User: flenvcenter Topic: Biodiversity-Independent
Category: Protection :: Species Conservation
Last updated: Oct 12 2017 21:43 IST RSS 2.0
 
1 to 20 of 2,855    
Beyond Biodiversity: A New Way of Looking at How Species Interconnect 12.10.2017 Environmental News Network
In 1966, an ecologist at the University of Washington named Robert Paine removed all the ochre starfish from a short stretch of Pacific shoreline on Washington’s Olympic Peninsula. The absence of the predator had a dramatic effect on its ecosystem. In less than a year, a diverse tidal environment collapsed into a monoculture of mussels because the starfish was no longer around to eat them.
Also found in: [+]
The dark side of digitally tracking endangered species 11.10.2017 Energy & Climate | Greenbiz.com
The data could make it easier for poachers to find animals and plants that scientists are trying to protect.
Also found in: [+]
19 Western species won’t receive federal protections 9.10.2017 High Country News Most Recent
The animals range from minuscule Nevada mollusks to dwindling Pacific walruses.
Also found in: [+]
Trump Administration Denies Endangered Species Protection To Walruses Threatened By Climate Change 8.10.2017 Green on HuffingtonPost.com
It's a "death sentence for the walrus," a conservation group said.
Also found in: [+]
Hurricane Exposes and Washes Away Thousands of Sea Turtle Nests 5.10.2017 Environmental News Network
Hurricane Irma took a devastating toll on incubating sea turtle nests in the Archie Carr National Wildlife Refuge, one of the most important loggerhead and green turtle nesting sites in the world, according to new estimates from the UCF Marine Turtle Research Group.
Also found in: [+]
Nearly 400 new species discovered in the Amazon 28.9.2017 Planet Ark News
A fiery-orange tailed monkey, a new species of pink river dolphin and a stingray resembling a cross between a pancake and honey comb are among the hundreds of new species discovered in the Amazon over the past two years.
Also found in: [+]
How satellite imagery is transforming conservation science 27.9.2017 GreenBiz.com
High-resolution earth imagery is enabling ecologists to more accurately account for wildlife populations, deforestation, illegal mining and other changes in the landscape.
Also found in: [+]
What is the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service? 27.9.2017 High Country News Most Recent
Also found in: [+]
The fight to save vaquitas from extinction 23.9.2017 High Country News Most Recent
Through a tangle of corruption and overfishing, a marine species hangs in the balance.
Also found in: [+]
In monuments report, a skewed view of protections 19.9.2017 High Country News Most Recent
Under the Antiquities Act, landscapes like the Grand Canyon count as ‘objects’ that can be protected.
Also found in: [+]
The end of an epic butterfly journey? 15.9.2017 High Country News Most Recent
As the Western monarch population declines, survivors may become stranded in a growing sea of houses and farm fields.
Also found in: [+]
Wildfire and Invasive Species Drives Increasing Size and Cost of Public Land Restoration Efforts 7.9.2017 Environmental News Network
An examination of long-term data for lands managed by the Bureau of Land Management finds that land treatments in the southwestern United States are increasingly large, expensive and related to fire and invasive species control.The study, recently published in Restoration Ecology, reveals an extensive legacy of land management decisions and provides new insight on strategies to increase future treatment efficacy in an extremely water-limited region.
Also found in: [+]
Interior overhauls sage grouse conservation 24.8.2017 High Country News Most Recent
How big a role do industry concerns play in potential rewrite of management plans?
Also found in: [+]
Monkey Species Not Seen Alive for 80 Years Rediscovered in the Amazon 15.8.2017 Environmental News Network
Scientists have rediscovered a species of monkey in the Brazilian Amazon not seen alive since 1936, according to reporting by Mongabay.The species, the bald-faced Vanzolini saki, was first discovered along the Rio Eiru more than 80 years ago by Alfonzo Olalla, an Ecuadorian naturalist. But scientists had found no other living evidence of the monkey since then. Earlier this year, a team of seven primatologists, led by Laura Marsh of the Global Conservation Institute, began a three-month expedition aboard a boat through the Upper Jurua River and its tributaries to search for the missing monkey and survey other wildlife in the remote region of Brazil.
Also found in: [+]
Whitley Award winner ornithologist’s claims on conservation of Great Indian Bustard raise doubts 8.8.2017 Pune – The Indian Express
Also found in: [+]
Deforestation and Climate Disruption Are Degrading the Amazon, Endangering Our Survival 7.8.2017 Truthout.com
The Amazon Rainforest, the most biologically diverse place on Earth, is threatened by deforestation and anthropogenic climate disruption. (Photo: CIAT ; Edited: LW / TO) As human beings, our survival depends upon respecting the complexity of the Earth's ecosystems and protecting them, say the experts in Brazil tasked with protecting the Amazon rainforest from the effects of human-caused climate disruption. The Amazon is one of the most important and biodiverse ecosystems, and it is being deforested at an astonishing rate. The Amazon Rainforest, the most biologically diverse place on Earth, is threatened by deforestation and anthropogenic climate disruption. (Photo: CIAT ; Edited: LW / TO) Sao Paolo and Brasilia, Brazil -- Warwick Manfrinato, the director of Brazil's Department of Protected Areas, has a deep understanding of biological interdependence, as well as its importance. "If we are of utter service to nature, then we provide the benefits to all other living things on the planet," Manfrinato told ...
Also found in: [+]
How a ruling on gray wolves could impact grizzlies 3.8.2017 High Country News Most Recent
A precedent-setting decision on endangered species recovery echoes East to West.
Also found in: [+]
Financial Incentives Could Conserve Tropical Forest Diversity 2.8.2017 Green Technology and Environmental Science News - ENN
The past few decades have seen the rise of global incentive programs offering payments to landowners to help reduce tropical deforestation. Until now, assessments of these programs have largely overlooked decreases in forest diversity. In what might be a first of its kind study, University of Missouri researchers have integrated forest imaging with field-level inventories and landowner surveys to assess the impact of conservation payments in Ecuador’s Amazon Basin forests. They found that conservation payment programs are making a difference in the diversity of tree species in protected spaces. Further, the species being protected are twice as likely to be of commercial timber value and at risk of extinction.
Also found in: [+]
Great Lakes Wolves To Remain On Endangered Species List, Court Rules 2.8.2017 Green on HuffingtonPost.com
Conservationists say the decision could help save other imperiled wildlife.
Also found in: [+]
Trump Interior Nominee Has A History Of Contempt For The Agency She's About To Lead 26.7.2017 Politics on HuffingtonPost.com
Oil-friendly Texan Susan Combs is waging a “personal crusade to fight endangered species.”
Also found in: [+]
1 to 20 of 2,855