserving nature or green growth. It is hard to accomplish both.
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The Crossroads of Conservation in Latin America 9.9.2016 Green on HuffingtonPost.com
Saying Latin America and conservation together evokes abundance of wealth and beauty . But all that magnificence also comes with a unique set of risks, threats and challenges. Photo Credit: Y.-J. Rey-Millet / WWF I live in Quito, and only a few kilometers -- or few hours -- away , I can appreciate landscapes of immense natural and cultural value. I encounter compact forests that hold hundreds of thousands of species of known and unknown flora and fauna, running water, clean air, living oceans and an environment with a strong heartbeat. And it's not just Quito. So many Latin American cities have similar relationships with nature. In some, you may find it closer to the center of urban life, and in others, you may have to get further away, but the result will almost always be the same. However, just like you can appreciate the richness of these areas, the risks and threats are also in plain sight, along with the poverty that stems from them. These risks are front and center here at the 2016 World ...
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The Customer Isn't Always Right: How Consumers Drive Wildlife Crime 9.9.2016 Green on HuffingtonPost.com
Consumers around the globe are helping fuel a booming illegal wildlife trade that's estimated to be valued at as much as $10 billion per year. In recent years, it's grown to the point that wildlife trafficking is now in the top five illicit activities worldwide - up there with counterfeiting and drugs. WWF's successful 'Chor Chang Campaign' elicited a significant response from the Thai public. The letter in the Thai alphabet called 'Chor' is the same first letter of the word for elephant, 'Chang'. The campaign asked people to remove the letter 'Chor' from their names to demonstrate what a life without elephants would be, and many responded via social media with their names missing that particular letter. Photo Credit: © WWF-Thailand Whether naively or deliberately, global consumers are snapping up everything from high-end luxury goods to tourists' trinkets made from elephant ivory, illegally sourced reptile skin and endangered sea turtle shells. Elephant ivory, for instance, is so coveted in some ...
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A View of Earth From The Milky Way 8.9.2016 Green on HuffingtonPost.com
As a child I was always fascinated with astronomy, the stars, planets, and galaxies. I can still remember my parents taking me to stargazing events on those clear somewhat-cool Florida "winter" nights. We were members of our local astronomy club. I can remember staring for hours through a telescope, admiring the beauty within the known universe; but largely seeing what was in our own backyard, within our own galaxy. The most amazing night sky I can remember was when I was 16 years old, sleeping in the Negev desert of Israel. A close second was at a summer camp in Georgia. That night happened to be a most beautiful shooting star evening. Now it's been over a decade since I've been able to see more than a handful of stars in the sky. Mainly, because I live in a city with extreme light pollution However, this past Labor Day weekend, I was in a remote locale, with minimal lights in the area, and was once again able to see a beautiful night-time sky filled with stars and even a glimpse of our own beautiful ...
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Middle schoolers flock together to build a better future for birds 8.9.2016 TreeHugger
A chance to learn scientific and technical skills while helping conserve birds was all the motivation middle-school students needed to participate in a Cornell University afterschool program this summer. The students are now flocking back to school ...
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In 20 Short Years, We've Wiped Out 10 Percent Of Earth’s Wilderness 8.9.2016 Green on HuffingtonPost.com
HONOLULU ― Over the past 20 years, a mere blink of an eye in our species’ 200,000-year existence , humans have managed to eliminate 10 percent of the world’s wilderness, a new analysis has found. Globally, the authors write, the “catastrophic declines” in wilderness area over the last two decades add up to about 1.27 million square miles ― an area twice the size of Alaska. Hardest hit was the Amazon, which has lost 30 percent of its wilderness area since the early 1990s. In Central Africa, 14 percent of the totalwilderness area has vanished.  The study, which appeared Thursday in the journal Current Biology, is just the latest piece of evidence that we are having a devastating impact on the natural world around us. In an interview this week at the world’s largest conservation event ,  James Watson , director of science and research initiatives at the Wildlife Conservation Society  and the leader of the study, described his own findings as “shocking” and “bloody dramatic.” “I consider it like a species ...
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