User: flenvcenter Topic: Biodiversity-Independent
Category: Problems :: Habitat Loss
Last updated: Jul 02 2020 01:24 IST RSS 2.0
 
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Here's Another Staggering Cost Of Trump's Border Wall 18.2.2017 Politics on HuffingtonPost.com
Much has been made of the monetary cost of President  Donald Trump’s proposed border wall. Trump himself has cited wildly differing  estimates. Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell (R-Ky.) recently said that the wall would cost $12 billion to $15 billion . Some experts have cited numbers far higher . But the wall’s true cost surpasses even the biggest numbers being discussed. There’s upkeep, of course — hundreds of millions of dollars per year will be needed to maintain the 1,000-mile barrier. There are other expenses, too, some of them intangible and difficult to quantify. The political blowback could be significant. Mexican President Enrique Peña Nieto has already canceled a meeting with Trump over the wall, calling it a sign of disrespect. (Mexico is America’s third-largest trading partner and a close ally.) And the impacts on native tribes , border communities and migrant populations are projected to be immense. Then, there’s the potential damage to the environment , both locally and beyond. ...
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The state of private investment in conservation 23.1.2017 Design & Innovation | GreenBiz.com
A growing community of conservation investors is building the case that shows quantifiable economic benefit by preserving or enhancing clean water, habitat protection or food and fiber provision. All that's needed is more money.
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Bedrooms for burrowing owls 11.1.2017 High Country News Most Recent
In Oregon, the Global Owl Project builds artificial burrows to help owls recover.
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Bedrooms for burrowing owls 11.1.2017 High Country News Most Recent
In Oregon, the Global Owl Project builds artificial burrows to help owls recover.
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Ranch owner builds in the path of pronghorn migration 10.1.2017 High Country News Most Recent
It’s not clear if the new building could interfere with the animal’s long-distance travels.
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House Republicans want to ‘repeal and replace’ the ESA 28.12.2016 High Country News Most Recent
After attempts to chip away at the law bill by bill, Utah Rep. Rob Bishop says he’d rather scrap the Endangered Species Act altogether.
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Indigenous people hold the key to caribou survival 7.12.2016 rabble.ca - News for the rest of us
When government biologists in Canada want to learn where caribou are, they put radio-tracking collars on some animals and monitor their movements. This gives them a rough idea of where herds are and where they travel, but it doesn’t tell them much about a caribou population's history -- travel routes before their habitat was degraded or historical feeding, breeding and calving ...
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Top Scientists: Amazon's Tapajós Dam Complex "a Crisis in the Making" 4.12.2016 Truthout - All Articles
The Tapajós River, Brazil. More than 40 dams would turn this free-flowing river and its tributaries into a vast industrial waterway threatening the Tapajós Basin's ecosystems, wildlife, people and even the regional and global climate. (Photo: International Rivers on Flickr, licensed under an Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike 2.0 Generic (CC BY-NC-SA 2.0) license) Brazil is forging ahead with plans to build a vast hydropower dam complex in the heart of the Amazon that would convert the now remote and wild Tapajós river system into a tamed industrial waterway for the purpose of transporting soybeans -- development that scientists and NGOs say will threaten Amazonian biodiversity , ecosystems, traditional livelihoods, indigenous cultures, and the global climate. A total of 42 large dams are planned or under construction in the Tapajós Basin, a biologically and culturally rich region, and one of eight areas of Amazonian biological endemism . Fed by tributaries in the states of Mato Grosso, Rondônia and ...
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Canada Designates Its Second And Largest Arctic Marine Protected Area 2.12.2016 Green on HuffingtonPost.com
A new marine protected area in the Canadian Arctic protects species and habitats, prevents oil and gas development and safeguards economic activities for Inuvialuit. A block of the Beaufort Sea off the Parry Peninsula in the Amundsen Gulf has been set aside to create Canada’s largest Arctic marine protected area (MPA), Anguniaqvia niqiqyuam. Slightly smaller than the size of Luxembourg, it is a tiny fraction of the Arctic Ocean, yet it is being celebrated by environmental organizations and Inuvialuit leaders as a way to protect the region’s ecological resources while providing food security and economic development opportunities for those who live there. “This MPA clearly recognizes human use and the importance of the region to the community,” said Chris Debicki, project director for Oceans North Canada, a campaign led by the Pew Charitable Trusts. According to the Government of Canada, it is the first time the creation of an MPA with conservation objectives has been guided by traditional knowledge. ...
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This $100 billion marketplace benefits business and landowners 1.12.2016 Energy & Climate | Greenbiz.com
It's changing the face of real estate, and caters to rural America, business and industry. Here's how Allegheny Power Company unearthed hidden value.
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Pacific Northwest Tribes Fight to Protect the Centerpiece of Their Culture 24.11.2016 Truthout.com
The Tulalip are one of dozens of Pacific Northwest tribes -- both in Washington State and British Columbia -- intertwined by their reliance on and reverence for salmon. This cultural icon is under assault from development, pavement, pollution, farming and a changing climate. (Photo: Environmental Health News) This story is part of " Sacred Water," EHN's ongoing investigation into Native American struggles -- and successes -- to protect culturally significant water sources on and off the reservation. Tulalip, Washington -- The flat-bottom boat weaves across bends in the broad, mud-colored Qwuloolt Estuary, scaring up squawking blue herons and geese along the sloping banks of muck. Scattered log booms poke out. "A little more than a year ago we were driving cars out here," says Francesca Hillery, a Tulalip Tribes spokeswoman, tucked tightly in a raincoat and baseball cap to protect against the early autumn drizzle blowing in from the Sound as the skiff glides across the water. In August 2015, the U.S. Army ...
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Latest: Feds plan sagebrush survey 21.11.2016 High Country News Most Recent
The data could provide a blueprint for science-based decisions.
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New study finds eco-assets boost property sale price 3.11.2016 Small Business | GreenBiz.com
Assessing property for the endangered species it saves or wetlands it preserves could pay off for some California landowners.
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Our Unique Freshwater Treasures at Risk 2.11.2016 Green on HuffingtonPost.com
Loss of land-based, marine and freshwater populations (WWF) In the world's largest dam removal, the Elwha and the Glines Canyon dams on the Elwha River in the Pacific Northwest tumbled down in 2011 and 2014 respectively. Within a few years, riverine life has bounced back at an unexpected pace. Salmon, which had lost 98% of their populations after the river was dammed, make their way upstream to spawn in the thousands, and otters, beavers and birds are feasting on the renewed riches. Unfortunately, the restoration of the Elwha River is still the exception rather than the rule. On the other side of the Pacific Ocean, thousands of river dolphins thrived in the Yangtze River only 50 years ago. By 1994, fewer than 100 individuals remained, and by 2006, the Yangtze dolphin had become extinct . Pollution, dam building and reckless navigation destroyed a proud branch on the tree of life in the blink of an eye. According to the 2016 Living Planet Report which WWF published last week, freshwater species may be ...
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Saving Mexico's endangered sea turtles will be good for tourism too 27.10.2016 Green on HuffingtonPost.com
Sea turtles have been around for 150 million years, but today's pace of climate change represents an existential challenge. Regis Duvignau/Reuters Adán Echeverría-García , Universidad Autónoma de Baja California Seven of the world's eight sea turtles species nest on the beaches of Mexico - undertaking the serious business of reproduction in 17 of the country's 32 states. That means 53% of Mexican national territory, which is flanked by both the Pacific and Atlantic Oceans, is home to sea turtles. But in a country with one of the world's most extensive shorelines , nesting beaches for turtles are disappearing. Climate change, human development, and the complex interaction between the two are to blame. Across the world, turtle species are already endangered: most populations have seen a drastic decline of more than 80% in under 20 years. Mexico has detected a sharp decrease in the populations of Leatherback turtle (Dermochelys coriacea), and the species is now critically endangered . Similarly, the number ...
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A Billionaire's Fantasy Island on the Hudson: Private Glitter, Public Land 26.10.2016 Truthout - All Articles
In the United States' new gilded age, the super rich are making incursions into land and waterways belonging to the public. One example is a floating island and performance space -- mostly funded by billionaire Barry Diller -- under construction in New York City's Hudson River estuarine sanctuary. Barry Diller, an executive with a knack for finding the hottest media fad, on a terrace overlooking New York City's Central Park on February 14, 1999. (Suzanne DeChillo / New York Times Photo) Stories like this one depend on support from readers like you. If you like what you read at Truthout, please make a donation! One of the joys of moving to Manhattan this past spring has been the Hudson River, which flows past the front door of my apartment building. A minute's walk takes me to a biking and walking path that goes all the way (eleven miles south) to Manhattan's southernmost point, Battery Park. A richly diverse crowd of picnickers, joggers and bikers, African American, Dominican, Asian and European ...
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Sustainable Cities: 3 Ways Cities Can Contribute to a Renewable Energy Future 20.10.2016 Green on HuffingtonPost.com
This week, global policy makers gather in Quito for the Habitat III Conference to reinvigorate the global commitment to the sustainable development of cities. Meeting every 20 years, the Habitat Conference will this year focus on setting a new Urban Agenda. Within this context and for the first time ever, the Conference will also discuss the rapid deployment of renewable energy as a means to achieve a sustainable urban future. This could not be timelier. Dramatic cost declines and technological innovations, present cities with an unprecedented opportunity to transform and decarbonise their energy supply on the basis of a positive economic case - an option that did not exist when the Habitat Conference last convened in 1996. This is great news, considering cities are home to 54% of the global population and generate 70% of global emissions. The opportunity has not gone unnoticed. Cities are realising that renewables offer a feasible means to not only address climate change and reduce air pollution, but ...
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Fostering Sustainable Cities at Habitat III 18.10.2016 Green on HuffingtonPost.com
This week, leaders from more than 190 nations are discussing the future of the world's cities as part of Habitat III , the United Nations Conference on Housing and Sustainable Urban Development in Quito, Ecuador. While conversations will focus on many issues surrounding the rapid urbanization of our planet, none are as important as clearly defining a path that will lead us closer to a sustainable and equitable urban future. And it's a huge challenge. We need to look no further Quito's doorstep to grasp the scope and scale of what's before us. In Latin America and the Caribbean (LAC), more than 80% of people live in urban areas and that is expected to increase to 90% by 2025. These changes will make the LAC the most urbanized developing region in the world. Mexico City, Mexico. In addressing this rapid urbanization, leaders must also focus on societal changes taking place at the same time. Like income inequality. LAC has improved its distribution of wealth in recent years , but is still the most unequal ...
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It's Time To Get Real On The Sustainable Development Goals 20.9.2016 Green on HuffingtonPost.com
Co-authored by Jonas Freist-Held, UN-Habitat Youth Advisor for Europe In Munich, important stakeholders of German and international development gathered to discuss the Agenda 2030. In a nutshell: Germany wants to play a leading role in the implementation of the Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs) - and the youth will play a central role in Germany's Agenda 2030. Thursday morning, Munich, in the plenary of the German Museum. Bono's grinning face appears on the screen. "Guten Morgen!", the front singer of U2 greets, "I am sending you a message from the future. It's 2030. I am happy to tell you: There's no more AIDS; Tuberculosis - kaputt, Malaria kaputt." "Our world in 2030" is the slogan of the Conference on the Future organized by the German Ministry of Economic Cooperation and Development (BMZ). And so it is Bono, also activist and founder of ONE, that entertains the audience with the world he wants. "Germany plays a major role in making my wishes become true" he concludes. Plenary session of the ...
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Fighting Wildlife Crime With Science And Technology 13.9.2016 Green on HuffingtonPost.com
It's hard to imagine a world without majestic wildlife roaming Africa's savannahs. More and more, however, the unimaginable seems to be taking root - and it is unsettling beyond belief. Years ago, I had the privilege of studying wildlife in Kenya as a graduate student. While I was researching Grevy's zebra, I observed other amazing species: elephant, gerenuk, and lion, as they searched for food and water while their land and water sources became more scarce. Habitat loss was one of the biggest threats to wildlife then, and it continues now to be a major threat: as agricultural activity and industry increase, there is less space for wildlife. Photo by Michiel Terellen We have the ability to maintain healthy wildlife populations in their habitats by marrying sustainable development with biodiversity conservation. Almost 20 years ago, I joined the U.S. Agency for International Development (USAID) as an American Association for the Advancement of Science Fellow to learn how to better integrate conservation ...
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