User: flenvcenter Topic: Biodiversity-Independent
Category: Problems :: Habitat Loss
Last updated: Nov 22 2019 23:41 IST RSS 2.0
 
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This $100 billion marketplace benefits business and landowners 1.12.2016 Energy & Climate | Greenbiz.com
It's changing the face of real estate, and caters to rural America, business and industry. Here's how Allegheny Power Company unearthed hidden value.
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Pacific Northwest Tribes Fight to Protect the Centerpiece of Their Culture 24.11.2016 Truthout.com
The Tulalip are one of dozens of Pacific Northwest tribes -- both in Washington State and British Columbia -- intertwined by their reliance on and reverence for salmon. This cultural icon is under assault from development, pavement, pollution, farming and a changing climate. (Photo: Environmental Health News) This story is part of " Sacred Water," EHN's ongoing investigation into Native American struggles -- and successes -- to protect culturally significant water sources on and off the reservation. Tulalip, Washington -- The flat-bottom boat weaves across bends in the broad, mud-colored Qwuloolt Estuary, scaring up squawking blue herons and geese along the sloping banks of muck. Scattered log booms poke out. "A little more than a year ago we were driving cars out here," says Francesca Hillery, a Tulalip Tribes spokeswoman, tucked tightly in a raincoat and baseball cap to protect against the early autumn drizzle blowing in from the Sound as the skiff glides across the water. In August 2015, the U.S. Army ...
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Latest: Feds plan sagebrush survey 21.11.2016 High Country News Most Recent
The data could provide a blueprint for science-based decisions.
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New study finds eco-assets boost property sale price 3.11.2016 Small Business | GreenBiz.com
Assessing property for the endangered species it saves or wetlands it preserves could pay off for some California landowners.
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Our Unique Freshwater Treasures at Risk 2.11.2016 Green on HuffingtonPost.com
Loss of land-based, marine and freshwater populations (WWF) In the world's largest dam removal, the Elwha and the Glines Canyon dams on the Elwha River in the Pacific Northwest tumbled down in 2011 and 2014 respectively. Within a few years, riverine life has bounced back at an unexpected pace. Salmon, which had lost 98% of their populations after the river was dammed, make their way upstream to spawn in the thousands, and otters, beavers and birds are feasting on the renewed riches. Unfortunately, the restoration of the Elwha River is still the exception rather than the rule. On the other side of the Pacific Ocean, thousands of river dolphins thrived in the Yangtze River only 50 years ago. By 1994, fewer than 100 individuals remained, and by 2006, the Yangtze dolphin had become extinct . Pollution, dam building and reckless navigation destroyed a proud branch on the tree of life in the blink of an eye. According to the 2016 Living Planet Report which WWF published last week, freshwater species may be ...
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Saving Mexico's endangered sea turtles will be good for tourism too 27.10.2016 Green on HuffingtonPost.com
Sea turtles have been around for 150 million years, but today's pace of climate change represents an existential challenge. Regis Duvignau/Reuters Adán Echeverría-García , Universidad Autónoma de Baja California Seven of the world's eight sea turtles species nest on the beaches of Mexico - undertaking the serious business of reproduction in 17 of the country's 32 states. That means 53% of Mexican national territory, which is flanked by both the Pacific and Atlantic Oceans, is home to sea turtles. But in a country with one of the world's most extensive shorelines , nesting beaches for turtles are disappearing. Climate change, human development, and the complex interaction between the two are to blame. Across the world, turtle species are already endangered: most populations have seen a drastic decline of more than 80% in under 20 years. Mexico has detected a sharp decrease in the populations of Leatherback turtle (Dermochelys coriacea), and the species is now critically endangered . Similarly, the number ...
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A Billionaire's Fantasy Island on the Hudson: Private Glitter, Public Land 26.10.2016 Truthout - All Articles
In the United States' new gilded age, the super rich are making incursions into land and waterways belonging to the public. One example is a floating island and performance space -- mostly funded by billionaire Barry Diller -- under construction in New York City's Hudson River estuarine sanctuary. Barry Diller, an executive with a knack for finding the hottest media fad, on a terrace overlooking New York City's Central Park on February 14, 1999. (Suzanne DeChillo / New York Times Photo) Stories like this one depend on support from readers like you. If you like what you read at Truthout, please make a donation! One of the joys of moving to Manhattan this past spring has been the Hudson River, which flows past the front door of my apartment building. A minute's walk takes me to a biking and walking path that goes all the way (eleven miles south) to Manhattan's southernmost point, Battery Park. A richly diverse crowd of picnickers, joggers and bikers, African American, Dominican, Asian and European ...
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Sustainable Cities: 3 Ways Cities Can Contribute to a Renewable Energy Future 20.10.2016 Green on HuffingtonPost.com
This week, global policy makers gather in Quito for the Habitat III Conference to reinvigorate the global commitment to the sustainable development of cities. Meeting every 20 years, the Habitat Conference will this year focus on setting a new Urban Agenda. Within this context and for the first time ever, the Conference will also discuss the rapid deployment of renewable energy as a means to achieve a sustainable urban future. This could not be timelier. Dramatic cost declines and technological innovations, present cities with an unprecedented opportunity to transform and decarbonise their energy supply on the basis of a positive economic case - an option that did not exist when the Habitat Conference last convened in 1996. This is great news, considering cities are home to 54% of the global population and generate 70% of global emissions. The opportunity has not gone unnoticed. Cities are realising that renewables offer a feasible means to not only address climate change and reduce air pollution, but ...
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Fostering Sustainable Cities at Habitat III 18.10.2016 Green on HuffingtonPost.com
This week, leaders from more than 190 nations are discussing the future of the world's cities as part of Habitat III , the United Nations Conference on Housing and Sustainable Urban Development in Quito, Ecuador. While conversations will focus on many issues surrounding the rapid urbanization of our planet, none are as important as clearly defining a path that will lead us closer to a sustainable and equitable urban future. And it's a huge challenge. We need to look no further Quito's doorstep to grasp the scope and scale of what's before us. In Latin America and the Caribbean (LAC), more than 80% of people live in urban areas and that is expected to increase to 90% by 2025. These changes will make the LAC the most urbanized developing region in the world. Mexico City, Mexico. In addressing this rapid urbanization, leaders must also focus on societal changes taking place at the same time. Like income inequality. LAC has improved its distribution of wealth in recent years , but is still the most unequal ...
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It's Time To Get Real On The Sustainable Development Goals 20.9.2016 Green on HuffingtonPost.com
Co-authored by Jonas Freist-Held, UN-Habitat Youth Advisor for Europe In Munich, important stakeholders of German and international development gathered to discuss the Agenda 2030. In a nutshell: Germany wants to play a leading role in the implementation of the Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs) - and the youth will play a central role in Germany's Agenda 2030. Thursday morning, Munich, in the plenary of the German Museum. Bono's grinning face appears on the screen. "Guten Morgen!", the front singer of U2 greets, "I am sending you a message from the future. It's 2030. I am happy to tell you: There's no more AIDS; Tuberculosis - kaputt, Malaria kaputt." "Our world in 2030" is the slogan of the Conference on the Future organized by the German Ministry of Economic Cooperation and Development (BMZ). And so it is Bono, also activist and founder of ONE, that entertains the audience with the world he wants. "Germany plays a major role in making my wishes become true" he concludes. Plenary session of the ...
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Fighting Wildlife Crime With Science And Technology 13.9.2016 Green on HuffingtonPost.com
It's hard to imagine a world without majestic wildlife roaming Africa's savannahs. More and more, however, the unimaginable seems to be taking root - and it is unsettling beyond belief. Years ago, I had the privilege of studying wildlife in Kenya as a graduate student. While I was researching Grevy's zebra, I observed other amazing species: elephant, gerenuk, and lion, as they searched for food and water while their land and water sources became more scarce. Habitat loss was one of the biggest threats to wildlife then, and it continues now to be a major threat: as agricultural activity and industry increase, there is less space for wildlife. Photo by Michiel Terellen We have the ability to maintain healthy wildlife populations in their habitats by marrying sustainable development with biodiversity conservation. Almost 20 years ago, I joined the U.S. Agency for International Development (USAID) as an American Association for the Advancement of Science Fellow to learn how to better integrate conservation ...
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Middle schoolers flock together to build a better future for birds 8.9.2016 TreeHugger
A chance to learn scientific and technical skills while helping conserve birds was all the motivation middle-school students needed to participate in a Cornell University afterschool program this summer. The students are now flocking back to school ...
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The World Is Completely Urbanized 1.9.2016 Green on HuffingtonPost.com
In 2008, the United Nations declared that the world passed an unprecedented, but silent, benchmark: for the first time in history, the world is more urban than it is rural. This event had been anticipated for some time and was subject to constant academic reference in support of an "urban age" thesis. This conceptualization has been used in support of "city growth" and to justify the dominance of the city -- simultaneously conceptualized as the urban -- over other geographies and settlement types. In more recent years, this topic has been revisited by critical urban theorist Neil Brenner, Professor of Urban Theory at the Harvard Graduate School of Design. Contrary to popular beliefs, Brenner argues that the world has been completely urbanized and warns of the danger in fetishizing "cityness." Brenner and his colleague, Christian Schmid, have already deconstructed the flawed methodologies deployed by United Nations demographers to quantify the global urban population in an earlier publication . These ...
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Lawsuit Filed to Stop Oil, Gas Exploration in Florida's Big Cypress National Preserve 27.7.2016 Commondreams.org Newswire
Center for Biological Diversity A lawsuit filed today by a coalition of local and national environmental groups would prevent extensive seismic exploration for oil and gas in the Big Cypress National Preserve, which is home to endangered species like the iconic Florida panther and recharges an important source of drinking water for many South Floridians. ​The preserve also serves as a major watershed for Everglades National Park to the ...
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In praise of a wild West 17.6.2016 High Country News Most Recent
A 21st-century vision for Western public lands, including their role in solving challenges like climate change.
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Why our relationship to the public lands must evolve 17.6.2016 High Country News Most Recent
A 21st-century vision for Western lands, including their role in solving challenges like climate change.
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The New Urban Agenda 16.6.2016 Green on HuffingtonPost.com
Co-authored by Natasha Ardiani Panelists of the "Youth and the New Urban Agenda" event. The world is more becoming more urban by the day. The United Nations project that by 2050, 70% of the world population will reside in urban areas, "making urbanization one of the 21st century's most transformative trends" . As the world population is increasingly urbanized, so will many of our challenges across all segments of society. The battle for sustainable development will be won or lost in cities. It is on the sidelines of rapid urbanization--of population, poverty, social inequality, and climate change, among others--that the United Nations is convening the Conference on Housing and Sustainable Urban Development (Habitat III) in Quito, Ecuador, this October. Despite the dilemmas that cities face, they are also the locations for creative experimentation and interventions. The New Urban Agenda, the outcome document of this upcoming conference, is aspiring to become a radical and transformative tool that will ...
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Lawsuit Filed to Protect Wildlife and San Pedro River from Sprawling Development 26.5.2016 Commondreams.org Newswire

A lawsuit against the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers and the U.S. Fish & Wildlife Service was filed today in federal court in Arizona to protect the San Pedro River, and the wildlife and millions of migratory birds that depend on it.

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Stop the Grousing, Protect Our Birds 21.5.2016 Green on HuffingtonPost.com
The greater sage-grouse , an iconic bird of the American West, won a fight last year with the help of ranchers and others to stay off the endangered species list. Meanwhile, the golden-cheeked warbler , a flashy little Texas songbird that weighs less than an ounce is in a battle with powerful developers to stay on the same list. Audubon and bird lovers are supporting both efforts. Why? Because the Endangered Species Act is giving birds a fighting chance for survival in both cases. Just a few months ago, the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service announced the greater sage-grouse would not be added to the endangered species list. Audubon supported that decision because it showed how ranchers, farmers, federal agencies, states, industry and green groups had banded together to create plans that--if implemented well--will help safeguard the threatened habitat of the brown-and-white, chicken-sized bird. We called it a new lease on life for the greater sage-grouse and the entire sagebrush ecosystem: The plant life ...
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Inclusive Cities Critical to the New Urban Agenda #HabitatIII 17.5.2016 Green on HuffingtonPost.com
Photo taken of speakers and participants of the Indigenous Forum session in Toluca. Co-authored by Doug Ragan, Chief of UN-HABITAT Youth and Livelihoods Unit, and Juan Varela,UN-HABITAT Toluca de Lerdo is the capital of the State of Mexico. The City was founded in 1530 and has had a storied ancient, colonial and modern history, with a backdrop of majestic Spanish colonial buildings and the Nevado de Toluca volcano that rises to 4,570 metres at its tallest peak. It is the home of the Otomi people, who are one of the first peoples to live in the Valley of Mexico and Toluca Valley, and who built their communities around the extensive lake system in the area. In modern times the valley is an industrial hub, facing both the positive impacts of urbanization in regards to economic growth, but as well the negative impacts of industrial pollution and the economic inequalities that are far to common globally. Toluca was an excellent host for the Latin American and Caribbean Regional Conference for Habitat III, ...
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