User: flenvcenter Topic: Air and Climate-Independent
Category: Climate Change :: Climate Change Impacts
Last updated: Sep 23 2014 07:59 IST RSS 2.0
 
1 to 20 of 3,577    
Google Chairman: Giving Money To ALEC Was A 'Mistake' 23.9.2014 Green on HuffingtonPost.com
Google executive chairman Eric Schmidt said on Monday that his company's support for the American Legislative Exchange Council was a "mistake," adding that it should avoid aligning with groups that deny climate change. "We funded [ALEC] as part of a political campaign for something unrelated [to climate change]," Schmidt said on NPR's "The Diane Rehm Show ." "I think the consensus within the company was that that was some sort of mistake and so we're trying to not do that in the future." "The company has a very strong view that we should make decisions in politics based on facts -- what a shock. And the facts of climate change are not in question anymore," Schmidt continued. "Everyone understands climate change is occurring and the people who oppose it are really hurting our children and our grandchildren and making the world a much worse place. And so we should not be aligned with such people -- they're just, they're just literally lying." Activists have criticized Google's support for ALEC since last ...
Also found in: [+]
No Need to Sacrifice the Planet's Arteries to Save Her Lungs 23.9.2014 Green on HuffingtonPost.com
From the flood-prone coastline of Bangladesh to East Africa's drought-stricken farm lands, climate change hits people hardest who have least contributed to it. World governments have agreed to mobilize $100 billion a year for climate mitigation and adaptation projects by 2020, most directly through the new Green Climate Fund (GCF). The People's Climate March will hopefully set some official pants on fire and speed up the capitalization of the new fund. At the same time, we need to be vigilant that the powers that be don't abuse the GCF as honey pots from which they can fund business-as-usual or outright destructive projects. Using large dams as an example, governments need to heed the following lessons of experience with climate finance as they commit new funding to the GCF: Take a holistic view of ecological threats: Large dams have helped turn freshwater ecosystems into the ecosystem type most threatened by species extinction. Tropical reservoirs are also a major source of greenhouse emissions in the ...
Also found in: [+]
Climate Change To Trigger Longer, Fiercer 'Megadroughts,' Study Warns 22.9.2014 Green on HuffingtonPost.com
By Chris Arsenault ROME, Sept 22 (Thomson Reuters Foundation) - Climate change will unleash megadroughts in the coming decades worse than anything seen in the last 2,000 years, new research warns. In semi-arid regions such as the U.S. southwest, there is an 80 percent chance of a drought lasting more than a decade, according to a study published in the Journal of Climate. The paper from academics at Cornell University, the U.S. Geological Survey and the University of Arizona combines historical data on droughts with new climate models looking at changes to rainfall patterns caused by global warming. One ominous scenario puts the chance of a drought in the United States lasting more than 35 years at 20 to 50 percent. The burden of drought will also fall heavily on subtropical countries in the developing world, including across the Mediterranean, western and southern Africa and Latin America. "Risks throughout the subtropics appear as high or higher than our estimates for the U.S. Southwest," ...
Also found in: [+]
Carbon Shock: More leaders are following the money 22.9.2014 Business Operations | GreenBiz.com

Climate change is finally jolting leaders in the language they understand. Look at Brazil and China — and this mug, for example.

Carbon Shock: More leaders are following the money
Also found in: [+]
It's Time for Action on Climate Change 22.9.2014 Green on HuffingtonPost.com
This week in New York City, the UN Climate Summit will bring heads of state, business community leaders and activists together to push for action to protect our planet from climate change. While the need for a response is urgent and felt every day in communities across the country, our leaders in Washington have failed to find a way past partisan gridlock and get something done. That is why I will be hosting a special program on what our states and local communities can do, absent leadership from Washington. Because one thing is clear: We can't afford to wait. Here in New York, we are already seeing how climate change contributes to increasingly violent and extreme weather that has cost us dearly, in both damage and in lives. Earlier this month, my office issued a report that demonstrated the toll that extreme rainstorms and floods are taking on communities all over the State. The report illustrates how our climate is changing and how climate change poses a clear and present danger to every New Yorker, ...
Also found in: [+]
Tackling Climate Change Presents A 'Golden Opportunity' For Public Health 22.9.2014 Politics on HuffingtonPost.com
For Carol Kelly, biking to and from work is a no-brainer: She doesn't have to deal with the notorious Seattle traffic, she can exercise without visiting the dreary gym and she saves money on gas. And, of course, she acknowledges that her swap of a tailpipe for pedals contributes -- at least in a small way -- to tackling climate change. "I don't necessarily connect it to climate, but it's a bonus," said Kelly, 47, a fine arts professor at Seattle University, as she waited on her bike at a stop sign Friday evening in the Green Lake neighborhood of Seattle. "The planet is going to burn up. If everyone were on bikes, it wouldn't be as much of a problem." Biking, walking and other active forms of transportation are just a few ways that reducing our use of fossil fuels may benefit not only the planet but also our health and the economy, according to a study published in the Journal of the American Medical Association on Monday -- to coincide with the United Nations Climate Summit in New York City . The new ...
Also found in: [+]
Why 400,000 People Marched For Climate Change Action 22.9.2014 Politics on HuffingtonPost.com
Climate activists filled the streets of New York City today for the People's Climate March . People came from across the country and around the world to support meaningful action on climate change just days before world leaders assemble for the UN climate summit. Initial counts estimated march attendance at more than 400,000 people, three times the number predicted by organizers before the event. The march included representatives from over 1,500 organizations, including students, scientists, faith groups, labor unions, businesses, environmental groups and more. We talked to just a few participants and asked them to share why they came to march today. The answers we got were inspiring, unique and powerful. Harry, Rochester, New York "From the Earthsavers, Philippines, UNESCO Artist For Peace -- We have to conscienticize the world leaders to agree on the global deal for survivial and keep a safe healthy planet for our children. We are battered by supertyphoons -- and we must stop the madness of carbon ...
Also found in: [+]
This Is What It Looks Like When 300,000 People March For Climate Change Awareness 22.9.2014 Green on HuffingtonPost.com
More than 300,000 people stepped out in New York City for the People's Climate March on Sunday, what's being hailed as the largest climate march in history as many worry about the state of our planet.

Have a hard time imagining what that many people looks like? Take a gander at the video above to see the crowds stretching for miles up Central Park West.
Also found in: [+]
Why 300,000 People Marched For Climate Change Action 22.9.2014 Green on HuffingtonPost.com
Climate activists filled the streets of New York City today for the People's Climate March . People came from across the country and around the world to support meaningful action on climate change just days before world leaders assemble for the UN climate summit. Initial counts estimated march attendance at more than 300,000 people, three times the number predicted by organizers before the event. The march included representatives from over 1,500 organizations, including students, scientists, faith groups, labor unions, businesses, environmental groups and more. We talked to just a few participants and asked them to share why they came to march today. The answers we got were inspiring, unique and powerful. Harry, Rochester, New York "From the Earthsavers, Philippines, UNESCO Artist For Peace -- We have to conscienticize the world leaders to agree on the global deal for survivial and keep a safe healthy planet for our children. We are battered by supertyphoons -- and we must stop the madness of carbon ...
Also found in: [+]
Big Considerations for the US as Climate Change Sweeps the Globe 21.9.2014 Commondreams.org Views
Also found in: [+]
Days of Action: Why We Vote 21.9.2014 Politics on HuffingtonPost.com
Something's happening here. Across the globe, millions of people have come together to send a unified message to our leaders: Climate change is real, and every nation must step up and take action -- before it's too late. Today in New York City, as President Obama prepares to join more than 120 other world leaders for an historic summit on climate, thousands of Americans are taking to the street to urge action on climate change. And I am proud to be among them. The dialogue around climate change can often become mired in gloom and doom, which is understandable given the topic. With communities across the country already feeling the impacts -- from historic droughts impacting crops, to rising sea levels threatening communities, to extreme weather or tainted drinking water -- people can get down. But here's the good news: The political conversation on climate change is shifting in real time, and our leaders are taking notice. This shift is happening for a simple reason: Climate change is no longer an ...
Also found in: [+]
Days of Action: Why We Vote 21.9.2014 Green on HuffingtonPost.com
Something's happening here. Across the globe, millions of people have come together to send a unified message to our leaders: Climate change is real, and every nation must step up and take action -- before it's too late. Today in New York City, as President Obama prepares to join more than 120 other world leaders for an historic summit on climate, thousands of Americans are taking to the street to urge action on climate change. And I am proud to be among them. The dialogue around climate change can often become mired in gloom and doom, which is understandable given the topic. With communities across the country already feeling the impacts -- from historic droughts impacting crops, to rising sea levels threatening communities, to extreme weather or tainted drinking water -- people can get down. But here's the good news: The political conversation on climate change is shifting in real time, and our leaders are taking notice. This shift is happening for a simple reason: Climate change is no longer an ...
Also found in: [+]
Climate Change This Week: Energy Efficiency Saves Trillions, US Birds at Risk, and More! 21.9.2014 Green on HuffingtonPost.com
Today, the Earth got a little hotter, and a little more crowded. Daily Climate Change: Global Map of Unusual Temperatures, Sep 20, 2014 How unusual has the weather been? No one event is "caused" by climate change, but global warming, which is predicted to increase unusual, extreme weather, is having a daily effect on weather, worldwide. Looking above at recent temperature anomalies, much of the U.S. is experiencing well above normal warmer temperatures; the eastern Pacific warm spot continues to prevent much rain from reaching California, sending it into further drought. The North Pole and much of the areas surrounding it are experiencing much warmer than normal temperatures - not good news for our Arctic thermal shield of ice. Hotter than usual temperatures continue to dominate human habitats. (Add 0.3-0.4 C to have these anomaly values calibrate with those of NASA.) Daily updates of can be seen here for both the temperature anomalies map, and the jetstream map. For real time animated US surface ...
Also found in: [+]
The Drought of Climate Change Support 20.9.2014 Politics on HuffingtonPost.com
This summer, we've seen a continuation of the record-breaking heat and drought in the Southwest that began several years ago. In parts of Texas and Oklahoma, it's as bad as it was during the "Dust Bowl" years of the 1930s. Crops have withered, water restrictions are in place, and air conditioning costs are going through the roof. None of this is good for people, livestock or the local economy. Is this just a natural variation, or is it connected to global warming? Certainly, there have been unusual episodes of drought in the past that were unrelated to global warming. But we also know that because of greenhouse gases from the burning of fossil fuels, temperatures have been steadily shifting to higher levels. This means that when we get unusually hot, dry conditions, it starts out from a higher base, which makes things a lot worse. Even minor fluctuations push us into more and more extreme territory. Across the globe, we've loaded the atmosphere with so much pollution from burning fossil fuel that the ...
Also found in: [+]
Our Disappearing Snows: Climate Change and Water Resources 20.9.2014 Green on HuffingtonPost.com
As the Earth has warmed over the past 30 years, the global water cycle has begun to change. In particular, our snows have begun to disappear. The implications for the water systems we've built and operate are vast and pervasive. And despite decades of research, observations, and outreach to water managers, we're not ready. Nearly three decades ago, as a young graduate student at the Energy and Resources Group at the University of California, Berkeley, I published initial results from the core of my doctoral dissertation to integrate regional hydrologic models with output from the three major general circulation models of the climate in operation in the United States. Those models - the Goddard Institute for Space Studies (GISS) model under the direction of Dr. James Hansen, the Geophysical Fluid Dynamics Model (GFDL) under the direction of Dr. Syukoro Manabe, and the model developed at the National Center for Atmospheric Research (NCAR) under the direction of Dr. Warren Washington, were still too coarse ...
Also found in: [+]
Egyptian art sheds light on changing ecosystem 19.9.2014 Environmental News Network
Depictions of animals in ancient Egyptian artefacts have helped scientists assemble a detailed record of the large mammals that lived in the Nile Valley over the past 6,000 years. A new analysis of this record shows that species extinctions, probably caused by a drying climate and growing human population in the region, have made the ecosystem progressively less stable. The study, published in Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences (PNAS), found that local extinctions of mammal species led to a steady decline in the stability of the animal communities in the Nile Valley.
Also found in: [+]
People's Climate March: Working for a Better World 19.9.2014 Green on HuffingtonPost.com
This Sunday, an estimated 100,000 people will flood the streets of midtown Manhattan for the largest climate demonstration in world history. They will come from all over the globe, with interests, talents, and biographies that mirror the incredible diversity of our world. What's even more groundbreaking is how many groups have come together to unite behind a common message of environmental protection. Thousands of union members will link arms with environmental activists, to demand action from global leaders to reverse the effects of climate change. At first, that might seem strange -- the labor movement and environmentalists are not often characterized as natural allies. But if the People's Climate March teaches us anything, it's that what unites us is far greater than what divides us. 1199's members, over 400,000 nurses and caregivers, are both the heroes and victims of climate change. As medical professionals, they have been on the front lines of the climate fight, caring for New Yorkers in the wake ...
Also found in: [+]
The Gathering Storm 19.9.2014 Green on HuffingtonPost.com
Winston Churchill saw the gathering storm long before the rest of the world. Europe sacrificed millions of people before it openly acknowledged and then directly confronted the crisis. Yet, even after the Allies responded, the outcome was uncertain. Only when the U.S. entered the fray could the Allies see a clear path to end the threat. While meeting that threat, the war mobilization also provided employment for millions and pulled the U.S. economy out of the Great Depression, leading to a half-century of prosperity. Americans mostly look back fondly on that period, as the world became a better place in many ways for the changes that were made. Today, we face another threat, this time from climate disruption. Again, the U.S. must lead -- this time to a clean energy future and a healthier world. As we experience more intense and longer heat waves, prolonged drought, crop failures, rising seas, increasing wildfires and floods, and as natural systems begin to crash, we will see profoundly destabilizing ...
Also found in: [+]
Environmentalist Bill McKibben Explains How We Can 'Stave Off Real Disaster' 19.9.2014 Politics on HuffingtonPost.com
It's not too late for the world to recalibrate their methods of consuming energy, but according to environmentalist and 350.org co-founder Bill McKibben, that action should've gone into effect years ago. "If the question's when do we need to make change, the correct answer is 25 years ago," he told HuffPost Live's Alyona Minkovski in a Thursday appearance to promote the People's Climate March , happening in New York City on Sunday. Proof of environmental damage includes a rise in average temperatures, which has the potential to impact human life on an extreme scale. "We've raised temperature one degree. We're headed for two degrees even if we do everything right. The trouble is, we're not doing everything right, so at the moment we're headed to an increase of four or five degree celsius, eight or nine degrees Fahrenheit this century. If we let this happen, we can't have civilizations like the ones we're used to," he explained. "We just won't be able to grow the grain to support them." While environmental ...
Also found in: [+]
Climate Change You Can Believe In 19.9.2014 Commondreams.org Views
Also found in: [+]
1 to 20 of 3,577