On December 31 2020, the newsrack service will be shut down permanently.

It has been a nice long run from the Sarai days in 2004 to being hosted on its own domain around 2006. Beside maintenance, there has been no real active development on the code or the features since early 2008. Since 2015, even all that maintenance was pretty bare bones. A lot of news sources no longer provide reliable RSS feeds and since mid 2018, there were growing issues with the service and I only kept it alive to assist a handful of users.

So, it is time to shut this down. The internet world in 2020 is vastly differently from 2003 when I first conceptualized this service. Thanks for using this all these years.

If you need to access any data, email me: subbu at newsrack.in

 
User: flenvcenter Topic: Air and Climate-Independent
Category: Air :: Indoor Air
Last updated: Dec 20 2017 18:48 IST RSS 2.0
 
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Could indoor air quality become part of the post coronavirus playbook? 15.5.2020 GreenBiz.com
Could indoor air quality become part of the post coronavirus playbook? Joe Snider Fri, 05/15/2020 - 01:29 Here is what we know, or think we know, about COVID-19: it can spread through the air. According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) , it is thought that the COVID-19 virus can spread "through respiratory droplets produced when an infected person coughs, sneezes or talks." According to a news release from the National Institutes of Health on March 17, these respiratory droplets seem to be detectable in the air for as long as three hours. Here is what we also know about hospital buildings and the way they are designed: Ventilation is an important aspect for the design of medical facilities, embraced to prevent the spread of airborne disease. As engineer Gregory Hudson notes in his article " Ventilation Strategies for Healthcare Facilities ," "Appropriate ventilation, when properly applied and designed, can limit the spread of airborne pathogens throughout a healthcare ...
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Airmega 400S offers smart, silent air purification (Review) 20.12.2017 TreeHugger
This home air purifier features HEPA filterscand a real-time air quality sensor, and can filter the air completely twice per hour in 1,560 square feet of living space.
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New study confirms that when it comes to healthy homes, material choices matter. 18.9.2017 TreeHugger
It also has real implications for our tighter homes with fewer air changes per hour.
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Selecting the right house plant could improve indoor air 24.8.2016 Environmental News Network
Indoor air pollution is an important environmental threat to human health, leading to symptoms of "sick building syndrome." But researchers report that surrounding oneself with certain house plants could combat the potentially harmful effects of volatile organic compounds (VOCs), a main category of these pollutants. Interestingly, they found that certain plants are better at removing particular harmful compounds from the air, suggesting that, with the right plant, indoor air could become cleaner and safer. The researchers are presenting their work today at the 252nd National Meeting & Exposition of the American Chemical Society (ACS). ACS, the world's largest scientific society, is holding the meeting here through Thursday. It features more than 9,000 presentations on a wide range of science topics. A brand-new animation on the research is available at http://bit.ly/ACSindoorairpollution."Buildings, whether new or old, can have high levels of VOCs in them, sometimes so high that you can smell them," says ...
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5 houseplants for removing indoor air pollution 24.8.2016 TreeHugger
New research finds that certain houseplants are best for removing specific harmful compounds.
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This air purifier doesn't just filter indoor air pollution, it destroys it 25.5.2016 TreeHugger
Instead of just catching indoor air pollutants, the Molekule device is claimed to actually destroy them by breaking them down into harmless elements.
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Reinventing Green Building 17.5.2016 Green on HuffingtonPost.com
A new book is less reinvention than it is revisionism. "The green building revolution has stalled," declares Jerry Yudelson in Reinventing Green Building , to be released June 1 by New Society Publishers. His premise is that certification programs such as the US Green Building Council's Leadership in Energy and Environmental Design (LEED) rating system are too costly and cumbersome: "By 2015, LEED had certified less than 1 percent of commercial buildings and homes in the US during its first 15 years. Annual project registrations and certifications for LEED in the US are now fewer in number in 2015 than in 2010. It's time for a green building program that works for 'the other 99 percent'...." Yudelson calls for green building advocates to "abandon the approach they have taken for the past 25 years." Instead, he argues, "The entire green building assessment process could easily be turned over to algorithms, eliminating a need for third-party auditors or assessors, as well as expensive consultants, ...
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Is your home making you sick? 20.4.2016 Sustainable Housing and Green Building News - ENN
New research in the journal Science of the Total Environment has highlighted the dangerous effects of indoor pollution on human health, and has called for policies to ensure closer monitoring of air quality.A collaborative effort of European, Australian and UK researchers, led by the University of Surrey,  assessed the harmful effects of indoor pollution in order to make recommendations on how best to monitor and negate these outcomes.Dr Prashant Kumar of the University of Surrey explained, “When we think of the term ‘air pollution’ we tend to think of car exhausts or factory fumes expelling grey smoke. However, there are actually various sources of pollution that have a negative effect on air quality, many of which are found inside our homes and offices. From cooking residue to paints, varnishes and fungal spores the air we breathe indoors is often more polluted than that ...
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Is your home making you sick? 20.4.2016 Green Lifestyle and Sustainable Culture News - ENN
New research in the journal Science of the Total Environment has highlighted the dangerous effects of indoor pollution on human health, and has called for policies to ensure closer monitoring of air quality.A collaborative effort of European, Australian and UK researchers, led by the University of Surrey,  assessed the harmful effects of indoor pollution in order to make recommendations on how best to monitor and negate these outcomes.Dr Prashant Kumar of the University of Surrey explained, “When we think of the term ‘air pollution’ we tend to think of car exhausts or factory fumes expelling grey smoke. However, there are actually various sources of pollution that have a negative effect on air quality, many of which are found inside our homes and offices. From cooking residue to paints, varnishes and fungal spores the air we breathe indoors is often more polluted than that ...
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Is your home making you sick? 20.4.2016 Global Health and Wellness News - ENN
New research in the journal Science of the Total Environment has highlighted the dangerous effects of indoor pollution on human health, and has called for policies to ensure closer monitoring of air quality.A collaborative effort of European, Australian and UK researchers, led by the University of Surrey,  assessed the harmful effects of indoor pollution in order to make recommendations on how best to monitor and negate these outcomes.Dr Prashant Kumar of the University of Surrey explained, “When we think of the term ‘air pollution’ we tend to think of car exhausts or factory fumes expelling grey smoke. However, there are actually various sources of pollution that have a negative effect on air quality, many of which are found inside our homes and offices. From cooking residue to paints, varnishes and fungal spores the air we breathe indoors is often more polluted than that ...
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Is your home making you sick? 20.4.2016 Global Pollution and Prevention News - ENN
New research in the journal Science of the Total Environment has highlighted the dangerous effects of indoor pollution on human health, and has called for policies to ensure closer monitoring of air quality.A collaborative effort of European, Australian and UK researchers, led by the University of Surrey,  assessed the harmful effects of indoor pollution in order to make recommendations on how best to monitor and negate these outcomes.Dr Prashant Kumar of the University of Surrey explained, “When we think of the term ‘air pollution’ we tend to think of car exhausts or factory fumes expelling grey smoke. However, there are actually various sources of pollution that have a negative effect on air quality, many of which are found inside our homes and offices. From cooking residue to paints, varnishes and fungal spores the air we breathe indoors is often more polluted than that ...
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Is your home making you sick? 20.4.2016 Environmental News Network
New research in the journal Science of the Total Environment has highlighted the dangerous effects of indoor pollution on human health, and has called for policies to ensure closer monitoring of air quality.A collaborative effort of European, Australian and UK researchers, led by the University of Surrey,  assessed the harmful effects of indoor pollution in order to make recommendations on how best to monitor and negate these outcomes.Dr Prashant Kumar of the University of Surrey explained, “When we think of the term ‘air pollution’ we tend to think of car exhausts or factory fumes expelling grey smoke. However, there are actually various sources of pollution that have a negative effect on air quality, many of which are found inside our homes and offices. From cooking residue to paints, varnishes and fungal spores the air we breathe indoors is often more polluted than that ...
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A Brief History of Mold 14.4.2016 Green on HuffingtonPost.com
Mold is old. As Mother Nature’s great recycler, mold and fungi are a critical component of our natural environment. Simply said, we need mold to turn dead things back into dirt, but when it starts trying to do that to our home, it becomes a problem, in many ways. Our bodies have developed a very acute aversion to decay. Nearly everyone recoils from the smell of something rotting. We instinctively know that these things are unhealthy, and so does our immune system, which is likely why mold exposure causes such significant discomfort in a large part of our population. Even before science began to link mold exposure to human illnesses, people knew that it wasn’t good for you. In the Old Testament – Leviticus 14 – you will find the first written mold remediation protocol. Here’s an excerpt: The Lord said to Moses and Aaron, “When you enter the land of Canaan, which I am giving you as your possession, and I put a spreading mold in a house in that land, the owner of the house must go and tell the priest, ‘I ...
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The new imperative in buildings, cleaner air! 6.11.2015 Environmental News Network
A study just published by the Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health has linked a building’s indoor air quality directly to its occupants’ cognitive function. Cognitive function is defined as the cerebral activities that lead to knowledge including acquiring information, reasoning, attention, memory and language.The revolutionary finding of this study is that lowering indoor air levels of carbon dioxide and volatile organic compounds (VOCs) improves human cognitive function. In other words: Cleaner air makes us smarter!
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Poor Indoor Air Quality Linked To Workers' Low Cognitive Function 27.10.2015 Politics on HuffingtonPost.com
Running into mental blocks at your desk job? A new Harvard study says you may be able to blame it on the air quality in your office.  In a paper published Monday in the journal Environmental Health Perspectives, a team of researchers found that people working in well-ventilated "green" buildings with below-average indoor air pollution and carbon dioxide, or CO2, showed better cognitive functioning than workers in "non-green" offices with typical pollutant and CO2 levels.   "These results suggest that even modest improvements to indoor environmental quality may have a profound impact on the decision-making performance of workers," lead study author Joseph Allen, the director of the Healthy Buildings Program at the Harvard Center for Health and the Global Environment, wrote.  The findings, Think Progress notes, provide " an entirely new public health impetus for keeping global CO2 levels as low as possible."  The study of 24 people exposed to different indoor environmental quality conditions over six full ...
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Luxembourg-Based AirBoxLab Launches Foobot in U.S. 26.10.2015 ENN Network News - ENN
New indoor air quality innovation bridges environmental and personal health priorities
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Artificial lung to help study air pollution effects 23.10.2015 Environmental News Network
Air pollution is one of the leading causes of lung cancer and respiratory diseases, responsible for one in eight global deaths, according to the World Health Organisation.However, researchers will soon be able to develop new treatments for such diseases with a life-sized, artificial human lung created at the Technion-Israel Institute of Technology in Haifa, Israel. It is the first diagnostic tool for understanding in real time how tiny particles move and behave in the deepest part of the human lungs, the alveolar tissue. 
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How To Purify Your Home Without A Pricey Air Purification System 1.10.2015 Green on HuffingtonPost.com
Sure, you think your house is clean... but is it really? In addition to  dusting surfaces  and washing your linens, you might want to pay attention to the air quality in your home. LEED-accredited interior designer  Sarah Barnard  said air quality is an important factor when it comes to personal well-being, noting that  volatile organic compounds , or gasses emitted from common household products like carpet and paints, can be "trapped indoors and can be the cause of regular headaches and in some people, dizziness."  The bottomline is that "keeping our indoor air clean is an important part of a healthy lifestyle," Barnard said.  The logical first step would be to get an air purifier. Unfortunately, quality machines can cost upwards of $800. So, to save money -- or help aid your current air purifier -- a few experts shared ways homeowners and renters can DIY their way to better air quality.  "In a best case scenario, different strategies would be combined together for optimum effect," Barnard noted. In ...
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Is asthma being worsened by energy efficient homes? 22.9.2015 TreeHugger
No, it is being worsened by crappy homes.
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Ways to improve indoor air quality 25.7.2015 Environmental News Network
Indoor air quality isn’t something most people think about, but breathing clean air can and does impact out health. Here’s why paying attention to the air you breathe indoors is so important and how to then go about improving it. Vacuum More OftenVacuuming more often will help keep dust at bay, but many vacuums also come with a filter system which can remove mold, pollen, and other air pollutants. Aim to vacuum at least once a week, twice if you live with animals.
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