User: flenvcenter Topic: Air and Climate-Independent
Category: Climate Change :: Climate Change Impacts
1 new since Aug 16 2017 19:58 IST RSS 2.0
 
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Balloons and drones and clouds; oh, my! 16.8.2017 Environmental News Network
Last week, researchers at Sandia National Laboratories flew a tethered balloon and an unmanned aerial system, colloquially known as a drone, together for the first time to get Arctic atmospheric temperatures with better location control than ever before. In addition to providing more precise data for weather and climate models, being able to effectively operate UASs in the Arctic is important for national security.“Operating UASs in the remote, harsh environments of the Arctic will provide opportunities to harden the technologies in ways that are directly transferable to the needs of national security in terms of robustness and reliability,” said Jon Salton, a Sandia robotics manager. “Ultimately, integrating the specialized operational and sensing needs required for Arctic research will transfer to a variety of national security needs.”
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NASA's GPM Found Gert Strengthening into a Hurricane 15.8.2017 Environmental News Network
NASA looked at the rainfall rates within Tropical Storm Gert as it continued to strengthen and found the most intense rainfall on the tropical cyclone's eastern side. Just over 12 hours later, Gert would strengthen into a hurricane. As Gert has strengthened, the storm began generating dangerous surf along the U.S. East coast.The Global Precipitation Measurement mission or GPM core observatory satellite passed above tropical storm Gert on August 14, 2017 at 9:36 a.m. EDT (1336 UTC) when winds had reached about 57.5 mph (50 knots). Data collected by GPM's Microwave Imager (GMI) and Dual-Frequency Precipitation Radar (DPR) instruments were used to show the coverage and the intensity of rainfall around Tropical Storm Gert. The area covered by GPM's radar swath revealed that the most intense rainfall, measuring greater 3.5 inches (90 mm) per hour, was located in bands of rain on the eastern side of the ...
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NASA Sees Tropical Storm Jova Being Ripped Apart 15.8.2017 Environmental News Network
Satellite imagery from NOAA's GOES-West satellite showed vertical wind shear was already tearing Tropical Storm Jova apart just two days after it formed. By August 14, the storm weakened into a post-tropical cyclone.Tropical Storm Jova formed around 11 p.m. EDT on Friday, August 11. Now, wind shear it tearing the storm apart.At 12:45 p.m. EDT (1500 UTC) on Sunday, August 13, NOAA's GOES-West satellite captured a visible image of Tropical Depression Jova that showed wind shear was pushing most of the clouds southwest of the center of circulation. That wind shear is causing the demise of the depression.NOAA manages the GOES series of satellites. NASA/NOAA's GOES Project at NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center in Greenbelt, Maryland uses the satellite data to create imagery.
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NASA Sees Formation of Comma-Shaped Tropical Storm 14W 11.8.2017 Environmental News Network
The fourteenth tropical cyclone of the Northwestern Pacific Ocean hurricane season formed about 200 miles away from Wake Island and a NASA-NOAA satellite saw it take on a comma-shape.  NASA-NOAA’s Suomi NPP satellite passed over Tropical Storm 14W on August 11 at 0118 UTC (Aug. 10 at 9:18 p.m. EDT) shortly after it formed. The Visible Infrared Imaging Radiometer Suite (VIIRS) instrument aboard took a visible light picture of the storm that showed thunderstorms around the low-level center and a thick band wrapping from the east to south to west, forming a comma-shape.
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NASA Analyzed Intensifying Franklin's Rains Before Landfall 10.8.2017 Environmental News Network
Before Tropical Storm Franklin made landfall in east-central Mexico, the storm was intensifying. Two NASA satellites provided a look at the storm's cloud heights and extent and rainfall within.
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What it takes to recover from drought 10.8.2017 Environmental News Network
Drought-stricken areas anxiously await the arrival of rain. Full recovery of the ecosystem, however, can extend long past the first rain drops on thirsty ground.According to a study published August 10 in Nature, the length of drought recovery depends on several factors, including the region of the world and the post-drought weather conditions. The authors, including William Anderegg of the University of Utah, warn that more frequent droughts in the future may not allow time for ecosystems to fully recover before the next drought hits.Find a video abstract of this study here. The study was funded by the National Science Foundation and by NASA.
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Incomplete Drought Recovery May Be The New Normal 10.8.2017 Environmental News Network
The amount of time it takes for an ecosystem to recover from a drought is an important measure of a drought’s severity. During the 20th century, the total area of land affected by drought increased, and longer recovery times became more common, according to new research published by Nature by a group of scientists including Carnegie’s Anna Michalak and Yuanyuan Fang.
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Death Valley just had its hottest month on record 9.8.2017 High Country News Most Recent
Unusually hot desert nights contributed to what may well be a new planet record.
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Deforestation and Climate Disruption Are Degrading the Amazon, Endangering Our Survival 7.8.2017 Truthout.com
The Amazon Rainforest, the most biologically diverse place on Earth, is threatened by deforestation and anthropogenic climate disruption. (Photo: CIAT ; Edited: LW / TO) As human beings, our survival depends upon respecting the complexity of the Earth's ecosystems and protecting them, say the experts in Brazil tasked with protecting the Amazon rainforest from the effects of human-caused climate disruption. The Amazon is one of the most important and biodiverse ecosystems, and it is being deforested at an astonishing rate. The Amazon Rainforest, the most biologically diverse place on Earth, is threatened by deforestation and anthropogenic climate disruption. (Photo: CIAT ; Edited: LW / TO) Sao Paolo and Brasilia, Brazil -- Warwick Manfrinato, the director of Brazil's Department of Protected Areas, has a deep understanding of biological interdependence, as well as its importance. "If we are of utter service to nature, then we provide the benefits to all other living things on the planet," Manfrinato told ...
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Planting Resilience to Climate Change 6.8.2017 Truthout - All Articles
Aurelia Arzú inspects the cocoplum patch and reaches in to pluck the ripest fruits. It’s early in the year, and the season is just beginning, so the bush is loaded with edible, plum-sized fruit ripening from yellow to pink in the unrelenting afternoon sun. Arzú bites into the cocoplum, quite literally eating the fruits of her labor. Together with other local Garifuna women, she planted cocoplum, seagrape, and other native coastal plants on and around the sand dunes in an effort to halt their advance and prevent further displacement of Santa Rosa de Aguán community residents. Aurelia Arzú inspects a cocoplum bush planted by local Garifuna women, selecting the ripest fruit to eat. (Photo: Sandra Cuffe) "It fills me with pride to see this and to know that the women helped protect our community," says Arzú, looking out at the burgeoning vegetation. Arzú's footprints crisscross the sandy expanse, tracing a path from the Caribbean Sea lapping at the northern coast of Honduras to the dunes now dotted with ...
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Why Trump's New Surgeon General Should See Climate Change as a Global Health Issue 4.8.2017 Truthout - All Articles
As Dr. Jerome Adams, the new surgeon general, takes on the role of the most prominent physician in the US, we can only hope that he will pay serious attention to the studies that show a clear link between climate change and negative health outcomes. A Chinese migrant worker look sout from the door of his house next to a coal-fired power plant on November 27, 2015, on the outskirts of Beijing, China. (Photo: Kevin Frayer / Getty Images) It's hard to predict how President Trump's new Surgeon General,  Dr. Jerome Adams , will define the position. When it comes to key public health issues, Adams -- who is expected to be confirmed today by the US Senate Committee on Health, Education, Labor and Pensions -- has a record of views that don't align with those of President Trump. For example, as health commissioner in Indiana, Adams stood up for  needle exchange programs  and the  expansion of Medicaid  through the Affordable Care Act. On the global scene, Adams tried to correct  myths around the 2015 Ebola ...
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As climate changes, global food supply will become increasingly unstable 4.8.2017 TreeHugger
Global food shipments rely on 14 key 'chokepoints' that are susceptible to disruption, with disastrous effects.
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NASA Look at Tropical Storm Nalgae in Infrared Light 2.8.2017 Environmental News Network
NASA’s Aqua satellite passed over Tropical Storm Nalgae and gathered temperature data to determine the location of the most powerful storms. 
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Historical wildlife trends reliable for predicting species at risk 2.8.2017 Environmental News Network
Scientists at the University of York have shown that using historical wildlife data provides a more accurate measure of how vulnerable certain species might be to extinction from climate change.Some of the methods used to predict at risk species are trend-based – an indicator of what happens gradually over time – while others are trait based, which uses signs of climate change in the current environment.
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Climate scientists create Caribbean drought atlas 2.8.2017 Environmental News Network
Cornell atmospheric scientists have developed the first-of-its-kind, high-resolution Caribbean drought atlas, with data going back to 1950. Concurrently, the researchers confirmed the region’s 2013-16 drought was the most severe in 66 years due to consistently higher temperatures – a hint that climate change is to blame.
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Research Team Predicts Multi-Year U.S. Drought and Fire Conditions 1.8.2017 Environmental News Network
The next mega-droughts and subsequent active wildfire seasons for the western U.S. might be predictable a full year in advance, extending well beyond the current seasonal forecast and helping segments of the economy related to agriculture, water management and forestry.
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Insuring nature, ensuring resilience 1.8.2017 GreenBiz.com
Market-based strategies only go so far. These new types of products can protect and restore ecosystems in peril.
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Regenerative Appalachia: Storytelling And Songs Re-Envision Boone, North Carolina 30.7.2017 Green on HuffingtonPost.com
So, it’s hard to explain what led to the “great crisis.” You see, everyone said it would never happen. A megadrought has
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NASA-NOAA Satellite Spots Tropical Storm Nesat Being Sheared 28.7.2017 Environmental News Network
NASA-NOAA's Suomi NPP satellite captured an image of Tropical Storm Nesat being affected by vertical wind shear as it parallels the east coast of the Philippines.On July 27, 2017 at 12:24 a.m. EDT (0424 UTC) the Visible Infrared Imaging Radiometer Suite (VIIRS) instrument aboard NASA-NOAA's Suomi NPP satellite provided a visible-light image of Tropical Storm Nesat as it continued moving north in the Philippine Sea. The VIIRS image showed thunderstorms circling the low-level center and a band of thunderstorms northwest of the center, running parallel to the coast of the Northern Philippines. The image also showed that the bulk of Nesat's clouds were being pushed to the southwest as a result of northeasterly vertical wind shear.
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Researchers develop model to predict and prevent power outages using big data 27.7.2017 Environmental News Network
High-speed winds during a thunderstorm may cause trees around an electric grid to crash into the distribution system feeders causing an outage in that area. Currently, most utility companies diminish such accidents by scheduling regular tree-trimming operations. This effort is costly and is based on a rotational approach to different service areas, which may take months and sometimes years before all trees are trimmed.
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