User: flenvcenter Topic: Biodiversity-Independent
Category: Biodiversity
Last updated: Jan 18 2018 22:34 IST RSS 2.0
 
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The Trump Administration's Attacks on Public Lands and Waters Will Cause Irreparable Harm 18.1.2018 Truthout.com
The designation of a national monument protects the land from drilling, fracking, mining, logging -- protection not afforded to the majority of public land, says Randi Spivak of the Center for Biological Diversity. Spivak discusses why the largest delisting of protected federal lands in US history will harm species, waters and exacerbate climate change. Who are the powerful funders behind Truthout? Our readers! Help us publish more stories like this one by making a tax-deductible donation. In December, Trump  announced  that he would shrink Bears Ears and Grand Staircase-Escalante National Monuments in Utah by 85 percent and 46 percent respectively. The announcement came after Trump had ordered Secretary of the Interior Ryan Zinke in April to review 27 national monuments created since 1996 that were 100,000 acres or larger, and Zinke subsequently recommended that these and other monuments be reduced. Trump's move represents the  largest  delisting of protected federal lands in US history, removing 2 ...
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New Study From the University of Halle: How Climate Change Alters Plant Growth 12.1.2018 Environmental News Network
Global warming affects more than just plant biodiversity - it even alters the way plants grow. A team of researchers at Martin Luther University Halle-Wittenberg (MLU) joined forces with the Leibniz Institute for Plant Biochemistry (IPB) to discover which molecular processes are involved in plant growth. In the current edition of the internationally renowned journal "Current Biology", the group presents its latest findings on the mechanism controlling growth at high temperatures. In the future this could help breed plants that are adapted to global warming.
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The Negative Impact of Climate Change on Freshwater Bodies 12.1.2018 Environmental News Network
A lot of research is being conducted into the acidification of the world’s oceans. A recent study has proved that freshwater bodies are likewise affected. Rising carbon dioxide levels could upset the balance of species.
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Pacific Northwest Salmon Species Has Lost Two-Thirds of Its Genetic Diversity 12.1.2018 Green Technology and Environmental Science News - ENN
Chinook salmon, an iconic species in the Pacific Northwest that supports a major fishery industry and indigenous traditions, have lost up to two-thirds of their genetic diversity over the past 7,000 years, according to a new study. Scientists warn the loss could make it difficult for the species to cope with warming global temperatures and ocean acidification — environmental changes that are already impacting the fish today.
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Trump Expands Offshore Drilling in Assault on Biodiversity and Coastal and Indigenous Communities 11.1.2018 Truthout - All Articles
Bipartisan opposition is growing to President Trump's proposal to greatly expand offshore oil and gas drilling. The reversal of the Obama-era restrictions would open more than a billion acres of water in the Arctic, Pacific, Atlantic and Gulf of Mexico to offshore oil and gas drilling. Initially the Interior Department moved to allow offshore oil and gas drilling in nearly all of the United States' coastal waters, but then announced it has dropped plans to open up the waters off the coast of Florida, following fierce opposition by Florida's Republican Governor Rick Scott. Scott is an ally of President Trump, and the state is also home to Trump's winter resort at Mar-a-Lago. Now governors and lawmakers from Georgia, South Carolina, North Carolina, Virginia, Maryland, Delaware, New York, New Jersey, California, Oregon, Washington and other states are asking why only Florida is being exempted. We speak to Subhankar Banerjee, professor of art and ecology at the University of New Mexico. Banerjee is the ...
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Hiding from a warmer climate in the forest 11.1.2018 Environmental News Network
When studying the effect of climate change on biodiversity, it is important to consider the climate near the ground (microclimate) which a plant or an animal actually experiences. Deep shady depressions, dense old forests or places close to water for example are always considerably cooler than their surroundings.
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Noise Pollution Causes Chronic Stress in Birds, with Health Consequences for Young 9.1.2018 Environmental News Network
Birds exposed to the persistent noise of natural gas compressors show symptoms remarkably similar to those in humans suffering from post-traumatic stress disorder, new research shows.
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A 'Paris Agreement for shipping' could lower maritime emissions 5.1.2018 Design & Innovation | GreenBiz.com
Along with sustainable aquaculture and stronger ocean biodiversity laws, the world will see a deep dive into marine conservation this year.
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Green Brexit? Minister hints at sustainable farm subsidies 4.1.2018 TreeHugger
From soil carbon to flood prevention, reforming farm subsidies could be Brexit's upside.
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For endangered species, politics replaces science 4.1.2018 High Country News Most Recent
A leaked Fish and Wildlife memo suggests a shift away from science.
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For endangered species, politics replace science 4.1.2018 High Country News Most Recent
At Fish and Wildlife, a leaked memo threatens scientific integrity.
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Bound by Nature - Cul­tural Evol­u­tion Has Not Freed Hunter-Gather­ers from En­vir­on­men­tal For­cing 4.1.2018 Environmental News Network
Cultural evolution has made humans enormously potent ecosystem engineers and has enabled us to survive and flourish under a variety environmental conditions.
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Five Ideas for Creating a Sustainable Future 2.1.2018 Truthout.com
Join the movement for independent media -- no ads, no corporate pressure, just the facts. Click here to make a tax-deductible donation to Truthout today! Much news about the environment in 2017 focused on controversies over Trump administration actions, such as proposals to promote more use of coal and budget cuts at relevant federal agencies. At the same time, however, many scholars across the United States are pursuing innovations that could help create a more sustainable world. Here we spotlight five examples from our 2017 archives. 1. Restoring the Rio Grande Although many Americans may not realize it, the United States and Mexico work together on many environmental issues along their joint border, including drinking water, sanitation and flood control. Gabriel Diaz Montemayor, assistant professor of landscape architecture at the University of Texas at Austin,  proposes a bolder vision : greening the entire Rio Grande Valley, which forms more than half of the border. Restoring vegetation along the ...
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Scientists call for action to tackle the threat of invasive tree species to a global biodiversity hotspot 2.1.2018 Environmental News Network
An invasive Australian tree is now posing a serious threat to a global diversity ‘hotspot’ according to new collaborative research between Landcare Research in New Zealand, the Universities of Cambridge (UK) Denver (US) and Bangor University (UK).
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The Caribbean Is Stressed Out 29.12.2017 Sustainable Ecosystems and Community News - ENN
Forty percent of the world’s 2.5 billion people live in coastal cities and towns. A team including Smithsonian marine biologists just released 25 years of data about the health of Caribbean coasts from the Caribbean Coastal Marine Productivity Program (CARICOMP). The study provides new insights into the influence of both local and global stressors in the basin, and some hope that the observed changes can be reversed by local environmental management.
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The Caribbean Is Stressed Out 29.12.2017 Environmental News Network
Forty percent of the world’s 2.5 billion people live in coastal cities and towns. A team including Smithsonian marine biologists just released 25 years of data about the health of Caribbean coasts from the Caribbean Coastal Marine Productivity Program (CARICOMP). The study provides new insights into the influence of both local and global stressors in the basin, and some hope that the observed changes can be reversed by local environmental management.
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Pesticides Linked to Declining Bee Populations Also Threaten Birds and Small Mammals 19.12.2017 Truthout - All Articles
The Environmental Protection Agency's latest assessment of four neonicotinoid pesticides linked to declining populations of pollinators show that they could also harm birds and small mammals, but the agency is reluctant to ban their use until it completes its review. Environmentalists, concerned that it may prove too late for some species, want restrictions placed on the chemicals. Support your favorite writers by making sure we can keep publishing them! Make a donation to Truthout to ensure independent journalism survives. The Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) has determined that popular pesticides linked to declining bee populations also pose a threat to birds and, in some cases, small mammals and insects. The EPA  released  preliminary scientific assessments of four chemicals from the neonicotinoid or "neonic" class of insecticides on Friday as part of an ongoing review that environmentalists and farmers are watching closely. Previous EPA assessments echoed  research   showing  that neonics can ...
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Complex, Old-Growth Forests May Protect Some Bird Species in a Warming Climate 16.12.2017 Environmental News Network
Old forests that contain large trees and a diversity of tree sizes and species may offer refuge to some types of birds facing threats in a warming climate, scientists have found.
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Vis­itor Pat­terns and Emer­ging Activ­it­ies in Na­tional Parks Re­vealed by So­cial Me­dia Posts 14.12.2017 Environmental News Network
Researchers from the Digital Geography at the University of Helsinki have been studying whether social media data could be used to understand visitor’s activities in national parks and most recent results are presented in Scientific reports: Instagram, Flickr, or Twitter: Assessing the usability of social media data for visitor monitoring in protected areas.
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Native Fish Species at Risk Following Water Removal from the Colorado River 12.12.2017 Environmental News Network
Agriculture and domestic activities consume much of the Colorado River water that once flowed to the Colorado Delta and Northern Gulf of California. The nature and extent of impact of this fresh-water loss on the ecology and fisheries of the Colorado Delta and Gulf of California is controversial. A recent publication in the journal PeerJ reveals a previously unseen risk to the unique local biodiversity of the tidal portion of the Delta. 
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