User: flenvcenter Topic: Air and Climate-National
Category: Air :: Air Policy
Last updated: Aug 20 2017 17:55 IST RSS 2.0
 
1 to 20 of 11,190    
In Gaza, we get four hours of electricity a day — if we're lucky 20.8.2017 LA Times: Commentary

Some friends threw me a surprise birthday party last month. They placed a chocolate cake lit with candles before me and told me to make a wish for the year ahead. I immediately blurted out, “24-hour electricity and air conditioning.” They laughed and suggested I wish for something more realistic.

...
Also found in: [+]
In the complex world of sustainability, taxes are still certain 17.8.2017 Small Business | GreenBiz.com
Countries remaining in the Paris accord may impose energy taxes on U.S.-refined products, which could create a new tracking and reporting nightmare.
Also found in: [+]
Elizabeth Warren's advice for Democrats: Don't fall back to the center 14.8.2017 Washington Post
Elizabeth Warren's advice for Democrats: Don't fall back to the center
Also found in: [+]
Study: Fines for illegal pollution plummet under Trump 10.8.2017 Seattle Times: Business & Technology

WASHINGTON (AP) — Fines for illegal pollution have plummeted under President Donald Trump, according to analysis by an environmental advocacy group. The Environmental Integrity Project looked at that civil penalties paid by polluters during the first six months under Trump. The group published an analysis Thursday that found penalties were less than half their levels […]
Also found in: [+]
Smoggier Skies in Texas? No Thanks, Washington! 9.8.2017 Main Feed - Environmental Defense
Before leaving for summer recess, the U.S. House of Representatives approved a bill, H.R. 806, that would sideline public health protections by changing the Clean Air Act fundamentally and delay important air quality protections. This so-called by changing the required review by EPA of standards from the current 5-year interval to 10 years. In Texas, several of our metro areas already fail the health-based standards for ozone , including the Houston and Dallas-Fort Worth regions. Now, some legislators in Washington, D.C., have put forward legislation that would put even more Texans at risk, since the new 2015 health-based ozone standard would likely have identified the San Antonio region, as well as Houston and Dallas-Fort Worth, as areas requiring new clean air actions be taken. The 2015 ozone air quality standard was put forward after a lengthy scientific evaluation process that involved many in the public health, medical, and scientific communities. Delaying these standards to 2025 means delaying ...
Also found in: [+]
'Path to GMO humans' presents 'profound ethical issues' 9.8.2017 LA Times: Commentary

To the editor: As pointed out in your editorial, the ethics related to gene editing are extremely complicated. This is especially true in today’s pragmatic culture. (Re “The path to GMO humans,” Editorial, Aug. 4)

All so-called improvements are not good. Although much good can come out of gene...

Also found in: [+]
Does state funding for Medi-Cal discriminate against the Latinos it serves? 9.8.2017 LA Times: Commentary

Only about half of the non-emergency care doctors in California are willing to treat patients who are on Medi-Cal — the state’s version of Medicaid, the joint federal-state health insurance program for the poor and disabled — because the state pays them too little for their services. Yet the federal...

Also found in: [+]
The Daily 202: The GOP congressional majority may be too strong for Trump to break 9.8.2017 Washington Post
The Daily 202: The GOP congressional majority may be too strong for Trump to break
Also found in: [+]
"Cruel and Unusual": Texas Prisoners Face Deadly Heat and Contaminated Water 8.8.2017 Truthout.com
Deadly heat, unsafe water, black mold and cockroaches plague prisoners at many Texas prisons. (Image: Jared Rodriguez / Truthout ) While the people who run Texas's prisons sit in air-conditioned offices and sip bottled water, the state's prisoners are subjected to deadly summer heat, toxic drinking water, black mold and cockroaches in their cells, say prisoners at the Eastham Unit who have filed suits contending cruel and unusual punishment. Deadly heat, unsafe water, black mold and cockroaches plague prisoners at many Texas prisons. (Image: Jared Rodriguez / Truthout ) This story is the fifth piece in "America's Toxic Prisons," an investigative, collaborative series between Truthout and Earth Island Journal. This series dives deeply into the intersection between mass incarceration and environmental justice. As a  federal judge ordered  the Texas Department of Criminal Justice (TDCJ) to cool down one of its prison units for the sake of its elderly and sick residents' health, plaintiffs at another Texas ...
Also found in: [+]
Remember those smoggy 60s? We do, don't repeal clear air provisions 8.8.2017 LA Times: Commentary

Re: "State limited in its fight to save anti-smog rules," Aug. 3

To the editor: Sixty-five years ago, when I was with the then-County of Los Angeles Air Pollution Controls District, air pollution in parts of Los Angeles County was so bad that if one of us went to speak about what was called "smog"...

Also found in: [+]
New California law gives air quality officials the power to quickly shut down polluters 8.8.2017 LA Times: Commentary

Local air quality officials are gaining new powers to quickly stop polluters when they endanger people’s health under legislation signed by Gov. Jerry Brown on Monday.

The law, which goes into effect Jan. 1, follows years of frustration in communities such as Paramount, Boyle Heights and Maywood...

Also found in: [+]
U.S. EPA Releasing Smog Rule 5.8.2017 Global Pollution and Prevention News - ENN
Faced with a lawsuit by 15 states, the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency announced this week it would no longer delay the implementation of a rule requiring states to reduce emissions of smog-creating air pollution. Crafted by the Obama administration in 2015, the regulation calls for states to begin meeting stricter ozone standards as of October 1, 2017, lowering the air pollution limit from 0.075 parts per million to 0.070 ppm.  Ground-level ozone, or smog, is created when pollutants from cars, power plants, and other common industrial activities react with sunlight.  It can cause respiratory and other health problems.  In June, U.S. EPA head Scott Pruitt announced the agency would delay implementation of the new standards by one year.
Also found in: [+]
U.S. EPA Releasing Smog Rule 5.8.2017 Climate Change News - ENN
Faced with a lawsuit by 15 states, the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency announced this week it would no longer delay the implementation of a rule requiring states to reduce emissions of smog-creating air pollution. Crafted by the Obama administration in 2015, the regulation calls for states to begin meeting stricter ozone standards as of October 1, 2017, lowering the air pollution limit from 0.075 parts per million to 0.070 ppm.  Ground-level ozone, or smog, is created when pollutants from cars, power plants, and other common industrial activities react with sunlight.  It can cause respiratory and other health problems.  In June, U.S. EPA head Scott Pruitt announced the agency would delay implementation of the new standards by one year.
Also found in: [+]
U.S. EPA Releasing Smog Rule 5.8.2017 Environmental News Network
Faced with a lawsuit by 15 states, the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency announced this week it would no longer delay the implementation of a rule requiring states to reduce emissions of smog-creating air pollution. Crafted by the Obama administration in 2015, the regulation calls for states to begin meeting stricter ozone standards as of October 1, 2017, lowering the air pollution limit from 0.075 parts per million to 0.070 ppm.  Ground-level ozone, or smog, is created when pollutants from cars, power plants, and other common industrial activities react with sunlight.  It can cause respiratory and other health problems.  In June, U.S. EPA head Scott Pruitt announced the agency would delay implementation of the new standards by one year.
Also found in: [+]
Chicago to sue Justice Department over threat to strip funds from 'sanctuary cities' 5.8.2017 LA Times: Commentary

Chicago Mayor Rahm Emanuel said Friday that the city is suing the federal government in defense of its status as a so-called sanctuary city and against threats to withhold U.S. grant funds.

Emanuel told "Connected to Chicago" on WLS-AM that the city would be in federal court Monday arguing that...

Also found in: [+]
So Trump wants the consumer watchdog sacked. Here's what's really going on 4.8.2017 LA Times: Commentary

President Trump has been party to nearly 4,100 lawsuits over the last three decades. About half the time he was the one doing the suing; the other half he was the one being sued.

But what makes Trump a complete hypocrite on this score — and aligns him with the business world — is that although...

Also found in: [+]
Sen. Cory Booker’s bill to legalize marijuana may be a long shot, but it’s still worth talking about 4.8.2017 LA Times: Commentary

This week Sen. Cory Booker (D-N.J.) introduced a sweeping bill that would not only legalize marijuana at the federal level, but would attempt to reverse the impact that the war on pot has had in poor and minority communities.

The Marijuana Justice Act would remove marijuana from the list of controlled...

Also found in: [+]
High prices, student loans put housing out of reach, readers say 4.8.2017 LA Times: Commentary

Courtney Pickard is a real estate agent who holds an MBA from Loyola Marymount University and makes around $100,000 a year.

But Pickard, 27, said she can’t buy a house.

“My goal right now is to be a homeowner by 34,” she said. “It’s a lofty goal.”

Pickard is among the dozens who responded to a...

Also found in: [+]
Would the military really have to obey a Trump command to fire a nuclear weapon? 4.8.2017 LA Times: Commentary

At a security conference late last month, the commander of the U.S. Pacific Fleet was asked what he would do if President Trump ordered him “to make a nuclear attack on China.” The commander, Adm. Scott Swift, answered promptly that he would, framing the issue as one of democratic governance and...

Also found in: [+]
Don't let rich absentee dads off the hook 4.8.2017 LA Times: Commentary

Although he was fired as President Trump’s communications director before he was ever sworn in, Anthony Scaramucci, in his not-quite-week on the not-quite-job, established himself as many men. He was the hardballer who forced out chief of staff “Reincey” Priebus. He was “The Mooch,” as he called...

Also found in: [+]
1 to 20 of 11,190