User: flenvcenter Topic: Air and Climate-Independent
Category: Climate Change :: Climate Change Impacts
Last updated: Jan 23 2015 04:39 IST RSS 2.0
 
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The Climate Post: Obama Tackles Climate Change in State of the Union Address 23.1.2015 Green on HuffingtonPost.com
"No challenge -- no challenge -- poses a greater threat to future generations than climate change," said President Obama in his 2014 State of the Union address . "The best scientists in the world are all telling us that our activities are changing the climate," he said, "and if we do not act forcefully, we'll continue to see rising oceans, longer, hotter heat waves, dangerous droughts and floods, and massive disruptions that can trigger greater migration, conflict, and hunger around the globe. The Pentagon says that climate change poses immediate risks to our national security. We should act like it." To combat climate change, the president said the government had taken actions ranging from the way we produce energy to the way we use it. Although he did not mention his use of executive power to regulate carbon dioxide emissions from power plants and methane emissions from the oil and gas industry, he did highlight the landmark agreement with China to cut greenhouse gases. "In Beijing, we made an historic ...
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Climate-Induced Migration: A Looming Crisis 22.1.2015 Green on HuffingtonPost.com
Climate change is an immense and multifaceted global challenge, likely to change the planet we call home and our very way of life. In some of the most industrialized settings in the world as well as in the most vulnerable areas, people may find they can no longer live in places they have called home for generations. Climate change causes many serious problems, including extreme weather disasters, the rise of sea levels, species extinction and environmental degradation. Each of these factors is expected to trigger large-scale migration. "We now know," said Mary Robinson, U.N. Special Envoy for Climate Change and former President of Ireland, "that climate change is a driver of migration, and is expected to increase the displacement of populations." Although there are no exact predictions of migration induced by climate change, future forecasts vary from 25 million to 1 billion "environmental migrants" by 2050. These estimates are wide ranging because the links between climate change and migration are ...
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California's Forests Have Lost Half Their Big Trees, And Climate Change May Be To Blame 22.1.2015 Green on HuffingtonPost.com
California’s biggest trees are doing a disappearing act, and researchers say the disturbing pattern may be strongly driven by climate change. A study published Tuesday in the journal Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences found that the state’s big trees -- those measuring more than 2 feet in diameter -- have declined by more than 50 percent since the 1930s across 46,332 square miles of the state's forests. Mixed stands of Jeffrey pine, white fir and red fir in Halls Flatt, California, 1925, courtesy of the Marian Koshland Bioscience and Natural Resources Library, University of California, Berkeley. Such giant trees, the study says, “contribute disproportionately to forest structure and function, carbon stocks, and the cultural values of forests” compared to smaller trees, which have increased in population and compete with larger ones for resources. “Older, larger trees are declining because of disease, drought, logging and other factors, but what stands out is that this decline is statewide ,” ...
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Critical mule deer research relies on fundraising 21.1.2015 High Country News Most Recent
Scientists raise money to study effects of drought, development and migration.
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A Year of Opportunity to Combat Climate Change -- and Transform Economies 21.1.2015 Green on HuffingtonPost.com
© Curt Carnemark/World Bank Scientists declared this past year as the warmest year on Earth since record-keeping began in 1880, and a series of scientific reports found glaciers melting and extreme weather events intensifying. There can be no doubt that this year world leaders must commit to transforming their economies to combat climate change . We must put an end to decades of harmful fossil fuel subsidies and redirect those resources to the people who need them. We must put a price on carbon and begin to rein in pollution that fuels climate change. And world leaders must produce a substantive climate agreement in Paris that commits every country to reduce greenhouse gas emissions. In Davos this week, leaders from all corners of the world, representing both the public and private sectors, are discussing these critically important issues. Many already are climate leaders, innovators who are transforming their own operations and economies into sustainable, competitive engines of growth fit for a ...
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Why Developing Countries are Disproportionately Affected by Climate Change -- and What Can They Do About it 21.1.2015 Green on HuffingtonPost.com
If there is something today that nobody, regardless of socio-economic status, ethnicity or race, can run away from, it is the issue of climate change. In particular, the world's poorest people are most vulnerable to the devastating effects climate change. Unlike people of wealthier developed countries, the people of the developing world do not have the means to fight global climate change. They will be the first and worst to be hit. A temperature rise of 2 to 4 degrees will cause a decreased yield in agriculture and increase rural-to-urban migration that will eventually lead to political unrest in already unstable governments. This is currently happening in places like my home country of Kenya. Over the last few years, the weather patterns have been changing and becoming more unpredictable. According to the Consultative Group on International Agricultural Research (CGIAR), it is not just droughts that are causing continuous food insecurity in Africa but rather, it is the minor climate shifts that have ...
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You Need to Know: About That Drought 21.1.2015 Green on HuffingtonPost.com
So maybe you've heard that Californians are going through a dry spell. In fact, things are really rough, with dry, gravely ground; wilting, exhausted lawns; and residents who would just like to take a long, carefree shower (even as they are encouraged to report water wasters). Instead, after the four-year stretch of record-breaking dry spells, California's government is cracking down on water consumption both for individuals and farms. Of course, hydration is essential for plant growth and livestock, so now the question is: How will California's drought affect eaters and cooks across the country? Wait, what's happening in California? 2014 is expected to be California's hottest year on record. 2014 was officially the driest year on record since 1977 . Some towns are literally running out of water , residents are being asked to conserve water, and farms are feeling the drought in ever more severe extremes. "In year three of a punishing drought, the terrible question arises: What if it just never rains ...
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The 10 Most Important Water Stories in 2014 19.1.2015 Green on HuffingtonPost.com
Peter Gleick (Pacific Institute) and Carl Ganter (Circle of Blue) 1. The California Drought Becomes an Emergency California's multi-year drought grew dire enough in 2014 to prompt Governor Jerry Brown to declare a drought emergency in January. By the end of the year, California had experienced the driest and hottest 36 months in its 119-year instrumental record. Some researchers described the drought as 1) the worst in over 1200 years and 2) evidence of rising temperatures globally as climate changes accelerate. As of mid-January, the drought is continuing . As the California and western drought continued in 2014, storage reservoirs in the region were drawn down to record lows. "Bathtub rings" around Lake Mead in 2012. In July 2014, Lake Mead reached the lowest levels since the lake was filled in the 1930s. © J. Carl Ganter/Circle of Blue 2. Tigris and Euphrates River Dams Influence Islamic State Expansion Conflicts over water have a long history . In 2014, a new analysis described the links between ...
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How do atmospheric rivers and aerosols impact California rainfall? 17.1.2015 Environmental News Network
In the midst of the California rainy season, scientists are embarking on a field campaign designed to improve the understanding of the natural and human-caused phenomena that determine when and how the state gets its precipitation. They will do so by studying atmospheric rivers, meteorological events that include the famous rainmaker known as the Pineapple Express.CalWater 2015 is an interagency, interdisciplinary field campaign starting January 14, 2015. CalWater 2015 will entail four research aircraft flying through major storms while a ship outfitted with additional instruments cruises below. The research team includes scientists from Scripps Institution of Oceanography at UC San Diego, the Department of Energy's Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, NOAA, and NASA and uses resources from the DOE’s Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Climate Research Facility—a national scientific user ...
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The State of the Environment 17.1.2015 Politics on HuffingtonPost.com
We just finished, in 2014, the hottest year on record, further affirmation, as if any were needed, of the mounting dangers of climate change. From the boreal forest of Canada, to the Appalachian Mountains, to the Gulf of Mexico, special places and essential natural systems are under assault by oil, coal and gas companies, as we go to the ends of the Earth to feed our addiction to fossil fuels. Our waters, communities, ranches and farms are threatened by fracking, pipelines and tanker trains that have brought the hazards and destruction of the industrial oil patch to the American backyard. And our power plants are kicking out unlimited tons of the carbon pollution that puts future generations at risk of widening deserts, rising seas, withering drought, ravaging storms, blistering heat and other disasters related to the kinds of extreme weather events driven by climate change. As President Obama prepares to assess the State of the Union on Tuesday night, the state of the environment is imperiled. There are ...
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The State of the Environment 17.1.2015 Green on HuffingtonPost.com
We just finished, in 2014, the hottest year on record, further affirmation, as if any were needed, of the mounting dangers of climate change. From the boreal forest of Canada, to the Appalachian Mountains, to the Gulf of Mexico, special places and essential natural systems are under assault by oil, coal and gas companies, as we go to the ends of the Earth to feed our addiction to fossil fuels. Our waters, communities, ranches and farms are threatened by fracking, pipelines and tanker trains that have brought the hazards and destruction of the industrial oil patch to the American backyard. And our power plants are kicking out unlimited tons of the carbon pollution that puts future generations at risk of widening deserts, rising seas, withering drought, ravaging storms, blistering heat and other disasters related to the kinds of extreme weather events driven by climate change. As President Obama prepares to assess the State of the Union on Tuesday night, the state of the environment is imperiled. There are ...
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2014 Record-Breaking Heat Is Bad for Business 17.1.2015 Green on HuffingtonPost.com
This post was co-authored by Forbes Tompkins . It's official: 2014 was the world's hottest year on record . And it's part of a decades-long trend. If you're under 30 years old, global temperatures have been above average your whole life. This long-running record heat contributes to an expensive "new normal" for global businesses and national economies, raising the cost due to shifting weather patterns and more extreme heat waves, storms and droughts that can be fueled by a changing climate. 2014 was not just the hottest year on record globally, but the world also experienced record-high seasonal temperatures in the summer and fall, and the second-warmest spring. The World Economic Forum's Global Risks report shows that leaders increasingly see these phenomena as a major drag on their bottom lines, ranking severe weather events and water crises among the top 10 likeliest global risks, and the risks expected to have the most impact in 2015. Neeraj Sahai, president of Standard & Poor's Ratings Services, put ...
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White House: 2014's Global Warming Shows 'We Can't Wait' 16.1.2015 Green on HuffingtonPost.com
(Adds more from White House statement, background) WASHINGTON, Jan 16 (Reuters) - U.S. reports showing 2014 was the warmest year on record are a reminder that climate change is happening now and that action to fight global warming must not be delayed, the White House said on Friday. The new data is "another reminder that climate change is not a problem for the future - it's happening here and now and we can't wait to take action," a White House official said in a statement after NASA and the National Oceanographic and Atmospheric Administration released reports that last year was the warmest since record keeping began in 1880. President Barack Obama has been using executive authorities to fight climate change, setting new rules on carbon emissions from power plants and vehicles. "We will continue to move forward on this vital issue," the official said. But Republicans, who gained control of the Senate in November's elections, have made slowing down the administration's issuance of new rules ...
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White House Unveils Plan to Cut Methane Emissions 40-45 Percent In Next Decade 14.1.2015 Green on HuffingtonPost.com
WASHINGTON -- The White House announced on Wednesday that it is setting new goals for reducing methane emissions in the oil and gas sector, aiming to cut those releases by 40 to 45 percent from 2012 levels by 2025. While methane emissions have dropped in recent decades, Dan Utech, the special assistant to the president for energy and climate change, said in a call with reporters Wednesday morning that the expansion of oil and gas development in the U.S. has put those emissions on track to rise 25 percent by 2025 without new controls. The administration says the methane rules are key to meeting the overall emission reduction targets that President Barack Obama has called for. "The U.S. is now the largest oil and gas producer in the world, providing an abundant source of energy to power and heat American homes and businesses," said Utech. "At the same time, methane, the primary component of natural gas, is a potent greenhouse gas with 25 times the heat-trapping potential of carbon dioxide." Specific ...
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2015 Catastrophic Fires Continue; Climate Change Held Culpable 14.1.2015 Green on HuffingtonPost.com
Another fantastic post by climate campaigner, Guy Ragen, from the Australian Conservation Foundation. Since it's extremely difficult to find an American media home for this excellent Aussie analysis, I'm trusting that Huffington Post will raise the flag high on extreme weather events like this and their connection to global warming. Australia is burning because of climate change. Guy gives us an important on-the-ground perspective, a warning shot to the West. Hopefully, we'll take heed. Like the U.S. southwest, southern Australia is at increased risk due to unprecedented heatwaves, droughts and fires, the likes of which have ravaged countries across the globe in recent years in connection to climate change. Australia, in particular, as one of the first and most impacted developed countries, bears a special burden and responsibility to help mitigate the worst impacts of climate change while the window of opportunity is still open. In Australia, the impacts of climate change are already playing out, and ...
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The Methane Monster Roars 13.1.2015 Truthout - All Articles
(Image: Icy waters , rising steam , gas jets via Shutterstock; Edited: JR/TO) Losing Arctic sea ice due to rising global temperatures means releasing larger amounts of previously trapped methane into the atmosphere. This process will magnify the effects of feedback loops and climate disruption, which, scientists warn, threaten all plants, animals and humans on earth. (Image: Icy waters , rising steam , gas jets via Shutterstock; Edited: JR/TO) During a recent hike in Washington State's Olympic National Park, I marveled at the delicate geometry of frost-covered ferns. White crystalline structures seemed to grow from the green leaves, encasing them in a frozen frame of temporary beauty. Progressing further up into the mountains, I stopped to lunch and sip hot coffee from a thermos while gazing across a river valley at a snow-covered mountainside, sizing up a frozen waterfall for a possible ice climb in the future. Yet I found myself beginning to wonder how many more winters ice would continue to form ...
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Climate Change This Week: The Heat Is On, A Wind Power Tree, and More! 13.1.2015 Green on HuffingtonPost.com
Today, the Earth got a little hotter, and a little more crowded. Japan Meteorological Agency is the first of 4 major global temperature recordkeepers to release their data for 2014, notes Brian Kahn at Climate Central. OO 2 014 Was The Hottest Year On Record Globally By Far - says the Japan Meteorological Agency; NOAA and NASA are expected to concur soon. Despite some winter rains, California remains in the depths of a prolonged drought, probably worsened by climate change brought on from burning fossil fuels. Climate Change's Connection to Extreme Weather Is Ever More Evident, reports Andrea Thomspon at Climate Central, as studies increasing show firm connections between climate change and extreme weather, especially extreme heat. The results support predictions of ever worsening heat, both globally and locally, and worsening extreme weather. OO New Treelike Wind Turbine Is Small, Silent, Ideal for Cities says NewWind, the French company producing them. Small green plastic wind turbines on the ...
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Survey Finds Doctors Concerned About Impacts Of Climate Change On Patient Health 8.1.2015 Green on HuffingtonPost.com
WASHINGTON -– American medical professionals specializing in respiratory conditions and critical care are concerned about what climate change may mean for patient health, a new survey finds. A survey of members of the American Thoracic Society , which represents 15,000 physicians and other medical professionals who work in the fields of respiratory disease, critical care and sleep disorder, finds that the majority of respondents said they were already seeing health effects in their patients that they believe are linked to climate change. Seventy-seven percent said they have seen an increase in chronic diseases related to air pollution, and 58 percent said they'd seen increased allergic reactions from plants or mold. Fifty-seven percent of participants said they'd also seen injuries related to severe weather. An overwhelming majority -- 89 percent -- agreed that climate change is happening, and 65 percent said they thought climate change was relevant to direct patient care. Forty-four percent said they ...
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Hottest Year on Record, 2014, Brings Economic Opportunity 7.1.2015 Green on HuffingtonPost.com
Coauthored by Julia Trezona Peek With 2014 weighing in as the hottest year on record , the window to mitigate global warming rapidly shrinks. It's time to eliminate the debate that action on climate change will harm economic growth. Climate change, left unaddressed, will decimate our economy. Confronting the challenge, on the other hand, will produce jobs and save money. Those who deny climate change and block the policies necessary should be appropriately identified as opposed to lasting job creation and unwilling to protect the American economy and labor force.This is not an overstatement: the costs of continuing business-as-usual are staggering. The economic costs alone are overwhelming. In 2012 alone, Americans lost $139 billion dollar in damages from climate related droughts, storms, floods, blizzards, fires, and more. If climate change continues unabated, Americans can expect to spend $35 billion annually on coastal property damage, $12 billion in increased electrical bills for air conditioning ...
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Nurses Welcome President’s Commitment to Veto Proposed Bill by New Congress to Green Light Keystone XL Pipeline 7.1.2015 Commondreams.org Newswire
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