User: flenvcenter Topic: Biodiversity-Independent
Category: Specific Organisms :: Insects
Last updated: Sep 27 2018 24:16 IST RSS 2.0
 
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There’s nuance behind the recent bird decline study 30.9.2019 High Country News Most Recent
The journal Science documented an estimated total loss of 2.9 billion birds. But is that the whole picture?
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Can the gene editing technology CRISPR help reduce biodiversity loss worldwide? 20.9.2019 GreenBiz.com
Though scientists are optimistic that CRISPR could help, they also emphasize caution and community engagement in order to get it right.
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Scientists have declared a biodiversity crisis — here's what that means for business 8.5.2019 Design & Innovation | GreenBiz.com
A ground-breaking UN report yesterday revealed scale of threat facing the natural world.
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We’re destroying the biodiversity we depend on 6.5.2019 High Country News Most Recent
A new U.N. study shows that up to 1 million species risk extinction because humans use up nature much faster than it can be replenished.
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Is an 'insect apocalypse' actually happening? 3.5.2019 Business Operations | GreenBiz.com
Humans are having oustize impacts on biodiversity — they must reverse it before it's too late.
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We cannot push population growth under the carpet 29.4.2019 The Earth Times Online Newspaper - Health News
We use the tiger (this is a prime Siberian example) to show up our failure to conserve wild species, but while we monopolise all the food that animals require, we could remember that it is not only their conservation we urgently need to cover. It is also our own indulgences.
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How a tiny endangered species put a man in prison 15.4.2019 Current Issue
The Devils Hole pupfish is nothing to mess with.
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Challenging media to do better covering climate breakdown 20.3.2019 rabble.ca - News for the rest of us
Media Matters The Extinction Rebellion chapter in Ottawa, inspired by the example of Extinction Rebellion in the U.K., recently called on the CBC to do better in its reporting of the existential issue of our time: climate breakdown. That's because mainstream media plays a significant role in shaping public awareness as well as framing political narratives on key issues. What media covers, what it chooses not to cover, how stories are reported, and the relative priority a story is given are all critical factors in public engagement. On December 21, 2018, Extinction Rebellion organized coordinated actions at BBC offices in central London, Bangor, Birmingham, Bristol, Cambridge, Glasgow, Sheffield, Truro and the bureau in Berlin. Their letter to the BBC stated that the national broadcaster should place "the climate and ecological emergency as its top editorial and corporate priority…" It said the BBC should give climate change the same "level of urgency the corporation placed on informing the public about ...
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Climate change and corporate greed combine to destroy forests with fire and felling 26.9.2018 rabble.ca - News for the rest of us
Ed Finn The razing of millions of acres of forests by wildfires has been increasing in scale and intensity for the past few decades. This year has set new records for the number of trees and shrubs destroyed by fire -- not just in the United States and Canada, but also in many other countries, including England, Spain, Portugal, Greece, Sweden, Latvia, and North Korea. Wildfires, of course, have been a yearly occurrence in the summer months for centuries. Triggered mainly by lightning, they were nature's way of disposing of dead timber and providing fertile ground for new plant growth. That is still an important natural process, although many conflagrations today are unnaturally caused by human carelessness, such as poorly tended campfires and flipped-away cigarette butts. Far more devastating for the world's forests today, however, are the effects of global warming, mostly caused by the greenhouse gas emissions that emanate from the burning of fossil fuels. One of the detrimental effects of climate ...
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For the next big innovation for agriculture, think small 17.8.2018 Small Business | GreenBiz.com
Companies large and small, and even the likes of Nicole Kidman, are increasingly finding insects appetizing and sustainable.
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These 8 nature-based startups from around the world are going to save it 13.6.2018 Energy & Climate | Greenbiz.com
And this environmental impact accelerator is going to help.
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Models and mimics are marvels in SE Asia 2.5.2018 The Earth Times Online Newspaper - Environment News
Look at those modified wings and the bee antennae. But this is no stinger or biter. It’s a clearwing moth, and you can find similar species near your own location worldwide. It’s all about the mimic, and its model- in this case a generalised stingless bee. Trouble is, you won’t find this guy. Good luck, but he seems to be almost extinct. One of those many new species that will disappear rapidly, just like many others that have been seen just as we destroy their habitat.
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Trends in agriculture show organics on top 30.4.2018 Business Operations | GreenBiz.com
'Organic doesn't mean what it used to — it's not just an "alternative" system to conventional agriculture anymore.
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The Bayer-Monsanto Merger Is Bad News for the Planet 20.4.2018 Truthout - All Articles
Two new studies from Europe  have found that the number of farm birds in France has crashed by a third in just 15 years, with some species being almost eradicated. The collapse in the bird population  mirrors the discovery last October  that over three quarters of all flying insects in Germany have vanished in just three decades. Insects are the staple food source of birds, the pollinators of fruits, and the aerators of the soil. The chief suspect in this mass extinction is the aggressive use of neonicotinoid pesticides,  particularly imidacloprid and clothianidin, both made by German-based chemical giant Bayer . These pesticides,  along with toxic glyphosate herbicides (Roundup) , have delivered a one-two punch against Monarch butterflies, honeybees and birds. But rather than banning these toxic chemicals, on March 21st  the EU approved  the $66 billion merger of Bayer and Monsanto, the US agribusiness giant producing Roundup and the genetically modified (GMO) seeds that have reduced seed diversity ...
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Activists Storm Washington, Demanding Protection for All Immigrants 7.3.2018 Truthout.com
We walked with the same resilience and strength that our community demonstrates in fighting for our right to stay in the US, says Maria Duarte, a Dreamer with Movimiento Cosecha. Duarte and Omar Cisneros, her fellow organizer and US-born ally, discuss their march from New York City to Washington, DC, and the steps they are taking to hold Congress -- especially Democrats -- accountable for not acting to protect immigrants. An immigration activist wears butterfly wings during a protest March 5, 2018, on Capitol Hill in Washington, DC. (Photo: Alex Wong / Getty Images) Stories like this are more important than ever! To make sure Truthout can keep publishing them, please give a tax-deductible donation today. Welcome to Interviews for Resistance. We're now more than a year into the Trump administration, and activists have scored some important victories in those months. Yet there is always more to be done, and for many people, the question of where to focus and how to help remains. In this series, we talk ...
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Animals’ advice for surviving trying times 7.2.2018 High Country News Most Recent
Are you the political equivalent of an armadillo, ant or tiger?
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Corporations need nature's regenerative service 2.2.2018 Design & Innovation | GreenBiz.com
Many people do not perceive the value of wilderness areas, even though we receive life-sustaining services from them every day.
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It's the small things that matter – when insects shaped today's natural world 30.1.2018 Environmental News Network
Insects that play an essential role in moulding ecosystems may have begun their rise to prominence earlier than previously thought, shedding new light on how the world became modern. That is the finding of a new paper published by an international team of researchers led by Simon Fraser University's Bruce Archibald who is also a research associate at the Royal BC Museum.
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Cougars Officially Declared Extinct in Eastern U.S., Removed from Endangered Species List 24.1.2018 Environmental News Network
Eastern cougars once roamed every U.S. state east of the Mississippi, but it has been eight decades since the last confirmed sighting of the animal. Now, the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service has officially declared the subspecies extinct and removed it from the U.S. endangered species list.
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Photo: Cute little beetle considers a leaf 19.1.2018 TreeHugger
Our photo of the day is a lesson in biodiversity.
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