User: flenvcenter Topic: Air and Climate-Independent
Category: Climate Change :: Climate Change Impacts
Last updated: Sep 18 2020 21:40 IST RSS 2.0
 
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Southwest experiences mass bird die-off 18.9.2020 High Country News Most Recent
‘To see this many individuals and species dying is a national tragedy.’
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Dispatch from an irreversibly changed New Mexico 16.9.2020 High Country News Most Recent
Laura Paskus’s new book examines wildfire, drilling on the Navajo Nation and climate grief.
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West coast wildfires signal a planetary fire age 15.9.2020 High Country News Most Recent
Beyond climate change, history has helped create the pyrocene.
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Extreme heat is here, and it’s deadly 1.9.2020 High Country News Most Recent
Gearing up for the fight against a new climate enemy.
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Extreme wildfires make their own dangerous weather 28.8.2020 High Country News Most Recent
And climate change is making it even worse.
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The digital divide worsens the inequitable impacts of the climate crisis 3.8.2020 Business Operations | GreenBiz.com
The digital divide worsens the inequitable impacts of the climate crisis Maddie Stone Mon, 08/03/2020 - 01:00 This story originally appeared in Grist and is republished here as part of Covering Climate Now, a global journalistic collaboration to strengthen coverage of the climate story. One of the starkest inequalities exposed by the coronavirus pandemic is the difference between the digital haves and have-nots. Those with a fast internet connection are more able to work and learn remotely, stay in touch with loved ones and access critical services such as telemedicine. For the millions of Americans who live in an internet dead zone , fully participating in society in the age of social distancing has become difficult, if not impossible. But if the pandemic has laid bare America’s so-called "digital divide," climate change will only worsen the inequality that stems from it. As the weather grows more extreme and unpredictable, wealthy urban communities with faster, more reliable internet access will have ...
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Racism makes the impacts of climate change unequal 2.7.2020 GreenBiz.com
This article originally was published on Yale Environment 360 . The killing of George Floyd by Minneapolis police and the disproportionate impact of COVID-19 on African Americans, Latinos and Native Americans have cast stark new light on the racism that remains deeply embedded in U.S. society. It is as present in matters of the environment as in other aspects of life: Both historical and present-day injustices have left people of color exposed to far greater environmental health hazards than whites. Elizabeth Yeampierre has been an important voice on these issues for more than two decades. As co-chair of the Climate Justice Alliance , she leads a coalition of more than 70 organizations focused on addressing racial and economic inequities together with climate change. In an interview with Yale Environment 360, Yeampierre draws a direct line from slavery and the rapacious exploitation of natural resources to current issues of environmental justice. "I think about people who got the worst food, the worst ...
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3 keys for scaling nature-based solutions for climate adaptation 17.6.2020 Business Operations | GreenBiz.com
This article originally was published in World Resources Institute . In Indonesia, climate change is already a pernicious threat. More than 30 million people across northern Java suffer from coastal flooding and erosion related to more severe storms and sea level rise. In some places, entire villages and more than a mile of coastline have been lost to the sea. The flooding and erosion are exacerbated by the destruction of natural mangrove forests. These forests absorb the brunt of waves’ impact, significantly reducing both the height and speed of waves reaching shore. And mature mangroves can store nearly 1,000 tons of carbon per hectare, thus mitigating climate change while also helping communities adapt. Without mangroves, 18 million more people worldwide would suffer from coastal flooding each year (an increase of 39 percent). That’s why in Demak, Java, a diverse group of residents, NGOs, universities and the Indonesian government are working together on the "Building with Nature" project to restore a ...
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Climate change has setnetters worried about Alaska’s sockeye 1.6.2020 Current Issue
Last year, the state’s Ugashik River was so warm salmon wouldn’t swim up it to spawn.
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Fast-growing Western cities face megadrought 8.5.2020 High Country News Most Recent
Eleven states and northern Mexico will likely experience a drought more severe than any since the 1500s.
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These key investments can build resilience to pandemics and climate change 30.4.2020 Business Operations | GreenBiz.com
Here's what will help beyond immediate disaster response.
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On this Earth Day, let’s think about agriculture 22.4.2020 High Country News Most Recent
Farmers and ranchers hold the key to carbon storage.
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Biodiversity, pandemics and the circle of life 20.4.2020 Energy & Climate | Greenbiz.com
Addressing biodiversity, like so many other things, seems to have been shunted aside by the coronavirus outbreak. It would make much more sense to keep it front and center.
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In semi-arid Africa, farmers are transforming the 'underground forest' into life-giving trees 9.4.2020 Design & Innovation | GreenBiz.com
Revitalization of a traditional agricultural practice known as farmer managed natural regeneration is bringing new life to millions of acres of degraded land while boosting food, fuel, habitat and carbon storage.
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Utilities are the new cool 9.4.2020 Design & Innovation | GreenBiz.com
Thriving in the age of climate change pivots around electricity, and that means electric utilities are at the center.
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Why protecting soil carbon is a win-win for farmers and the planet 2.4.2020 Design & Innovation | GreenBiz.com
The benefits of protecting and restoring soil carbon go well beyond any one farm or any one year. But not enough people are taking these steps.
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Tribal nations demand response to climate relocation 1.4.2020 High Country News Most Recent
Five Indigenous communities have asked the U.N. to investigate the United States’ failure to live up to legal obligations.
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Asia's central banks must rise to the challenge of climate change 30.3.2020 Business Operations | GreenBiz.com
Most central banks in Asia already believe they should help to promote green bonds and other low-carbon initiatives.
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Protecting tropics could save half of species on brink, report says 27.3.2020 Resource Efficiency | GreenBiz.com
Local farmers could be part of the key to helping to prevent extinction.
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What if sports reacted to climate change like it’s reacting to coronavirus? 25.3.2020 GreenBiz.com
GreenSportsBlog's Lew Blaustein lays out a future that imagines how American sports leagues could take climate action.
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