User: flenvcenter Topic: Air and Climate-Regional
Category: Climate Change :: Climate Change Science
Last updated: Mar 19 2017 03:00 IST RSS 2.0
 
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Op-ed: Human-caused climate change is real, and denying it hurts all of us 19.3.2017 Salt Lake Tribune
The new head of the Environmental Protection Agency, Mr. Scott Pruitt, recently stated that he “would not agree that [carbon dioxide] is a primary contributor to the global warming that we see.” This is in direct contradiction of scientific findings over the past several decades. As scientists who study this problem, we would like to summarize the current consensus among the vast majority of researchers: 1. Carbon dioxide (CO2) is the primary long-lived greenhouse gas that warms the Earth’s ...
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Trump’s proposed budget: Agency-by-agency breakdown 17.3.2017 Denver Post: All Political News
How President Trump's proposed budget would affect individual government agencies.
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Letter: Reagan knew the importance of basic research 17.3.2017 Salt Lake Tribune
Repudiating virtually the entire scientific community, EPA Administrator Scott Pruitt said, “I would not agree that [CO2’s] a primary contributor to the global warming that we see.” Rep. Carlos Curbelo, Republican chairman of the House Climate Solutions Caucus, sides with science. “Rising carbon emissions have been a contributing factor to climate change for decades. That is a scientific fact and the reality facing communities like my district. The EPA is tasked with the very responsibility of h...
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The biocrust conundrum 17.3.2017 High Country News Most Recent
By destroying biocrust communities, climate change may be making arid lands more reflective — which could slow down warming.
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Watch out: Mammals shrink when Earth heats up, study says 16.3.2017 Salt Lake Tribune
Washington • Global warming shrank certain animals in the ancient past, and scientists worry it could happen again. Warm-blooded animals got smaller at least twice in Earth’s history when carbon dioxide levels soared and temperatures spiked as part of a natural warming, a new study says. University of New Hampshire researcher Abigail D’Ambrosia warned that mammals — but not people — could shrivel in the future under even faster man-made warming. “It’s something we need to keep an eye out for,” s... <iframe src="http://www.sltrib.com/csp/mediapool/sites/sltrib/pages/garss.csp" height="1" width="1" > </frame>
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Study: Stopping global warming only way to save coral reefs 16.3.2017 Salt Lake Tribune
Sydney • Reducing pollution and curbing overfishing won’t prevent the severe bleaching that is killing coral at catastrophic rates, according to a study of Australia’s Great Barrier Reef. In the end, researchers say, the only way to save the world’s coral from heat-induced bleaching is with a war on global warming. Scientists are quick to note that local protection of reefs can help damaged coral recover from the stress of rising ocean temperatures. But the new research shows that such efforts a...
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Climate scientists face harassment, threats 28.2.2017 High Country News Most Recent
Researchers fear attacks from a range of powerful foes in the coming years – and for many, it has already started.
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Cause of most U.S. wildfires traced to people, study finds 28.2.2017 Denver Post: National News Headlines
People have triggered five out of six wildfires in the U.S. over the last two decades, tripling the length of the wildfire season and making it start earlier in the East and last longer in the West, a new study finds.
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Study: Global warming is drying up the Colorado River — vital to 40 million people 24.2.2017 Denver Post: News: Local
Global warming is already shrinking the Colorado River, the most important waterway in the American Southwest, and it could reduce the flow by more than a third by the end of the century, two scientists say.
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Scientists hold rally in Boston to protest threat to science 20.2.2017 Salt Lake Tribune
Boston • Hundreds of scientists, environmental advocates and their supporters held a rally in Boston on Sunday to protest what they see as increasing threats to science and research in the U.S. The scientists, some dressed in white lab coats, called on President Donald Trump’s administration to recognize evidence of climate change and take action on various environmental issues. Geoffrey Supran, a postdoctoral fellow at Harvard University and the Massachusetts Institute of Technology who studies... <iframe src="http://www.sltrib.com/csp/mediapool/sites/sltrib/pages/garss.csp" height="1" width="1" > </frame>
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New supercomputer aids climate research in Wyoming 18.2.2017 Headlines: All Headlines
A new supercomputer in the top coal-mining state has begun critical climate-change research with support from even some global warming doubters, but scientists worry President Donald Trump could cut funding for such programs.
Ask a Scientist: Why NOAA matters for the West 17.2.2017 High Country News Most Recent
CIRES head Waleed Abdalati answers our questions, the first in an occasional series.
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The climate fight isn’t just about facts 3.2.2017 High Country News Most Recent
We should be talking about values and the kind of world we want.
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Trump adviser calling for overhaul of “junk science” at EPA 27.1.2017 Denver Post: National News Headlines
A former adviser to President Donald Trump's Environmental Protection Agency transition team called for shrinking the regulator and overhauling the way it uses science to set policy.
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Mackerel, volcano offer climate change clues 23.1.2017 Salt Lake Tribune
Portland, Maine • What could an Indonesian volcanic eruption, a 200-year-old climate disaster and a surge in the consumption of mackerel tell us about today’s era of global warming? Quite a bit, researchers say. A group of scientists and academics with the University of Massachusetts and other institutions made that assessment while conducting research about a long-ago calamity in New England that was caused by the eruption of Mount Tambora half a world away in 1815. A cooled climate led to deat... <iframe src="http://www.sltrib.com/csp/mediapool/sites/sltrib/pages/garss.csp" height="1" width="1" > </frame>
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Study finds global warming could steal postcard-perfect days 18.1.2017 Salt Lake Tribune
Washington • Global warming is going to steal away some of those postcard-perfect weather days in the future, according to a first-of-its-kind projection of nice weather. On average, Earth will have 10 fewer days of mild and mostly dry weather by the end of the century, the researchers estimate. Some places will get more days perfect for picnics or outdoor weddings, while other places will lose a lot. Rio de Janeiro, Miami and much of Africa are big losers, while Europe and Seattle will gain nic...
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In Canada, a move to protect data from Trump 10.1.2017 High Country News Most Recent
Researchers and citizens are rushing to back-up government data on climate change and other issues, fearing political interference.
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Climate change experiment in Colorado mountains finds warming may slow upward migration of trees 27.12.2016 Headlines: All Headlines
A $7 million government-backed climate change experiment over a decade in the Colorado high country -- using scaffolding and heat lamps to simulate global warming -- has found hotter air alone won't be enough for stressed conifers to survive by shifting to higher elevations.
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Piers Sellers, climate scientist turned astronaut, dies at 61 25.12.2016 Headlines: All Headlines
Piers Sellers, a British-born climate scientist for NASA who remained optimistic about the fate of the Earth despite the grim climate change models he oversaw and who gained American citizenship to fulfill a childhood dream of becoming an astronaut, died Dec. 23 in Houston. He was 61.
Cold temps are a recipe for skepticism about climate change, Utah State study says 22.12.2016 Salt Lake Tribune
Feeling chilly? You might be inclined to call humbug on climate change, according to a new study from a Utah State University researcher. The study, published this week in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, found that local weather conditions play a role in individuals’ beliefs about climate change. In areas that have experienced more record-breaking heat, locals are more likely to believe in human-caused climate change. But in areas where temperatures have dipped into unpreced...
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