User: flenvcenter Topic: Air and Climate-National
Category: Climate Change :: Citizen Groups
Last updated: Oct 18 2014 09:46 IST RSS 2.0
 
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Why We Need War for a Great Recovery 18.10.2014 Politics on HuffingtonPost.com
Nobelist Paul Krugman has said it could take another world war, or similar mobilization effort to put everyone back to work and economic growth to return to historical levels from the Great Recession -- even an Alien Invasion would do it, he once quipped. In fact, the Great Recession was the equivalent of the Great Depression, which took more than 10 years of massive infrastructure building, retooling of whole industries, and a World War to recover. But aren't the wars are we are now fighting -- against ISIS, Ebola and global climate change -- such equivalents? What do we mean by that? Even the New Deal wasn't enough to get us out of the Great Depression. It took the mobilization of everyone in the effort of producing and building things to defeat a worldwide danger. Government as well as the private sector was involved, as all governments are during wartime. Governments created the jobs and paid the bills that produced the millions of tanks, planes and war equipment needed to defeat our enemies. Well, ...
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Can We Earn a Living on a Living Planet? 17.10.2014 Commondreams.org Views
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Naomi Klein: 'Grassroots Movement From Below' vs. 'Business-as-Usual' 17.10.2014 CommonDreams.org Headlines
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Abundant Natural Gas Won't Slow Climate Change, Study Says 15.10.2014 Green on HuffingtonPost.com
WASHINGTON (AP) — Cheap and plentiful natural gas isn't quite a bridge to a brighter energy future as claimed and won't slow global warming, a new study projects. Abundant natural gas in the United States has been displacing coal, which produces more of the chief global warming gas carbon dioxide. But the new international study says an expansion of natural gas use by 2050 would also keep other energy-producing technologies like wind, solar and nuclear, from being used more. And those technologies are even better than natural gas for avoiding global warming. Computer simulations show that emissions of heat-trapping gases to make electricity would not decline worldwide and could possibly go up, says the study, released Wednesday by the journal Nature. Unconventional techniques such as high-volume hydraulic fracturing and ultra-deep water drilling have increased global supplies of natural gas so much that prices are now expected to remain relatively low for years to come. That makes generating electricity ...
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Mining in Ecuador's Intag Valley: An Untold Story of Climate Change 15.10.2014 Green on HuffingtonPost.com
This article originally appeared on cuslar.org On the heels of the "largest climate march in history," where hundreds of thousands of activists, demonstrators, politicians, and environmentalists gathered together to protest in solidarity against climate change; NYC's sixth annual Climate Week ; and the United Nations Climate Summit , the issue of climate change is certainly a hot topic, so to speak. Over the past few weeks, at least 50 foundations have pledged to sell off holdings in the world's top oil and gas producers, while leaders like Archbishop Desmond Tutu and major business companies -- including Big Oil -- have pledged to divest from fossil fuels and cut carbon dioxide emissions. However, amid all the fanfare around the pledges to fight climate change and global warming, another environmental issue has failed to reach the masses, one that over the last several decades has had devastating and irrevocable ramifications for rural communities worldwide. Historically, the mining industry has played ...
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Activism Or Greenwashing? Giant Companies Bankroll New Social Good Platform 15.10.2014 Green on HuffingtonPost.com
A recently launched news site wants to rally millennials to save the planet. But first, it has to find a way to reconcile its mission with the massive corporations that are bankrolling it. The site, Collectively.org , focuses on uplifting stories about environmental innovation and sustainability. The stories are written by a mix of journalists, consultants and PR professionals. At the end of every story, the site suggests ways that young readers can get involved to help make a difference. “Today we are launching a new type of platform, and we hope that by doing so, we are also taking the first step to altering the course of our collective futures,” reads a Collectively article published on Oct. 7, the day of the site's launch. Before Collectively can help convince young people to save the world, however, it must earn their trust. A number of large corporations are providing the majority of funding for the venture, including Coca-Cola, PepsiCo, McDonald’s, Nestle, General Mills, Johnson & Johnson, Nike, ...
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Must Environmentalists and Labor Activists Find Themselves at Odds With Each Other? 13.10.2014 American Prospect
“I think the American people right now have been so focused, and will continue to be focused, on our economy and jobs and growth, that if the message is somehow we’re going to ignore jobs and growth simply to address climate change, I don’t think anybody is going to go for that. I won’t go for that.” --President Barack Obama, November 14, 2012, two weeks after Hurricane Sandy   It has been a tough couple of years in the effort to unite labor, community, and environmental groups, an alliance that has always been strained. The extractive energy sector—coal, gas, oil—has historically had strong union representation and well-paying jobs. Tensions rose in 2011 after the Sierra Club escalated their campaign to close coal plants and 350.org, the climate protection group led by activist Bill McKibben, called for a halt to the Keystone XL Pipeline project.  Even Obama’s relatively mild order this past June on reducing pollution from power plants was opposed by the International Brotherhood of Electrical Workers ...
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Must Environmentalists and Labor Activists Find Themselves at Odds? 13.10.2014 American Prospect
“I think the American people right now have been so focused, and will continue to be focused, on our economy and jobs and growth, that if the message is somehow we’re going to ignore jobs and growth simply to address climate change, I don’t think anybody is going to go for that. I won’t go for that.” --President Barack Obama, November 14, 2012, two weeks after Hurricane Sandy   It has been a tough couple of years in the effort to unite labor, community, and environmental groups, an alliance that has always been strained. The extractive energy sector—coal, gas, oil—has historically had strong union representation and well-paying jobs. Tensions rose in 2011 after the Sierra Club escalated their campaign to close coal plants and 350.org, the climate protection group led by activist Bill McKibben, called for a halt to the Keystone XL Pipeline project.  Even Obama’s relatively mild order this past June on reducing pollution from power plants was opposed by the International Brotherhood of Electrical Workers ...
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If Not Now, When? A Labor Movement Plan to Address Climate Change 12.10.2014 Commondreams.org Views
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The Climate Change Movement Is Not Wishful Thinking Anymore 6.10.2014 Mother Jones
This story first appeared on the TomDispatch website. Less than two weeks have passed and yet it isn't too early to say it: the People's Climate March changed the social map—many maps, in fact, since hundreds of smaller marches took place in 162 countries . That march in New York City, spectacular as it may have been with its 400,000 participants, joyous as it was, moving as it was (slow-moving, actually, since it filled more than a mile's worth of wide avenues and countless side streets), was no simple spectacle for a day. It represented the upwelling of something that matters so much more: a genuine global climate movement. When I first heard the term "climate movement" a year ago, as a latecomer to this developing tale, I suspected the term was extravagant, a product of wishful thinking. I had, after all, seen a few movements in my time (and participated in several). I knew something of what they felt like and looked like—and this, I felt, wasn't it. I knew, of course, that there were climate-related ...
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Nobel laureates' global warming meet scrapped due to HK protests 6.10.2014 Yahoo: Politics

The pro-democracy protesters started occupying central parts of Hong Kong on September 28, 2014Paris (AFP) - A four-day environment symposium which was to gather 11 Nobel laureates in Hong Kong from Wednesday, has been scrapped due to "sustained disruptions in the city," the organisers said Monday.


The Climate March: Beyond Asking Those Beholden to the Wrong People to Do the Right Thing 5.10.2014 Green on HuffingtonPost.com
The People's Climate March was an amazing and valuable achievement. The People's Climate March was a powerful exercise in a nearly powerless strategy. Who, among those with an inkling of the climate disaster already upon millions of beings on the planet, could not be heartened by the numbers, commitment, creativity, energy, joy, and diversity involved in Sunday's protests? The movement showed itself to be... a movement. And yet which of these quotations rings more true? 350.org's emailed "Official reportback from the UN meeting and People's Climate March" outlines a strategy of continuing to let those who have run ours and the world's affairs for decades know how we feel, as if that matters: The next important UN gatherings will be in Lima in December 2014 and in Paris in December 2015. Our hope is to use people-power to ratchet up the pressure on these talks, to channel the voices of millions around the world to increase the accountability and ambition of world leaders in these negotiations. If they are ...
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As the Globe Warms, So Does the Climate Movement 2.10.2014 Commondreams.org Views
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South Pacific Nations Plan To Block Australian Coal Port To Protest Climate Change Inaction 1.10.2014 Green on HuffingtonPost.com
SYDNEY, Oct 1 (Reuters) - Protesters from 12 South Pacific nations plan to block ships entering and leaving Australia's Port of Newcastle, the world's largest coal export terminal, this month to highlight effects they say climate change is having on their islands. Some experts say climate change will cause higher tides that will swamp lower-lying Pacific islands and present other challenges such as coral bleaching and an increase in storms and cyclones. A spokesman for the environmental activist group 350.org told Reuters the blockade by a flotilla of small boats on Oct. 17 would be peaceful and last a full day. On Monday, a sole demonstrator from the Front Line Action on Coal group chained himself to a rail line leading to the port and disrupted shipments before being removed by police. Millions of tonnes of coal mined from collieries owned by BHP Billiton Rio Tinto , Glencore and others pass through the port each year. Newcastle handles more than 4,000 ship movements annually, more than ...
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What’s Wrong With the Radical Critique of the People’s Climate March 1.10.2014 Commondreams.org Views
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On the News With Thom Hartmann: Activists Take Over Wall Street After Climate March, and More 30.9.2014 Truthout - All Articles
In today's On the News segment: Activists take over Wall Street after the massive march for action on climate change; the Obama administration is standing up to corporate tax dodgers; Google finally drops ALEC; and more. TRANSCRIPT: Thom Hartmann here – on the best of the rest of Economic and Labor News... You need to know this. After the recent, massive march on climate change, activists and protesters took over Wall Street. Three thousand people held a sit-in around the infamous charging bull statue, and demanded an end to the "economic system based on exploiting frontline communities, workers, and natural resources." Protesters say that the root of the climate crisis is capitalism itself, and they want the banksters to stop profiting off of our planet's destruction. Rising temperatures, toxic water, mega droughts, and super storms are some of the environmental risks of global warming, but these protesters wanted to shine a light on the economic causes, and dangers, of climate change. The profiteers on ...
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Don't Blame Climate Change Deniers 30.9.2014 Truthout.com
MythicAmerica is on a forced hiatus while I deal with health problems. But over 300,000 people in New York City the other day reminded us all that no one's health will matter much unless we take care of the planet's health. So I felt moved to polish up a previously unpublished column and share these thoughts with you: The old joke, "Everybody talks about the weather, but nobody does anything about it," is no laughing matter any more. It's dead serious. Yet the United States seems politically paralyzed on this most vital issue. It's easy to blame the climate change deniers. But it's wrong. In Gallup's most recent poll only 18% of us denied climate change. In a CBS poll , only 11% were outright deniers. The vast majority of Americans are well aware that there's a real problem . More than four out of five agree with the overwhelming scientific consensus that climate change is happening now or surely will happen soon. And a solid majority believe that what they read in the news about climate change is either ...
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Rocket's Red Glare, Bombs Bursting in Air Steal Global Climate Protests' Thunder [Pt. II] 30.9.2014 Green on HuffingtonPost.com
Part 1 focused on the People's Climate March, the UN Climate Summit, global climate negotiations, and the effects of the new Middle Eastern air war escalation on the media's desultory coverage of the global climate protest movement. Part 2 provides a brief critique of the Obama Administration's climate policies. Climate activists see the President piously jaw-boning about the need for action to protect the climate for our children while his Administration is busily throwing millions of acres of public lands open to oil, gas and coal producers even as the State Department promotes fracking abroad, as if fracking were a solution to climate change and not a part of the problem. We will one day come to regret brashly disseminating this harmful technology just as we should rue the post-World War II Federal program that spread nuclear power technology around the world in the name of commercializing nuclear reactors, only to multiply the risks of nuclear weapons proliferation -- much to our consternation ...
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How We Win on Climate Change 30.9.2014 Commondreams.org Views
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The Climate 'Marchers' Who Fought and Died in the Amazon 30.9.2014 Green on HuffingtonPost.com
Participants from Physicians for Social Responsibility at the People's Climate March in New York City, Sept. 21 (photo courtesy of Gloria Gonzalez) The 400,000 people who walked across New York City in this month's People's Climate March may not have known it, but their actions came on the heels of another event far away, involving indigenous activists in a remote part of the Amazon rainforest. Near the border of Peru and Brazil, they were making their own journey -- sometimes by walking -- to have their voices heard and to demand action on climate change, as were the marchers in New York. For many, the People's Climate March was seen as a success and a good start, providing some momentum on the issue of how to deal with climate change and a more hopeful and optimistic focus on challenges. Yet for the members of Peru's Asháninka indigenous group who were traveling to negotiate territorial rights that would help them better protect the forest, the "lungs of the planet," the outcome in the rainforest was ...
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