User: flenvcenter Topic: Air and Climate-National
Category: Air :: Air Policy
Last updated: Mar 30 2015 20:48 IST RSS 2.0
 
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Wind power or hot air? Foes question Christie’s shift on clean energy. 30.3.2015 Washington Post
ATLANTIC CITY — Just off this city’s famous coastline is one of the windiest stretches of the Mid-Atlantic, where constant breezes can fill a sail or — in theory — turn the blades of a wind turbine. It’s a place the state’s Republican governor invoked in 2010 in pledging to make New Jersey a wind superpower. Read full article >>
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Vote-a-Rama Reveals Senators’ Environmental Agenda 28.3.2015 Main Feed - Environmental Defense
By Jeremy Symons It’s been a big news day in the U.S. Senate, with Senate Democratic Leader Harry Reid announcing he won’t run for another term. But that's not the only news. Courtesy: Wikipedia We have had our eyes on the Senate’s marathon “Vote-a-Rama” budget process that wrapped up around three-thirty this morning. A number of environmental and energy votes came and went in a flurry of two-minute debates. While the votes mean little in terms of law (the budget bill doesn’t even go to the president for signature), Senators on both sides of the aisle brought up measures as trial balloons to find out where Senators stand on issues that could resurface when Congress takes up other legislation in the future. Disturbingly, but not surprisingly, polluter lobbyists were hard at work and Senators filed dozens of amendments attacking the Clean Air Act, the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA), President Obama’s Climate Action Plan, and other environmental measures. Others fought back with their own ...
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Senate Budget A Polluter Policy Wish List, Not Serious Attempt to Move America Forward 28.3.2015 Commondreams.org Newswire
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The Climate Post: Supreme Court Reviews EPA's Power Plant Mercury Rule; Decision Due in June 27.3.2015 Green on HuffingtonPost.com
The U.S. Supreme Court heard oral arguments this week in a challenge to the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency's (EPA) consideration of cost impacts when developing the Mercury and Air Toxics Standard , (MATS) which are set to go into effect next month. At issue in the case is whether the Clean Air Act requires the EPA to consider costs in addition to health and environmental impacts when determining whether (not just how) to regulate hazardous air pollutants emitted by power plants. The MATS rule, finalized in December 2011, requires coal-burning power plants to reduce emissions of toxic pollutants by installing control technologies. The EPA estimates the rule would cost industry about $9.6 billion a year but have the benefits of cutting coal and oil emissions by 90 percent and generating $37 billion in savings through "co-benefits." The U.S. Court of Appeals for the District of Columbia held that it is in EPA's discretion whether to consider costs when deciding whether it is "appropriate and ...
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Expert: US rules make chances of cockpit takeover slim 27.3.2015 Philly.com News
U.S. flight regulations make it less likely that a single jetliner pilot could barricade himself or herself inside the cockpit as French prosecutors say the Germanwings copilot did before crashing his airliner into the French Alps, a Massachusetts Institute of Technology aviation analyst said Thursday.
McConnell Amendment #836 Would Undermine the Clean Air Act -- EDF 27.3.2015 Main Feed - Environmental Defense
McConnell Amendment #836 Would Undermine the Clean Air Act -- EDF
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Airlines to require 2 crew members in cockpit at all times 27.3.2015 AP Business
LONDON (AP) -- Airlines and officials around the world on Thursday began requiring two crew members to always be present in the cockpit, after details emerged that the co-pilot of Germanwings Flight 9525 had apparently locked himself in the cockpit and deliberated crashed the plane into the mountains below....
The Latest: US identifies 3rd American plane crash victim 27.3.2015 Yahoo: Top Stories
The Latest: US identifies 3rd American plane crash victim
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France passes law to promote green roofs 26.3.2015 Environmental News Network
Environmentalism is fast becoming a top concern in France – a rooftop concern, to be precise. Excitingly, the nation has just passed new legislation that will require all upcoming commercial construction projects to feature either green roofs or solar panels above their top floors.
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Pricing congestion to invest in sustainable transport: lessons from London 26.3.2015 THE CITY FIX
In 2003, London adopted a program of congestion pricing that now places a roughly $17 (£11.50) daily fee on motor vehicles entering central London. The effort was expected to reduce car traffic, air pollution, and emissions in the area, and ...
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Air Canada changing cockpit policy after Germanwings crash 26.3.2015 World
Air Canada said on Thursday it is changing its policies to ensure that all flights have two people in the cockpit at all times after initial reports on the Germanwings flight that crashed on Tuesday. Canada's biggest airline is making the change "without delay," said spokesman Peter Fitzpatrick in an email. He said Air Canada was monitoring the investigation into the crash closely, noting that "at this point the cause is unknown." Fitzpatrick declined to describe Air Canada's previous policy, saying he could not discuss security ...
Louisiana Residents Convince EPA That Burning Explosive Waste Outside Is a Bad Idea 26.3.2015 Truthout.com
More than 18 million pounds of hazardous explosives are still sitting in bunkers at Camp Minden in Louisiana, after an explosion happened there more than two years ago. Officials haven't agreed on how to clean up the wartime leftovers, but they have decided not to burn them in the open air. A handout photo of the scene of an explosion at Camp Minden in Louisiana in October 2012, after which 18 million pounds of unstable hazardous material was discovered. Webster Parish residents and others said they would not shy from a confrontation if authorities proceed with a plan to openly burn an abandoned stockpile of M6 propellant left at the camp since the private contractor that owned it declared bankruptcy. (Louisiana National Guard via The New York Times) Do you want to see more stories like this published? Click here to help Truthout continue doing this work! More than 18 million pounds of M-6 artillery propellant and other hazardous explosives are still sitting in bunkers at the Camp Minden military ...
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Supreme Court's conservative justices question cost of EPA emissions rule 26.3.2015 LA Times: Business
The Supreme Court's conservative justices sharply questioned the high cost of a new Obama administration environmental regulation Wednesday, raising the prospect they may block the strict emissions standards for coal-fired power plants.
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GOP Launches Brazen Bid to Give Carbon Polluters Free Rein 26.3.2015 Green on HuffingtonPost.com
Congressional Republicans are proposing legislation this week that would allow states simply to "opt out" of the Obama administration's Clean Power Plan, the pioneering plan to curb carbon pollution from our power plants. A budget amendment by Sen. Rob Portman (R-OH) and a bill by Rep. Ed Whitfield (R-KY) strike at the heart of the federal Clean Air Act by letting each state simply walk away from national clean air requirements, giving big carbon polluters free rein to foul the air. This is the McConnell-Boehner Congress's most dangerous and brazen bid to carry out the big polluters' agenda to derail crucial action on climate change. These bills would force us back to the dark days half a century ago when powerful polluters had a free hand to poison our air, because states were unwilling or unable to protect their citizens. Nearly 50 years ago, congressional leaders made it a national responsibility to protect Americans' health and environment. They saw that air pollution doesn't stop at state ...
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Statement on Today’s Supreme Court Hearing to Decide Profits vs People 26.3.2015 Commondreams.org Newswire
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Polluters Again Challenge Common Sense Public Health Protections at the Supreme Court 25.3.2015 Green on HuffingtonPost.com
Today, the Supreme Court will hear polluter arguments against the Environmental Protection Agency's (EPA) vital Mercury and Air Toxics Standards (MATS), a long-overdue protection finalized in 2012 that will help guard our families, air, water, and wildlife from dangerous toxic pollution that comes from coal plants. These vital protections are critically important to public health, and the polluters challenging them are putting lives at risk. The mercury, arsenic, and other poisonous metal and acid gas pollution that these protections are meant to control pose serious dangers to pregnant women and young children. EPA scientists have estimated that as many as one in 10 women have mercury levels in their blood high enough to cause damage to a developing baby. I know I worried about this when I was pregnant with my daughter five years ago, and I still worry about it now as she grows up. That's why thousands of Sierra Club supporters worked with our partner organizations for years to push for these standards. ...
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U.S. justices divided over challenge to mercury air pollution rule 25.3.2015 Health
By Lawrence Hurley WASHINGTON (Reuters) - The U.S. Supreme Court appeared closely divided on Wednesday as it weighed whether the Obama administration had to consider costs before deciding whether to regulate emissions of mercury and other hazardous pollutants mainly from coal-fired power plants. Justice Anthony Kennedy could be a possible swing vote on the nine-justice court, with liberals backing the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency's rationale and conservatives hostile to the government's arguments. Chief Justice John Roberts also suggested he was troubled by the disparity between the costs and benefits of the regulation, saying it was a "red flag" for him. The government says it did not quantify some of the benefits, but says they could be worth billions of dollars, including a reduction in mercury poisoning, which can lead to developmental delays and abnormalities in children.
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U.S. Supreme Court To Hear Arguments Over EPA Mercury Limits 25.3.2015 Green on HuffingtonPost.com
WASHINGTON (AP) — The Supreme Court is taking up a challenge by industry groups and Republican-led states that want to roll back Obama administration environmental rules aimed at reducing power plant emissions of mercury and other hazardous air pollutants that contribute to respiratory illnesses, birth defects and developmental problems in children. The justices are hearing arguments Wednesday in a case about the authority of the Environmental Protection Agency to take action against coal- and oil-fired power plants that are responsible for half the nation's output of mercury. The EPA's rules on emissions of chromium, arsenic, acid gases, nickel, cadmium as well as mercury and other toxic substances is supposed to begin taking effect in April, and be in full force next year. The court is to decide whether the Clean Air Act requires that costs be a factor in the initial decision on whether to regulate hazardous air pollutants from power plants, or whether health risks are the only consideration. The EPA ...
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Yemen president flees Aden home as Shiite rebels near, official says 25.3.2015 LA Times: Top News
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Supreme Court hears arguments in dispute over EPA mercury rule 25.3.2015 LA Times: Commentary
Lawyers for the coal and electric power industries go before the Supreme Court on Wednesday hoping to block a strict new federal rule against mercury and other toxic air pollutants.
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