User: flenvcenter Topic: Air and Climate-Independent
Category: Climate Change :: Climate Change Impacts
Last updated: Sep 01 2014 23:47 IST RSS 2.0
 
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Five Reasons NATO Needs to Worry About Climate Change 1.9.2014 Commondreams.org Views
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Climate Change This Week: Rising Health Risks and Heat, Rising Renewables, and More! 31.8.2014 Green on HuffingtonPost.com
Today, the Earth got a little hotter, and a little more crowded. Daily Climate Change: Global Map of Unusual Temperatures, Aug 29 2014 How unusual has the weather been? No one event is "caused" by climate change, but global warming, which is predicted to increase unusual, extreme weather, is having a daily effect on weather, worldwide. Looking above at recent temperature anomalies, much of the US is cooler than normal, but the eastern Pacific warm spot continues to prevent much rain from reaching California, which is hotter than normal. The North Pole and surroundings are experiencing much warmer than normal temperatures - not good news for our Arctic thermal shield of ice. Hotter than usual temperatures continue to dominate human habitats. (Add 0.3-0.4 C to have these anomaly values calibrate with those of NASA.) Daily updates of can be seen here for both the temperature anomalies map, and the jetstream map. For real time animated US surface wind patterns, click here , and here , for the planet. ...
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Boosting Resilience in the Caribbean Countries 30.8.2014 Truthout - All Articles
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Hillary Clinton is Just Plain Wrong on GMOs 29.8.2014 Commondreams.org Views
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Climate Crisis a Public-Health Emergency Too: Why Nurses Will Join Climate March Sept. 21 29.8.2014 Green on HuffingtonPost.com
Early last November Typhoon Haiyan/Yolanda slammed into the Philippines, leaving more than 6,000 people dead, tens of thousands injured, and many more bereft of their homes and livelihoods. The storm was called the most powerful tropical cyclone ever to make landfall. Few of the international media who flew in to report on the devastation noted an underlying cause: subsurface ocean waters recorded at 9 degrees Fahrenheit above average , fueling the intensity of the storm. But National Nurses United, which rapidly dispatched a number of nurse volunteers, who provided basic, hands-on medical support for thousands of the injured, never lost sight of a broader concern. Taking a break one day from the medical mission, RN volunteers joined a press conference with local healthcare and environmental activists, noting that huge storms are not new but are far worse because of the consequences of the human-made climate crisis. RNs at climate crisis press conference following Typhoon Haiyan/Yolanda "Climate change ...
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Climate Change Will Ruin Hawaii, New Study Suggests 29.8.2014 Green on HuffingtonPost.com
Climate change has its sights on its next victim, and it's one of America's favorite vacation spots. Hawaii is known for its near perfect weather, but a new report from the University of Hawaii's Sea Grant program states that islands in the Pacific might be unrecognizable in the coming years as climate change makes them hotter, arid, stormy and even disease-ridden. According to " Climate Change Impacts In Hawaii: A Summary Of Climate Change And Its Impacts To Hawaii’s Ecosystems And Communities ," which was paid for by Hawaii Tourism Authority (HTA), the oceans, rainfall, ecosystems and immunity of people who live on islands in the Pacific are all at peril. But what’s more, tourism -- an industry responsible for most of the state’s annual revenue -- might all but vanish. Amongst the doom and gloom, the study projects: Higher average temperatures, stressing native animals and plants and causing an uptick in heat-related illnesses in people (think dengue fever or cholera), as well as a higher concentration ...
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35-Year 'Megadrought' May Threaten Southwest Within Century, Study Finds 28.8.2014 Green on HuffingtonPost.com
Thanks to the expected effects of climate change, there's at least an 80 percent chance of a decade-long drought occurring in the Southwest over the next century, a new study has found. “This will be worse than anything seen during the last 2,000 years and would pose unprecedented challenges to water resources in the region,” Toby Ault, lead author of the study, said in a press release Wednesday. Ault is part of a group of researchers from Cornell University, the University of Arizona and the U.S. Geological Survey who used computer models to estimate the likelihood that a drought lasting 10 years, 35 years or 50 years could occur in the Southwest in the next century. The study will be published in the American Meteorological Society’s Journal of Climate. The researchers found that when accounting for climate change, there is a 20-50 percent chance of a 35-year long megadrought in the next century, depending on the region. There is a 5-10 percent chance of a 50-year megadrought, they reported. The ...
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Existing Coal Plants Will Pump Out 300 Billion Tons Of CO2 Emissions Before They're Retired 28.8.2014 Green on HuffingtonPost.com
This story originally appeared on Climate Central. It seems straightforward to say that when you buy a new car by taking out a loan, you’re committing to spending a certain amount of your income per month on that car for a specific period of time. Of course, by buying that car, you’re also committing to polluting the atmosphere with some amount of carbon dioxide. But how often do car buyers make that calculation? The same can be said for coal-fired power plants , which spew billions of tons of climate-changing CO2 into the atmosphere each year, and continue to be built across the globe. Coal-fired power plants are the largest contributors to the atmospheric CO2 concentrations, which last year reached 400 parts per million (ppm) for the first time in human history — up from 280 ppm in pre-industrial times. While utilities account for operating costs, few ever calculate how much CO2 those power plants will emit into the atmosphere during their lifespans, according to a new study conducted by Princeton ...
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As Obama Settles on Nonbinding Treaty, "Only a Big Movement" Can Take on Global Warming 28.8.2014 Democracy Now!
As international climate scientists warn runaway greenhouse gas emissions could cause "severe, pervasive and irreversible impacts," the Obama administration is abandoning attempts to have Congress agree to a legally binding international climate deal. The New York Times reports U.S. negotiators are crafting a proposal that would not require congressional approval and instead would seek pledges from countries to cut emissions on a voluntary basis. This comes as a new U.N. report warns climate change could become "irreversible" if greenhouse gas emissions go unchecked. If global warming is to be adequately contained, it says, at least three-quarters of known fossil fuel reserves must remain in the ground. We speak to 350.org founder Bill McKibben about why his hopes for taking on global warming lie not in President Obama's approach, but rather in events like the upcoming People's Climate March in New York City, which could mark the largest rally for climate action ever. "The Obama administration, which ...
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20 New Species Of Coral Listed As Threatened 28.8.2014 Politics on HuffingtonPost.com

WASHINGTON (AP) — The federal government is protecting 20 types of colorful coral by putting them on the list of threatened species, partly because of climate change.


Five species can be found off the Atlantic and Gulf of Mexico coasts of Florida, Puerto Rico and the Virgin Islands. The other 15 are in the Pacific Ocean area near Guam and American Samoa.


The National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration originally looked at listing 66 species, but Wednesday listed only 20 for various reasons. All are called threatened, not endangered. Coral reefs, which are in trouble worldwide, are important fish habitats.


The agency cited threats to coral from global warming, including oceans getting more acidic, water getting warmer and a bleaching disease. Other threats include fishing practices. Two coral species already were listed.

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Why Island Wisdom Is Crucial to Help the World Adapt and Prepare for the Impacts of Climate Change 27.8.2014 Green on HuffingtonPost.com
By Han Seung-soo* For decades, small island countries have been warning the world about the consequences of climate change. While many countries have been debating whether climate change is even happening or who is to blame, small islands have just had to deal with its impact, from extreme weather to rising sea levels and increasing environmental vulnerability. Major storms have always been a fact of life for small islands. But in recent years they have intensified in their destructive capabilities. In 2004, Hurricane Ivan struck the Caribbean island of Grenada, causing widespread destruction. The financial cost of the disaster was estimated at more than $900 million - more than twice the country's gross domestic product (GDP). Only 10 months later, the country was hit again, this time by Hurricane Emily, which caused another $50 million in damage. In the Caribbean, changes in hurricane intensity and frequency could eventually result in additional annual losses of $450 million, largely due to disruption ...
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Climate Change and Underground Water: A Need to Link Science With People 27.8.2014 Green on HuffingtonPost.com
Water is life, however the way it is being used by humans and the scientific facts which informs how it is being diminished is no doubt a mystery for common people in Pakistan to be aware of. This is evident from the example of Rawalpindi city of Pakistan! Let's see how this mystery prevails. Research in the district Rawalpindi shows that abnormal rain patterns in this region during 1996-2005 shapely decline underground water. Rains in this region were intense and quick run-off didn't contribute in the recharge of underground water. Research findings show that approximately 7 to 10 feet of underground water has been reduced every year within 1996-2005. Only in the Gawal Mandi area of district Rawalpindi, underground water depleted from approximately 25 ft in 1960 to 275 ft in 2005. This is such an alarming situation, yet remained unfocused by both public and private sector. The knowledge of a common citizen, who in particular is illiterate, is completely an out-of-the-question talking point. Why can we ...
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Draft Of Upcoming IPCC Report Presents Stark View Of The Future As Climate Change Rages On 26.8.2014 Green on HuffingtonPost.com
WASHINGTON (AP) — Global warming is here, human-caused and probably already dangerous — and it's increasingly likely that the heating trend could be irreversible, a draft of a new international science report says. The United Nations' Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change on Monday sent governments a final draft of its synthesis report, which combines three earlier, gigantic documents by the Nobel Prize-winning group. There is little in the report that wasn't in the other more-detailed versions, but the language is more stark and the report attempts to connect the different scientific disciplines studying problems caused by the burning of fossil fuels, such as coal, oil and gas. The 127-page draft, obtained by The Associated Press, paints a harsh warning of what's causing global warming and what it will do to humans and the environment. It also describes what can be done about it. "Continued emission of greenhouse gases will cause further warming and long-lasting changes in all components of the ...
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Florida Citrus Growers Wage 'War' To Try And Stop Deadly Greening Disease 24.8.2014 Green on HuffingtonPost.com
LAKE WALES, Florida (AP) — Citrus has always been synonymous with Florida. The orange adorns the state license plate. The University of Florida's famed football stadium was named after an orange magnate. There is even a county called Citrus. Throughout the decades, the citrus industry has always stood strong — through freezes, hurricanes and rampant development. But now the $9 billion industry is facing its biggest threat yet, putting at risk the state's economy but also its very identity. Blame a mottled brown bug no bigger than a pencil eraser that carries a lethal disease. In China, where the problem was first discovered, it's called huanglongbing. Translation: "the yellow dragon disease." In Florida, it's known simply as "greening." It arrived here via an invasive bug called the Asian Citrus Psyllid, which carries bacteria that are left behind when the psyllid feeds on a citrus tree's leaves. The tree continues to produce useable fruit, but eventually disease clogs the vascular system. Fruit falls, ...
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Drought Causes Western US to Rise 23.8.2014 Environmental News Network
Severe drought affecting the western United States in recent years is not only influencing water restrictions for residence and creating problems for crops and wildlife, but it's changing the landscape by causing land to rise up in elevation.
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Climate Change This Week: China Out Competes US on Solar, Droughts & Chills, and More! 23.8.2014 Green on HuffingtonPost.com
Today, the Earth got a little hotter, and a little more crowded. Daily Climate Change: Global Map of Unusual Temperatures, Aug 22, 2014 How unusual has the weather been? No one event is "caused" by climate change, but global warming, which is predicted to increase unusual, extreme weather, is having a daily effect on weather, worldwide. Looking above at recent temperature anomalies, much of the US is experiencing much hotter than normal temperatures; the eastern Pacific warm spot continues to prevent much rain from reaching California. Much of the North Pole and surroundings are experiencing much warmer than normal temperatures - not good news for our Arctic thermal shield of ice. Hotter than usual temperatures continue to dominate human habitats. (Add 0.3-0.4 C to have these anomaly values calibrate with those of NASA.) Daily updates of can be seen here for both the temperature anomalies map, and the jetstream map. For real time animated US surface wind patterns, click here , and here , for the ...
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This Film Narrated By Leo DiCaprio Presents A Clear Climate Change Solution: Price Carbon 23.8.2014 Green on HuffingtonPost.com
By Leila Conners -- Tree Media Ahead of the 2014 UN Climate Summit on Sept. 23, "Carbon" attempts to move the debate forward, exploring how governments worldwide are putting a price on carbon through carbon trading or carbon taxes. "Carbon" is the first film in Green World Rising, a four-part series narrated by Leonardo DiCaprio that focuses on climate change challenges and solutions. Given the alarming list of severe climate impacts in the Arctic, in the South Seas and in places closer to home like New York City and California, and in light of the business-as-usual attitude that still prevails, resulting in increasingly dangerous levels of carbon in our atmosphere, we believe that getting the word out on the solutions and risks is critical. All four films create a whole picture, from the path forward to the peril we face if we don't take action. We begin the series with "Carbon," a solution to keeping carbon in the ground. We then move to "Green World Rising" on the technologies that will power our ...
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WMO and others at Montreal climate change conference 22.8.2014 Earth Times
What do we and our children have to look forward to? The weather forecasters and meteorologist have a menu few would enjoy.
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Reducing NYC's carbon emissions one building at a time 21.8.2014 Business Operations | GreenBiz.com

Buildings cause 75 percent of the city's GHG emissions. Reducing their energy use is essential to mitigating citywide emissions and lowering costs.

Reducing NYC's carbon emissions one building at a time
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Urban Heat Islands Cooking U.S. Cities, Report Shows 21.8.2014 Green on HuffingtonPost.com
This story originally appeared on Climate Central. Cities are almost always hotter than the surrounding rural area but global warming takes that heat and makes it worse. In the future, this combination of urbanization and climate change could raise urban temperatures to levels that threaten human health, strain energy resources, and compromise economic productivity. Summers in the U.S. have been warming since 1970. But on average across the country cities are even hotter, and have been getting hotter faster than adjacent rural areas. ( report continues below interactive) With more than 80 percent of Americans living in cities, these urban heat islands — combined with rising temperatures caused by increasing heat-trapping greenhouse gas emissions — can have serious health effects for hundreds of millions of people during the hottest months of the year. Heat is the No.1 weather-related killer in the U.S., and the hottest days, particularly days over 90°F, are associated with dangerous ozone pollution ...
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