User: flenvcenter Topic: Biodiversity-Independent
Category: Protection :: Captive Breeding
Last updated: Dec 15 2017 22:42 IST RSS 2.0
 
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What threatens the black-footed ferret? 10.1.2020 High Country News Most Recent
Biologists are trying to understand why the species continues to disappear in the West
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Saving Salamanders: Vital to Ecosystem Health 15.12.2017 Environmental News Network
Amphibians—the big-eyed, swimming-crawling-jumping-climbing group of water and land animals that includes frogs, toads, salamanders and worm-like caecilians—are the world’s most endangered vertebrates. One-third of the planet’s amphibian species are threatened with extinction. Now, these vulnerable creatures are facing a new foe: the Batrachochytrium salamandrivorans (Bsal) fungus, which is the source of an emerging amphibian disease that caused the die-off of wild European salamander populations.
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Sage grouse review; false coal stats; elk deaths 26.6.2017 High Country News Most Recent
HCN.org news in brief.
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Experts: Captive breeding of sage grouse won’t work 14.6.2017 High Country News Most Recent
Zinke calls for a review of conservation plans.
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SeaWorld Exploits Orca's Pregnancy, Despite Outcry Over Captive Breeding 3.5.2017 Truthout - All Articles
Under pressure from activists and in anticipation of a California state ban against the inhumane practice of keeping and breeding orcas in captivity, SeaWorld announced an end to the practice. However, that has not stopped SeaWorld from exploiting what it calls the last captive birth of an orca with a livestream featuring the pregnant Takara. Visitors look at orca whales at SeaWorld in San Diego, July 17, 2013. (Photo: Sandy Huffaker / The New York Times) April the Giraffe -- a giraffe at the Animal Adventure Park in upstate New York -- gave birth to a baby calf on April 15, completing weeks of a live stream from the zoo. Toys R Us sponsored the live feed, which  attracted  millions of viewers, brought in thousands of dollars in donations, and launched their own  site  and store for April the Giraffe. The New York zoo's successful marketing campaign has now inspired  SeaWorld  in San Diego to launch a similar one, as it provides updates and livestream discussions with trainers featuring a pregnant ...
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Humans Just Killed Off These 12 Animals, And You Didn't Even Notice 17.12.2016 Green on HuffingtonPost.com
For thousands of years, the Bramble Cay melomys, a small, mouse-like rodent, eked out a living on a tiny coral island in Australia’s Great Barrier Reef. It was the reef’s only endemic mammal species, and survived on the few plants that grew on its island home. But as climate change expedited sea level rise and increased storm surges that flooded the low-lying island, the Bramble Cay melomys and its food supply was severely threatened. In June, after years of fruitless searching, scientists announced that they could no longer find any trace of the rodent.  The melomys was posthumously bestowed the ignominious title of the first mammal to go extinct because of human-induced global warming . “Sadly,” WWF-Australia spokesperson Darren Grover told The New York Times, “it won’t be the last.”  Scientists say the planet is currently on the precipice of the sixth mass extinction , an event that could see the wiping out of at least 75 percent of the Earth’s species. The current extinction rate is at least  100 ...
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Mission Mikey: Accomplished 14.12.2016 Green on HuffingtonPost.com
How far would you go to rescue a monkey in need? Mikey came to the front of his temporary enclosure and reached his tiny fingers toward the opening. He wants my phone! You are getting so bold and comfortable already, Mikey. It's only been one day. Young Mikey had a home. He had a large cage in the living room; he had toys, fruit, and blankets. But, he is still a two-year-old vervet monkey. He is a wild primate at heart who needs to climb trees, forage, and be with others of his own kind. He was the product of captive breeding, taken from his mother at two weeks of age. He was then shipped across state lines to live in a human house as a pet with the children, the rescued dogs, and the semi-feral cats outside eating on the porch. Mikey's human owner was moving to an apartment that wouldn't allow animals and had to give him up. The Born Free USA Primate Sanctuary, located in Dilley, Texas, is equipped to house and care for vervets. We do it already. Let's be clear; primates, or other wild animals, are not ...
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Wildlife Farming: Does It Help Or Hurt Threatened Species? 25.10.2016 Environmental News Network
More than a decade ago, looking to slow the decimation of wildlife populations for the bushmeat trade, researchers in West Africa sought to establish an alternative protein supply. Brush-tailed porcupine was one of the most popular and high-priced meats, in rural and urban areas alike. Why not farm it? It turned out that the porcupines are generally solitary, and when put together, they tended to fight and didn't have sex. In any case, moms produce only one offspring per birth, hardly a recipe for commercial success. Wildlife farming is like that — a tantalizing idea that is always fraught with challenges and often seriously flawed. And yet it is also growing both as a marketplace reality and in its appeal to a broad array of legitimate stakeholders as a potentially sustainable alternative to the helter-skelter exploitation of wild resources everywhere. Food security consultants are promoting wildlife farming as a way to boost rural incomes and supply protein to a hungry world. So are public health ...
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Root Canal: SeaWorld Gets Drilled In New Killer Whale Teeth Report 17.8.2016 Green on HuffingtonPost.com
SeaWorld’s CEO Joel Manby has been all smiles since he and Wayne Pacelle, CEO of The Humane Society of the United States announced that their organizations had reached an agreement to end the captive breeding of killer whales at SeaWorld’s parks in California, Texas and Florida along with the six killer whales under SeaWorld’s care at Loro Parque in Spain. But when it comes to the killer whales themselves, they’re not smiling because there is something missing - their teeth. Dentition as a Welfare Indicator Do you  remember going to the dentist as a child for a checkup? Do you remember how happy you were if you didn’t have any cavities? Do you remember the sound of the dentist’s drill when you did? A new report from the Free Morgan Foundation (FMF) examines the condition of killer whale teeth as a measure of their welfare in captivity. The report, Ongoing concerns regarding the SeaWorld orca held at Loro Parque, Tenerife, Spain provides extensive photographic documentation that chronicles the dentition ...
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A Troubling Snag in the Comeback of the California Condor 9.8.2016 Environmental News Network
IN THE EARLY ’80s, the California condor almost scavenged its way to extinction. The grisly-looking birds survive off the remains of animals, often leftovers shot by hunters. But those hunters often used lead ammunition. Condors were dying of lead poisoning, their numbers dropping as low as 22.In one of conservation’s greatest success stories, a frantic captive breeding program brought the huge, glorious scavenger roaring back; today, the condors number close to 450, over half of which are wild. While an outright ban on lead ammunition won’t kick in until 2019, aggressive public education has helped safeguard the species—inland at least. But scientists have found a new threat to the reestablished condors: extremely high levels of mercury and the pesticide DDT in the birds’ blood. This time, it’s an appetite for marine mammal flesh that may threaten the ...
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This Rabbit May Be Conservation's Newest, Cutest Success Story 25.6.2016 Green on HuffingtonPost.com
New England’s only native rabbit species may soon be hopping in the wild in abundant numbers once again. The New England cottontail population has declined by more than 75 percent since 1960, mostly from habitat loss caused by development, according to the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service. There are now only five small populations across a range from Maine to New York. (Yes, technically New York is not part of New England, but apparently no one told the New England cottontail that.) But conservation efforts for the bunnies are proving to be promising, the Associated Press reports. Captive breeding and reintroduction efforts has helped the population on Rhode Island’s Patience Island double to more than 150 rabbits. And two dozen rabbits released at a managed wildlife area in New Hampshire are thriving and expanding in numbers. Of course, since the habitat loss was the problem in the first place, it’s crucial to ensure the growing population actually has a place to live. New England cottontails live in the ...
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California Condor Population Reaches New Heights 14.6.2016 Environmental News Network
After years of intense — and often controversial — restoration efforts, biologists are finally reporting some good news for the beleaguered California condor: More chicks are surviving in the wild, and the birds are becoming increasingly independent and expanding their range.Earlier this year, the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service announced what it called a milestone for the California condor: More chicks had hatched and fledged in the wild during 2015 than the number of condors that had died. In late March, Steve Kirkland, the agency’s condor field coordinator, reported that two more chicks had fledged in 2015 in Baja California, but had only just been discovered, bringing the total in the wild to 270.It was perhaps the most promising news about the condor in decades.
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Feed the birds, but what about vultures? 22.4.2016 The Earth Times Online Newspaper - Environment News
We don’t know whether captive breeding or supplementary feeding should be the answer for what has been a successful programme for the bearded vulture or lammergeier. The answer is in this paper which tries to establish exactly how the future should be for this unique species, in both Europe and Central Asia.
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Is It Okay to Go Back to SeaWorld 1.4.2016 Green on HuffingtonPost.com
It's all about the turnstile ~ by Ric O'Barry, Founder/Director of Dolphin Project Featured image: Screen grab YouTube/WorldWideVids97 SeaWorld and their new partner, The Humane Society of the United States* (HSUS), recently announced the end of SeaWorld's captive breeding (actually inbreeding) program for orcas. We welcome that. It's good news. * Not to be confused with your local humane society. But there's some bad news, too: all other species of dolphin are excluded from the breeding ban. Captive breeding for the vast majority of dolphins in the various SeaWorld amusement parks will not be phased out. They say, "it could happen," but I'm not buying pie in the sky or the old carrot and stick trick. Let's stick with what we know and what is real: sperm on demand and artificial insemination will continue for the majority of SeaWorld's dolphins, now, with the blessing of HSUS. SeaWorld also announced a change in the orca shows. No more "theatrical orca shows" in favor of "orca exhibits" that "highlight ...
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SeaWorld Victory Offers Important Reminders for Social Movements 19.3.2016 Green on HuffingtonPost.com
Celebrating the Diversity of Tactics That Collectively Conspired to Free Shamu "A healthy movement -- like a healthy ecosystem -- is marked by diversity." I've heard this refrain often in the environmental movement circles I've campaigned in, organized with and spun stories for over the last two and half decades. And the recent jaw-dropping announcement from SeaWorld offers us an elegant example of this diversity in action. The decision by SeaWorld to end its captive breeding program is worthy of celebration. But before everyone rushes to make meaning and explain how we got here, crediting any one particular event for the victory, I feel compelled, as the systems-thinking, ocean-loving media maven that I am, to remind us all to spread the love around, and celebrate all the many great organizations and actions that have led us to this remarkable day. Obviously the success of the documentary Blackfish springs to mind as SeaWorld falls to its knees and changes its business model, redeeming itself and ...
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SeaWorld Ends Orca Breeding: Experts Weigh In 18.3.2016 Green on HuffingtonPost.com
SeaWorld just announced that they would no longer let their orcas -- also known as killer whales -- breed. I asked several killer whale and animal behavior experts for their opinions. Barbara J. King, whose books include How Animals Grieve, wrote: Killer whales and other cetaceans suffer so much in captivity, both physically and emotionally, that they shouldn't be held at all--full stop... While cessation of breeding captive killer whales is a positive step, it wouldn't address the profoundly distressed and depressed behaviors of killer whales who live now at SeaWorld. Each of these individuals has thoughts and feelings about his or her captivity, and we can't turn away from these. Caption: Tall-finned male L-41, with female L-22 at his left side and two other L-pod members traveling Haro Strait. When this photo was taken in 2013, he was 36 years old; she was 42. Credit: Carl Safina Kenneth Balcomb has studied the free-living orcas of the Pacific Northwest for four decades. I got to know him -- and some ...
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I Am Morgan - Stolen Freedom: Provocative Killer Whale Film Premiers in San Francisco 10.3.2016 Green on HuffingtonPost.com
I Am Morgan - Stolen Freedom is a provocative new film about the marine theme park industry. It gives the audience a glimpse -- be it ever so brief -- at the barren, lifeless, concrete world of captivity, as seen through the eyes of a killer whale. An official selection of the 2016 San Francisco International Ocean Film Festival (SFIOFF), I Am Morgan (New Zealand) will be making its world premiere when it screens alongside 47 other films representing the work of filmmakers from 13 countries. Each film brings to light different issues and perspectives of our dependence and never ending struggle to balance the ebb and flow of human-ocean interaction in a socially responsible and sustainable manner. Ana Blanco, Executive Director of the SFIOFF is thrilled with the diversity of this year's films, filmmakers and the global issues they address: "The SFIOFF provides an opportunity to see many films that are otherwise unavailable to the public, inspiring audiences of all ages to be empowered through the powerful ...
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Gecko Captive Breeding Hides Illegal Trade 15.1.2016 Green on HuffingtonPost.com
Tokay geckos are the world's second largest species of gecko, with males reaching lengths of up to 15 inches (38 centimeters). Photograph by blickwinkel/Alamy Stock Photo For many species threatened by the illegal wildlife trafficking, such as rhinos, elephants, tigers, and bears, debates persist as to whether a legal trade in their parts and products can reduce smuggling. But increasing evidence suggests that a legal trade instead acts as a conduit for the illegal trade. For instance, recent studies showed that Hong Kong's domestic ivory sales provided cover for illegal stocks. Now, a new report by TRAFFIC, a wildlife monitoring NGO, on captive breeding of Tokay geckos in Indonesia suggests the same holds true for captive breeding. Tokay geckos are nocturnal lizards that live in Southeast Asia. While there is some demand for them as pets, the real demand is for their use as traditional Asian medicines -- everything from an aphrodisiac and energy drink to treatments for diabetes, cancer, and HIV/AIDS. ...
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We've Rediscovered 'Extinct' Giant Tortoises 8.1.2016 Green on HuffingtonPost.com
The Galápagos Islands, 1,000 kilometers off the coast of South America, are probably most famous as the place that inspired Charles Darwin’s theory of evolution . They are home to an extraordinary array of wildlife, including giant Galápagos tortoises, the world’s largest land-living cold-blooded animals. The tortoises once thrived in the archipelago. There were originally 15 species that evolved as the islands formed volcanically . However, since the arrival of people four species have become extinct. A few weeks ago we returned from an expedition to the islands in search of two of these extinct species of tortoises. It may sound like a fool’s errand, but our expedition was a success. Here’s how we did it. Tortoises under threat The Galápagos Islands were colonised in the late 1800s. A combination of poaching by whalers and pirates, and introduced pests competing for food and eating eggs and hatchlings, led to tortoises being exterminated on some islands, and dramatically reduced on others. Darwin wrote ...
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SeaWorld Sues California Authorities Over Orca Breeding Ban 30.12.2015 Green on HuffingtonPost.com
SAN DIEGO, Dec 29 (Reuters) - SeaWorld sued California authorities on Tuesday, seeking to overturn a decision that allows the San Diego theme park to expand its orca habitat only if it stops breeding killer whales in captivity. The lawsuit, filed in San Diego Superior Court, argues that the California Coastal Commission overstepped its authority when it imposed the breeding restriction because it does not have jurisdiction over the marine mammals, which are regulated under federal law. The commission, which oversees development along California's coast, only had jurisdiction to approve or reject construction projects at the park and would effectively end SeaWorld's popular killer whale shows, the complaint said. "The condition forces SeaWorld to either agree to the eventual demise of its lawful and federally regulated orca exhibition, or withdraw the permit application and forego the effort to enhance the orcas' habitat," SeaWorld Entertainment Inc attorneys said.   During a contentious seven-hour ...
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