User: flenvcenter Topic: Air and Climate-National
Category: Air :: Air Policy
Last updated: Aug 30 2014 11:46 IST RSS 2.0
 
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EPA staff recommends significantly lower ozone standard 30.8.2014 LA Times: Top News
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Environmental Protection Agency staff says smog rules should be up to 20 percent stronger 30.8.2014 Star Tribune: Politics
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EPA staff says agency needs to be tough on smog 30.8.2014 AP Politics
WASHINGTON (AP) -- The Environmental Protection Agency's staff has concluded that the government needs to tighten smog rules by somewhere between 7 and 20 percent....
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EPA staff says agency needs to be tough on smog 30.8.2014 Yahoo: Top Stories
WASHINGTON (AP) — The Environmental Protection Agency's staff has concluded that the government needs to tighten smog rules by somewhere between 7 and 20 percent.
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Right to Know Reader: Cancer-Causing Power Plants Might Be Closer Than You Think 30.8.2014 Green on HuffingtonPost.com
Photo by Solovyova Lyudmyla When you think about sources of toxic air pollution, one of the first things you might picture is a large power plant with huge smoke stacks belching black clouds into the sky. But the truth is that smaller power plants collectively contribute more to the cancer risk faced by Americans every day. Consider the Evergreen Community Power Plant near Reading, Penn., a small power plant that burns wood waste from the forestry and construction industries. The plant spews out an alarming toxic cloud of chemicals , including lead, chromium, nickel, mercury, cobalt, beryllium and cadmium, many of which have been shown to cause cancer. But the Evergreen community may not even know it's there because the facility avoids the public disclosure and public process requirements faced by larger power plants by claiming to keep barely under the emissions thresholds that define it as a small, stationary source . According to the EPA, smaller polluters like this -- including factories and chemical ...
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New California Law Puts State on Road to a Million Zero-Emission Vehicles 28.8.2014 Union of Concerned Scientists
California Legislature approves the Charge Ahead California Initiative, which aims to bring one million electric cars, trucks and buses to California by 2023.
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Real estate pros strive to explain building energy performance 28.8.2014 Business Operations | GreenBiz.com

In California, brokers are at the heart of every non-residential sale or lease. Can the AIR organization get them on board with benchmarking?

Real estate pros strive to explain building energy performance
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Water contamination discussed in Warminster 28.8.2014 Philly.com News
A new drinking-water testing requirement has led authorities in Warminster and Horsham to close four major wells and could further delay redevelopment of the former Naval Air Station Willow Grove.
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With This Decade's Climate Policy, Expect More Warming Than if Nothing Was Done at All 27.8.2014 Truthout.com

2014 827 clim fwThe Navajo Generating Station in Arizona. It removes up to 90 percent of global cooling sulfate emissions, but the majority of coal fired generation in the U.S. does not. (Photo: Bruce Melton)

Since 1986, we have emitted as much carbon dioxide as we emitted in the prior 236 years, yet climate policy has only become approximately 13 percent more stringent. New knowledge suggests currently proposed policy will likely cause more warming in critical short-term time frames than if nothing was done at all. 

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EPA’s Clean Power Plan: Texas’ Last Stand or Last Hope? 27.8.2014 Main Feed - Environmental Defense
By Marita Mirzatuny Source: North Texas Renewable Energy Group August has been an eventful month here in Texas. And, no, I’m not referring to news about Governor Rick Perry, rather some of his appointees. The Texas Public Utility Commission (PUC), Texas Commission on Environmental Quality (TCEQ), Railroad Commissioners (RRC) Barry Smitherman and Christy Craddick, and State Representative Jason Isaac held a joint session to discuss the Environmental Protection Agency’s (EPA) new Clean Power Plan (CPP). The CPP will limit – for the first time ever – carbon emissions for existing power plants. Texas, the number one polluter in the country, needs to cut 195 billion pounds of carbon in the next 18 years, according to a  Texas Tribune analysis . However, EPA suggests Texas could easily meet its goal through a combination of actions: making coal plants more efficient, using more natural gas plants, increasing the use of renewable resources, and expanding energy efficiency. Texas has a choice : either roll up ...
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In Wake Of Ferguson, Police Departments Try To Build Trust With Black Residents 27.8.2014 Politics on HuffingtonPost.com
DALLAS (AP) — In the aftermath of the police shooting in Ferguson, Missouri, some police departments are renewing efforts to reach out to black communities to build trust — holding public meetings, fielding questions and letting people voice the anger they feel toward officers who patrol their neighborhoods. Dallas Police Chief David Brown considers it a preventative step. "I'd much rather they shout at me at a town hall meeting at a church and get to know me afterward than not have a relationship," Brown said. After a police shooting has already happened, "it's too late to try to establish relationships." Dallas has had 13 police shootings so far this year, leading to eight deaths. That follows last year's tally of 22 shootings and six deaths, according to police. To reassure the public, Dallas County District Attorney Craig Watkins recently announced he would begin sending two prosecutors to independently investigate each police shooting. Both Brown and Watkins are black and grew up in Dallas. Watkins ...
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Trash Burning Far More Polluting Than Expected As Countries Often Fail To Report Emissions 27.8.2014 Green on HuffingtonPost.com
NEW DELHI (AP) — Rampant trash-burning is throwing more pollution and toxic particles into the air than governments are reporting, according to a scientific study estimating more than 40 percent of the world's garbage is burned. The study published Tuesday in the journal Environmental Science and Technology attempts the first comprehensive assessment of global trash-burning data, including carbon dioxide, carbon monoxide, mercury and tiny particulate matter that can dim the sun's rays or clog human lungs. "Doing this study made me realize how little information we really have about garbage burning and waste management," said lead researcher Christine Wiedinmyer of the government-funded National Center for Atmospheric Research, in Boulder, Colorado. "What's really interesting is all the toxins. We need to look further at that." It also presents the first country-by-country index of rough emissions estimates for both carbon dioxide and toxic pollutants linked to human disease, though researchers ...
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Global trash burning more polluting than expected 27.8.2014 Twincities.com: Nation
NEW DELHI (AP) — Rampant trash-burning is throwing more pollution and toxic particles into the air than governments are reporting, according to a scientific study estimating more than 40 percent of the world's garbage is burned.
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Letter: Utah Division of Air Quality bows to industry 27.8.2014 Salt Lake Tribune
The Utah DAQ has it backwards. When Bryce Bird stated in a Salt Lake Tribune article (“Utah Grapples with Toxic Water…” Aug. 24), “Until we asked questions and started pressing the issue with Danish Flats, maybe they didn’t know the full extent of their emissions.” He apologized for their ignorance of toxic issues. “Maybe they didn’t know”? The responsibility of industry is always to know before any activity. But the Herbert administration is historically industry friendly at the expense of the ...
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How Cutting Emissions Pays Off 26.8.2014 Global Pollution and Prevention News - ENN
Lower rates of asthma and other health problems are frequently cited as benefits of policies aimed at cutting carbon emissions from sources like power plants and vehicles, because these policies also lead to reductions in other harmful types of air pollution. But just how large are the health benefits of cleaner air in comparison to the costs of reducing carbon emissions?
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How Cutting Emissions Pays Off 26.8.2014 Global Health and Wellness News - ENN
Lower rates of asthma and other health problems are frequently cited as benefits of policies aimed at cutting carbon emissions from sources like power plants and vehicles, because these policies also lead to reductions in other harmful types of air pollution. But just how large are the health benefits of cleaner air in comparison to the costs of reducing carbon emissions?
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How Cutting Emissions Pays Off 26.8.2014 Environmental News Network
Lower rates of asthma and other health problems are frequently cited as benefits of policies aimed at cutting carbon emissions from sources like power plants and vehicles, because these policies also lead to reductions in other harmful types of air pollution. But just how large are the health benefits of cleaner air in comparison to the costs of reducing carbon emissions?
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Israel, Palestinians reach ceasefire: Hamas spokesman says 26.8.2014 Chicago Tribune: Nation
Palestinian officials said Tuesday a Gaza ceasefire deal with Israel has been reached under Egyptian mediation and a formal announcement of an agreement was ...
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ESPN Says Announcers Do Not Have to Say 'Redskins' on Air 25.8.2014 CommonDreams.org Headlines
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Levels of Air Toxics decreasing across US Cities 23.8.2014 Environmental News Network
More and more people are living in our cities. They are great places to live, exciting, good jobs, great night life, but also sometimes congestion and unhealthy air quality. The latter problems are improving, however. Efforts to make cities livable without driving are paying off. Bike lanes, bike sharing, and efforts to reduce auto traffic and congestion are helping to improve the air quality in our cities. The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) this week released its Second Integrated Urban Air Toxics Report to Congress - the final of two reports required under the Clean Air Act (CAA) to inform Congress of progress in reducing public health risks from urban air toxics. "This report gives everyone fighting for clean air a lot to be proud of because for more than 40 years we have been protecting Americans – preventing illness and improving our quality ...
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