User: flenvcenter Topic: Air and Climate-National
Category: Climate Change :: Climate Change Science
Last updated: Sep 16 2020 15:45 IST RSS 2.0
 
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Startup tackles decarbonizing industrial heat processes 16.9.2020 Energy & Climate | Greenbiz.com
Startup tackles decarbonizing industrial heat processes Myisha Majumder Wed, 09/16/2020 - 01:30 Skyven Technologies, founded in 2013, is a company with a unique proposition for companies in the industrial sector — a way to save money through decarbonizing. Skyven CEO Arun Gupta said the idea came when he applied the thinking behind his Ph.D. dissertation in microelectronics to an entirely different field: climate change. "I was able to figure out how to apply the technological concepts of the work that I was doing for Texas Instruments for a partial solution for climate change, and that inspired me to start working on is basically a technology that captures heat from the sun and uses that heat to reduce fuel consumption," he said. The component of the industry sector emissions Skyven seeks to decarbonize is process heat — such as the creation of steam — which accounts for a large component of the emissions from the industry sector. In order to manufacture products, companies in the industry sector must ...
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Policy News: September 14, 2020 14.9.2020 EcoTone
In This Issue: Action Alert: Scientific Societies, House Science Committee Push for Research Relief The RISE Act would authorize $26 billion in emergency relief for federal science agencies. Upcoming ESA Webinars ESA will host a webinar with Engineers and Scientists Acting Locally Sept. 30. Congress Sen. Richard Durbin (D-IL) calls for $55 billion for a ...
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COVID-19, weakened environmental protections, and rights infringements threaten the Amazon’s Indigenous territories and protected areas 14.9.2020 Climate 411 - Environmental Defense Fund
This post was coauthored by Bärbel Henneberger. Indigenous communities living in the Amazon rainforest are known as the ‘guardians of the forest’ because of their effectiveness in keeping forests intact. Indigenous territories and protected areas, which cover 52 percent of the Amazon and store 58 percent of the carbon, outperform surrounding lands in terms of […]
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Those Orange Western Skies and the Science of Light 12.9.2020 Mother Jones
This piece was originally published in Wired and appears here as part of our Climate Desk Partnership. The sky above San Francisco was the color of television, tuned to the president. To be fair, I stole that punch line from Twitter, and nerd-lit snark about Donald Trump’s apparent choices in his alleged makeup won’t fix climate change and the worst […]
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RELEASE: Consortium Launches Program to Train Next Generation of City Climate Resilience Leaders 10.9.2020 WRI Stories
RELEASE: Consortium Launches Program to Train Next Generation of City Climate Resilience LeadersGlobal Commission on Adaptation brings together broad coalition of universities, cities and community organizations to help cities build resilience to climate change   WASHINGTON, D.C. (September 10, 2020) — A global consortium of universities, cities, community organizations and World Resources Institute launched an initiative to build cities’ capacities to adapt to the impacts of climate change.... [[ This is a content summary only. Visit my website for full links, other content, and more! ...
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Building Coastal Resilience in Bangladesh, the Philippines, and Colombia: Country Experiences with Mainstreaming Climate Adaptation 8.9.2020 WRI Stories
Working Paper Featured ...
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Fire, smoke, heat, drought — how climate change could spoil your next glass of California Cabernet 5.9.2020 LA Times: Business

How many more scorched summers can the king grape of Napa Valley survive?

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As second heat wave sears California, experts say health impacts will worsen with climate change 5.9.2020 LA Times: Environment

As a second major heat bears down on Southern California, experts are warning the public to take seriously the health dangers of extreme temperatures.

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They Know How to Prevent Megafires. Why Won’t Anybody Listen? 2.9.2020 Mother Jones
This story was published in partnership with ProPublica, a nonprofit newsroom that investigates abuses of power. Sign up for ProPublica’s Big Story newsletter to receive stories like this one in your inbox as soon as they are published. What a week. Rough for all Californians. Exhausting for the firefighters on the front lines. Heart-shattering for […]
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Policy News: August 31, 2020 31.8.2020 EcoTone
In This Issue: Register to Vote & Request an Absentee Ballot The general election is less than 70 days away. Visit Vote.org for information about requesting an absentee ballot. Upcoming ESA Webinars ESA will host two webinars with the Federation of American Scientists and Engineers and Scientists Acting Locally. Congress House Science Committee proposes a ...
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3 Climate-Resilient Food Solutions for Smallholder Farmers 25.8.2020 WRI Stories
3 Climate-Resilient Food Solutions for Smallholder Farmers Comments|Add Comment|PrintAs climate change continues to affect crops worldwide, research and development for climate-resilient crops can prove crucial for smallholder farmers. Photo by Rajesh Ram/Unsplash Communities across the Global South are facing a hunger crisis — one that existed before COVID-19 hit and has since gotten worse. In Southern Africa, record-breaking droughts and floods destroyed crops on a large scale early this... [[ This is a content summary only. Visit my website for full links, other content, and more! ...
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Disasters Are Driving a Mental Health Crisis. The Only Federal Program to Address It Is Underfunded. 25.8.2020 Mother Jones
This story was originally published by the Center for Public Integrity and appears here as part of the Climate Desk collaboration. Barbara Herndon lay in the center of her bed, muscles tensed, eyes on the television. She was waiting for the storm. All morning on that day in late May, the news had covered the cold front slouching south […]
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Solar Panels Are Starting to Die. What Will We Do With the Megatons of Toxic Trash? 24.8.2020 Mother Jones
This piece was originally published in Grist and appears here as part of our Climate Desk Partnership. Solar panels are an increasingly important source of renewable power that will play an essential role in fighting climate change. They are also complex pieces of technology that become big, bulky sheets of electronic waste at the end of […]
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6 Ways the US Can Curb Climate Change and Grow More Food 21.8.2020 WRI Stories
6 Ways the US Can Curb Climate Change and Grow More Food Comments|Add Comment|PrintHarvesting corn. Photo by United Soybean Board/Flickr American agriculture is among the most productive in the world. It employs 2.6 million people in growing food and other products worth nearly $400 billion annually. Over 20% of that output is shipped abroad, making the United States the largest exporter of agricultural products globally. U.S. agriculture has also grown more efficient in recent years,... [[ This is a content summary only. Visit my website for full links, other content, and more! ...
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On China, Biden may have little choice but to continue Trump's hard-line policy 14.8.2020 LA Times: Business

Biden will rally allies and set a new tone, yet underneath his China policy may look closer to Trump's than to Obama's a decade ago.

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Green Tech on the Red Sea: Inside Saudi Arabia’s Innovation Machine 11.8.2020 GreenBiz.com
Green Tech on the Red Sea: Inside Saudi Arabia’s Innovation Machine How do we innovate our way out of the climate crisis? It will take boundless innovators around the world to solve humanity’s greatest challenges. And with all that innovation comes nearly limitless potential for new products, services, business models, companies and entire industries. For more than 11 years, research conducted at the King Abdullah University of Science and Technology (KAUST), located on the Red Sea coast of Saudi Arabia, has focused on addressing challenges related to the environment, energy, water and food. Today, KAUST, the first and fully co-educational research institute in the Kingdom, is working to leverage science and technology to find solutions to the world’s most pressing problems. In this one-hour conversation, three KAUST professors will discuss some of the most promising innovations, as well as how it is partnering with companies around the world to accelerate these innovations’ development and ...
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An insurance policy for cutting emissions: New research strengthens the case for climate backstops 10.8.2020 Climate 411 - Environmental Defense Fund
Climate backstops are a critical part of a carbon fee that help ensure expected emissions reductions actually occur. More federal climate proposals are using them, including the new America’s Clean Future Fund Act from Senator Richard Durbin. New research on these innovative mechanisms can help advance our understanding of different design options and implications for […]
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How to Build a Circular Economy 6.8.2020 WRI Stories
How to Build a Circular Economy Comments|Add Comment|PrintA circular economy can help mitigate the climate crisis, and makes social and financial sense. Photo by Aaron Minnick | WRI. We have a waste problem. The world threw away around 300 million tons of plastic in 2019, nearly equivalent to the weight of the human population. Scientists expect there could be more plastic than fish in the ocean by 2050. One year's electronic waste weighs in at more than 50 million tons. And while far too... [[ This is a content summary only. Visit my website for full links, other content, and more! ...
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10 Charts Show the Economic Benefits of US Climate Action 28.7.2020 WRI Stories
10 Charts Show the Economic Benefits of US Climate Action Comments|Add Comment|PrintSmoky Hills Wind Farm in Kansas, United States. Photo by Drenaline/Wikimedia Commons The United States made substantial progress towards a low-carbon economy over the past several years. Low-carbon technologies became more efficient and affordable compared to fossil fuels, while U.S. clean energy investment and deployment grew to new heights, creating millions of jobs. All this progress could be in jeopardy... [[ This is a content summary only. Visit my website for full links, other content, and more! ...
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What makes Al Gore hopeful: Tech innovation, science-based targets and the racial 'awakening' 22.7.2020 Resource Efficiency | GreenBiz.com
What makes Al Gore hopeful: Tech innovation, science-based targets and the racial 'awakening' Heather Clancy Wed, 07/22/2020 - 02:00 Who is responsible for emissions? Where did they originate? How can we be sure? A global coalition fronted by former Vice President Al Gore promises granular insights and data into those sources — down to individual power plants, ships or factories. Climate TRACE (short for Tracking Real-time Atmospheric Carbon Emissions) intends to use a massive worldwide network of satellite images, land- and sea-based sensors and advanced artificial intelligence to generate what it’s describing as the "most thorough and reliable data on emissions the world has ever seen." The long lag it takes to calculate this information today is untenable if countries and the corporate sector hope to act quickly, the group wrote  in a blog about the initiative, co-authored by Gore and Gavin McCormick, founder and executive director of coalition member WattTime. "From companies looking to select ...
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