User: flenvcenter Topic: Air and Climate-Independent
Category: Climate Change :: Climate Change Impacts
Last updated: Sep 22 2016 01:55 IST RSS 2.0
 
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Climate Change This Week: Megadroughts, Virtual Clean Power Plants, and More! 22.9.2016 Green on HuffingtonPost.com
Today, the Earth got a little hotter, and a little more crowded. Saving BUB, Beautiful Unique Biodiversity, as in this Amazonian ant-mimic treehopper, is another reason to preserve carbon storing forests. Credit Andreas Kay at flickr Forests: the cheapest way to store carbon A Key Preserver of Carbon Storage in Rainforests - are tapirs, which help disperse the seeds of the largest carbon-storing trees. OO The Surprising Link Between The Tapirs Of Costa Rica And Climate Change - They disperse seeds of the largest trees that store the most carbon, suggest new studies. Protecting tapirs and other large seed-eating mammals is key to preserving carbon storage capability in rainforests. <> OO The Alarming Number Of Fires In The Brazilian Amazon is an undeniable sign that predatory exploration in the Brazilian Amazon has not yet been properly tackled. OO Humans Have Destroyed A Tenth Of Earth's Wilderness In 25 Years and there may be none left within a century if trends continue, says an authoritative new ...
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Welcome to the Anthropocene, are environmentalists equipped to respond? 15.9.2016 rabble.ca - News for the rest of us
On September 5, 2016 in Cape Town, South Africa, members of the "Working Group on the Anthropocene" presented findings of their research to the annual International Geological Congress. A research paper by the group of 35 scientists, commissioned by the Congress, was published in January of this year, concluding that a new, "functionally and stratigraphically distinct" unit of geologic time has ...
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Mass Fish Die-Offs Are the New Normal: Climate Change Shuts Down a Montana River 15.9.2016 Truthout.com
A dead mountain whitefish floats in the Yellowstone River in Montana. (Photo: Montana Fish, Wildlife and Parks) An unprecedented fish kill in Montana's iconic Yellowstone River has brought the West's climate future in focus. Scientists say climate change killed the fish by creating a perfect environment for microscopic parasites, deadly to fish, to thrive. It's bad news for the West's outdoor economy. A dead mountain whitefish floats in the Yellowstone River in Montana. (Photo: Montana Fish, Wildlife and Parks) Early in the morning on August 19, 2016, Chad Jacobson, a 36-year-old Montanan, lifelong fisherman and soon-to-be father received a text message from a friend who is one of Montana's many fly-fishing guides. "Can you believe they shut down the Yellowstone?" said the text. Jacobson grew up in a family of fishermen and makes it a priority to get out on the rivers as often as possible throughout the year. He was stunned. "I mean, you see this kind of stuff happening in rivers around here, it's ...
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GODAN: Worldwide Hunger indicates Help Needed! 14.9.2016 Earth Times
We’re afraid that we have neglected the food security side of our responsibilities. Articles on Politics and Health have been published at the expense of this vital area, as the effects of consolidating food reserves is not only to alleviate criminal use of bushmeat, theft and extortion. We must also preserve areas for wildlife where otherwise people have been forced to cut down their forest to grow more crops/sell timber/build mines, roads or various infrastructure. GODAN are gathering in New York to spread expertise on agriculture and nutrition that will feed the parts of the world that are starving.
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Free-swimming Ocean Gliders Help Scientists Understand Storm Intensity 13.9.2016 Environmental News Network
A regional team from Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution (WHOI), Rutgers University, the University of Maine, the University of Maryland, and the Gulf of Maine Research Institute mobilized Friday in advance of post-Tropical Storm Hermine’s arrival in the Northeast to gather data from new ocean instruments that will help better predict the intensity and evolution of future tropical storms along the US East Coast.  The team, part of the TEMPESTS program organized through the Cooperative Institute for the North Atlantic Region, is funded by the NOAA office of Oceanic and Atmospheric Research.
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Ocean Warming Is Already Affecting Arctic Fish And Birds 12.9.2016 Green on HuffingtonPost.com
A new report finds that the “staggering” rate of warming in the world’s oceans is shifting fisheries, spreading disease and altering the behavior of many marine species around the world – including in the Arctic. Up until a few years ago, mackerel were unknown in Greenland’s cold waters. The small oily fish typically spawned west of the British Isles and then migrated toward the northeast along the Norwegian current to feed for the summer. But in 2007, they began to show up in large numbers in the Irminger Current around Iceland. On the ocean highway, where they once turned right, they now turned left. By 2011, the mackerel had found their way into Greenlandic waters, prompting the launch of a new fishery. Three years later, the mackerel fishery made up 23 percent of Greenland’s export earning, an “extreme example of how climate change can impact the economy of an entire nation,” Teunis Jansen, a researcher at the Technical University of Denmark, said in a release. The mackerel aren’t the only species ...
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Climate Change Creates Cruising Weather in the NW Passage - If You Can Afford the Insurance 12.9.2016 Green on HuffingtonPost.com
The fabled Northwest passage isn't what it used to be - an impenetrable ice-choked wilderness. For the first (but surely not the last) time, a high-end luxury cruise ship has traversed the Arctic Sea: This short THIS PLANET video is being published while the Crystal Serenity is still at sea, heading for New York City, it's final port of call. Maybe the cruise did not quite achieve the Crystal Line's trademarked offer of "Unexpected Adventure" (TM) - but somewhere between Ulukhaktok and Labrador, the small number of travelers who could pay for a berth on the ship did get their money's worth. Icebergs, check. Whales, check. Native villages, check. Polar bears standing on fragments of ice, seemingly bewildered by passing zodiacs full of humans -- check. Meanwhile, worries by the Canadian Broadcasting Corporation and the Coast Guard about "another Titanic" were for naught, at least for this year: Video: Canadian Broadcasting Corporation Thanks to climate change, the Crystal Serenity never needed to deploy ...
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Center for Biological Diversity Stands With Standing Rock Sioux Tribe in Opposing Dakota Oil Pipeline 9.9.2016 Commondreams.org Newswire

Kierán Suckling, executive director of the Center for Biological Diversity, released the following statement today in support of the Standing Rock Sioux tribe in its fight to stop the Dakota Access Oil Pipeline and preserve its land and culture:

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As Climate Changes Us, We Change Wildlife 8.9.2016 Green on HuffingtonPost.com
It's easier and easier to understand the impacts a changing climate has on our daily lives: higher temperatures can affect everything from the food we eat, to the bills we pay for air conditioning in the summer and heat in the winter. Fencing in Siana Conservancy, highlighting the difference in pasture between fenced and unfenced land. But we're not the only ones affected. Climate change also impacts wildlife and the habitat on which they depend. Changes in climate are altering the timing of life cycles, causing species to shift where they live, and in some cases even leading to extinction. While the direct correlation between a changing climate and wildlife is increasingly clear, to date there's been less focus on understanding how human responses to climate change also impact wildlife and their habitat. That's where my work comes in. I recently visited the Siana conservancy in Kenya, part of the Greater Mara ecosystem. This part of the world, home to the Maasai people of Kenya, has one of the most ...
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Study Finds Greenhouse Gases Doubled the Chances of Louisiana's Flooding Rains 8.9.2016 Truthout.com
Human-caused climate change likely doubled the chances of the torrential rains that caused deadly flooding in Louisiana and damaged 60,000 homes in the state, a new study has found. Less than a month after the deluge that killed 13 people, a team of scientists have just published an analysis of rainfall records going back to the 1930s alongside computer model simulations. Lead author of the study Dr. Karin van der Wiel, a research associate at both Princeton University and the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, said the extra greenhouse gases in the atmosphere had now "changed the odds" for Louisiana being hit by torrential downpours. Compared to the year 1900, the model analysis had clearly shown that the extra greenhouse gases in the atmosphere had increased the chances of a torrential downpour in that Gulf Coast region. Van der Wiel told DeSmog, "The odds for a comparable event have now changed by at least 40 per cent, and our best estimate is a doubling. That is because of the increases ...
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Global Warming Likely Doubled Chances of Historic Louisiana Rainfall, Study Finds 8.9.2016 CommonDreams.org Headlines
Andrea Germanos, staff writer

New federal research backs up claims the historic rainfall that triggered disastrous flooding in Louisiana last month is linked to climate change.

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Climate Change This Week: It Started 200 Years Ago, A Lit Fuse, and More! 7.9.2016 Green on HuffingtonPost.com
As The Permafrost Melts the landscape becomes one of meltwater lakes. OO 'It's A Lit Fuse:' Widespread Release Of Ancient Carbon From Melting Arctic Permafrost has been measured and confirmed. Takeaways: These releases of climate changing greenhouse gases could trigger a self-reinforcing cycle of accelerating climate change: gases spur further global warming, which spur further release of gases. There are vast amounts of carbon stored in the permafrost. "It's a lit fuse, but the length of that fuse is very long," said the lead study author. "According to the model projections, we're getting ready for the part where it starts to explode. But it hasn't happened yet." * * GOOD CLEAN NEWS OO China, US To Ratify Landmark Paris Climate Deal Ahead Of G20 Summit sources reveal. The move may tip momentum and bring accord into force globally sooner. OO California Assembly Approves Climate Change Law - a bill extending California's greenhouse gas emission targets, after an intense floor debate. Related Headline: OO ...
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Climate Denial and Sea Level Rise 6.9.2016 Green on HuffingtonPost.com
Like those who do not think the Holocaust took place, men landed on the moon, or President Obama is an American, there are equally deluded people who think that climate science is a hoax or some kind of left-wing conspiracy. As the New York Times reported last week, parts of Florida are already having 'sunny-day floods' due to the impact of sea level rise during some high tides. Last weekend I left my Long Island summer home early to return to the safety of Morningside Heights, a full 121 feet above sea level . The south shore of Long Island is no stranger to flooding, but where we once saw a 6-12 inch storm surge last weekend we saw a surge of 1-3 feet, from a storm that did not really come close to my summer home. Scientists at Columbia's Earth Institute in our Lamont-Doherty Earth Observatory, International Research Institute for Climate and Society, Center for Climate Systems Research, Lenfest Center for Sustainable Energy, and Center for International Earth Science Information Network have been ...
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As Hermine Strengthens, Experts Warn Climate Change Could Worsen Effects 5.9.2016 CommonDreams.org Headlines
Nadia Prupis, staff writer

Sea level rise caused by climate change could mean the damage wrought by Post-Tropical Cyclone Hermine will be even greater than previous surges, scientists warned this weekend.

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In Myanmar, Nature Can Help Communities Face Climate Challenges 3.9.2016 Green on HuffingtonPost.com
The impacts of climate change are becoming an ever starker reality around the world, with 2016 on pace to be the hottest year in human history - topping the previous record set just last year. While the Paris Agreement represents significant progress toward addressing this global challenge, international leaders need to further accelerate emissions reductions to keep global temperature rise "well below 2°C above-pre-industrial levels and aiming for 1.5 degrees Celsius," as called for in the landmark agreement. A landscape of forests and mountains in Myanmar. Photo Credit: © Minzayar Oo / WWF-US And that need is more urgent than ever. With current greenhouse gas emissions levels, we are tracking toward a much more severe scenario: a planet that is 3 to 5°C degrees warmer by the end of the century and potentially much sooner. As we have already experienced with increasingly extreme and variable weather around the world--from unprecedented heat waves to increasingly frequent and intense "1,000 year" floods ...
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A Post Trump World 1.9.2016 Politics on HuffingtonPost.com
Given Donald Trump's denial of human-influenced climate change, what kind of world awaits us environmentally if he should get his way? Here is the sorry picture. Cities increasingly are choked by lung-irritating photochemical smog. Cases of asthma and other respiratory ailments greatly escalate, and mortality rates rise accordingly. Many urban dwellers routinely wear air filter masks when venturing outside during the most pollution-prone months of the year. Unprecedented heat waves in the summer months force the elderly and infirm to remain primarily indoors. Indeed, where possible, our cities air condition their armories and other public buildings to serve as long-term emergency shelters for citizens who have run out of options. Tropical maladies spread northward with the migration of warm weather disease-carrying insects. Coastal communities are besieged by rising sea levels, and in some instances start to relocate inland. Trump himself is impacted, and it isn't pretty. Not only is it often too hot to ...
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Climate change has less impact on drought than previously expected 1.9.2016 Environmental News Network
As a multiyear drought grinds on in the Southwestern United States, many wonder about the impact of global climate change on more frequent and longer dry spells. As humans emit more carbon dioxide into the atmosphere, how will water supply for people, farms, and forests be affected?A new study from the University of California, Irvine and the University of Washington shows that water conserved by plants under high CO2 conditions compensates for much of the effect of warmer temperatures, retaining more water on land than predicted in commonly used drought assessments.According to the study published this week in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, the implications of plants needing less water with more CO2 in the environment changes assumptions of climate change impacts on agriculture, water resources, wildfire risk, and plant growth.
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Study assesses climate change vulnerability in urban America 31.8.2016 Environmental News Network
Flooding due to rising ocean levels. Debilitating heat waves that last longer and occur more frequently. Rising rates of diseases caused by ticks, fleas, and mosquitoes, such as Lyme disease, Chikungunya, and Zika. Increasing numbers of Emergency Room visits for asthma attacks due to higher levels of ground-level ozone. Impacts of climate change such as these will affect cities across the country.One of the first efforts to systematically assess how cities are preparing for climate change shows that city planners have yet to fully assess their vulnerability to climate change, leaving serious risks unaddressed. In their evaluations to-date, they see infrastructure and risks to specific human populations as the primary areas of concern. Despite these concerns, expert assessments of urban climate vulnerability often do not address the real risks that local planners face.
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Vegetation matters 31.8.2016 Climate Change News - ENN
In California's Sierra Nevada mountains, as more precipitation falls in the form of rain rather than snow, and the snowpack melts earlier in spring, it's important for water managers to know when and how much water will be available for urban and agricultural needs and for the environment in general.While changing precipitation patterns can have a significant impact on stream flows in the Sierra Nevada mountains, a new study by UC Santa Barbara researchers indicates that shifts in vegetation type resulting from warming and other factors may have an equal or greater effect. Their findings appear in the journal PLOS One.
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The West May Not Be So Doomed On Water After All 31.8.2016 Green on HuffingtonPost.com
It can be difficult to see any bright side when it comes to the water challenges facing the western U.S. Whether it’s the severe drought going on its fifth year or the nation’s largest reservoir, Lake Mead, hitting a historically low water level , there are many valid reasons to be concerned about the region’s dwindling water supplies . That’s particularly true for the 40 million people across seven states who depend on the Colorado River for their water needs. The river is, quite literally, drying up . Still, there’s also plenty of reason for optimism, even if those stories don’t tend to grab as many headlines when compared to the doom and gloom. Earlier this month, news reports noted that, thanks to conservation efforts in many communities along the Colorado River basin, an officially-designated water shortage in Lake Mead has officially been staved off for another year. It is currently projected that an official shortage — defined as the lake dropping below 1,075 feet above sea level — could return as ...
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