User: flenvcenter Topic: Biodiversity-Independent
Category: Specific Organisms :: Fungi
Last updated: Jul 13 2017 05:40 IST RSS 2.0
 
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Hundreds of species of fungi in deep coral ecosystems discovered by University of Hawaii at Manoa botanists 13.7.2017 Environmental News Network
Researchers from the University of Hawai?i at M?noa Department of Botany have discovered hundreds of potentially new species of fungi in the deep coral ecosystem in the ?Au?au channel off Maui, Hawai?i. Mesophotic coral ecosystems (MCE) are generally found at depths between 130–500 feet and possess abundant plant (algal) life as well as new fish species. The mysteries of these reefs are only recently being revealed through technological advances in closed circuit rebreather diving. Previously overlooked—being too precarious for conventional SCUBA and too shallow to justify the cost of frequent submersible dives—mesophotic reefs continuously disclose breathtaking levels of biodiversity with each dive, yielding species and behavioral interactions new to science.
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Summary of the 33 Research Proposals Winning Funding in our 2017 Small Grants Program 13.7.2017 ENN Network News - ENN
We were able to fund 33 of 90 proposals this year, for a total of $32,160. Funded proposals were submitted by 19 men and 15 women, most of whom are academics: two professors, 13 doctoral students, nine masters students and three undergraduates. Seven are independent researchers. The 33 proposals come from 19 states: Alabama (1), California (2), Colorado (2), Florida (1), Illinois (5), Iowa (3), Kansas (3), Michigan (1), Mississippi (1), Missouri (3), Montana (1), Nebraska (1), Nevada (1), North Carolina (1), Ohio (1), South Dakota (1), Texas (2), Wisconsin (2) and Wyoming (1).
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Hot new imagery of wintering bats suggests a group behavior for battling white-nose syndrome 6.7.2017 Wildlife and Habitat Conservation News - ENN
Hot new imagery from temperature-sensing cameras suggests that bats who warm up from hibernation together throughout the winter may be better at surviving white nose syndrome, a disease caused by a cold-loving fungus ravaging insect-eating bat populations in the United States and Canada. The study by researchers with Massey University in New Zealand and the USGS was published in Methods in Ecology and Evolution.  
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Wood Beetles Are Nature's Recyclers – With A Little Help From Fungi 23.5.2017 Green on HuffingtonPost.com
Michał Filipiak , Institute of Environmental Sciences, Jagiellonian University Dead wood-eating beetles, such as termites, can cause damage to residential properties. But they repay humans by performing a priceless service: helping us recycle decomposing dead trees. Decomposition may have an unpleasant ring to it but it is a fundamental process in a functioning ecosystem, ensuring that we are not buried under the huge mass of dead organic matter that is produced every year right on our own doorsteps. Dead wood-eating beetles are among the insect world’s best decomposers – organisms that digest dead matter and make their own living cells and tissues out of the acquired atoms . The vast majority of organic matter produced worldwide every year is stored in wood, which is tough, and hard to digest and decompose. Worse yet, wood is nutritionally stingy . Dead wood is rich in sugars (cellulose, hemicelluloses and lignin ), but try surviving on sugar alone! Digested wood may be source of energy, but it is ...
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Fungal Diseases Are on the Rise -- Is Environmental Change to Blame? 21.5.2017 Truthout - All Articles
Scientists and physicians are looking for clues to a worrying increase in fungal infections and exploring ways to reduce the threat. (Photo: Pixabay ) Why doesn't this site have ads? In order to maintain our integrity, Truthout doesn't accept any advertising money. Help us keep it this way -- make a donation to support our independent journalism. Fungi are everywhere -- from the mushrooms that decompose fallen logs in the forest, to the mold that grows in your bathtub, to the microscopic fungal cells that reside naturally on your skin. Scientists estimate there are 1.5 million species of fungi on the planet. They're a diverse group, bunched together by their ability to use digestive enzymes to break down and absorb nutrients from their surroundings -- a characteristic that makes some of them great decomposers. Fungi are, in essence, nature's first compost bin. Many of them also help plants grow or carry out other important ecosystem functions. And some fungi are pathogens, causing disease in plants and ...
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Humans, not climate change, wiped out Australian megafauna 20.1.2017 Environmental News Network
New evidence involving the ancient poop of some of the huge and astonishing creatures that once roamed Australia indicates the primary cause of their extinction around 45,000 years ago was likely a result of humans, not climate change. 
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They Lost Their Jungles to Plantations, but These Indigenous Women Grew Them Back 11.12.2016 Truthout - All Articles
It is early morning in Dhepagudi, a sleepy hamlet nestled in the green hills of Odisha, India. Admai Kumruka is sifting millet in a traditional sieve made of bamboo strips. Children mill around, playing on a mud and sand mound. A few huts down, Rello Dindika is sorting through harvested corn. A group of women are chopping fresh pumpkin leaves and flowers for a stir-fry dish. They have finished morning chores and farming work and are now preparing breakfast. Some of the corn will be ground to a powder for a wholesome porridge. The rest will be popped in clay vessels for evening snacks. "We have mandya or kosla [varieties of millets] or maka [corn] porridge in the mornings sometimes with roots and tubers or gondri saag [a variety of greens] foraged from the jungles," Kumruka says. "In the afternoons and evenings, we make rice with tubers, vegetables and legumes. Sometimes we add wild mushrooms or jhotta [okra] and holud [turmeric roots]." The women belong to the Khond community, a large indigenous tribal ...
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Before the Holiday Feast: New Data on Pesticides in Food Raises Safety Questions 23.11.2016 Green on HuffingtonPost.com
As American gather their families to share a Thanksgiving meal this week, new government data offers a potentially unappetizing assessment of the U.S. food supply: Residues of many types of insecticides, fungicides and weed killing chemicals have been found in roughly 85 percent of thousands of foods tested. Data released last week by the U.S. Department of Agriculture shows varying levels of pesticide residues in everything from mushrooms to potatoes and grapes to green beans. One sample of strawberries contained residues of 20 pesticides, according to the "Pesticide Data Program" (PDP) report issued this month by the USDA's Agricultural Marketing Service. The report is the 25th annual such compilation of residue data for the agency, and covered sampling the USDA did in 2015 Notably, the agency said only 15 percent of the 10,187 samples tested were free from any detectable pesticide residues. That's a marked difference from 2014, when the USDA found that over 41 percent of samples were "clean" or ...
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Meatless Monday: Small Steps, Big Changes -- Gene Baur and "Living the Farm Sanctuary Life" 22.8.2016 Green on HuffingtonPost.com
There was no plan, there was only "concern about animals and nature," says Gene Baur. "I wanted to do something positive it the world." He did. In 1986, he co-founded Farm Sanctuary. Now almost 30 years later, Farm Sanctuary is America's premier farm animal protection organization, a safe haven for factory farm animals abused and/or left for dead, and a transformative place for people, too. Farm Sanctuary offers education, outreach and the opportunity to rediscover our primal bond with animals. "Farm animals are not that different from cats and dogs," says Baur. "They have feelings, relationships, respect and compassion." Their open affection remind of us our own humanity. And our responsibility. "We don't share our lives with animals just because we want to. We do it because we need them," Baur writes in "Living the Farm Sanctuary Life." Co-written with Gene Stone, Baur's new book provides a little Farm Sanctuary wherever you are, with adorable farm animal photos, pleasing plant-based recipes from fab ...
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Delta flood’s carbon footprint, floodplain fallout and purple fungi fighters 22.8.2016 Current Issue
HCN.org news in brief.
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How a purple bacteria could help save amphibians in the Rockies 1.8.2016 High Country News Most Recent
A Colorado researcher is using boreal toads’ microbiomes to help them ward off a deadly fungus.
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Trees talk to each other and recognize their offspring 29.7.2016 TreeHugger
The Lorax might have spoken for the trees, but it turns out that trees can speak for themselves. At least to other trees, that is.
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Climate Change This Week: A Hot New High, Kids Show the Way, and More! 27.7.2016 Green on HuffingtonPost.com
OO Europe's Oil Imports 'Dependent On Unstable Countries' OO Power From "The New Coal", Natural Gas, Expected To Reach A Record High, Despite Climate Concerns - bad news, because besides the bad methane emissions from its production and distribution, burning it adds further emissions. OO US Coal Ash Crisis Builds - Coal production and use has plummeted, but the wastes left behind after burning it keep on coming, and they have been stored in lightly regulated, water-filled basins since at least the 1950s. OO China Pledged To Curb Coal Plants. Greenpeace Says It's Still Adding Them. The construction boom would result in about 400 gigawatts of excess capacity and waste more than $150 billion on building unneeded plants, said the new a report. But ... OO Record Growth In Chinese Renewable Energy Markets OO Coal India Accused Of Bulldozing Human Rights Amid Production Boom says Amnesty International report. <> OO Fossil Fuel Industry Risks Losing $33 Trillion in revenue in the next 25 years due to global ...
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Frogs that can take the heat expected to fare better in a changing world 8.7.2016 Environmental News Network
Amphibians that tolerate higher temperatures are likely to fare better in a world affected by climate change, disease and habitat loss, according to two recent studies from the University of California, Davis.Frogs are disappearing globally, and the studies examine why some survive while others perish. The studies reveal that thermal tolerance -- the ability to withstand higher temperatures -- may be a key trait in predicting amphibian declines.HEAT-TOLERANT FROGS ESCAPE DEADLY FUNGUSOne of the world's deadliest wildlife pandemics is caused by a fungus, Batrachochytrium dendrobatidis, or Bd. The fungus is linked to several amphibian extinctions and global declines.
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Termites, Mushrooms and Cheetahs 18.3.2016 Green on HuffingtonPost.com
It's Termite Awareness Week. The National Pest Management Association (NPMA) uses this week, March 15-March 21, to educate people in the U.S. about termite prevention. Namibia may be known as "The Cheetah Capital of the World," but we also have our share of termites, too. Like their American counterparts, termites here can be destructive to human structures and strip farmlands of life-supporting vegetation. So what does this have to do with cheetah conservation? From the African farmer's perspective, cheetahs and termites have much in common. Historically both have been perceived as worthless vermin, pests that threaten human livelihoods. Species perceived to interfere with human livelihoods often become targets for mass eradication. During the 1970s and 1980s approximately 10,000 cheetah were removed from Namibia by farmers for posing predation threats to livestock. And for many years now, African farmers have been trying to rid the landscape of termites, because they perceive them to compete with ...
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Ignored Too Long: Kids' Health & The Crumbling Schoolhouse 3.3.2016 Green on HuffingtonPost.com
Co-Author Nsedu Obot-Witherspoon, MPH, Executive Director, Children's Environmental Health Network It seems like school children trying to learn in Detroit and Flint, MI can't catch a break, nor can they in Hoosick Falls, NY , and hundreds of other communities. We read daily about polluted drinking water ; then, about schools with black mold, failing heating systems, roaches and rats where children, by law , must spend their days. And behave. And take tests. We also know that it's unfair to single out schools in Detroit , a city that has come to represent the post-industrial collapse of manufacturing centers. Detroit simply is not the only city with mushrooms growing out of damp school building walls. In New York, the state education department cut staff responsible for addressing school facilities by half and has failed to improve school design standards . California and other states have suspended or slashed school construction funds . We also hear from parents and teachers about these conditions. For ...
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The Fight To Save Panama's 'Symbol Of Hope' From Extinction 10.2.2016 Green on HuffingtonPost.com
I've lived in Panama for less than a month, and I've already become quite familiar with its celebrated golden frog. The little yellow guy is all over t-shirts and postcards and souvenirs. He's stamped on lottery tickets and grinning above the entrance to the aptly-named "La Rana Dorada" restaurant in downtown Panama City. Archaeologists have even discovered ancient gold relics sculpted in the shape of tiny amphibians. I asked both locals and scientists what the frog means to them; why you see its iconic face everywhere. "We're taught in school that it's a symbol Panama's biodiversity," journalist and entrepreneur Alfonso Grimaldo said. "It's a natural light; a reminder that the earth is sacred," said agriculture student Ericka Quiroz. "They were everywhere when we were kids; we used to catch them from the drain pipes," designer Ani Dillon recalled. Known for its striking day-glo coloring and the adorable waving motion it makes with its webbed hands, the golden frog represented hope and resilience and the ...
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U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service Restricts Salamander Imports to Protect Native Species From Deadly Disease 13.1.2016 Commondreams.org Newswire
Center for Biological Diversity In response to a petition from the Center for Biological Diversity and Save The Frogs, the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service today announced a temporary rule restricting the importation of salamanders for the pet trade. The restriction is designed to prevent introduction of the deadly fungus Batrachochytrium salamandrivorans (Bsal) into the United ...
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Your Favorite Banana Is Facing Extinction As Deadly Fungus Spreads 2.12.2015 Green on HuffingtonPost.com
One of the world’s most popular fruits may go extinct -- yet again. Before 1960, your grandparents and great-grandparents were eating better bananas. Called Gros Michel, they were tastier, bigger and more resilient than the bananas found in supermarkets worldwide today. “ It has a more robust taste ,” said Dan Koeppel, author of “Banana: The Fate of the Fruit That Changed the World” of the yummier yellow fruit. “It’s more creamy.” So why can’t we too enjoy the robust creaminess of the Gros Michel, once the world's export banana? Turns out, the species went virtually extinct in the 1960s thanks to an invasive and incurable fungus that wiped out most Gros Michel plantations around the world. That explains how the Cavendish -- the blander banana we now eat -- grew in prominence. It tasted worse and was less hardy than the Gros Michel, but the species seemed able to resist the fungal invasion, known as “Panama disease.” That is, it was able to. Now, a newer, more virulent strain of Panama disease is wreaking ...
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Bat-killing Fungus Reaches Nebraska 13.11.2015 Commondreams.org Newswire
Center for Biological Diversity State and federal wildlife officials announced today that a bat-killing fungus that has swept across the eastern United States and Canada over the past eight years, killing millions of bats, has been confirmed by scientists in eastern Nebraska. Samples taken from bats in a mine in Cass County, Neb. at the end of last winter tested positive for the fungus that causes white-nose syndrome; the bat species found with the fungus were northern long-eared bats, tricolored bats and big brown ...
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