User: flenvcenter Topic: Air and Climate-Independent
Category: Climate Change :: Climate Change Impacts
Last updated: Aug 30 2016 22:16 IST RSS 2.0
 
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Climate Change Is Destroying Monarch Butterflies' Habitat In Mexico 30.8.2016 Green on HuffingtonPost.com
In the winter months of 2015-2016, monarch butterflies had their best migration in years, arriving in record numbers to the Central Mexico forests where they hibernate. Unfortunately, those forests had a really bad year. Severe storms toppled many of the oyamel fir trees where millions of the iconic orange-winged insects rest after their long trip from Canada. More than 70 hectares of forest were damaged, the biggest loss since the 2009-2010 winter, according to data (link in Spanish) released Tuesday (Aug. 23) by the World Wildlife Fund (WWF). In more bad news, experts expect the butterflies’ overwintering grounds to get hit by this sort of extreme weather more frequently in the future due to climate change. *This chart shows winter seasons, starting in 2009-2010 and ending in 2015-2016. The lost habitat is a depressing setback for monarch lovers. There are many along the butterflies’ international route who have been fighting for the monarch’s survival, including the presidents of the US and Mexico . ...
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An Open Letter To New England Governors On The Importance Of Climate Change Action 30.8.2016 Green on HuffingtonPost.com
On Monday, August 29, the New England governors met in Boston to discuss regional economic development. Climate, environmental and social justice groups from across the region released the following open letter in response: Dear Governors, As you gather to discuss the challenges and opportunities for economic growth in our region, we are writing to draw your attention to one of the most pressing economic problems facing New England: climate change. Sea level rise, extreme weather and other climate impacts threaten our region's prosperity and security. At the same time, the transition to clean energy and sustainability presents a wealth of exciting opportunities for growth, innovation, and job creation. Climate change is already impacting the New England economy. From the cranberry growing, seafood and maple sugaring industries to skiing and our iconic leaf-peeping tourism, businesses are facing warmer and less hospitable conditions here . As the planet continues heating up, we are facing the possibility ...
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Water pipes, infrastructure could buckle under climate change 30.8.2016 GreenBiz.com
Aging water pipes and wastewater treatment facilities are under even more threat because of climate change-induced heat extremes and floods.
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Storms in Mexico Kill Millions of Monarchs 29.8.2016 Environmental News Network
While international efforts are under way to help keep dwindling populations of monarch butterflies from disappearing, scientists are raising concerns about how severe weather and a loss of forest habitat at their wintering grounds in Mexico are affecting them.Every year, monarchs embark on an epic multigenerational migration that takes them thousands of miles from Canada and the U.S. in search of sites in California and in Mexico. The fir trees in the southern regions offer the shelter and warmth they need to survive the winter.Unfortunately, these vital forests in Mexico have been threatened by illegal logging, and now storms have destroyed hundreds of acres of habitat, while severe weather is believed to have killed an estimated 6.2 million of these iconic butterflies.
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Climate Change Pledges Not Nearly Enough to Save Tropical Ecosystems 28.8.2016 Truthout - All Articles
US Secretary of State John Kerry signs the Paris Agreement at the UN in New York while holding granddaughter Dobbs Higginson on his lap. Scientists warn that the agreement is insufficient to prevent disastrous climate change. (Photo courtesy of US Department of State) The Paris Agreement marked the biggest political milestone to combat climate change since scientists first introduced us in the late 1980s to perhaps humanity's greatest existential crisis. Last December, 178 nations pledged to do their part to keep global average temperatures from rising more than 2 degrees Celsius (3.6 degrees Fahrenheit) over preindustrial levels -- adding on an even more challenging, but aspirational goal of holding temperatures at 1.5 degrees Celsius (2.7 degrees Fahrenheit). To this end, each nation produced a pledge to cut it's own carbon emissions, targeting everything from the burning of fossil fuels to deforestation to agriculture. It seems like a Herculean task, bound, the optimistic say, to bring positive ...
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Climate Change and the 1,000-year Flood in Baton Rouge: When Will We Learn? 27.8.2016 Commondreams.org Views
Amy Goodman, Denis Moynihan

The floodwaters are receding in Baton Rouge, Louisiana, and the scale of the damage is revealing itself. It has been described as a 1,000-year flood, leaving at least 13 people dead and close to 60,000 homes ruined. According to Weather Underground meteorologists Jeff Masters and Bob Henson, August has been the wettest month in Baton Rouge in 174 years, when records were first kept.

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Climate-Denying Weather Channel Founder Frets About A Hillary Clinton Victory 27.8.2016 Green on HuffingtonPost.com
Lingering U.S. political debate over whether human activity is causing climate change could be settled once and for all by the 2016 presidential election, according to John Coleman, a climate change denier who co-founded The Weather Channel.  Coleman, a retired TV weatherman credited with persuading a communications magnate to start The Weather Channel in 1981, said during an interview with a likeminded skeptic on website  Climate Depot on Wednesday that a November victory by Democratic nominee Hillary Clinton may usher in years of government anti-pollution regulations and would further marginalize climate deniers. “This election may be a tipping point in the climate debate,” said Coleman, who has called climate change “a myth.”  Climate Depot promotes climate change denial.   The only scientific debate about climate change is what to do about it. An overwhelming majority of climate scientists believe human activity is causing global warming. The Obama administration has pushed anti-pollution policies ...
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Meet the NASA scientist keeping an eye on California’s drought 26.8.2016 High Country News Most Recent
Senior scientist Jay Famiglietti’s research looks at the West and the world’s dwindling water resources.
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After Louisiana floods, U.S. accelerates climate change with offshore drilling 26.8.2016 rabble.ca - News for the rest of us
Thursday, August 25, 2016 Like this article? rabble is reader-supported journalism. Chip in to keep stories like these coming. Rather than enabling more dangerous deep-water oil extraction, President Obama should be spending his remaining months in office working to reduce U.S. dependence on fossil ...
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Five Years Since Irene, Report Warns of Severe Weather Damage From Climate Change 26.8.2016 Commondreams.org Newswire

As Vermonters mark the fifth anniversary of Tropical Storm Irene, U.S. Sen. Bernie Sanders (I-Vt.) pointed to a new report from the Congressional Budget Office that warns damage from severe weather in future decades is expected to become increasingly common in Vermont and throughout the United States because of climate change.

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Climate Change This Week: Heating Up, Melting Away, Upping Wind Power, and More! 24.8.2016 Green on HuffingtonPost.com
Today, the Earth got a little hotter, and a little more crowded. Saving BUB, Beautiful Unique Biodiversity, like this Jeweled Flower Mantis found in Asian forests, is another reason to save these important ecosystems. Source Pinterest Forests: the cheapest way to store carbon OO Malaysia: Sarawak Establishes 2+ Million Acres Of Protected Areas and may add 1.1 million more... now will these truly be protected from illegal deforestation? Stay tuned, folks. <> Credit Dan at freedigitalphotos.net OO Rising Temperatures Stunt Tree Growth new research finds iconic Douglas firs across the West are water- and heat-stressed. Rising Temperatures Fuel Fires - the Sobranes, CA wildfire has destroyed nearly 70,000 acres of forest and destroyed over 40 homes. Source www.wcvb.com OO 43 Large US West Wildfires as of August 24, 2016 shows the US Forest Service wildfire map. OO New England Is Being Deforested since the 1980s due to expansion of affluent suburbs, says a new study; since then 5% of its forests has been ...
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Day After Obama Tours Louisiana Flood Damage, Government Holds Massive Gulf Oil and Gas Lease Auction 24.8.2016 Truthout - All Articles
On Tuesday, President Obama visited Louisiana for the first time since the devastating floods that killed 13 people and damaged 60,000 homes. The Red Cross has called it the worst natural disaster in the United States since Hurricane Sandy. While many climate scientists have tied the historic floods in Louisiana to climate change, President Obama made no link during his remarks. However, on Tuesday, four environmental activists were arrested in New Orleans protesting the Interior Department's decision to go ahead with a lease sale of up to 24 million acres in the Gulf of Mexico for oil and gas exploration and development. The sale is being held today in the Superdome -- the very building where thousands of displaced residents of New Orleans sought refuge during Hurricane Katrina 11 years ago. We speak to Antonia Juhasz, an oil and energy analyst, author of Black Tide: The Devastating Impact of the Gulf Oil Spill. She joins us from San Francisco. TRANSCRIPT AMY GOODMAN: On Tuesday, President Obama visited ...
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Day After Obama Tours Louisiana Flood Damage, Gov't Holds Massive Gulf Oil & Gas Lease Auction 24.8.2016 Democracy Now!
On Tuesday, President Obama visited Louisiana for the first time since the devastating floods that killed 13 people and damaged 60,000 homes. The Red Cross has called it the worst natural disaster in the United States since Hurricane Sandy. While many climate scientists have tied the historic floods in Louisiana to climate change, President Obama made no link during his remarks. However, on Tuesday, four environmental activists were arrested in New Orleans protesting the Interior Department's decision to go ahead with a lease sale of up to 24 million acres in the Gulf of Mexico for oil and gas exploration and development. The sale is being held today in the Superdome—the very building where thousands of displaced residents of New Orleans sought refuge during Hurricane Katrina 11 years ago. We speak to Antonia Juhasz, an oil and energy analyst, author of "Black Tide: The Devastating Impact of the Gulf Oil Spill." She joins us from San Francisco.
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Leading Doctor Calls Climate Change Gravest Health Threat of 21st Century 23.8.2016 CommonDreams.org Headlines
Nadia Prupis, staff writer

Climate change is the greatest threat to public health worldwide and doctors must step up to help mitigate it, according to a leading advocate speaking at the annual Canadian Medical Association (CMA) meeting in Vancouver on Monday.

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The New Normal: Organizing to Break the Cycle of Climate Disaster 20.8.2016 Commondreams.org Views
Rae Breaux

The record-breaking floods in Louisiana are the latest example of what many working people already know all too well: climate change has already begun, and it is wrecking our communities.

So far, over 30,000 people have been evacuated from their homes, 10,000 people are in shelters, and those numbers are rising. The shelters themselves are experiencing flooding, and some families have already been relocated multiple times. At this point, almost 30 parishes have been declared major disaster areas.

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From Epic Fires to a 1,000-Year Flood: The Climate Change of Here and Now 19.8.2016 CommonDreams.org Headlines
Deirdre Fulton, staff writer

From deadly floods in Louisiana to an "explosive" wildfire in California, the impacts of the climate change are being felt across the United States this week.

Neither extreme weather event can be exclusively blamed on global warming. But record-breaking heat, warmer oceans, and drier brush—all linked to man-made climate change—are certainly contributing factors. 

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Are We Feeling Collective Grief Over Climate Change? 18.8.2016 Commondreams.org Views
Margaret Hetherman

In 1977, I was in middle school in Michigan, and a science teacher shared a tidbit off-curriculum. Some scientists had postulated that as a result of "pollution," heat-trapping gasses might one day lead to a warming planet. Dubbed "the greenhouse effect," the image was clear in my 12-year old mind: people enclosed in a glass structure, heating up like tomatoes coaxed to ripen. It was an interesting concept, but something in the very, very distant future.

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Facing Rising Seas, Remote Alaskan Village Votes To Move (Again) 18.8.2016 Green on HuffingtonPost.com
The residents of Shishmaref, an island village of around 560 people in Alaska’s Chukchi Sea, have voted to relocate in the face of rising seas brought on by global climate change, according to reports.  An unofficial ballot count Wednesday showed the vote was 89-79 in favor of leaving, the Associated Press and Grist report. A city clerk told AP the count does not include absentee or special needs ballots. Village officials did not immediately respond to The Huffington Post’s request for comment Wednesday. This isn’t the first time the village has tried to pack up and go. In July 2002, confronted with melting permafrost and other climatic changes that have imperiled the island’s future, residents decided moving was the only way to keep their community intact. But they faced logistical hurdles, as The Huffington Post documented in a 2014 feature , such as finding a new location and securing funding. So 14 years later they are still there, prompting this week’s  vote on relocation. Grist reports that ...
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July 2016 Was The Hottest Month Ever Recorded 17.8.2016 Green on HuffingtonPost.com
If July felt horrendously hot, that’s because it was. NASA and the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration ― two leading global authorities on climate ― both say July 2016 was not only the hottest July on record, but the most sizzling month in the history of record-keeping. NOAA on Wednesday said July’s global average temperature was 62.01 degrees , 1.57 degrees above the 20th-century average. NASA, which uses a slightly different methodology,  said Monday  the average global temperature in July was  1.51 degrees above average . Both agencies pegged July as the hottest month since monitoring began in 1880. The record continues a global hot streak that scientists have linked to global warming, with average  temperatures continuing to climb  as  extreme weather events occur more frequently.  The July data underscores the fact that man’s role in climate change is “no longer subtle,” said Michael Mann, a climate scientist at Pennsylvania State University. “We are seeing them play out in the daily ...
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Roots Of The Sand Storms Are In America! 16.8.2016 Green on HuffingtonPost.com
I was born in Pali, a small town in Rajasthan, the largest state of India with a major portion of the Thar desert. Although it is located around the desert region, once every few years it also receives its share of wetter than usual Indian monsoon. And this year in 2016, this part of India is once again flooded as are several other parts of India including Mumbai, Delhi, Kolkata and in the recent memory, many other parts such as Kashmir and Chennai. These intense weather patterns in India are of course not isolated incidents as they are matched with similar examples of droughts, hurricanes, typhoons, floods, and other natural disasters throughout the world. While it is common to read analyses by scholars in which the rise of global terrorism is at least partially blamed on American foreign policy, how can the rise in recent natural disasters be explained? It is true that unplanned and mismanaged urbanization has insufficient ways to deal with natural disasters in most of the African and Asian countries. ...
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