User: flenvcenter Topic: Biodiversity-Independent
Category: Problems :: Species Loss
Last updated: Jan 10 2018 02:37 IST RSS 2.0
 
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The Endangered Species Act itself could go extinct 9.1.2018 Writers on the Range
Congress and the Trump administration threaten an act vital to wildlife and habitat.
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The birds we've lost: 10 incredible avian species that are gone forever 3.1.2018 TreeHugger
From the passenger pigeon to the laughing owl, here is but a small sampling of the mighty birds that are now extinct.
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Too late for the extinct or critically-endangered on Earth. 8.12.2017 The Earth Times Online Newspaper - Health News
IUCN must be listened to, unless you are one of those who disregards any science on the grounds that it could be fake. Acting is the opposite to disinterest, but what can we do to counter the actions of great industries or the governments of large populations of people? The answer seems bland, but it proves individuals are always important.
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Study Finds Variation Within Species is a Critical Aspect of Biodiversity 5.12.2017 Environmental News Network
Concerns about biodiversity tend to focus on the loss of species from ecosystems, but a new study suggests that the loss of variation within species can also have important ecological consequences.
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Threatened plants on state lands have few protections 27.11.2017 Current Issue
Politics, land ownership and imperiled plants collide in New Mexico.
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Over 15,000 Scientists Just Issued a "Second Notice" to Humanity. Can We Listen Now? 14.11.2017 Truthout - All Articles
Yikes. Over 15,000 scientists hailing from more than 180 countries just issued a dire  warning  to humanity: "Time is running out" to stop business as usual, as threats from rising greenhouse gases to biodiversity loss are pushing the biosphere to the brink. The new warning was published Monday in the international journal  BioScience , and marks an update to the "World Scientists' Warning to Humanity" issued by nearly 1,700 leading scientists 25 years ago. The 1992 plea, which said Earth was on track to be "irretrievably mutilated" baring "fundamental change," however, was largely unheeded. "Some people might be tempted to dismiss this evidence and think we are just being alarmist," said William Ripple, distinguished professor in the College of Forestry at Oregon State University, and lead author of the new warning. "Scientists are in the business of analyzing data and looking at the long-term consequences. Those who signed this second warning aren't just raising a false alarm. They are acknowledging ...
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15,000 Scientists in 184 Countries Warn About Negative Global Environmental Trends 13.11.2017 Environmental News Network
Human well-being will be severely jeopardized by negative trends in some types of environmental harm, such as a changing climate, deforestation, loss of access to fresh water, species extinctions and human population growth, scientists warn in today’s issue of BioScience, an international journal.
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Help track mosquitoes with your smartphone 7.11.2017 TreeHugger
Calling all citizen scientists! Stanford needs your help monitoring the disease-spreading insects.
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Tropical beetles face extinction threat 18.10.2017 Environmental News Network
Climate change is putting many tropical high altitude beetles at risk of extinction, warn an international team of scientists.
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Bold effort underway to save the vaquita porpoise from extinction 12.10.2017 TreeHugger
With fewer than 30 vaquitas left in the wild, the 'panda of the sea' is the most endangered marine mammal in the world. Now a crazy plan might just save them.
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World's largest trees given new hope for preservation 12.10.2017 Planet Ark News
A new project will decode genetic make-up of world's largest trees in order to better understand and protect them.
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19 Western species won’t receive federal protections 9.10.2017 High Country News Most Recent
The animals range from minuscule Nevada mollusks to dwindling Pacific walruses.
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The fight to save vaquitas from extinction 23.9.2017 High Country News Most Recent
Through a tangle of corruption and overfishing, a marine species hangs in the balance.
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Once-Abundant Ash Tree and Antelope Species Face Extinction – IUCN Red List 14.9.2017 Green Technology and Environmental Science News - ENN
North America’s most widespread and valuable ash tree species are on the brink of extinction due to an invasive beetle decimating their populations, while the loss of wilderness areas and poaching are contributing to the declining numbers of five African antelope species, according to the latest update of The IUCN Red List of Threatened Species™
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A race against time: Saving the North Atlantic right whale 5.9.2017 Sustainable Ecosystems and Community News - ENN
In June 2017, three critically endangered North Atlantic right whale carcasses were spotted floating in the Gulf of St. Lawrence. In the weeks that followed the number of dead right whales rose to 10, while three more were found entangled alive in fishing gear. (The total number of deaths may be as high as 12.)For a species with approximately 500 surviving animals in the world, this was a crisis — an unprecedented die-off signalling a troubled outlook for the species.
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Diverse Landscapes Are More Productive and Adapt better to Climate Change 5.9.2017 Environmental News Network
The dramatic, worldwide loss of biodiversity is one of today's greatest environmental problems. The loss of species diversity affects important ecosystems on which humans depend. Previous research predominantly addressed short-term effects of biodiversity in small experimental plots planted with few randomly selected plant species. These studies have shown that species-poor plant assemblages function less well and produce less biomass than species rich systems.
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Bahamian Songbirds Disappeared During Last Glacial-Interglacial Transition 30.8.2017 Environmental News Network
Two species of songbirds that once made a home in the Bahamas likely became extinct on the islands because of rising sea levels and a warmer, wetter climate, according to a new study by researchers at the University of California, Riverside and the University of Florida, Gainesville. The study, which was published today in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, presents a historical view of how climate change and the resulting habitat loss can affect Earth’s biodiversity.
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Preserving one of world's most endangered primate species 15.8.2017 Environmental News Network
All day long, for five straight months, Sheila Holmes slipped through the Madagascar rainforest, 16,000 kilometres away from her Calgary university classes, eyes and feet following black-and-white ruffed lemurs as they flew through the trees.Holmes was not your average tourist on this Indian Ocean island off the eastern coast of Africa. Instead, this University of Calgary student, who is now working on her anthropology doctorate, became a crucial part of what is the longest continuous monitoring program of one of the most endangered primate species in the world.
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Financial Incentives Could Conserve Tropical Forest Diversity 2.8.2017 Green Technology and Environmental Science News - ENN
The past few decades have seen the rise of global incentive programs offering payments to landowners to help reduce tropical deforestation. Until now, assessments of these programs have largely overlooked decreases in forest diversity. In what might be a first of its kind study, University of Missouri researchers have integrated forest imaging with field-level inventories and landowner surveys to assess the impact of conservation payments in Ecuador’s Amazon Basin forests. They found that conservation payment programs are making a difference in the diversity of tree species in protected spaces. Further, the species being protected are twice as likely to be of commercial timber value and at risk of extinction.
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Historical wildlife trends reliable for predicting species at risk 2.8.2017 Environmental News Network
Scientists at the University of York have shown that using historical wildlife data provides a more accurate measure of how vulnerable certain species might be to extinction from climate change.Some of the methods used to predict at risk species are trend-based – an indicator of what happens gradually over time – while others are trait based, which uses signs of climate change in the current environment.
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