User: flenvcenter Topic: Biodiversity-Independent
Category: Specific Organisms :: Fungi
Last updated: Oct 09 2014 05:31 IST RSS 2.0
 
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Loon, Interrupted: Chicks Dying, Social Chaos; Is Their Comeback Unraveling? 8.10.2014 Truthout - All Articles
A common loon. (Photo: Matthew / Flickr ) Holderness, New Hampshire - Tiffany Grade sweeps her binoculars over tangled tree roots at water’s edge. She spots a black and white checkerboard of feathers in a lichen-covered crease in the shoreline – a loon sitting on a nest. Just offshore, a second loon glides past, dives, then disappears. Also see: Heavy Metal Songs: Contaminated Songbirds Sing the Wrong Tunes To the untrained eye, it’s an idyllic summer scene on Squam Lake. But to a loon biologist like Grade, it’s trouble. “Do you see the way he stretches his neck up?” Grade says, pointing to the diving bird. “He knows he’s some place he shouldn’t be.” The male intruder is biding his time until the nesting loon leaves. This vying for territory imperils the unhatched chick: Its parents can be killed or distracted, leaving the egg undefended or the chick unfed. And if one parent is ousted, the intruder kills the chick. At Squam Lake, it’s social chaos. Chicks are dying. Eggs aren’t hatching. It’s a scenario ...
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Loon, Interrupted: Chicks Dying, Social Chaos. Is Their Comeback Unraveling? 8.10.2014 Truthout.com
A common loon. (Photo: Matthew / Flickr ) Holderness, New Hampshire - Tiffany Grade sweeps her binoculars over tangled tree roots at water’s edge. She spots a black and white checkerboard of feathers in a lichen-covered crease in the shoreline – a loon sitting on a nest. Just offshore, a second loon glides past, dives, then disappears. Also see: Heavy Metal Songs: Contaminated Songbirds Sing the Wrong Tunes To the untrained eye, it’s an idyllic summer scene on Squam Lake. But to a loon biologist like Grade, it’s trouble. “Do you see the way he stretches his neck up?” Grade says, pointing to the diving bird. “He knows he’s some place he shouldn’t be.” The male intruder is biding his time until the nesting loon leaves. This vying for territory imperils the unhatched chick: Its parents can be killed or distracted, leaving the egg undefended or the chick unfed. And if one parent is ousted, the intruder kills the chick. At Squam Lake, it’s social chaos. Chicks are dying. Eggs aren’t hatching. It’s a scenario ...
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Biological Collections Are Vital to Preserving Species in the Face of Climate Change 29.9.2014 Green on HuffingtonPost.com
Among the many different resources that scientists will use to try to forestall some of the effects of climate change, the nation's treasure trove of preserved plants, animals, and microscopic organisms is undoubtedly one of the least known to most people. But these biological collections represent a very powerful tool for understanding how climate change is likely to affect life on Earth. Our nation has a rich heritage in such collections, which are held at about 1,000 scientific research institutions such as universities, natural history museums, and botanical gardens. What are in these collections? They consist of such things as the skeletons and skins of mammals, birds and reptiles; fossils, tissue samples, and fish and spiders preserved in fluid; dried plants and fungi glued to stiff paper or stored in boxes; and tiny organisms on microscope slides. Although no one knows exactly, we estimate that there are approximately one billion preserved specimens in the U.S. that have been gathered by ...
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Four Ways Industrial Ag Is Destroying the Soil - and Your Health 14.9.2014 Truthout.com
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Deep Sea 'Mushrooms' Defy Classification In The Tree Of Life 5.9.2014 Green on HuffingtonPost.com
This is Dendrogramma enigmatica. And as its name suggests, it’s quite the enigma. In fact, the tiny, mushroom-shaped organism is so mysterious that it seems to defy just about everything we know about animals. It doesn't fit into any of the known categories in the animal kingdom, scientists say, and as of now, its links to other animal groups remain hazy. Recently, D. enigmatica was thrown into the spotlight when Jean Just, a zoologist at the Natural History Museum of Denmark in Copenhagen, discovered it among invertebrate specimens he had collected at depths of 400 and 1,000 meters in the Tasman Sea in the 1980s. According to a new study co-authored by Just and published Wednesday in the journal PLOS ONE , more than a dozen of the specimens were found to defy classification in the tree of life. They were unique. "Finding something like this is extremely rare, it's maybe only happened about four times in the last 100 years ," study co-author Jorgen Olesen, an associate professor at the University of ...
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Don’t lose your lid! (the green roof argument) 2.9.2014 The Earth Times Online Newspaper - Health News
Life is changing. Now we can have a garden on our roof, but the wildlife and energy-transforming possibilities are really building up. I doubt if you’ll like some of our ideas here, but there may be some way you can imagine a green roof being of benefit and fitting in to your local landscape.
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What Are Pesticides, and Why Do We Use Them on the Farm? 12.8.2014 Green on HuffingtonPost.com
When people talk about using chemicals on the farm, oftentimes they use the word "pesticides." To people outside agriculture, pesticides tends to be the catch-all category for any and all chemical compound we spray on our crops. And honestly, that is far from the truth. We don't have a jug labeled "pesticides" that goes on anything and everything. In agriculture we call any sort of chemical we use on the farm "crop-protection products." The truth about the crop-protection products we use on the farm is that we use specific chemicals labeled for very specific uses and at very specific amounts. I've written before that as farmers we have a choice in what seed to select. We also have a choice when it comes to what we put on our crops. It varies depending on crop, soil, crop rotation, current condition of the crop, pests, and moisture. The choices we make regarding what to spray are careful, calculated, and measured out. It is not something we do haphazardly or thoughtlessly like many websites will ...
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Moose Drool Detoxifies Fungus 25.7.2014 Wildlife and Habitat Conservation News - ENN
Saliva contains important substances helps us digest food. It also plays a part in keeping our mouths clean and healthy. Another newly discovered use? Making toxic plants less toxic. Not for us of course, but according to new research, moose and reindeer saliva can help can slow the growth of a toxic grass fungus, and subsequently make it less toxic for them, allowing the animals to graze on the grass without negative effects.
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Hints Of Hope Emerge In Deadly American Bat Plague 13.7.2014 Green on HuffingtonPost.com
This story originally appeared on Mother Nature Network. About 6 million American bats have died from white-nose syndrome since its mysterious 2006 debut, and the disease's rapid spread still threatens the survival of some species. But if scientists are right about a few little brown bats in the U.S. Northeast, there may finally be a light at the end of the tunnel. A new study from Vermont suggests up to 96 percent of little brown bats survived last winter's hibernation in Aeolus Cave, a major bat hangout that has been riddled with white-nose syndrome (WNS) since 2008. First reported by the Associated Press, this is at least the third known case of WNS seemingly losing its grip on a bat colony. Two caves in New York have shown similar hints of recovery, and biologists in Vermont also recently found the rate of that state's bat die-off may be slowing down . The Aeolus Cave researchers radio-tagged 442 little brown bats before hibernation began last fall, then installed equipment to record how many tagged ...
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Fungi Clean Contaminated Soil 22.5.2014 Environmental News Network
A new system for cleaning soils contaminated with industrial toxins harnesses the power of White rot - a common fungus that decays fallen wood in forests. Research in Finland shows it can also destroy dioxins and poly-aromatic hydrocarbons.
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White-Nose Syndrome, Fatal Fungal Disease, Reaches Bats In Wisconsin and Michigan 11.4.2014 Green on HuffingtonPost.com
By Brendan O'Brien April 10 (Reuters) - Bats in Wisconsin and Michigan have been infected with a disease that has killed millions of the mosquito-eating mammals elsewhere in the U.S. and could have a detrimental impact on farming and forestry, wildlife officials said on Thursday. White-nose syndrome appeared in five small brown bats collected in February and March in northern Michigan during routine surveillance, the state's Department of Natural Resources said in a statement. "Even though we've known this disease was coming, it is a disappointing day," said Dan O'Brien, a department wildlife veterinarian. Two bats in Wisconsin tested positive for the fungal disease after they were collected in a mine during winter surveillance in Grant County, near the Illinois border, where the disease was confirmed in 2012. White-nose syndrome is mainly spread from bat to bat, but it is also possible for humans to transport spores via clothing and gear from fungus contaminated sites such as caves and ...
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Baby Porcupine Rescued From Dead Mother's Womb After Car Accident (VIDEO) 30.3.2014 Green on HuffingtonPost.com
A Maine man went to look for mushrooms, but instead, came home with something much cuter and charismatic.

Jared Buzzell was driving with a friend when he saw a car hit a porcupine ahead of him. He then decided to approach the critter and search for its bezoar -- a stone-like material that some think has medicinal value. Instead of the bezoar, he found an adorable baby porcupine that he is now rearing and rehabilitating at his house.

Until the Buzzells give him away to a licensed wildlife rehabilitator, they are enjoying the extra guest and feeding it every few hours with a baby doll bottle. Could this lucky little porcupine get any cuter!?
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Thought-to-be-Extinct Harlequin Frog Rediscovered in Costa Rica 19.3.2014 Environmental News Network
The critically endangered harlequin frog (Atelopus varius), believed to be extinct in Costa Rica, has been rediscovered in the Talamanca Mountains of southern Costa Rica by an international team of researchers. The harlequin frog was a relatively common species in areas of Costa Rica and Panama until 1988, when populations declined rapidly, primarily as a result of the invasive, infectious chytrid fungus (implicated in extinctions of hundreds of amphibian species globally). The increasingly rare harlequin was believed extirpated from Costa Rica until 2004, when two individual harlequin frogs were spotted in a remote area near Manuel Antonio National Park in the western region of the country. Unfortunately, no harlequin frogs have been seen at this location since then.
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Oregon moves to help disappearing honeybees 15.3.2014 High Country News Most Recent
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Compostable tower made of fungi & agricultural waste to rise in NYC 19.2.2014 TreeHugger
This winning competition entry for a temporary installation will feature biologically cultivated bricks made with cornstalks and mushroom mycelium.
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Adorable Nepalese Red Panda Cubs Born At Auckland Zoo (VIDEO) 5.2.2014 Green on HuffingtonPost.com
Adorable Nepalese Red Panda Cubs Born At Auckland Zoo (VIDEO)
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Panama’s sloths harbor potential drugs 30.1.2014 Environmental News Network
Sloths may be slow, apparently boring animals, but their hair is fast becoming an intriguing avenue for scientists seeking new drugs, including antibiotics and cancer-fighting compounds. A paper published in PLOS One this month (15 January) shows that sloth hair harbors a rich diversity of fungi whose extracts may contain a treasure trove of compounds active against bacteria, breast cancer cells and the parasites that cause malaria and Chagas’ disease.
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Climate Change This Week: Faster Heating, A Stitch in Time, and More! 24.1.2014 Green on HuffingtonPost.com
To find out how, check out Pear Energy and Ethical Electricity . * * Deforestation in Malaysian Borneo. A recent analysis found that Malaysia, which is a part of the TPP, has the world's highest deforestation rate between 2000-2012. Photo by: Rhett A. Butler of Mongabay.com ☼☼☼ On the Bright Side ☼☼☼ ___________ People of the First Nations are leading the way in opposing Canadian Tar Sands, and are taking their fight to the courts. Credit John Isaac (United Nations) via www.firstnations.eu ☼☼☼ BRIGHT IDEAS ☼☼☼ Ceres, an award-winning organization devoted to mobilizing investor and business leadership to build a thriving, sustainable global economy, has produced a report outlining how to do so; it, or its executive summary, can be downloaded here For more news on green technology, click here . * * ☼☼☼ BRIGHT DEVELOPMENTS ☼☼☼ source mjmonty via RTCC.org ☼☼☼ BRIGHT SIDE, STATE SIDE ☼☼☼ Google's California ...
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5 green causes for holiday gift donations 22.11.2013 TreeHugger
Gifts that don't involve "stuff" are all the rage these days. What could be a better present than a greener, fairer future?
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Getting Dirty Is Good for Your Immune System 6.11.2013 Commondreams.org Views
David Suzuki Go outside in nature and get dirty. It's healthy for you. (Photo: Shutterstock) For much of human history we lived close to the natural world. As civilization evolved we became increasingly urbanized, and most of us now live in cities. As we"ve moved away from nature, we"ve seen a decline in other forms of life. Biodiversity is disappearing. The current rate of loss is perhaps as high as 10,000 times the natural rate. read ...
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