User: flenvcenter Topic: Air and Climate-National
Category: Climate Change :: Citizen Groups
Last updated: Nov 01 2014 06:06 IST RSS 2.0
 
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Here Are The Top Super PAC Mega-Donors In 2014 Elections 1.11.2014 Politics on HuffingtonPost.com
WASHINGTON -- In Iowa, a television station recently created a new program so it could sell more advertising to political campaigns, party committees and independent groups bombarding voters in this year's battleground states. The advertising crush is being driven in large part by big-spending independent groups, including super PACs and nonprofits, which are on pace to set a record for independent spending in a midterm election cycle. The groups are set to spend more than $600 million -- double their expenses from the 2010 elections. Super PACs accounted for $332 million in spending through the end of October, according to the Center for Responsive Politics. Massive contributions from the wealthiest Americans, large corporations, dark money nonprofits and labor unions are behind this super PAC spending binge. A review of Federal Election Commission records by The Huffington Post found that 140 donors who gave more than $500,000 each to super PACs accounted for $365.5 million in super PAC donations as of ...
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Beating Climate Change by Retooling the Economy: The Story Begins in Navajo Country 24.10.2014 Truthout - All Articles
Solar panels in the Nevada desert. (Photo: jsmoorman ) Do you want media that's accountable to YOU, not to advertisers or billionaire sponsors? Invest in independent media - donate to Truthout today! This story is part of the Climate in Our Hands collaboration between Truthout and YES! Magazine. “I grew up without running water,” Nichole Alex, a young woman from Dilkon, Ariz., says in a video released by the activist group Black Mesa Water Coalition . Alex grew up on the Navajo reservation in the rural Black Mesa region of Arizona, where for decades a controversial coal mine emptied the region’s aquifer, leaving local wells dry. “I grew up traveling 20 miles to gather water,” Alex continues. “That’s not fair, that my community is being sacrificed to power the valley here.” In 1970, the Peabody Coal Company began mining on the reservation. Although tribal members were initially enthusiastic about the jobs the mine would provide, over time the relationship grew rocky. The company built a coal slurry ...
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Democrat Climate Activist Is Election's Biggest Donor — That We Know Of 23.10.2014 NPR: Morning Edition
Activist Tom Steyer has spent an astonishing $58 million this election cycle. He says he wants leaders in Washington who will take climate change seriously.
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Billionaires Answer Call To Donate To Republican Super PACs For 2014 Homestretch 22.10.2014 Politics on HuffingtonPost.com
WASHINGTON -- Billionaires are rushing to the aid of Republicans in the homestretch of the 2014 elections with a massive super PAC infusion after a plea from big money mastermind Karl Rove. On Sept. 17, Rove, the co-founder of the super PAC and dark money duo American Crossroads and Crossroads GPS, took to the Wall Street Journal editorial page to send out his billionaire bat-signal. If the rich want to ensure Republican control of the Senate, "reducing the Democratic cash advantage will tip the needle in the GOP's direction," Rove wrote. "That will only happen if Republicans open their wallets to candidates whom they may have never met." Since Rove's plea, 21 billionaires and their family members have poured $19.9 million into super PACs backing Republican Party candidates, fueling an October outside spending surge. Only $5.1 million was given to the Republican super PACs in the first half of September, before Rove's request. The billionaire cash infusion came from what has become the core of the ...
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One Month After Historic People’s Climate March, 'Climate Action' from Global Leaders Still Disappointing 21.10.2014 Commondreams.org Views
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Why We Need War for a Great Recovery 18.10.2014 Politics on HuffingtonPost.com
Nobelist Paul Krugman has said it could take another world war, or similar mobilization effort to put everyone back to work and economic growth to return to historical levels from the Great Recession -- even an Alien Invasion would do it, he once quipped. In fact, the Great Recession was the equivalent of the Great Depression, which took more than 10 years of massive infrastructure building, retooling of whole industries, and a World War to recover. But aren't the wars are we are now fighting -- against ISIS, Ebola and global climate change -- such equivalents? What do we mean by that? Even the New Deal wasn't enough to get us out of the Great Depression. It took the mobilization of everyone in the effort of producing and building things to defeat a worldwide danger. Government as well as the private sector was involved, as all governments are during wartime. Governments created the jobs and paid the bills that produced the millions of tanks, planes and war equipment needed to defeat our enemies. Well, ...
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Can We Earn a Living on a Living Planet? 17.10.2014 Commondreams.org Views
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Naomi Klein: 'Grassroots Movement From Below' vs. 'Business-as-Usual' 17.10.2014 CommonDreams.org Headlines
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Abundant Natural Gas Won't Slow Climate Change, Study Says 15.10.2014 Green on HuffingtonPost.com
WASHINGTON (AP) — Cheap and plentiful natural gas isn't quite a bridge to a brighter energy future as claimed and won't slow global warming, a new study projects. Abundant natural gas in the United States has been displacing coal, which produces more of the chief global warming gas carbon dioxide. But the new international study says an expansion of natural gas use by 2050 would also keep other energy-producing technologies like wind, solar and nuclear, from being used more. And those technologies are even better than natural gas for avoiding global warming. Computer simulations show that emissions of heat-trapping gases to make electricity would not decline worldwide and could possibly go up, says the study, released Wednesday by the journal Nature. Unconventional techniques such as high-volume hydraulic fracturing and ultra-deep water drilling have increased global supplies of natural gas so much that prices are now expected to remain relatively low for years to come. That makes generating electricity ...
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Mining in Ecuador's Intag Valley: An Untold Story of Climate Change 15.10.2014 Green on HuffingtonPost.com
This article originally appeared on cuslar.org On the heels of the "largest climate march in history," where hundreds of thousands of activists, demonstrators, politicians, and environmentalists gathered together to protest in solidarity against climate change; NYC's sixth annual Climate Week ; and the United Nations Climate Summit , the issue of climate change is certainly a hot topic, so to speak. Over the past few weeks, at least 50 foundations have pledged to sell off holdings in the world's top oil and gas producers, while leaders like Archbishop Desmond Tutu and major business companies -- including Big Oil -- have pledged to divest from fossil fuels and cut carbon dioxide emissions. However, amid all the fanfare around the pledges to fight climate change and global warming, another environmental issue has failed to reach the masses, one that over the last several decades has had devastating and irrevocable ramifications for rural communities worldwide. Historically, the mining industry has played ...
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Activism Or Greenwashing? Giant Companies Bankroll New Social Good Platform 15.10.2014 Green on HuffingtonPost.com
A recently launched news site wants to rally millennials to save the planet. But first, it has to find a way to reconcile its mission with the massive corporations that are bankrolling it. The site, Collectively.org , focuses on uplifting stories about environmental innovation and sustainability. The stories are written by a mix of journalists, consultants and PR professionals. At the end of every story, the site suggests ways that young readers can get involved to help make a difference. “Today we are launching a new type of platform, and we hope that by doing so, we are also taking the first step to altering the course of our collective futures,” reads a Collectively article published on Oct. 7, the day of the site's launch. Before Collectively can help convince young people to save the world, however, it must earn their trust. A number of large corporations are providing the majority of funding for the venture, including Coca-Cola, PepsiCo, McDonald’s, Nestle, General Mills, Johnson & Johnson, Nike, ...
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Must Environmentalists and Labor Activists Find Themselves at Odds With Each Other? 13.10.2014 American Prospect
“I think the American people right now have been so focused, and will continue to be focused, on our economy and jobs and growth, that if the message is somehow we’re going to ignore jobs and growth simply to address climate change, I don’t think anybody is going to go for that. I won’t go for that.” --President Barack Obama, November 14, 2012, two weeks after Hurricane Sandy   It has been a tough couple of years in the effort to unite labor, community, and environmental groups, an alliance that has always been strained. The extractive energy sector—coal, gas, oil—has historically had strong union representation and well-paying jobs. Tensions rose in 2011 after the Sierra Club escalated their campaign to close coal plants and 350.org, the climate protection group led by activist Bill McKibben, called for a halt to the Keystone XL Pipeline project.  Even Obama’s relatively mild order this past June on reducing pollution from power plants was opposed by the International Brotherhood of Electrical Workers ...
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Must Environmentalists and Labor Activists Find Themselves at Odds? 13.10.2014 American Prospect
“I think the American people right now have been so focused, and will continue to be focused, on our economy and jobs and growth, that if the message is somehow we’re going to ignore jobs and growth simply to address climate change, I don’t think anybody is going to go for that. I won’t go for that.” --President Barack Obama, November 14, 2012, two weeks after Hurricane Sandy   It has been a tough couple of years in the effort to unite labor, community, and environmental groups, an alliance that has always been strained. The extractive energy sector—coal, gas, oil—has historically had strong union representation and well-paying jobs. Tensions rose in 2011 after the Sierra Club escalated their campaign to close coal plants and 350.org, the climate protection group led by activist Bill McKibben, called for a halt to the Keystone XL Pipeline project.  Even Obama’s relatively mild order this past June on reducing pollution from power plants was opposed by the International Brotherhood of Electrical Workers ...
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If Not Now, When? A Labor Movement Plan to Address Climate Change 12.10.2014 Commondreams.org Views
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The Climate Change Movement Is Not Wishful Thinking Anymore 6.10.2014 Mother Jones
This story first appeared on the TomDispatch website. Less than two weeks have passed and yet it isn't too early to say it: the People's Climate March changed the social map—many maps, in fact, since hundreds of smaller marches took place in 162 countries . That march in New York City, spectacular as it may have been with its 400,000 participants, joyous as it was, moving as it was (slow-moving, actually, since it filled more than a mile's worth of wide avenues and countless side streets), was no simple spectacle for a day. It represented the upwelling of something that matters so much more: a genuine global climate movement. When I first heard the term "climate movement" a year ago, as a latecomer to this developing tale, I suspected the term was extravagant, a product of wishful thinking. I had, after all, seen a few movements in my time (and participated in several). I knew something of what they felt like and looked like—and this, I felt, wasn't it. I knew, of course, that there were climate-related ...
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Nobel laureates' global warming meet scrapped due to HK protests 6.10.2014 Yahoo: Politics

The pro-democracy protesters started occupying central parts of Hong Kong on September 28, 2014Paris (AFP) - A four-day environment symposium which was to gather 11 Nobel laureates in Hong Kong from Wednesday, has been scrapped due to "sustained disruptions in the city," the organisers said Monday.


The Climate March: Beyond Asking Those Beholden to the Wrong People to Do the Right Thing 5.10.2014 Green on HuffingtonPost.com
The People's Climate March was an amazing and valuable achievement. The People's Climate March was a powerful exercise in a nearly powerless strategy. Who, among those with an inkling of the climate disaster already upon millions of beings on the planet, could not be heartened by the numbers, commitment, creativity, energy, joy, and diversity involved in Sunday's protests? The movement showed itself to be... a movement. And yet which of these quotations rings more true? 350.org's emailed "Official reportback from the UN meeting and People's Climate March" outlines a strategy of continuing to let those who have run ours and the world's affairs for decades know how we feel, as if that matters: The next important UN gatherings will be in Lima in December 2014 and in Paris in December 2015. Our hope is to use people-power to ratchet up the pressure on these talks, to channel the voices of millions around the world to increase the accountability and ambition of world leaders in these negotiations. If they are ...
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As the Globe Warms, So Does the Climate Movement 2.10.2014 Commondreams.org Views
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South Pacific Nations Plan To Block Australian Coal Port To Protest Climate Change Inaction 1.10.2014 Green on HuffingtonPost.com
SYDNEY, Oct 1 (Reuters) - Protesters from 12 South Pacific nations plan to block ships entering and leaving Australia's Port of Newcastle, the world's largest coal export terminal, this month to highlight effects they say climate change is having on their islands. Some experts say climate change will cause higher tides that will swamp lower-lying Pacific islands and present other challenges such as coral bleaching and an increase in storms and cyclones. A spokesman for the environmental activist group 350.org told Reuters the blockade by a flotilla of small boats on Oct. 17 would be peaceful and last a full day. On Monday, a sole demonstrator from the Front Line Action on Coal group chained himself to a rail line leading to the port and disrupted shipments before being removed by police. Millions of tonnes of coal mined from collieries owned by BHP Billiton Rio Tinto , Glencore and others pass through the port each year. Newcastle handles more than 4,000 ship movements annually, more than ...
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What’s Wrong With the Radical Critique of the People’s Climate March 1.10.2014 Commondreams.org Views
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