User: flenvcenter Topic: Biodiversity-Independent
Category: Protection :: Policy
Last updated: Aug 30 2014 19:44 IST RSS 2.0
 
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These Retired Research Chimps Are Really Enjoying Their New Home 30.8.2014 Green on HuffingtonPost.com
Meet Mason. He's only 5, but already, he seems to be quite the "ladies' man." “He likes to play with the other girls,” Mark Lewis, an animal care specialist at Chimp Haven , a Keithville, Louisiana, chimpanzee sanctuary where Mason now lives, said per the Humane Society. "And he likes to follow some of the older females around.” Things haven’t always been so rosy for Mason, a former research chimp. His old home was the New Iberia Research Center in Louisiana, an animal research facility where some animals were allegedly subjected to abusive treatment, ABC News reported in 2009. Two years ago, Mason, together with 109 of the lab's other chimpanzees, were retired by the National Institutes of Health, and since then, animal welfare activists have been working hard to get them all to Chimp Haven. This summer, thanks in part to a fundraising campaign that raised millions of dollars, that goal was finally realized. According to the Humane Society, this is the largest group of government-owned chimpanzees ever ...
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Monarch Butterflies need Endangered Species Act protection 28.8.2014 Environmental News Network
As monarch butterflies are beginning their epic migration from Canada and the U.S. to Mexico for the winter, concerns about the drastic rate at which they're disappearing from the landscape have led environmental and health organizations to petition the government for federal protection. This week, the Center for Biological Diversity, Center for Food Safety, Xerces Society and monarch scientist Dr. Lincoln Brower filed a legal petition with the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service seeking protection for monarchs under the Endangered Species Act.
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Clever Panda May Have Faked Pregnancy For More Food 28.8.2014 Green on HuffingtonPost.com
When Ai Hin the panda started showing signs of pregnancy earlier this year, the world got pretty darn excited. Giant pandas are endangered creatures , after all, and they also happen to be notorious for their reluctance to breed in captivity. Even the panda's caretakers at the Chengdu Research Base of Giant Panda Breeding were jazzed about the potential birth and reportedly planned the first-ever live broadcast of a delivery of panda cubs. Unfortunately though, it looks like Ai Hin won't be starring in any such live stream in the near future because, it turns out, she is not actually pregnant. In fact, she's apparently been faking it. This picture, taken on July 17, 2014, shows giant panda Ai Hin sitting in her enclosure at the Chengdu Research Base of Giant Panda Breeding in Chengdu, in southwest China's Sichuan province. According to Xinhua News, Ai Hin's caretakers say the panda recently started acting normally again after two months of exhibiting tell-tale pregnancy signs. Experts have speculated ...
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Here Are Some Totally Weird And Wonderful Facts About Marsupials (You're Welcome) 27.8.2014 Green on HuffingtonPost.com
Marsupials are amazing creatures. Baffling and kind of weird, yes, but also totally amazing. Part of their mystique seems to stem from their uncanny same-but-differentness. After all, koalas sort of look like bears, and wombats resemble chubby rodents. But though marsupials are very much a part of the mammal family, they are also quite different -- in magnificent and bizarre ways -- from the mammals that you might be more accustomed to. Last week, YouTube personality Ze Frank explored some of these fascinating marsupial facts in an irreverently entertaining video about the animals. In the clip, which has already racked up almost 2 million views, Ze Frank discusses everything from kangaroo babies to wombat penises -- and we're pretty sure that each new nugget of marsupial knowledge will blow your mind. Did you know, for instance, that marsupial babies typically emerge from their mothers as teeny, helpless embryos ? Unlike placental mammals (like humans, dogs and whales), marsupial females don't have a ...
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Conservation is too conservative in the UK 27.8.2014 The Earth Times Online Newspaper - Environment News
The white-tailed eagle, the dormouse and the large blue butterfly are all threatened. But not by extinction. The threat comes from ill-equipped government who are going to cling to a list of alien plants and animals that is so far out-of-date, Darwin would have laughed. People would then be allowed to exterminate species like this on their land.
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After 90 Percent Decline, Federal Protection Sought for Monarch Butterfly 26.8.2014 Commondreams.org Newswire
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Bringing Conservation and Development Together 26.8.2014 Green on HuffingtonPost.com
Development and conservation are often viewed as separate or even opposing needs. The truth is, we simply won't be successful in addressing either the world's economic or environmental challenges unless we bring them together more often. USAID is the United States' leading organization focused on international economic development. Its principal tool is providing financial assistance to support economic growth around the world. As you can imagine, nature protection was not part of its original focus when it was founded back in 1961. Yet, things have changed since then. Like The Nature Conservancy (TNC), USAID has evolved a great deal, keeping core values while also bringing new strategies aboard. USAID has put increasing emphasis on investments in nature to strengthen economic development for human well-being, which is very encouraging to organizations like TNC. In fact, USAID has partnered with TNC since 1990 on forest, marine and freshwater conservation projects in Latin America, the Asia Pacific, and ...
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The Passenger Pigeon's Everlasting Mark: America's Most Infamous Extinction 25.8.2014 Green on HuffingtonPost.com
We rarely know the exact date and time an entire species goes extinct, but in the case of the passenger pigeon , we do. Martha, the very last of her species, took her final breath at the Cincinnati Zoo on September 1st 1914, marking the end of a species that was once the most abundant in North America. This was America's first infamous extinction. At the time of the Civil War, the passenger pigeon was the most numerous bird in all of North America, probably even the world. There were as many as 5 billion birds flying the skies. They ranged throughout the eastern United States, parts of Montana and Texas and north well into Canada. Imagine looking up into the sky today and not being able to see the sun because a flock of birds was so numerous it blocked the light for hours and hours. These birds were intimately woven into many aspects of early American life. Passenger pigeons influenced many of our nation's early writers, composers and artists, including John James Audubon, Henry David Thoreau and James ...
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How business can keep clean water flowing 25.8.2014 Business Operations | GreenBiz.com

Private investments productively and profitably can be diverted toward improving agricultural and urban watersheds, says TNC.

How business can keep clean water flowing
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D.C.'s Famous Snowy Owl Found Dead In Minnesota 23.8.2014 Green on HuffingtonPost.com
Washington, D.C.'s snowy owl famously survived being hit by a bus this past winter , but it seems our migratory friend couldn't steer clear of danger. After her accident, our wings were crossed for this tough bird. She was treated at City Wildlife -- the only urban wildlife rehabilitation center in the nation's capital -- then at the National Zoo, before she was ferreted off to the University of Minnesota's Raptor Center for feather transplants and further care. In mid-April, when the owl was released near Superior, Wisconsin , we rather hoped that'd be the last we'd see of her. But on Friday, a message on Minnesota's Raptor Center's website read: Sadly, we're writing today to let you know that The Raptor Center has learned the snowy owl's body has been recovered from the shoulder of a Minnesota highway, near where [she] had been released last spring. The snowy's cause of death is uncertain, but the placement of the body indicates [she] may have been hit by a vehicle. The body was in good condition, ...
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Judge Halts Plan to Eliminate Secure Grizzly Bear Habitat in Northwest Montana 23.8.2014 Commondreams.org Newswire
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Demand response keeps energy use low at Chicago high-rise 22.8.2014 Business Operations | GreenBiz.com

Load-shifting and other technologies save energy while helping tenants stay comfortable, no matter what the weather.

Demand response keeps energy use low at Chicago high-rise
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This (Really, Really) Little Cutie May Be The Smallest Dog In Britain 22.8.2014 Green on HuffingtonPost.com
World, meet Tyson — a teeny chihuahua-mix who might just be Britain’s smallest dog. ‘Britain’s smallest dog’ is four inches tall and weighs less than a bag of sugar: http://t.co/OWKNkZPtoS pic.twitter.com/5QZ2f9AHnf — Yahoo UK News (@YahooNewsUK) August 21, 2014 Born earlier this year, Tyson was reportedly so tiny at birth that his owner Rosemarie McLinden had to feed him with a dropper . “I had to start feeding him myself as he couldn't latch on to his mother," McLinden told Yahoo! News UK. “He was so small he just could not breastfeed due to the tiny size of his mouth.” Though McLinden and her husband initially worried about Tyson, who hasn’t grown much since he was born, it seems the little pup is now fit and healthy — though he remains teeny-weeny, as you can see in the video above. According to the Boston Standard, Tyson — who was named after boxer Mike Tyson "because he is such a little fighter,” McLinden told the news outlet — weighs just a little more than half a pound and is just five inches ...
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Conservation Is a Winning Conversation With Latinos 21.8.2014 Politics on HuffingtonPost.com
I visited Shenandoah River State Park on a recent sunny weekend with my family and was pleasantly surprised to see so many fellow Hispanics enjoying the outdoors. The park offers scenic views of the Blue Ridge Mountains, and river-front picnicking, fishing, hiking trails and boating. It was rewarding to see so many children enjoying the outdoors, as my team and I have spent years educating and encouraging Latino families to visit and enjoy their public lands, like this Virginia state park. Now, a new research brief from leading pollster Latino Decisions and Hispanic Access Foundation indicates that Latinos aren't just appreciating and increasingly advocating for our environment - they may even vote for candidates who will see it protected. Our research brief, " Hispanic Voter Perspectives on Conservation and Environmental Issues ," analyzes nine major public opinion polls from the last three years. It finds Latinos overwhelming support greater environmental protections, such as preserving parks and ...
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The Nature of Humans 21.8.2014 Green on HuffingtonPost.com
By Rod Fujita and Nya Van Leuvan, co-founders of Root Solutions Many of us joined the conservation movement because while studying nature, we fell in love with it. Or maybe we signed up because we loved nature growing up, and deepened our relationship by studying its many mysteries. In either case, it's safe to say that most conservationists know a lot more about why fish, birds and plants do the things they do, than about human behavior. But it is human behavior that now shapes the destiny of life on earth. For example, even the ocean -- which covers most of the planet -- is heavily impacted by human activity over roughly 40 percent of its surface. Our influence extends even into the most remote regions of the planet. The conservation movement has made great strides, but there is an urgent need to scale conservation solutions so that they are commensurate with the global scale of environmental impact. We created a new organization, Root Solutions , to help conservationists achieve this scale by ...
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'Beautiful Little Soul': Therapy Bunnies Help Alzheimer's, Dementia Patients 20.8.2014 Green on HuffingtonPost.com
It sounds almost too hopping cute to be true, but Teddy the therapy rabbit's first job was tending to his little sister Lulu. Lulu is the most recent addition to Minnesotan bunny enthusiast Jennifer Smith's multi-rabbit household. The animal had been left in a cardboard box next to a dumpster on a cold night this past winter. "A woman saw the box and opened it to find a beautiful rabbit freezing to death," Smith says. Lulu was brought to a local animal shelter, where -- against all odds -- she survived. Smith adopted her soon after that, but the rabbit clearly wasn't well, and Teddy was determined to help. "Our tiny house rabbit Teddy Graham would spend his days lying next to her pen. He rarely left her side," she says. "Lulu just laid there in her sick, broken kind of way. Teddy went right up to her and started kissing her face. ...Teddy saved Lulu, and Lulu adores Teddy for his devotion to her." Teddy Graham and Lulu. Photo credit: Jennifer Smith As of early August, Lulu and Teddy Graham are able to ...
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Primary forests-the action and the policy 19.8.2014 Earth Times
The animals and plants of the primary forests are those we are desperately trying to save. Their habitats are the primary forest, whether taiga or tropical. To conserve those myriad habitats, these policies and actions are recommended for immediate use by you, the people who can turn the tide and keep the last 5% of the once-great green forest.
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Wrestling Climate Change to the Ground 19.8.2014 Green on HuffingtonPost.com
It's July 2010, at state-of-the-art Dwight Center for Conservation Science at Pepperwood Preserve in the Mayacamas range east of Santa Rosa. The place is surrounded by some 3,000 acres of iconic Bay Area Coast Range habitat: sunny skies, untrammeled oak woodlands, gorgeous views. Inside, 23 palpably excited scientists introduce themselves and rattle off their disciplines: climate change modeler, spatial ecologist, physicist, soil physicist, ecologist focused on global carbon cycling and probabilistic vegetation modeling. Uh oh. Is this conference going to be all about graphs, equations and incomprehensible hypotheses presented with wild enthusiasm? (Yes.) A fire ecologist announces himself as "Discoverer of the Previously Unknown." Everybody laughs. "The whole town's here to paint the fence," says Lorrie Flint, a hydrologist from the U.S. Geological Survey. "And David's our Tom Sawyer." The tall, slim master of ceremonies is Dr. David Ackerly, professor of integrative biology at UC Berkeley. In buoyant ...
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People In North Texas Just Adopted More Than 2,200 Animals In One Day 19.8.2014 Green on HuffingtonPost.com
Post by City of Arlington, TX - Animal Services . All in all, "Empty the Shelter Day" was a huge win in many ways, said both organizers and participants. Not only did the event help to increase the visibility of animal shelters in their communities, but — given that overcrowding is an especially urgent problem in shelters during the summer — it was also critical in the saving of many, many lives. KXAS-TV reported, for instance, that one participating shelter, Dallas Animal Services, was euthanizing 50 to 60 animals every single day this summer because it simply didn't have space for them; on Saturday, however, the shelter found homes for 149 of its 150 animals . The day's success could perhaps be best summed up in a photograph posted by the Texas chapter of the Society for the Prevention of Cruelty to Animals, one of the event’s co-sponsors, at the end of the adoption effort. “Look at those empty kennels,” the organization wrote on Instagram. “#emptytheshelter...#savealife.” Encouraging pet adoption by ...
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Poll shows strong Latino support for conservation 18.8.2014 From the Blogs
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