User: flenvcenter Topic: Air and Climate-Independent
Category: Air :: Air Pollution
Last updated: Oct 15 2019 23:26 IST RSS 2.0
 
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In India’s fast-growing cities, a grassroots effort to save the trees 6.2.2019 Energy & Climate | Greenbiz.com
Densely populated megacities in the developing world, which are most in need of tree cover, often have the least.
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On-the-ground pollution data spurred stricter zoning in Los Angeles 31.1.2019 High Country News Most Recent
Locals’ efforts prompted buffers for auto shops and air filter rules for new buildings.
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An air conditioner powered by outer space and help from the sun 30.1.2019 Resource Efficiency | GreenBiz.com
Stanford researchers are testing a way to cool buildings without fossil fuels, while generating electricity at the same time.
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What killed Washington’s carbon tax? 21.1.2019 Current Issue
The curious death of 1631 and what it says about the future of addressing climate change.
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What will hyperloop mean for climate, ecosystems and resources? 8.1.2019 Energy & Climate | Greenbiz.com
Hyperloop promises ultrafast transportation — but what does it mean for the environment?
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Trump’s EPA is reluctant to punish law-breaking polluters 28.12.2018 High Country News Most Recent
A recent report shows that law enforcement at the agency is declining.
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Cooling is warming the planet, but market failures are freezing the AC industry's innovation 26.9.2018 GreenBiz.com
And four reasons why the business of air conditioning is slow to make strides in both cost or efficiency.
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September 22 is World Car-Free Day 20.9.2018 rabble.ca - News for the rest of us
Brent Patterson This Saturday September 22 is World Car-Free Day. That's a day when people in cities around the world opt to walk, cycle or take public transit rather than driving a car. In 2016, about 1,500 cities in 40 countries took part in the day. John Vidal writes in The Guardian, "This weekend, as part of World Car-Free Day, London will close 50 major streets to traffic, and Manchester, Leeds, Bristol, Glasgow, Cardiff, Oxford, Cambridge and Liverpool will also ban cars from parts of their city centres." The City of Ottawa does not appear to be officially marking the day, but Critical Mass cyclists will be self-organizing with this local event . Cars, trucks and buses fuelled by gasoline are a major contributor to air pollution. The U.S.-based Union of Concerned Scientists has noted: "Passenger vehicles are a major pollution contributor, producing significant amounts of nitrogen oxides, carbon monoxide, and other pollution. In 2013, transportation contributed more than half of the carbon monoxide ...
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‘Super pollutants’ such as methane, HFCs and black carbon were a hot topic at GCAS 17.9.2018 Business Operations | GreenBiz.com
Acting quickly to reduce relatively short-lived yet potent gases could have a big impact on human health and slow global warming.
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As microfibers infiltrate food, water and air, how can we prevent future release? 16.8.2018 Business Operations | GreenBiz.com
Scientists and manufacturers are looking for ways to keep the synthetics from getting into the environment in the first place.
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Why are our clothes so bad for the environment? 9.8.2018 Design & Innovation | GreenBiz.com
Minute fibers are polluting oceans, streams, rivers — even the air we breathe — with unknown consequences.
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Rural Americans' struggles against factory farm pollution find traction in court 6.8.2018 Small Business | GreenBiz.com
Industrial farms have negatively impacted surrounding communities for decades, but new litigation might be changing that.
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Aclima's particulate vision maps air pollution 11.7.2018 Small Business | GreenBiz.com
Revealing otherwise unseen toxicity is CEO Davida Herzl's mission.
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Auto Alliance Pushed Climate Denial to Get Trump Admin to Abandon Obama Fuel Efficiency Standards 8.4.2018 Truthout.com
(Photo: LanaElcova / Shutterstock) The Trump administration  officially announced Monday that it will scrap fuel economy and emissions targets  for cars and light-duty trucks sold in the United States and set new weaker standards, effectively undermining one of the federal government's most effective policies for reducing greenhouse gas emissions. As  the New York Times  and  the Los Angeles Times  anticipated late last week, the two agencies responsible for auto standards -- the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration (NHTSA) and the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) -- both claimed that their internal reviews have found the Obama-era standards to be too strict, and that the agencies would go back to the drawing board to revise standards for model years 2022-2025.  The weaker standards, expected to be revealed in coming months and reported to be well below the  current targets of 54.5 miles per gallon  (or roughly 35 miles per gallon in real-world driving conditions), will be celebrated as a ...
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Court Rules EPA Unlawfully Delayed Environmental Racism Investigations for Decades 6.4.2018 Truthout - All Articles
Father Phil Schmitter and other advocates from a predominately Black neighborhood in Flint, Michigan filed a civil rights complaint with the EPA more than 20 years before the city became a symbol of environmental racism. The EPA finally completed its investigation into the complaint last year, and only after environmental justice groups took the agency to federal court. Darlene McClendon, 62, at her home in Flint, Michigan, on October 11, 2016. (Photo: Brittany Greeson / For The Washington Post via Getty Images) Exposing the wrongdoing of those in power has never been more important. Support Truthout's independent, investigative journalism by making a donation! A federal court ruled this week that the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) violated the Civil Rights Act by delaying investigations into environmental discrimination complaints for years, even decades. For plaintiff Phil Schmitter, a priest and social justice activist from Flint, Michigan, the ruling is a bittersweet victory that was a long ...
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A Death in Louisiana's Cancer Alley Reinforces a Small Town's Fears of Industry Impacts 4.4.2018 Truthout - All Articles
Keith Hunter, long-time resident of St. James, Louisiana, in March 2017, roughly a year before he died. (Photo: Julie Dermansky) Thirty seconds: That's how long it takes to support the independent journalism at Truthout. We're counting on you. Click here to chip in! Sixty-year-old Keith Hunter lived in St. James, Louisiana, for roughly 27 years, and during that time, he watched as the sugarcane farms gave way to oil storage tanks and as a railroad terminal was being built down the road, all visible from his front yard. Hunter was an outspoken critic of the industrialization of his neighborhood. And in a similar fashion as some of his neighbors, Hunter died on February 10 following a respiratory illness. The town of St. James lies in St. James Parish, about 50 miles west of New Orleans. Despite its location along a stretch of Mississippi River between New Orleans and Baton Rouge known as both the "Petrochemical Corridor" and "Cancer Alley," St. James remained partially rural until fairly recently. In 2014 ...
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Tear Gas Is a Weapon of War 29.3.2018 Truthout - All Articles
In Tear Gas: From the Battlefields of World War I to the Streets of Today, Anna Feigenbaum traces the toxic history of how tear gas became a police weapon. "Tear gas is a weapon that polices the atmosphere and pollutes the very air we breathe," writes Feigenbaum. It immobilizes and is intended to break the spirit of protesters, but it is not without harmful health effects as well as a weapon against democracy. Police attack protesters with tear gas at an Occupy Oakland demonstration on January 28, 2012, in Oakland, California. (Photo: Steve Rhodes ) In Tear Gas: From the Battlefields of World War I to the Streets of Today, Anna Feigenbaum traces the toxic history of how tear gas became a police weapon. Get the book with a contribution to Truthout. Click here. "Tear gas is a weapon that polices the atmosphere and pollutes the very air we breathe," writes Anna Feigenbaum. It immobilizes and is intended to break the will and spirit of protesters, but it is not without harmful health effects as well as a ...
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New Orleans Approves Natural Gas Power Plant Despite Environmental Racism and Climate Concerns 19.3.2018 Truthout - All Articles
Opponents of Entergy's proposed natural gas power plant pack the March 8 New Orleans City Council meeting. (All Photos: © Julie Dermansky) Help preserve a news source with integrity at its core: Donate to the independent media at Truthout. Despite hearing over four hours of public comments mostly in opposition, New Orleans City Council recently approved construction of a $210 million natural gas power plant in a predominantly minority neighborhood. Entergy is proposing to build this massive investment in fossil fuel infrastructure in a city already plagued by the effects of climate change.  Choosing a gas plant over renewable energy options flies in the face of the city's own climate change plan and the mayor's support for the Paris Climate Accord, said several of the plant's opponents at the heated meeting when City Council ultimately voted to approve the plant. "It is not enough to plan for how we will adapt to climate change. We must end our contribution to it," wrote Mayor Mitch Landrieu in the ...
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Bottled Water, Brought to You by Fracking? 16.3.2018 Truthout - All Articles
(Photo: Derneuemann ; Edited: LW / TO) Truthout is funded by readers, not by corporations, lobbyists or government interests. Help us publish more stories like this one: Click here to make a tax-deductible donation! The new Food & Water Watch report " Take Back the Tap: The Big Business Hustle of Bottled Water " details the deceit and trickery of the bottled water industry. Here's one more angle to consider: The bottled water business is closely tied to fracking. The report reveals that the majority of bottled water is municipal tap water, a common resource captured in plastic bottles and re-sold at an astonishing markup -- as much as 2,000 times the price of tap, and even four times the price of gasoline. Besides being a rip-off, there is plenty more to loathe about the corporate water scam: The environmental impacts from pumping groundwater (especially in drought-prone areas), the plastic junk fouling up our waterways and oceans, and the air pollution created as petrochemical plants manufacture the ...
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In Ruling Called "Victory for Everyone Who Breathes," Federal Judge Says Scott Pruitt Violating Clean Air Act 13.3.2018 Truthout - All Articles
Scott Pruitt, administrator of the Environmental Protection Agency, speaks at the 2017 Concordia Annual Summit at the Grand Hyatt New York on September 19, 2017, in New York City. (Photo: Riccardo Savi / Getty Images for Concordia Summit) Resulting in what environmentalists called a "victory for everyone who breathes," a federal district court in California on Monday ruled that President Donald Trump's Environmental Protection Agency is violating the law by not implementing crucial smog protection guidelines mandated under the Clean Air Act. According to Judge Haywood Stirling Gilliam Jr. of the federal District Court for the District of Northern California, EPA chief Scott Pruitt broke the law by not listing areas in the country that are failing to comply with air pollution standards -- a violation of "his nondiscretionary duty under" the federal law -- and gave him until April 30th to list those areas publicly. While Pruitt submitted designations for areas in the country that were complying with smog ...
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