On December 31 2020, the newsrack service will be shut down permanently.

It has been a nice long run from the Sarai days in 2004 to being hosted on its own domain around 2006. Beside maintenance, there has been no real active development on the code or the features since early 2008. Since 2015, even all that maintenance was pretty bare bones. A lot of news sources no longer provide reliable RSS feeds and since mid 2018, there were growing issues with the service and I only kept it alive to assist a handful of users.

So, it is time to shut this down. The internet world in 2020 is vastly differently from 2003 when I first conceptualized this service. Thanks for using this all these years.

If you need to access any data, email me: subbu at newsrack.in

 
User: flenvcenter Topic: Air and Climate-National
Category: Climate Change :: Climate Change Science
Last updated: Dec 02 2020 13:42 IST RSS 2.0
 
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14 World Leaders Commit to 100% Sustainable Ocean Management to Solve Global Challenges; Call for More Countries to Join 2.12.2020 WRI Stories
14 World Leaders Commit to 100% Sustainable Ocean Management to Solve Global Challenges; Call for More Countries to Join Leaders of Australia, Canada, Chile, Fiji, Ghana, Indonesia, Jamaica, Japan, Kenya, Mexico, Namibia, Norway, Palau and Portugal commit to sustainably manage nearly 30 million sq km of their national waters by 2025 Leaders put a healthy ocean at the top of the global policy agenda to accelerate economic recovery LONDON (December 2, 2020) —The High Level Panel for a... [[ This is a content summary only. Visit my website for full links, other content, and more! ...
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RELEASE: 14 World Leaders Commit to 100% Sustainable Ocean Management to Solve Global Challenges; Call for More Countries to Join 2.12.2020 WRI Stories
RELEASE: 14 World Leaders Commit to 100% Sustainable Ocean Management to Solve Global Challenges; Call for More Countries to Join Leaders of Australia, Canada, Chile, Fiji, Ghana, Indonesia, Jamaica, Japan, Kenya, Mexico, Namibia, Norway, Palau and Portugal commit to sustainably manage nearly 30 million sq km of their national waters by 2025 Leaders put a healthy ocean at the top of the global policy agenda to accelerate economic recovery LONDON (December 2, 2020)—The High Level Panel for... [[ This is a content summary only. Visit my website for full links, other content, and more! ...
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Driving System Shifts for Climate Resilience: Case Studies of Transformative Adaptation in Bhutan, Ethiopia, and Costa Rica 30.11.2020 WRI Stories
Working Paper Featured ...
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The Myth of a Food Crisis 25.11.2020 Organic Consumers Association News Headlines

World Agriculture Towards 2030/2050 is a major report predicting global agricultural trends (Alexandratos & Bruinsma, 2012). It was produced by the economics division of the UN Food and Agriculture Organization (FAO). In its abstract the FAO authors make a prominent disclaimer. Its projections, they stress (both on p. i and p. 7), are not to be used for normative purposes; that is, their report is not a prescription of how the global food system should develop.

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Policy News: November 23, 2020 23.11.2020 EcoTone
In This Issue: President-elect Biden Announces Transition Team Agency review teams include many Obama administration alumni. Inform Science Policy Recommendation for President-elect Biden’s Administration ESA asks for your assistance in creating a list of federal science-related priorities. ESA Webinar — Science in President-elect Biden’s Administration The webinar recording in now available. Memos Outline Climate Policy ...
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Lake Michigan is known for its sandy shores. But surging water levels have left officials scrambling for new ways to protect them. 20.11.2020 Chicago Tribune: Popular
Rising temperatures, precipitation and human development across the Great Lakes basin have changed Lake Michigan, affecting millions along its coast.
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CU researchers link prehistoric wildfires to climate change 15.11.2020 Denver Post: News: Local
University of Colorado Boulder researchers have found that climate change spurred wildfires across much of the planet millions of years ago, with implications that human-caused climate change could have similar impacts in the future.
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Protecting Your Coffee from Climate Change: 3 Early Lessons in Costa Rica 28.10.2020 WRI Stories
Leer este blog en español Your daily cup of coffee, and the 25 million smallholder farmers who produce all the cups of coffee like it, are in danger. Why? Without adaptation measures, experts predict that by 2050 climate change will reduce by half the areas of the world suitable for coffee cultivation. Yet, despite the threats of rising temperatures, irregular rainfall, and coffee pests and diseases, putting climate adaptation measures into action can change this reality for some regions, protecting vulnerable farmers. New WRI research explores how people along the coffee supply chain can strengthen key advantages already present in one vibrant coffee growing region in Costa Rica. Coffee farming communities in Costa Rica face many of the same climate and profitability challenges as farmers in other major coffee-producing countries like Brazil, Colombia, Mexico, Guatemala, Honduras, Vietnam, Indonesia, Ethiopia and Uganda. In many of these countries, the coffee industry will require fundamental changes to ...
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Building a Climate Resilient Future for Costa Rica’s Coffee Farming Communities 28.10.2020 WRI Stories
Building a Climate Resilient Future for Costa Rica’s Coffee Farming Communities
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'What the Future Can Look Like': Study Shows Us Switch To 100% Renewables Would Save Hundreds of Billions Each Year 27.10.2020 Organic Consumers Association News Headlines

While President Donald Trump has baselessly attacked plans to eradicate fossil fuel-based sources of energy from the United States' power grid on the grounds that doing so would be expensive and economically destructive, a new analysis reveals the opposite to be true—aggressively transitioning to 100% renewables would save Americans up to $321 billion per year while reducing harmful greenhouse gas emissions that are heating the planet.

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These changes to our food systems could improve human and planetary health 26.10.2020 Resource Efficiency | GreenBiz.com
These changes to our food systems could improve human and planetary health Oliver Camp Mon, 10/26/2020 - 01:30 On the recent World Food Day, the clarion call was clearer than ever: We must fix our food systems to improve human health, drive economic growth and save the planet from environmental collapse. The challenges facing us are wide-ranging. The way the world produces and consumes food causes huge environmental impacts, and yet 3 billion people worldwide are unable to afford a healthy diet, and up to a third of the food we produce is wasted. What’s more, hunger and micronutrient deficiencies are concentrated among the poorest and most vulnerable — often including those who produce the food we eat. Meanwhile, the so-called double burden of malnutrition is on the rise: hunger and malnourishment coexisting with overweight and obesity, often in the same countries, communities or even individuals. Tackling these multiple challenges and threats requires coordinated action from the public sector, private ...
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As Colorado wildfires burn, fears that climate change is causing “multi-level emergency” mount 25.10.2020 Denver Post: Local
The record-breaking forest fires burning in Colorado even as winter sets in are the latest sign climate change is hitting the West hard, causing scientists to up their rhetoric and warn it is past time to move beyond planning and start aggressively acting.
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Europe’s wood pellet market is worsening environmental racism in the American South 21.10.2020 Small Business | GreenBiz.com
Europe’s wood pellet market is worsening environmental racism in the American South Danielle Purifoy Wed, 10/21/2020 - 00:45 This story was originally published by Southerly , in partnership with Scalawag and Environmental Health News for its Powerlines series, which looks at climate change, justice, and infrastructure in the American South. The series is supported by the Temple Hoyne Buell Center for the Study of American Architecture at Columbia University, and is part of their  POWER project .  In 2013, when Enviva Biomass opened a new plant near Belinda Joyner’s community in Northampton County, North Carolina, she already knew what to expect. As the Northeast Organizer for  Clean Water for North Carolina , she’d met with residents of a small, majority Black town called Ahoskie, 40 miles from her home. Enviva had built its  first North Carolina plant  there two years before.  The corporation, which manufactures wood pellets as a purportedly renewable alternative to coal, did what most industries do in ...
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Clean Energy Can Help Southeast Asia Recover After COVID-19 19.10.2020 WRI Stories
Print This farming couple in Thailand rents out some of their land for a wind turbine. Photo by Asian Development Bank. Prior to the devastating impacts of COVID-19, Southeast Asia was becoming an economic powerhouse. Manufacturing, industry and services expanded across the region in recent decades. Energy demand also grew an average of 6% per year, one of the fastest growth rates in the world. But despite the global decline in renewable energy prices, Southeast Asian countries have largely embraced fossil fuels to meet their growing energy needs. Close to 60% of Indonesia's electricity supply comes from its 29 gigawatt (GW) coal fleet. An additional 24.7 GW is in the works, making the country's coal pipeline the fifth largest in the world. The latest Philippine Energy Plan proposed expanding the share of coal in the energy mix from an already high 52.1% in 2018 to 55.3% by 2040 to support industrialization. The share of renewables in the Philippines' generation mix dropped to 21% in 2019, from more than ...
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Restoring Farmland Could Drastically Slow Extinctions, Fight Climate Change 17.10.2020 Organic Consumers Association News Headlines

The twin crises of climate change and biodiversity loss are intertwined: Storms and wildfires are worsening while as many as one million species are at risk of extinction. The solutions are not small or easy, but they exist, scientists say.

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What Farmers Need to Survive a Changing Climate: Transformative Adaptation 16.10.2020 WRI Stories
Print Growing millet in India. Photo by CGIAR Climate In India, as in many countries where agriculture is key, farmers are facing serious challenges from climate change. New climatic conditions are undermining the livelihoods of millions of farmers in India, raising doubts about whether farmers can continue to grow the same crops they are currently producing.  Small changes won’t do. These farmers need new options, information and technology to help them transform how they farm to survive in a changing climate. This kind of transformation is being powered by enhanced climate services – defined as systems to develop and provide climate information to help farmers make more climate-informed decisions - and improved crop research and development, aiding Indian farmers as they begin to shift from water-intensive crops like maize to drought- and heat-tolerant varieties of millet, a traditional crop that had dropped out of favor in recent decades. The transformation began with data: 40 years of weather and ...
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RELEASE: New analysis finds subnational action critical to global approaches to climate change 16.10.2020 WRI Stories
RELEASE: New analysis finds subnational action critical to global approaches to climate change HTML Editor - Full Version A new paper released today in the open-access, peer-reviewed journal Nature Communications demonstrates how combining existing sub-national climate action with expanded national strategies in the United States will be critical to reach scientifically informed climate goals—and finds that such a comprehensive approach could reduce emissions up to 49% by 2030, relative to 2005 levels. The paper, entitled " Fusing subnational with national climate action is central to decarbonization: The case of the United States ," also illuminates how the significant scale of action driven by subnational actors can form a critical part of national strategies—not only in the U.S. but also in other countries—as nations around the world increase their ambition to address climate change under the Paris Agreement. In reaching these conclusions, the paper illustrates that the coalitions of subnational ...
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Applying Climate Services to Transformative Adaptation in Agriculture 16.10.2020 WRI Stories
Applying Climate Services to Transformative Adaptation in Agriculture
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Opportunities for Crop Research, Development and Adoption to Drive Transformative Adaptation in Agriculture 16.10.2020 WRI Stories
Opportunities for Crop Research, Development and Adoption to Drive Transformative Adaptation in Agriculture
Leveraging the Ocean's Carbon Removal Potential 9.10.2020 WRI Stories
Print A combination of ocean-based carbon removal approaches could help address the global climate crisis. Photo by Kevin Davison/Unsplash To meet the Paris Agreement’s goal of limiting temperature rise to 1.5 degrees C (2.7 degrees F), greenhouse gas emissions must reach net-zero by mid-century. Achieving this will not only require reducing existing emissions, but also removing carbon dioxide already in the air. How much carbon to remove from the atmosphere will depend on emissions in the coming years, but estimates point to around 10-20 billion tons of CO2 per year through 2100, globally. This is a tremendous amount, considering that the United States emitted 5.4 billion tons of CO2 in 2018. As the need for climate action becomes more urgent, the ocean is gaining attention as a potential part of the solution . Approaches like investing in offshore energy production, conserving coastal ecosystems and increasing consumption of sustainable ocean-based protein offer opportunities to reduce emissions. In ...
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