User: flenvcenter Topic: Air and Climate-Independent
Category: Climate Change :: Climate Change Impacts
Last updated: Feb 20 2017 23:51 IST RSS 2.0
 
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Al Gore: 'Horrific' Health Risks From Climate, But 'We Have Solutions' 20.2.2017 Green on HuffingtonPost.com
ATLANTA — The climate crisis will have significant effects on health, but “we do have solutions at hand,” former U.S. Vice President Al Gore said today. Some of the health risks that Gore, an environmental expert, a book author and a Nobel Peace Prize winner, highlighted in his speech included the spread of infectious disease , the dangers of extreme heat and the health effects of air pollution. These health risks, and their potential solutions, were discussed here today (Feb. 16) at the Climate & Health Meeting, a gathering of experts from public health organizations, universities and advocacy groups that focused on the health impacts of climate change. [ 5 Ways Climate Change Will Affect Your Health ] The problems are already here, Gore said, as infectious diseases are now spreading to areas where they previously were not found. In addition, heat stress from extreme heat waves causes more deaths each year in the United States than all other extreme weather events, such as hurricanes and tornadoes, ...
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Science Isn't Just for Scientists—We Can All Take Part 19.2.2017 Commondreams.org Views
Madeline Ostrander

After he moved to London in his early 20s, Luke Howard became obsessed with the weather. Howard had a day job running a pharmacy business in the 1790s and early 1800s, but he spent a lot of his spare time staring at the sky. He collected a set of makeshift weather instruments—glass thermometers; a hygrometer (to measure moisture in the air) cobbled together from a wire spring and a strip of whalebone; and a barometer attached to an old astronomical clock that he bought secondhand and repaired himself.

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Here's Another Staggering Cost Of Trump's Border Wall 18.2.2017 Politics on HuffingtonPost.com
Much has been made of the monetary cost of President  Donald Trump’s proposed border wall. Trump himself has cited wildly differing  estimates. Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell (R-Ky.) recently said that the wall would cost $12 billion to $15 billion . Some experts have cited numbers far higher . But the wall’s true cost surpasses even the biggest numbers being discussed. There’s upkeep, of course — hundreds of millions of dollars per year will be needed to maintain the 1,000-mile barrier. There are other expenses, too, some of them intangible and difficult to quantify. The political blowback could be significant. Mexican President Enrique Peña Nieto has already canceled a meeting with Trump over the wall, calling it a sign of disrespect. (Mexico is America’s third-largest trading partner and a close ally.) And the impacts on native tribes , border communities and migrant populations are projected to be immense. Then, there’s the potential damage to the environment , both locally and beyond. ...
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Ask a Scientist: Why NOAA matters for the West 17.2.2017 High Country News Most Recent
CIRES head Waleed Abdalati answers our questions, the first in an occasional series.
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Snow Science in Support of Our Nation's Water Supply 16.2.2017 Environmental News Network
Researchers have completed the first flights of a NASA-led field campaign that is targeting one of the biggest gaps in scientists' understanding of Earth's water resources: snow.NASA uses the vantage point of space to study all aspects of Earth as an interconnected system. But there remain significant obstacles to measuring accurately how much water is stored across the planet's snow-covered regions. The amount of water in snow plays a major role in water availability for drinking water, agriculture and hydropower.
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Seven Words the Feds Can't Say 12.2.2017 Green on HuffingtonPost.com
Shortly after Donald Trump's election, according to news reports, federal scientists scrambled to back up their climate data, the words "climate change" were deleted from government documents and some of the climate change material on government web sites disappeared. The following announcement is "fake news", but we should not be surprised if it becomes real news real soon. WASHINGTON, D.C. - President Donald Trump signed an executive order today to launch "Project Sun Dial", a campaign to ban what the president called "meteorological negativity". "From now on, my Administration is going to count only sunny days," Trump said as he signed the order. "We have all the best weather here but the dishonest media won't report it." Trump called his directive "the most important presidential action in the history of America, maybe in the history of weather." The order directs federal agencies to stop using the following seven words in their communications and official documents: Disaster: "This word can no ...
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Drought identified as key to severity of West Nile virus epidemics 8.2.2017 Environmental News Network
A study led by UC Santa Cruz researchers has found that drought dramatically increases the severity of West Nile virus epidemics in the United States, although populations affected by large outbreaks acquire immunity that limits the size of subsequent epidemics.The study, published February 8 in Proceedings of the Royal Society B, involved researchers from UC Santa Cruz, Stanford University, and the New York State Department of Health. They analyzed 15 years of data on human West Nile virus infections from across the United States and found that epidemics were much larger in drought years and in regions that had not suffered large epidemics in the past.
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Understanding climate change means reading beyond headlines 8.2.2017 rabble.ca - News for the rest of us
Seeing terms like "post-truth" and "alternative facts" gain traction in the news convinces me that politicians, media workers and readers could benefit from a refresher course in how science helps us understand the world. Reporting on science is difficult at the best of times. Trying to communicate complex ideas and distill entire studies into eye-catching headlines and brief stories can open the door to misinformation and limited ...
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What We Can Learn from the California Drought 8.2.2017 Green on HuffingtonPost.com
Over the past three weeks, continued rain and snow across California has, almost miraculously, lifted nearly half of the state out of drought. That's a huge improvement from last February, when more than 95% of the state was listed as being in some form of drought . Large parts of the state have been under threat of extreme drought continuously for three consecutive years. While those of us in California are thankful, counting on unreliable weather patterns to save us isn't a viable approach to preparing for, or enduring, the kind of crippling drought our state has suffered through. However, there are some very straightforward steps that can be taken to mitigate against both drought AND flood - two conditions of which California has had its share and which are linked by the extreme weather that accompanies climate change. These measures provide the most important protections that we have against drought and flood. Both are too often overlooked and taken for granted. The first action we can take is ...
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You Ain't Seen Nothing Yet: A Preview of the Trump Era Crimes to Come 7.2.2017 Commondreams.org Views
Tom Engelhardt

It started in June 2015 with that Trump Tower escalator ride into the presidential race to the tune of Neil Young’s “Rockin’ in the Free World.” (“But there's a warnin' sign on the road ahead, there's a lot of people sayin' we'd be better off dead, don't feel like Satan, but I am to them...") In a sense the rockin’ has never stopped and by now the world, free or not, has been rocked

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The Crimes Of The Trump Era: A Preview 7.2.2017 Politics on HuffingtonPost.com
Cross-posted with TomDispatch.com It started in June 2015 with that Trump Tower escalator ride into the presidential race to the tune of Neil Young’s “ Rockin’ in the Free World .” (“But there's a warnin' sign on the road ahead, there's a lot of people sayin' we'd be better off dead, don't feel like Satan, but I am to them...") In a sense the rockin’ has never stopped and by now the world, free or not, has been rocked indeed.  No one, from Beijing to Mexico City, Baghdad to Berlin, London to Washington could question that. Who today remembers that, in those initial moments of his campaign, Donald Trump was already focused on the size of his first ( partially hired ) crowd?  (“This is beyond anybody’s expectations.  There’s been no crowd like this...”)  And he’s been consistently himself ever since -- less a strong man than a bizarrely high-strung one.  In the process, while becoming president, he emerged as a media phenomenon of a sort we’ve never seen before. First, it was those billions of dollars in ...
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Crimes of the Trump Era (a Preview) 7.2.2017 Truthout.com
Seen through a TV camera's eyepiece, Donald Trump speaks at the New Hampshire Institute of Politics at Saint Anselm College in Manchester, New Hampshire, June 13, 2016. (Photo: Damon Winter / The New York Times) It started in June 2015 with that Trump Tower escalator ride into the presidential race to the tune of Neil Young's " Rockin' in the Free World ." ("But there's a warnin' sign on the road ahead, there's a lot of people sayin' we'd be better off dead, don't feel like Satan, but I am to them...") In a sense the rockin' has never stopped and by now the world, free or not, has been rocked indeed.  No one, from Beijing to Mexico City, Baghdad to Berlin, London to Washington could question that. Who today remembers that, in those initial moments of his campaign, Donald Trump was already focused on the size of his first ( partially hired ) crowd?  ("This is beyond anybody's expectations.  There's been no crowd like this...")  And he's been consistently himself ever since -- less a strong man than a ...
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NASA Sees Tropical Cyclone Carlos Over La Reunion and Mauritius 7.2.2017 Environmental News Network
Tropical Cyclone 04S formed north of La Reunion Island on February 4 and continued to track slowly toward the island. This ended an unusual drought of tropical cyclone formation in that part of the Indian Ocean that began in July 2016. When NASA's Terra passed over the newly-formed tropical cyclone imagery showed a concentration of strong thunderstorms around the center of the compact storm. The storm was later renamed Tropical Cyclone Carlos.
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Saharan oases struggle as climate change takes a toll 7.2.2017 Design & Innovation | GreenBiz.com
Local residents of North Africa's Maghreb region employ traditional water conservation techniques as desert oases disappear.
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Is Global Climate Change Good for Business? 1.2.2017 Green on HuffingtonPost.com
By Steve Wilson Steve Wilson manages projects related to climate change adaptation and resilience for the Multilateral Investment Fund. He recently co-created Proadapt, a $12 million facility that helps build climate resilience in the private sector in Latin America and the Caribbean. In addition to increasing temperatures and rising sea levels, global climate change represents a complex exercise for the great majority of businesses, which must frame the meaning, the costs, and the business and investment opportunities associated with this ongoing phenomenon. For a large number of companies, action on climate change is embedded in some version of a "sustainability" or "green business" program aimed at improving environmental and business performance. These initiatives are typically focused on mitigation, or the reduction of greenhouse-gas emissions, rather than on building climate resilience in the face of risks such as cyclonic winds, heat waves, flooding and storm surge, and drought. The most effective ...
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Three Life-or-Death Reasons Why Climate, Food, and Native American Activists Need to Keep Working Together 1.2.2017 Commondreams.org Views
Ronnie Cummins

On Tuesday,  January 24, Donald Trump signed presidential memorandums to revive the controversial Keystone XL and Dakota Access oil pipelines—two major dirty oil and fracking pipelines halted by the Obama administration after massive resistance from indigenous, climate and other public interest groups, including food activists.

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Climate Change This Week: Trump Blocks Climate Information, Resistance Grows, and More! 31.1.2017 Green on HuffingtonPost.com
Today, the Earth got a little hotter, and a little more crowded. And the chances of Donald Trump's family and fortune surviving climate change are small, dwindling daily and irreversibly. Saving BUB, Beautiful Unique Biodiversity, as in these pygmy elephants in Borneo, is another reason to preserve carbon storing forests. Source Rainforest Rescue These elephants are already threatened by ivory poachers, but a planned road will greatly help poachers to invade their habitat. You can sign here to urge the plan is stopped! Forests: the cheapest way to store carbon What Consumers of Palm Oil Never See is what their consumption drives: deforestation and extinction. Source SOB - IAR Indonesia, RAN OO UK Bank Financing Tied To Deforestation, Rights Violations For Palm Oil In Indonesia Greenpeace has published evidence of illegal deforestation and violations of local communities by companies receiving $16+ billion in loans and credit from the British bank HSBC. OO 'Out Of Control' Wildfires Damage Protected ...
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Climate Change Raises the Stakes for Affordable Healthcare Coverage 27.1.2017 Commondreams.org Views
Richard Allen Williams, Elena Rios

Today, more than 100 million Americans depend on healthcare safety-net programs: Medicare, Medicaid and the Affordable Care Act (ACA). But that safety net could be shredded if Dr. Tom Price—Trump’s nominee for Secretary of Health and Human Services—has his way. Dr. Price has already introduced plans to dismantle the ACA and roll back Medicaid, which would take health insurance coverage away from 22 million Americans, 14 million of whom are low income.

There are many reasons to oppose these plans, but one of the most important is also the most overlooked: climate change.

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How "the year without summer" demonstrated the big effect just a few degrees of climate change can have 26.1.2017 TreeHugger
Ignoring climate change won't make it go away.
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Save the Reefs: How to Preserve the Caribbean’s Underwater Landscape 26.1.2017 Green on HuffingtonPost.com
As beautiful as the Caribbean is above water, an even more breathtaking and diverse landscape exists just below the surface, where an ecosystem of reefs boasts some of the best scuba diving and snorkeling on the planet. The Caribbean accounts for around 7 percent of the world’s shallow coral reefs, home to dozens of types of coral and as many as 700 species of reef fish. Beyond being home to diverse sea life, the reefs also shelter island shorelines from the threat of devastating hurricanes. By acting as a natural barrier to buffer the effects of waves and erosion, reefs are essential to coastal communities. And with 70 percent of Caribbean populations living along coastlines, reef health is critical in this region.   But the Caribbean reefs are part of an ecosystem that could be in danger of extinction. The coverage of coral reefs in the Caribbean region has declined by more than 50 percent over the past 30 years. From ocean acidification to global warming, threats to the Caribbean region’s coral reefs ...
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