User: flenvcenter Topic: Biodiversity-Independent
Category: Specific Organisms :: Fungi
Last updated: Jul 08 2016 23:49 IST RSS 2.0
 
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Frogs that can take the heat expected to fare better in a changing world 8.7.2016 Environmental News Network
Amphibians that tolerate higher temperatures are likely to fare better in a world affected by climate change, disease and habitat loss, according to two recent studies from the University of California, Davis.Frogs are disappearing globally, and the studies examine why some survive while others perish. The studies reveal that thermal tolerance -- the ability to withstand higher temperatures -- may be a key trait in predicting amphibian declines.HEAT-TOLERANT FROGS ESCAPE DEADLY FUNGUSOne of the world's deadliest wildlife pandemics is caused by a fungus, Batrachochytrium dendrobatidis, or Bd. The fungus is linked to several amphibian extinctions and global declines.
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Termites, Mushrooms and Cheetahs 18.3.2016 Green on HuffingtonPost.com
It's Termite Awareness Week. The National Pest Management Association (NPMA) uses this week, March 15-March 21, to educate people in the U.S. about termite prevention. Namibia may be known as "The Cheetah Capital of the World," but we also have our share of termites, too. Like their American counterparts, termites here can be destructive to human structures and strip farmlands of life-supporting vegetation. So what does this have to do with cheetah conservation? From the African farmer's perspective, cheetahs and termites have much in common. Historically both have been perceived as worthless vermin, pests that threaten human livelihoods. Species perceived to interfere with human livelihoods often become targets for mass eradication. During the 1970s and 1980s approximately 10,000 cheetah were removed from Namibia by farmers for posing predation threats to livestock. And for many years now, African farmers have been trying to rid the landscape of termites, because they perceive them to compete with ...
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Ignored Too Long: Kids' Health & The Crumbling Schoolhouse 3.3.2016 Green on HuffingtonPost.com
Co-Author Nsedu Obot-Witherspoon, MPH, Executive Director, Children's Environmental Health Network It seems like school children trying to learn in Detroit and Flint, MI can't catch a break, nor can they in Hoosick Falls, NY , and hundreds of other communities. We read daily about polluted drinking water ; then, about schools with black mold, failing heating systems, roaches and rats where children, by law , must spend their days. And behave. And take tests. We also know that it's unfair to single out schools in Detroit , a city that has come to represent the post-industrial collapse of manufacturing centers. Detroit simply is not the only city with mushrooms growing out of damp school building walls. In New York, the state education department cut staff responsible for addressing school facilities by half and has failed to improve school design standards . California and other states have suspended or slashed school construction funds . We also hear from parents and teachers about these conditions. For ...
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The Fight To Save Panama's 'Symbol Of Hope' From Extinction 10.2.2016 Green on HuffingtonPost.com
I've lived in Panama for less than a month, and I've already become quite familiar with its celebrated golden frog. The little yellow guy is all over t-shirts and postcards and souvenirs. He's stamped on lottery tickets and grinning above the entrance to the aptly-named "La Rana Dorada" restaurant in downtown Panama City. Archaeologists have even discovered ancient gold relics sculpted in the shape of tiny amphibians. I asked both locals and scientists what the frog means to them; why you see its iconic face everywhere. "We're taught in school that it's a symbol Panama's biodiversity," journalist and entrepreneur Alfonso Grimaldo said. "It's a natural light; a reminder that the earth is sacred," said agriculture student Ericka Quiroz. "They were everywhere when we were kids; we used to catch them from the drain pipes," designer Ani Dillon recalled. Known for its striking day-glo coloring and the adorable waving motion it makes with its webbed hands, the golden frog represented hope and resilience and the ...
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U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service Restricts Salamander Imports to Protect Native Species From Deadly Disease 13.1.2016 Commondreams.org Newswire
Center for Biological Diversity In response to a petition from the Center for Biological Diversity and Save The Frogs, the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service today announced a temporary rule restricting the importation of salamanders for the pet trade. The restriction is designed to prevent introduction of the deadly fungus Batrachochytrium salamandrivorans (Bsal) into the United ...
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Your Favorite Banana Is Facing Extinction As Deadly Fungus Spreads 2.12.2015 Green on HuffingtonPost.com
One of the world’s most popular fruits may go extinct -- yet again. Before 1960, your grandparents and great-grandparents were eating better bananas. Called Gros Michel, they were tastier, bigger and more resilient than the bananas found in supermarkets worldwide today. “ It has a more robust taste ,” said Dan Koeppel, author of “Banana: The Fate of the Fruit That Changed the World” of the yummier yellow fruit. “It’s more creamy.” So why can’t we too enjoy the robust creaminess of the Gros Michel, once the world's export banana? Turns out, the species went virtually extinct in the 1960s thanks to an invasive and incurable fungus that wiped out most Gros Michel plantations around the world. That explains how the Cavendish -- the blander banana we now eat -- grew in prominence. It tasted worse and was less hardy than the Gros Michel, but the species seemed able to resist the fungal invasion, known as “Panama disease.” That is, it was able to. Now, a newer, more virulent strain of Panama disease is wreaking ...
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Bat-killing Fungus Reaches Nebraska 13.11.2015 Commondreams.org Newswire
Center for Biological Diversity State and federal wildlife officials announced today that a bat-killing fungus that has swept across the eastern United States and Canada over the past eight years, killing millions of bats, has been confirmed by scientists in eastern Nebraska. Samples taken from bats in a mine in Cass County, Neb. at the end of last winter tested positive for the fungus that causes white-nose syndrome; the bat species found with the fungus were northern long-eared bats, tricolored bats and big brown ...
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Under the Mushroom Cloud—Nagasaki after Nuclear War 6.8.2015 Commondreams.org Views
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How microbes are cleaning up the BP oil spill 12.7.2015 Environmental News Network
Microbes, primarily bacteria and fungi, get a bad rap in today’s society. However they’ve long played an incredible role within the Earth’s ecosystem. And one of the most important places microbes are transforming the earth is in the Gulf of Mexico, where a number of strains are busy munching up the oil still left over from the Deepwater Horizon oil spill disaster.The Deepwater Horizon oil spill, which took place just over five years ago caused a massive ecological disaster in and around the Gulf of Mexico. This is partially because the spill took so long to quell, with oil companies scrambling (and often failing) to stem the flow of oil from the seabed.
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Fungus' Unchecked Advance Threatens Hibernating Bats Across West 20.5.2015 Commondreams.org Newswire
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Petition Seeks Emergency Moratorium on Imports of Salamanders for Pet Trade 14.5.2015 Commondreams.org Newswire
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Meatless Monday: Small Steps, Big Changes -- Gene Baur and 'Living the Farm Sanctuary Life' 27.4.2015 Green on HuffingtonPost.com
There was no plan, there was only "concern about animals and nature," says Gene Baur. "I wanted to do something positive it the world." He did. In 1986, he co-founded Farm Sanctuary . Now almost 30 years later, Farm Sanctuary is America's premier farm animal protection organization, a safe haven for factory farm animals abused and/or left for dead, and a transformative place for people, too. Farm Sanctuary offers education, outreach and the opportunity to rediscover our primal bond with animals. "Farm animals are not that different from cats and dogs," says Baur. "They have feelings, relationships, respect and compassion." Their open affection remind of us our own humanity. And our responsibility. "We don't share our lives with animals just because we want to. We do it because we need them," Baur writes in Living the Farm Sanctuary Life. Co-written with Gene Stone, Baur's new book provides a little Farm Sanctuary wherever you are, with adorable farm animal photos, pleasing plant-based recipes from fab ...
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Bat Disease Epidemic Still Expanding Throughout North America 24.4.2015 Green on HuffingtonPost.com
For the past decade, an epidemic called White-Nose Syndrome has had severe impacts on bat populations throughout North America. The fungus, Pseudogymnoascus destructans, feeds on soft tissues of bats such as their wings and noses. Little Brown Bat with white-nose syndrome Credit: Jonathan Mays, Wildlife Biologist, Maine Department of Inland Fisheries and Wildlife White Nose Syndrome was first discovered in Haile's Cave at John Boyd Thacher State Park by the New York State Department of Environmental Conservation during a routine bat survey in March 2007. The earliest evidence of the disease in North America can be seen in photographs taken by a cave hydrologist at Howe Caverns in Schoharie County, New York in the winter of 2006. New York State DEC states that since March 2007 "we discovered the disease in every hibernation site in New York in which we have looked for it." The U.S. Fish & Wildlife estimates a death toll between 5-7 million bats based on the most recent survey conducted in 2012 . Impacts ...
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Earth Day 2015: Regenerating the Soil and Reversing Global Warming 23.4.2015 Truthout.com
"The elimination of fossil fuels for all but the most limited and essential purposes is necessary but not sufficient to allow our descendants a fair chance for a healthy and prosperous future. Enhancing carbon biosequestration in terrestrial ecosystems is also essential."  - Wayne A. White, Biosequestration and Ecological Diversity p.118 (CRC Press 2013) The standard gloom and doom discourse surrounding global warming and climate change has infected the body politic with a severe case of depression and disempowerment. So starting April 22, embracing what the United Nations has designated as the "Year of the Soil," let's look at our planetary crisis from an entirely different, and more hopeful perspective. The good news is that the global grassroots, farmers and consumers united, can reverse our suicidal "business as usual" food, farming, energy, and land use practices. Harnessing the awesome power of Regenerative Organic Agriculture and reforestation, we can literally suck down enough excess (50-100 ppm ...
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Ants avoid traffic jams 22.4.2015 Environmental News Network
Rather than slowing down, ants speed up in response to a higher density of traffic on their trails, according to new research published in Springer's journal The Science of Nature - Naturwissenschaften. When the researchers increased the supply of food by leaving food next to the trail, ants accelerated their speed by 50 percent. This was despite more than double the density of traffic.
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How to grow mushrooms in your garden path 15.4.2015 TreeHugger
Plants don't like being trodden on. Mushrooms, however, do not seem to mind.
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Bats In Pennsylvania Threatened By White Nose Syndrome 6.4.2015 Green on HuffingtonPost.com
PITTSBURGH (AP) — One of the most common bat species in Pennsylvania is being threatened by white-nose syndrome, a fungal disease that has killed millions of bats of that species and others in North America. The U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service has listed the northern long-eared bat as a "threatened" species, the Pittsburgh Post-Gazette (http://bit.ly/1Cb0Nh3 ) reported Monday. The agency was considering listing the species as "endangered" — a more serious designation — but decided on "threatened" because the bat's population has not been affected outside areas where the fungal disease has caused problems, the newspaper reported. The agency is proposing interim rules meant to safeguard the bat's habitat, including limits on forest timbering. But the rules could also impact the wind energy and natural gas and oil drilling industries. Lora Zimmerman, a project leader with the Fish and Wildlife Service, said the "threatened" listing in Pennsylvania might seem odd in light of the fact that the long-eared bat's ...
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Biodiversity may reduce threat of disease 20.2.2015 Environmental News Network
Biodiversity level changes can have consequences for species and habitats around the world. A new study published in the Proceedings of the Royal Society B, reaffirms previous findings that higher diversity in ecological communities may lead to reduced disease threat. The study concludes that higher amphibian diversity in the Brazilian Atlantic Forest is linked to a lower infection rate of a fungus that is devastating amphibian populations around the world. 
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Montana mycologist fights fungus with fungus 22.12.2014 High Country News Most Recent
To save whitebark pines, apply slippery jack.
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A Health Check-up for Our Environment—Ignored at Our Own Risk 12.11.2014 Commondreams.org Views
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