User: flenvcenter Topic: Air and Climate-Regional
Category: Climate Change :: Climate Change Science
Last updated: May 23 2017 05:39 IST RSS 2.0
 
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Scientists say rate of sea level rise nearly tripled since 1990 23.5.2017 Salt Lake Tribune
A new scientific analysis finds that the Earth’s oceans are rising nearly three times as rapidly as they were throughout most of the 20th century, one of the strongest indications yet that a much feared trend of not just sea level rise, but its acceleration, is now underway. “We have a much stronger acceleration in sea level rise than formerly thought,” said Sönke Dangendorf, a researcher with the University of Siegen in Germany who led the study along with scientists at institutions in Spain, F... <iframe src="http://www.sltrib.com/csp/mediapool/sites/sltrib/pages/garss.csp" height="1" width="1" > </frame>
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Stop hoping we can fix climate change by pulling carbon out of the air, scientists warn 23.5.2017 Salt Lake Tribune
Scientists are expressing increasing skepticism that we’re going to be able to get out of the climate change mess by relying on a variety of large-scale land use and technical solutions that have been not only proposed, but often relied upon in scientific calculations. Two papers published last week debunk the idea of planting large volumes of trees to pull carbon dioxide out of the air — saying there just isn’t enough land available to pull it off — and also various other strategies for “carbon...
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Thanks to global warming, Antarctica is starting to turn green 19.5.2017 Denver Post: National News Headlines
Researchers in Antarctica have discovered rapidly growing banks of mosses on the ice continent's northern peninsula, providing striking evidence of climate change in the coldest and most remote parts of the planet.
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Thanks to global warming, Antarctica is starting to turn green 19.5.2017 Salt Lake Tribune
Researchers in Antarctica have discovered rapidly growing banks of mosses on the ice continent’s northern peninsula, providing striking evidence of climate change in the coldest and most remote parts of the planet. Amid the warming of the last 50 years, the scientists found two different species of mosses undergoing the equivalent of growth spurts, with mosses that once grew less than a millimeter per year, now growing over 3 millimeters per year on average. “People will think of Antarctica quit...
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Experts fear ‘quiet springs’ as songbirds can’t keep up with climate change 16.5.2017 Headlines: All Headlines
In 1962, Rachel Carson warned that pesticides, particularly DDT, would lead to springs without birdsong, as she wrote in her book "Silent Spring." Carson's forecast kick-started an environmental movement and was instrumental in the Environmental Protection Agency's decision to ban the pesticides 10 years later, so her descriptions of deathly quiet did not come to pass.
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Climate change is shrinking the West’s water supply 15.5.2017 High Country News Most Recent
Three new studies show dry times ahead.
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Alaska's tundra is worsening climate change 9.5.2017 Salt Lake Tribune
Even as the Trump administration weighs withdrawing the United States from the Paris climate agreement, a new scientific paper has documented growing fluxes of greenhouse gases streaming into the air from the Alaskan tundra, a long-feared occurrence that could worsen climate change. The new study, published in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, suggests that frozen northern soils - often called permafrost - are unleashing an increasing amount of carbon dioxide into the air as t... <iframe src="http://www.sltrib.com/csp/mediapool/sites/sltrib/pages/garss.csp" height="1" width="1" > </frame>
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Letter of the Week: Aquifer research needs federal funding 30.4.2017 Salt Lake Tribune
As a groundwater geologist working in rural Utah, I can vouch for Byron Ruby and Neil Longo’s commentary on how farmers (and ranchers), who overwhelmingly supported Donald Trump in the last election, consider climate change (“What’s more conservative than reverence for Earth?,” April 23). “Talk to them about climate change and chances are they’ll roll their eyes. But ask about how to deal with groundwater shortages or prolonged droughts, and you’ll have their attention.” As a scientist, as the a...
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At least global warming may get Americans off the couch more 24.4.2017 Salt Lake Tribune
Washington • Global warming’s milder winters will likely nudge Americans off the couch more in the future, a rare, small benefit of climate change, a new study finds. With less chilly winters, Americans will be more likely to get outdoors, increasing their physical activity by as much as 2.5 percent by the end of the century, according to a new study in Monday’s edition of the journal Nature Human Behaviour . Places like North Dakota, Minnesota and Maine are likely to see the most dramatic incre...
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Scientists leave labs, take to streets to defend research 22.4.2017 Salt Lake Tribune
Washington • Scientists worldwide left their labs to take to the streets Saturday along with students and research advocates in pushing back against what they say are mounting attacks on science. The March for Science, coinciding with Earth Day, was set for more than 500 cities, anchored in Washington and to be joined by dozens of nonpartisan scientific professional societies in a turnout intended to combine political and how-to science demonstrations. Marchers in Geneva carried signs that said,...
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For the first time on record, human-caused climate change has rerouted an entire river 18.4.2017 Denver Post: National News Headlines
A team of scientists Monday documented what they're describing as the first case of large-scale river reorganization as a result of human-caused climate change.
Colorado clean-tech innovators draw investors — and a pledge of support from Sen. Michael Bennet 14.4.2017 Denver Post: All Political News
Big money swirled around clean technology entrepreneurs at a government-backed forum in Denver Thursday as investors look to capitalize on a shift away from fossil fuels energy linked to climate change.
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Oman's mountains may hold clues for reversing climate change 13.4.2017 Salt Lake Tribune
Wadi Abdah, Oman • Deep in the jagged red mountains of Oman, geologists are searching for an efficient and cheap way to remove carbon dioxide from the air and oceans — and perhaps begin to reverse climate change. They are coring samples from one of the world’s only exposed sections of the Earth’s mantle to uncover how a spontaneous natural process millions of years ago transformed carbon dioxide into limestone and marble. As the world mobilizes to confront climate change, the main focus has been...
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California isn’t accounting for this major emitter 11.4.2017 Writers on the Range
Even though large reservoirs emit methane, the state doesn’t off-set their impact.
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Bob and Sarah Woodmansee: Climate change and the economy 4.4.2017 Steamboat Pilot
Our climate is changing. Average, daily temperatures are rising. Floods from unexpected and intense storms are more frequent. Warmer and shorter snow seasons are occurring. Road maintenance is becoming more costly. Wildfire frequency and intensity is increasing. These and other changes will continue to have impacts on economically important industries for Western Colorado such as ranching, farming, winter and summer recreation, wildlife populations (hunting and tourism), water quality supporting fisheries and municipalities, stream and river flows and timing, tourism loss due to wildfires, and more. Declining quality of experiences for tourists and outdoor recreationalists are key economic concerns for our economy. These realities are explicitly discussed In “Climate Smart Agriculture,” an article published in the March/April 2016 issue of the Colorado Water Center Newsletter (Volume 33, Issue 1)." The climate change research community, policymakers and water and other resource managers desperately need ...
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Catching air: Scientists trek high into the Rockies to measure Earth’s rising greenhouse gases 3.4.2017 Headlines: All Headlines
Climate researchers say the the weekly climb to gather air samples to measure heat-trapping greenhouse gases has become more of a mission than a job.
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Op-ed: Human-caused climate change is real, and denying it hurts all of us 19.3.2017 Salt Lake Tribune
The new head of the Environmental Protection Agency, Mr. Scott Pruitt, recently stated that he “would not agree that [carbon dioxide] is a primary contributor to the global warming that we see.” This is in direct contradiction of scientific findings over the past several decades. As scientists who study this problem, we would like to summarize the current consensus among the vast majority of researchers: 1. Carbon dioxide (CO2) is the primary long-lived greenhouse gas that warms the Earth’s ...
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Trump’s proposed budget: Agency-by-agency breakdown 17.3.2017 Denver Post: All Political News
How President Trump's proposed budget would affect individual government agencies.
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Research shows global warming could make us shorter 17.3.2017 Life-style – The Indian Express
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Letter: Reagan knew the importance of basic research 17.3.2017 Salt Lake Tribune
Repudiating virtually the entire scientific community, EPA Administrator Scott Pruitt said, “I would not agree that [CO2’s] a primary contributor to the global warming that we see.” Rep. Carlos Curbelo, Republican chairman of the House Climate Solutions Caucus, sides with science. “Rising carbon emissions have been a contributing factor to climate change for decades. That is a scientific fact and the reality facing communities like my district. The EPA is tasked with the very responsibility of h...
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