User: flenvcenter Topic: Biodiversity-Independent
Category: Protection :: Policy
Last updated: Sep 17 2014 19:55 IST RSS 2.0
 
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Protected Areas Do Work, Says Study 16.9.2014 Environmental News Network
Protected areas are working. That's the conclusion of a new analysis of over 80 different studies on the efficacy of parks and nature reserves in safeguarding wildlife. Published in the open access journal, PLOS ONE, the new study finds that in general protected areas house higher abundances of wildlife as well as greater biodiversity than adjacent areas.
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The Arctic Council: A Model for Sustainable Development? 16.9.2014 Green on HuffingtonPost.com
I write often of the conflict between natural resource exploitation and biodiversity protection, at one point an easy relationship until the world economy grew to a level of demand that shifted the balance from infinite to finite supply, from moderate to excessive demand. The ebb and flow is visible on land, for example, in the history of the American "rust belt," the middle states that flourished as the primary producer of iron and steel, then collapsed in the face of offshore competition and labor costs, now to feel the hope again of revival in the face of the fracking boom producing new supplies of natural gas, indifferent to the negative environmental consequence that will eventually be exhausted and return these communities to even greater destitution. This conflict underlies the growing controversy and opposition by many to comparable energy driven development in China, Africa, and other developing states with growing financial and social aspirations already enjoyed by the developed world. It seems ...
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Family pets are prey for Leopards in India 12.9.2014 Environmental News Network
A new study led by the Wildlife Conservation Society reveals that in India's human dominated agricultural landscapes, where leopards prowl at night, it's not livestock that’s primarily on the menu – it is man's best friend. The study, which looked at scat samples for leopards in India's Ahmednagar’s district in Maharashtra, found that 87 percent of their diet was made up of domestic animals. Domestic dog dominated as the most common prey item at 39 percent and domestic cats were second at 15 percent.
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How drones are emerging as a valuable conservation tool 11.9.2014 Business Operations | GreenBiz.com

One organization is promoting their use for everything from counting orangutans to putting a stop on poaching.

How drones are emerging as a valuable conservation tool
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Need or Greed? Biodiversity, Conservation & Ocean Health 11.9.2014 Green on HuffingtonPost.com
Since the founding of the World Ocean Observatory more than a decade ago, I have attended many conferences and international meetings on ocean and climate policy and issues. Sometimes I have attended as humble registrant, other times I have presented papers and Power Point presentations, but never have I been invited to moderate a session, to shape a presentation and discussion on a specific topic. So you can imagine my surprise when the invitation came to organize a presentation at the 2nd International Ocean Research Conference to be held in Barcelona, Spain in November of this year. The Intergovernmental Oceanographic Commission , known as the IOC, is part of UNESCO and typically gathers together nearly 1,000 delegates from UN divisions, national governments, non-governmental organizations, universities and research institutes to address the state of the international ocean agenda, its goals and objectives, and progress, or the lack thereof, since the last meeting. The IOC is charged with coordinating ...
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An Abundance of Loss with the Loss of Abundance 9.9.2014 Green on HuffingtonPost.com
By Steve Zack "If the laudable quest for survivors of the species proves not forlorn, we trust our boasted humanity will hold the protection of this beautiful bird to be a most sacred trust - an attitude rarely taken in the day of its abundance." So naturalist Albert Hazen Wright wrote in 1911, three years before the last of the Passenger Pigeon. The recent centenary of its extinction, for a bird that numbered in the billions in the 19th century and ended in oblivion early in the 20th century, brought forth much reflection and re-examination of our collective capacity and commitment to averting species' extinctions . My colleagues who comprise the major bird conservation groups and the relevant federal and state agencies of the U.S. have a new " State of the Birds " report. The report focuses on the above theme, indicating how much we have learned and now apply to avert future avian extinctions. Abundant Snow Geese and a few Ross's Geese at dawn in New Mexico's Bosque del Apache National Wildlife Refuge. ...
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Congress Must Act to Prevent Extinction of Valuable Conservation Stamp 6.9.2014 Green on HuffingtonPost.com
Each year, the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service provides funding appropriated by act of Congress for targeted international conservation projects to protect several of our most iconic and endangered species: Asian and African elephants, tigers, rhinos, great apes, and marine turtles. These funds for these programs, modest by government standards (approximately $10 million per year), provide critical support to maintain populations of species that might otherwise perish. The Save Vanishing Species stamp, issued in September 2011 by the U.S. Postal Service and featuring a tiger cub illustration, helps to protect species like elephants, tigers, and great apes. For two years until last fall, American citizens were able to contribute directly to this effort in a small but meaningful way: by mailing a letter. By using a Save Vanishing Species postage stamp to send a greeting card, wedding invitation, or utility bill, anybody concerned about the plight of our most threatened species could toss a dime into the ...
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Q&A with Henry Paulson: Dialogues on the Environment 4.9.2014 Green on HuffingtonPost.com
In this ongoing series, I talk with thought leaders about ideas and trends in the environmental movement. Next in the series is my conversation with Henry Paulson, the founder and chairman of The Paulson Institute . Mark Tercek: Over the course of your distinguished career as CEO of Goldman Sachs and our country's Secretary of the Treasury, you also always found the time to be very engaged in the conservation movement (including serving as Chairman of TNC's global board of directors from 2004 to 2006). How did you become a conservationist? Henry Paulson: I grew up on a farm northwest of Chicago, so our family life was very connected to the land. As long as I can remember, I had a strong interest in fishing and my parents, even though they had never fished or camped, took us on canoe camping trips in the wilderness of Quetico Provincial Park in Ontario, Canada where I could fish to my heart's content. So from an early age I was exposed to wild, beautiful landscapes, both on our annual summer camping trips ...
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Stop talking about conservation. We need restoration and rehabilitation. 3.9.2014 TreeHugger
It's not enough to hold back the destruction. We have to reverse it.
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A 50th Birthday Present for Wilderness Act: Keep Arctic Coastal Plain Wild 3.9.2014 Green on HuffingtonPost.com
Fifty years ago today, my conservation hero and mentor Mardy Murie stood next to President Lyndon Johnson as he signed the Wilderness Act. Mardy had worked tirelessly to help pass the law, traveling across Alaska, testifying at hearings on Capitol Hill, and inviting lawmakers to come for tea and cookies on her ranch in Moose, Wyoming. Her efforts were fueled by a fierce belief that American society grows stronger when we protect wild refuges apart from civilization. Mardy was not alone. Many groups rallied people in support of conservation from Alaska to Florida, with the Wilderness Society leading the way. And Congress passed the law with overwhelming support from Democrats and Republicans alike. The vast majority of leaders recognized the importance of conserving landscapes "where the earth and its community of life are untrammeled by man, where man himself is a visitor who does not remain." These are the wild places that have fed our nation's character--our grit, independence, and love of open ...
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From Walden Pond to Wilderness: Celebrating the 50th Anniversary of the Wilderness Act and the Land and Water Conservation Fund Act 3.9.2014 Politics on HuffingtonPost.com
"...in Wildness is the preservation of the World." Henry David Thoreau's famous line was not published until a month after his death in 1862 in the essay " Walking ." Thoreau spent much of the last decade of his life proclaiming the importance of nature and wilderness. His insight, distilled into a single sentence, echoed down the years as other Americans constructed our country's conservation legacy on the foundation Thoreau built in Concord, Massachusetts. Just over 100 years after the publication of Thoreau's words -- and 50 years ago today -- President Lyndon Johnson signed the Wilderness Act into law. Having established the first national parks in the world, America was once again innovating when it came to protecting our natural heritage. This time we had the foresight to safeguard the areas "untrammeled by man, where man himself is a visitor who does not remain." Since President Johnson signed the law, we've protected nearly 110 million acres of wilderness, areas where visitors can enjoy nature's ...
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How satellites sound fire alarm in tropical forests 3.9.2014 Business Operations | GreenBiz.com

Conservation International can detect fires and predict fire threat to help improve prevention and ecosystem damage control by viewing Earth’s changing biosphere from space.

How satellites sound fire alarm in tropical forests
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Time for Congress to Join President Obama in Continuing America's Conservation Legacy 3.9.2014 Politics on HuffingtonPost.com
On September 3, 1964 -- exactly 50 years ago -- President Lyndon B. Johnson signed two bills into law: The Wilderness Act and the Land and Water Conservation Fund (LWCF). From the White House Rose Garden he praised these conservation measures, declaring them "in the highest tradition of our heritage as conservators as well as users of America's bountiful natural endowments." At their core, both the Wilderness Act and the LWCF are congressional tools for conserving our natural and cultural heritage. In particular, the Wilderness Act preserves the untouched nature of notably pristine federal lands. Congress is tasked with designating these lands as wilderness areas where commercial activities -- motorized access, roads, human infrastructure -- are prohibited. As for the LWCF, it facilitates outdoor recreation by helping fund everything from expanding national parks like Rocky Mountain National Park to preserving Civil War battlefields like Gettysburg to building urban parks like Los Angeles' MacArthur ...
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Clownfish That Inspired Finding Nemo Closer to Endangered Species Act Protection 3.9.2014 Commondreams.org Newswire
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Mongoose Fights Off Lions, Shows Us The Definition Of Courage 3.9.2014 Green on HuffingtonPost.com
This mongoose has courage, and we're not lion. Faced with fierce cats in Kenya's Masaai Mara National Park, this plucky mongoose opted to fight back . Videographer Jerome Guillaumot captured the scene in 2011, but only recently released the footage online. In the video, the mongoose repeatedly bares its teeth, emits a terrifying squealing noise and charges the lions, who retreat in the face of such aggression. Though the small animal ultimately escapes to safety in a burrow, it later emerges to mount a second attack. Mongooses, notes National Geographic, are famously brave animals . Some species are known to attack venomous cobras. Of the International Union for Conservation of Nature 's 39 listed species of mongoose, seven are categorized as "vulnerable," "endangered" or "critically endangered" due to loss of habitat. WATCH the mongoose fight off the lions, ...
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These Retired Research Chimps Are Really Enjoying Their New Home 30.8.2014 Green on HuffingtonPost.com
Meet Mason. He's only 5, but already, he seems to be quite the "ladies' man." “He likes to play with the other girls,” Mark Lewis, an animal care specialist at Chimp Haven , a Keithville, Louisiana, chimpanzee sanctuary where Mason now lives, said per the Humane Society. "And he likes to follow some of the older females around.” Things haven’t always been so rosy for Mason, a former research chimp. His old home was the New Iberia Research Center in Louisiana, an animal research facility where some animals were allegedly subjected to abusive treatment, ABC News reported in 2009. Two years ago, Mason, together with 109 of the lab's other chimpanzees, were retired by the National Institutes of Health, and since then, animal welfare activists have been working hard to get them all to Chimp Haven. This summer, thanks in part to a fundraising campaign that raised millions of dollars, that goal was finally realized. According to the Humane Society, this is the largest group of government-owned chimpanzees ever ...
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Monarch Butterflies need Endangered Species Act protection 28.8.2014 Environmental News Network
As monarch butterflies are beginning their epic migration from Canada and the U.S. to Mexico for the winter, concerns about the drastic rate at which they're disappearing from the landscape have led environmental and health organizations to petition the government for federal protection. This week, the Center for Biological Diversity, Center for Food Safety, Xerces Society and monarch scientist Dr. Lincoln Brower filed a legal petition with the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service seeking protection for monarchs under the Endangered Species Act.
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Clever Panda May Have Faked Pregnancy For More Food 28.8.2014 Green on HuffingtonPost.com
When Ai Hin the panda started showing signs of pregnancy earlier this year, the world got pretty darn excited. Giant pandas are endangered creatures , after all, and they also happen to be notorious for their reluctance to breed in captivity. Even the panda's caretakers at the Chengdu Research Base of Giant Panda Breeding were jazzed about the potential birth and reportedly planned the first-ever live broadcast of a delivery of panda cubs. Unfortunately though, it looks like Ai Hin won't be starring in any such live stream in the near future because, it turns out, she is not actually pregnant. In fact, she's apparently been faking it. This picture, taken on July 17, 2014, shows giant panda Ai Hin sitting in her enclosure at the Chengdu Research Base of Giant Panda Breeding in Chengdu, in southwest China's Sichuan province. According to Xinhua News, Ai Hin's caretakers say the panda recently started acting normally again after two months of exhibiting tell-tale pregnancy signs. Experts have speculated ...
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Here Are Some Totally Weird And Wonderful Facts About Marsupials (You're Welcome) 27.8.2014 Green on HuffingtonPost.com
Marsupials are amazing creatures. Baffling and kind of weird, yes, but also totally amazing. Part of their mystique seems to stem from their uncanny same-but-differentness. After all, koalas sort of look like bears, and wombats resemble chubby rodents. But though marsupials are very much a part of the mammal family, they are also quite different -- in magnificent and bizarre ways -- from the mammals that you might be more accustomed to. Last week, YouTube personality Ze Frank explored some of these fascinating marsupial facts in an irreverently entertaining video about the animals. In the clip, which has already racked up almost 2 million views, Ze Frank discusses everything from kangaroo babies to wombat penises -- and we're pretty sure that each new nugget of marsupial knowledge will blow your mind. Did you know, for instance, that marsupial babies typically emerge from their mothers as teeny, helpless embryos ? Unlike placental mammals (like humans, dogs and whales), marsupial females don't have a ...
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Conservation is too conservative in the UK 27.8.2014 The Earth Times Online Newspaper - Environment News
The white-tailed eagle, the dormouse and the large blue butterfly are all threatened. But not by extinction. The threat comes from ill-equipped government who are going to cling to a list of alien plants and animals that is so far out-of-date, Darwin would have laughed. People would then be allowed to exterminate species like this on their land.
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