User: flenvcenter Topic: Air and Climate-Independent
Category: Climate Change :: Climate Change Impacts
Last updated: Sep 30 2014 23:55 IST RSS 2.0
 
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On the News With Thom Hartmann: Activists Take Over Wall Street After Climate March, and More 30.9.2014 Truthout - All Articles
In today's On the News segment: Activists take over Wall Street after the massive march for action on climate change; the Obama administration is standing up to corporate tax dodgers; Google finally drops ALEC; and more. TRANSCRIPT: Thom Hartmann here – on the best of the rest of Economic and Labor News... You need to know this. After the recent, massive march on climate change, activists and protesters took over Wall Street. Three thousand people held a sit-in around the infamous charging bull statue, and demanded an end to the "economic system based on exploiting frontline communities, workers, and natural resources." Protesters say that the root of the climate crisis is capitalism itself, and they want the banksters to stop profiting off of our planet's destruction. Rising temperatures, toxic water, mega droughts, and super storms are some of the environmental risks of global warming, but these protesters wanted to shine a light on the economic causes, and dangers, of climate change. The profiteers on ...
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There's a Strong Link Between Solving the Global Climate Crisis and Improving Our Health 30.9.2014 Green on HuffingtonPost.com
Consider the following (seemingly unrelated) realities: 1) An estimated 7 million deaths are attributed to air pollution every year; 2) over half of the U.S. population does not attain recommended minimum levels of daily exercise, contributing to rising rates of obesity and related diabetes, cancer and heart disease; and 3) greenhouse gas emissions -- responsible for the global climate crisis -- rose the fastest (roughly 2 percent per year) in the past decade, approximately twice the rate from the period between 1970 and 2000. What do these three threats to our health and our planet have in common? Fossil fuels. Fossil fuel combustion accounted for approximately 78 percent of the total increase in carbon dioxide between 1970 and 2010. Of course burning oil, gas and coal also release pollutants such as fine particulates, e.g. PM2.5, known to be harmful to human health. Therefore, cleaner energy can help both reduce the heating of the planet, while saving lives from air pollution. Greenhouse gas mitigation ...
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Humans To Blame For Major Decline In Wildlife Populations, WWF Report Finds 30.9.2014 Green on HuffingtonPost.com
GENEVA (AP) — About 3,000 species of wildlife around the world have seen their numbers plummet far worse than previously thought, according to a new study by one of the world's biggest environmental groups. The study Tuesday from the Swiss-based WWF largely blamed human threats to nature for a 52 percent decline in wildlife populations between 1970 and 2010. It says improved methods of measuring populations of fish, birds, mammals, amphibians and reptiles explain the huge difference from the 28-percent decline between 1970 and 2008 that the group reported in 2012. Most of the new losses were found in tropical regions, particularly Latin America. WWF describes the study it has carried out every two years since 1998 as a barometer of the state of the planet. "There is no room for complacency," said WWF International Director General Marco Lambertini, calling for a greater focus on sustainable solutions to the impact people are inflicting on nature, particularly through the release of greenhouse gases. The ...
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"A World of Solutions" ...Or Extinction... 30.9.2014 Green on HuffingtonPost.com
There is no question the climate change movement has reached a huge turning point over this last month and especially the last week. The final UN estimate is that over 400,000 people marched in the streets of New York City last Sunday. Even if the media failed to report this news accurately, it doesn't really matter any more. No one can stop this movement now. More than 1500 groups, scientists, religious organizations, students, people from all walks of life marched -- not just in NYC, but all over America and the world. The camaraderie was electric, reinforcing and empowering. What is even more astonishing are the social media reports coming in from the UN. Since #Climate2014 was launched six months ago they have reached 127,000,000 people worldwide, with an exposure of nearly 3 billion impressions. These numbers are phenomenal and have exceeded all expectations. What this shows is that people all over the world are truly paying attention. This is a movement that should not be taken lightly. We are ...
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Causes of California drought linked to climate change, Stanford scientists say 30.9.2014 Environmental News Network
The atmospheric conditions associated with the unprecedented drought currently afflicting California are "very likely" linked to human-caused climate change, Stanford scientists write in a new research paper. In a new study, a team led by Stanford climate scientist Noah Diffenbaugh used a novel combination of computer simulations and statistical techniques to show that a persistent region of high atmospheric pressure hovering over the Pacific Ocean that diverted storms away from California was much more likely to form in the presence of modern greenhouse gas concentrations.
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How Climate Change Helped ISIS 30.9.2014 Green on HuffingtonPost.com
As the Obama administration undertakes a highly public, multilateral campaign to degrade and destroy the militant jihadists known as ISIS, ISIL and the Islamic State, many in the West remain unaware that climate played a significant role in the rise of Syria's extremists. A historic drought afflicted the country from 2006 through 2010, setting off a dire humanitarian crisis for millions of Syrians. Yet the four-year drought evoked little response from Bashar al-Assad's government. Rage at the regime's callousness boiled over in 2011, helping to fuel the popular uprising. In the ensuing chaos, ISIS stole onto the scene, proclaimed a caliphate in late June and accelerated its rampage of atrocities including the recent beheadings of three Western civilians. While ISIS threatens brutal violence against all who dissent from its harsh ideology, climate change menaces communities (less maliciously) with increasingly extreme weather. Most of us perceive these threats as unrelated. We recycle water bottles and ...
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How Climate Change Helped ISIS 30.9.2014 Politics on HuffingtonPost.com
As the Obama administration undertakes a highly public, multilateral campaign to degrade and destroy the militant jihadists known as ISIS, ISIL and the Islamic State, many in the West remain unaware that climate played a significant role in the rise of Syria's extremists. A historic drought afflicted the country from 2006 through 2010, setting off a dire humanitarian crisis for millions of Syrians. Yet the four-year drought evoked little response from Bashar al-Assad's government. Rage at the regime's callousness boiled over in 2011, helping to fuel the popular uprising. In the ensuing chaos, ISIS stole onto the scene, proclaimed a caliphate in late June and accelerated its rampage of atrocities including the recent beheadings of three Western civilians. While ISIS threatens brutal violence against all who dissent from its harsh ideology, climate change menaces communities (less maliciously) with increasingly extreme weather. Most of us perceive these threats as unrelated. We recycle water bottles and ...
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Climate Change Is Driving Heat Waves Around The World: Report 30.9.2014 Green on HuffingtonPost.com
WASHINGTON –- The record-setting heat wave in Australia last year was "largely attributable" to human-caused climate change, according to a synthesis report released Monday . Heat waves in Japan, Korea, China and Europe were also "substantially influenced" by global warming, the report found. For the synthesis report, published in the Bulletin of the American Meteorological Society, 22 groups of scientists looked at 16 extreme weather events that took place in 2013. The paper concludes that at this time, it is more difficult to discern the human impact on other extreme events, such as the drought in California, extreme rainfall in Colorado, and an early-season blizzard in South Dakota. This is the third annual report on the connections between individual extreme weather events and climate change, led by scientists from the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration. The studies reached mixed conclusions about the California drought, which saw the driest 12-month period on record from 2013 into early ...
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Sizzle, Sizzle, Fossil Fuels and Trouble: Study Confirms Climate Change Drove Extreme Heat Waves 29.9.2014 CommonDreams.org Headlines
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Save the Humans 29.9.2014 Politics on HuffingtonPost.com
A few years ago, I was talking with Al Gore (yes, I'm name dropping). I asked him a very simple and pointed question: "Animal agriculture contributes about 18 percent of the gases that cause climate change. Why didn't you mention this in your book or movie?" His answer was disconcertingly honest. I'm paraphrasing, but he said: "For most people, the role of animal agriculture in climate change is too inconvenient of a truth." We like our animal products. Well, you like your animal products. I've been a vegan for 28 years, so to be honest I don't even remember what they taste like. But collectively, as a species, we seem to like animal products. A lot. To wit: Each year, the U.S. grows and kills about 10 billion livestock animals . Globally, we're raising and slaughtering about 56 billion animals animal agriculture each year. If you do the math, that means we're killing 1,776 animals for food every second of every day. That doesn't even include fish and other seafood. But even though I'm a vegan for ...
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Save the Humans 29.9.2014 Green on HuffingtonPost.com
A few years ago, I was talking with Al Gore (yes, I'm name dropping). I asked him a very simple and pointed question: "Animal agriculture contributes about 18 percent of the gases that cause climate change. Why didn't you mention this in your book or movie?" His answer was disconcertingly honest. I'm paraphrasing, but he said: "For most people, the role of animal agriculture in climate change is too inconvenient of a truth." We like our animal products. Well, you like your animal products. I've been a vegan for 28 years, so to be honest I don't even remember what they taste like. But collectively, as a species, we seem to like animal products. A lot. To wit: Each year, the U.S. grows and kills about 10 billion livestock animals . Globally, we're raising and slaughtering about 56 billion animals animal agriculture each year. If you do the math, that means we're killing 1,776 animals for food every second of every day. That doesn't even include fish and other seafood. But even though I'm a vegan for ...
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Global Warming Might Push Back Fall Foliage Transformations - Weather.com 29.9.2014 Green on HuffingtonPost.com
Your favorite fall foliage could come later in the year and last longer, thanks to global warming. 

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Forget The Hamburger; Insects Are Better For You And The Planet 28.9.2014 Green on HuffingtonPost.com
By the year 2100, there will be an estimated 11 billion people living on Earth. With that many mouths to feed, combined with the potential impact of climate change on the food supply as we know it, humans may need to start thinking about changing the way we eat -- or at least, what we eat. That notion underlies this fascinating new video by The Economist , which explains why we should all consider adding a new kind of protein to our diets: that of insects. Yep, insects. This picture taken on August 10, 2014 shows insects waiting to be sold in a market in Bangui, Central African Republic. The Economist's video explains that while insects might not seem too palatable to some people, they're really good for you . Plus, they're a much more sustainable protein source compared to other kinds of meat. So what say you? Would you add crickets or mealworms to your daily diet? Watch the video above and tell us in the ...
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Climate Change This Week: 400,000 Call For Climate Action, Hottest August on Record, and More! 27.9.2014 Green on HuffingtonPost.com
Today, the Earth got a little hotter, and a little more crowded. Daily Climate Change: Global Map of Unusual Temperatures, Jan 16 2014 How unusual has the weather been? No one event is "caused" by climate change, but global warming, which is predicted to increase unusual, extreme weather, is having a daily effect on weather, worldwide. Looking above at recent temperature anomalies, much of the US bakes in unusually hot temperatures; the eastern Pacific warm spot continues to prevent much rain from reaching California, sending it into further drought. Much of the areas surrounding the North Pole are experiencing much warmer than normal temperatures - not good news for our Arctic thermal shield of ice. Hotter than usual temperatures continue to dominate human habitats. (Add 0.3-0.4 C to have these anomaly values calibrate with those of NASA.) Daily updates of can be seen here for both the temperature anomalies map, and the jetstream map. For real time animated US surface wind patterns, click here , ...
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The People's March Demands "Human Change, Not Climate Change" 27.9.2014 Green on HuffingtonPost.com
For anyone looking for a bellwether of our country's stance on climate change, the People's Climate March in New York City sent a clear signal: nearly half a million people took to the streets last Sunday to demand "Climate Action Now." It was the largest climate mobilization in history, planned in advance of this week's United Nations summit to signal to world leaders -- particularly President Obama -- that it's time to get serious about fighting climate change. The march surpassed all projections of its size and scope, with at least 1,500 diverse groups representing labor unions, youth movements, faith assemblies, and a wide variety of other stakeholders. The strong presence of social justice groups showed a spreading awareness that low-income neighborhoods and communities of color are affected "first and worst" by climate impacts, and that shifting to a more sustainable economy could build a more just economy. Our unprecedented and sometimes lethal weather over the past several years, from hurricanes ...
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Africa to Issue $1 Billion in Climate Bonds 27.9.2014 Green on HuffingtonPost.com
While Africa is only responsible for a small percent of the world's carbon emissions, the continent is widely recognized to be among the most vulnerable to the planet's changing climate. Weather-related disasters are already undermining record growth in Africa and threatening hard-won development gains and our most vulnerable populations. Across Africa, we cannot wait for the world community to act. We are building up our capacity to manage and prepare for the weather shocks that are already impacting our countries. But beyond managing current climate risks, we must also prepare for a future in which Africa will need to invest as much as much as $10-20 billion a year to prepare for a 2°C warmer world by mid-century. Climate change is particularly threatening to the lives and livelihoods of our most vulnerable populations. In an effort to mobilize additional resources to African countries to manage this risk, the African Risk Capacity, a specialized agency of the African Union, is designing the Extreme ...
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Climate Change Jumpers 26.9.2014 Green on HuffingtonPost.com
It was fitting that New York hosted the recent UN climate change summit for several reasons. Let's start with the old joke about the guy who jumps off the Empire State Building and, as he passes the 50th floor on this way down, is heard to say "so far so good." But the pavement, that is looming larger by the minute to our clueless friend, is about to smack all of us in the face. Earlier this month, Swiss Re, one of the world's largest global reinsurers, predicted the probability of a Category 4 hurricane hitting New York in the near future (like the Norfolk, Long Island storm of 1821) and compared this to Hurricane Sandy, which was "only" a Category 1 storm. Swiss Re found that the city is almost entirely unprepared for this larger storm, which would flood vast portions of Manhattan and cause more than $100 billion in damages and untold economic interruption, making it the most costly natural disaster in U.S. history. In sharp contrast, the leaders who met at the UN, with very few exceptions, had no ...
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Don’t Blame Climate Change Deniers 26.9.2014 Commondreams.org Views
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The Climate Post: World Sees Some Tangible Outcomes from U.N. Climate Summit 26.9.2014 Green on HuffingtonPost.com
World leaders gathered in New York this week for the United Nations Climate Summit , a meeting aimed at raising carbon reduction ambitions and mobilizing progress toward a global climate deal. In speeches at the summit, President Obama and other leaders recognized that countries across the world are feeling climate change effects, particularly extreme weather. "In America, the past decade has been our hottest on record," said Obama , who also announced the launch of new scientific and technological tools to increase global climate resilience and extend extreme weather risk outlooks. "Along our eastern coast, the city of Miami now floods at high tide. In our west, wildfire season now stretches most of year. In our heartland, farms have been parched by the worst drought in generations, and drenched by the wettest spring in our history. A hurricane left parts of this great city dark and underwater. And some nations already live with far worse." Like Obama, representatives of other major nations had their ...
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From Rio to New York -- The (Long) Path Towards a Safer Planet 25.9.2014 Green on HuffingtonPost.com
The science of climate change is robust enough to inform the world that the safe and stable planet, on which humanity has thrived for millennia, may be approaching the end of a very benign chapter in its history. It's an era that led a single species to alter global biophysical trends to the point of inaugurating Anthropocene -- the geological epoch of man. As atmospheric greenhouse gas concentrations continue to rise at a rapid pace, known solutions have not reached the required level slow climatic disruption, bringing us ever closer to dangerous man-made climate change. In many regions, changing rainfall patterns or melting snow and ice are impacting the availability of water; and countless terrestrial, freshwater and marine species are shifting their geographic ranges, reproductive behavior and migration patterns. Given that landscapes are increasingly dominated by human activities, many natural paths for biogeographic accommodation are no longer available, aggravating an already serious global ...
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