User: flenvcenter Topic: Biodiversity-Independent
Category: Protection :: Wildlife Corridor
Last updated: Mar 28 2019 02:19 IST RSS 2.0
 
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Extinction looms for southern California’s mountain lions 25.3.2019 High Country News Most Recent
A new study presents a choice: Allow the big cats to vanish in 50 years — or build modest wildlife corridors.
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New Study Warns Of Extinction Threat For Southern California's Mountain Lions 22.3.2019 Green on HuffingtonPost.com
They could vanish in 50 years – or be protected by "wildlife corridors," researchers say.
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Should energy interests outweigh wildlife? 17.1.2019 High Country News Most Recent
In Wyoming, Trump’s energy dominance mandate could irreparably devastate mule deer migrations.
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6 reasons why the practice of silvopasture will help save modern farming 4.8.2018 Energy & Climate | Greenbiz.com
The ecological connectivity practice offers benefits to us all.
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Hell and polluted water: what holistic water management can do 7.6.2018 Resource Efficiency | GreenBiz.com
How the 'One Water' movement is successfully leveraging new practices to improve the health, and wealth, of cities and businesses.
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Seminar held on tiger conservation in Mumbai 4.2.2018 Mumbai – The Indian Express
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Habitat on the Edges: Making Room for Wildlife in an Urbanized World 4.1.2018 Environmental News Network
One morning not long ago, in the southern Indian state of Karnataka, I traveled with a Wildlife Conservation Society biologist on a switchback route up and over the high ridge of the Western Ghats. Our itinerary loosely followed the corridor connecting Bhadra Tiger Reserve with Kudremakh National Park 30 miles to the south.
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Researcher seeks to protect where the wild things walk 21.11.2017 Environmental News Network
UBC research is paving the way for a route that will serve as a pilot project to protect green space and allow wildlife to move throughout the Okanagan Valley.Kelowna was identified in the 2016 Stats Canada census as one of the fastest-growing cities in Canada. With growth comes development and UBC Professor Lael Parrott says the region is in danger of fragmenting low-elevation ecosystems and losing the habitat and movement routes needed by wildlife, especially on the east side of Okanagan Lake.
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Dozens of New Wildlife Corridors Identified for African Mammals 8.11.2017 Environmental News Network
Researchers at the University of California, Davis, have identified 52 potential wildlife corridors linking protected areas across Tanzania. Using a cost-effective combination of interviews with local residents and a land conversion dataset for East Africa, they found an additional 23 corridors over those previously identified by Tanzanian government reports.
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‘Diabolical’ mussels begin their march into Montana 12.10.2017 High Country News Most Recent
Divisions between state and tribal agencies could keep the door open for a most unwelcome visitor.
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In California, conservationists face off with vineyard owners 5.9.2017 Resource Efficiency | GreenBiz.com
It's vines versus old-growth forests, a biodiversity debate with consequences for steelhead trout, mountain lions and spotted owls.
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How Grizzlies, Monarchs and Even Fish Can Benefit From US Highways 4.6.2017 Truthout.com
Late last August, armed with a sweep net and identification guides, Sarah Piecuch was looking for butterflies. She trudged through waist-deep grasses, trying to keep her footing steady while tallying those she found fluttering through the sky or perched on nearby flowers. But Piecuch isn't an entomologist, and she wasn't walking in a pristine meadow. Rather, she's a wildlife biologist for the New York State Department of Transportation, and she was surveying the land beside busy highways in hopes of learning what kind of management can make these long, thin strips of habitat most beneficial for pollinators. Her work is just one of a number of projects across the country aimed at using the space along interstate highways to help wildlife. Threats and Opportunities In 1956, the U.S. Congress passed the Federal-Aid Highway Act creating the nation's interstate highway system. This legislation connected the country, creating a web of freeways that now totals some 47,000 miles -- nearly enough to circle the ...
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In Big Win For Big Cats, China Approves National Park Larger Than Yellowstone 10.3.2017 Green on HuffingtonPost.com
In yet another example of a “ green revolution ” in the country, Chinese officials have approved plans to establish a sprawling national park in the northeastern corner of the country. It will be a sanctuary for two cats endemic to the area that have dangled dangerously close to extinction: the Amur leopard and the Siberian tiger, also known as the Amur tiger. The park in the provinces of Jilin and Heilongjiang will be part of China’s brand-new national park system and will span 5,600 square miles — an area 60 percent larger than Yellowstone National Park. A comprehensive plan and pilot  for the park is expected to be rolled out before 2020.  Environmentalists are celebrating the news.  Dale Miquelle, a conservationist with the Wildlife Conservation Society and a big cat expert, said the sanctuary will be one of the largest big cat reserves in the world. “China’s commitment represents an extremely important step in recovering both subspecies in northeast Asia,” he wrote in an email to The Huffington ...
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Ranch owner builds in the path of pronghorn migration 10.1.2017 High Country News Most Recent
It’s not clear if the new building could interfere with the animal’s long-distance travels.
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New study finds eco-assets boost property sale price 3.11.2016 Small Business | GreenBiz.com
Assessing property for the endangered species it saves or wetlands it preserves could pay off for some California landowners.
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The human as a speciating force of nature! 2.7.2016 The Earth Times Online Newspaper - Environment News
How do we rule this planet? Mostly inadvertently, it seems. The numbers of extinctions are only matched by the displaced species which have become greater in number as they struggle to establish in new niches and habitats, including the pathogens, the unwanted and the invasive.
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Canada, USA and Mexico promise butterfly highway 2.7.2016 TreeHugger
Is this the thin edge of a much bigger wedge?
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Climate Change This Week: Climate Emergency, Pope Francis Inspires Divestment, and More! 29.6.2016 Green on HuffingtonPost.com
Today, the Earth got a little hotter, and a little more crowded. Saving BUB - beautiful unique biodiversity, like this furry Javanese beetle, is another benefit of conserving carbon-storing forests. Source gbohne at www.flickriver.com Forests: the cheapest way to store carbon Locals Know Best such as these Amazonian Awa forest people, when it comes to conserving forests. Source pinterest OO Indigenous Rights, Private Funding Key To Slowing Deforestation, Says Norway Minister - Efforts to save the world's forests hinge on securing private sector funds and ensuring indigenous communities in tropical forests are more involved in protecting their environment. <> A Lethal Landslide, and More Rain in a Javanese village. Courtesy of @Sutopo_BNPB OO Java, Indonesia: Massive Deforestation, Heavy Rain Create Lethal Landslides - Takeaways: 64 died in recent landslides; 1800s to present: Java forests declined from 10 to 0.4 million hectares. Since 2005: 2000+ people have died from landslides. Forests anchor ...
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End of an Era for Iconic Denali Wolf Pack? 22.6.2016 Green on HuffingtonPost.com
In 2012, to learn about carnivore ecology in Alaska and celebrate completing my doctorate, my family and I visited Tom Meier, who led Denali National Park's biological program from 2003 until his unexpected death in 2012. I first met this key mentor in the early 2000s, when I tracked wolves for him in Montana, to document a dispersing wolf population. Back then he worked for the US Fish and Wildlife Service on the Northern Rockies wolf reintroduction and strongly encouraged me to attend graduate school. Tom Meier In Alaska I joined him in his office, where a large Denali map hung on the wall. On it he pointed out a 7 by 20-mile notch in the northeast park boundary. Congress didn't include this chunk of private land, a popular hunting and trapping area called the Stampede Corridor and Wolf Townships, when they expanded the park in 1980. Tom used a recent incident to illustrate conservation challenges where wolves are subject to legal killing beyond park boundaries. Denali National Park Map, with Proposed ...
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Lawsuit Filed to Protect Wildlife and San Pedro River from Sprawling Development 26.5.2016 Commondreams.org Newswire

A lawsuit against the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers and the U.S. Fish & Wildlife Service was filed today in federal court in Arizona to protect the San Pedro River, and the wildlife and millions of migratory birds that depend on it.

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