User: flenvcenter Topic: Air and Climate-Independent
Category: Climate Change :: Climate Change Impacts
Last updated: Oct 22 2014 01:05 IST RSS 2.0
 
1 to 20 of 3,647    
'The Blood That's to Come': Pacific Islanders Take on Australian Coal 21.10.2014 CommonDreams.org Headlines
Also found in: [+]
Climate Change This Week: Driving Fast n' FREE on Solar, Record Rising Seas, and More! 21.10.2014 Green on HuffingtonPost.com
OO Hundreds Of Hunting And Fishing Groups Speak Out For Action On Climate Change OO Greenpeace Sinks Lego's Deal With Shell Oil Over Arctic Drilling - which included having toddlers get their plastic cars "filled" at Shell Gas stations... makes your heart curdle, just thinking about it... OO Glasgow Becomes First University In Europe To Divest From Fossil Fuels OO Nobel Laureates Call For A Revolutionary Shift In How Humans Use Resources OO Australian Anglicans Join Divestment Movement OO Orange Country, CA: Growing Numbers Call for End to Fracking in GOP Area Good Ideas: International Lawsuits Could Punish Carbon Emitters Even If Governments Don't reports Jeff Spross at Climate Progress. Improving climate science and the workings of international litigation could make courtrooms the next climate change battlefield, according to a new report. OO We Can Meet 2C Climate Target, But Success Depends On Immediate Action say energy experts. OO Americans Can Save More Money By Not Burning It on fossil fuels, ...
Also found in: [+]
Climate Change on the Nuclear Subcontinent 21.10.2014 Green on HuffingtonPost.com
Co-authored by William Blakemore In a recent blog post , Secretary of State John Kerry described climate change as a "gathering storm," already affecting millions around the world and posing direct challenges to our national security and global stability. In a new report , the Pentagon agreed. Indeed, our climate is changing in erratic but decisive ways, as the ice caps melt, seas warm (and rise), and the temperature of the globe increases over time. Diverse disciplines offer perspectives on these issues that could lead to our deeper understanding -- and mitigation. We seek to contribute by asking how these changes relate to geopolitical violence and terrorism, especially in the world's most unstable regions. One of those regions is the Middle East. In a September 29 post titled "How Climate Change Helped ISIS," we explored connections between a catastrophic, poverty-inducing drought and the rise of militant Jihadis in Syria, including ISIS (also known as ISIL or the Islamic State). The drought ...
Also found in: [+]
Hunters and Conservationists Join Forces to Protect Imperiled Wolverines 21.10.2014 Commondreams.org Newswire
Also found in: [+]
The Climate Post: U.S., Military to Plan More Strategically for Climate Change 20.10.2014 Green on HuffingtonPost.com
Climate change is a "threat multiplier" and worse than many of the challenges the U.S. military is already grappling with, according to a new report by the U.S. Department of Defense (DoD). The New York Times indicated that the report marks a departure from the DoD's previous focus on preparing bases to adapt to climate change. The DoD now calls on the military to incorporate climate change plans in its strategic thinking and budgeting. "Among the future trends that will impact our national security is climate change," said Defense Secretary Chuck Hagel. "Rising global temperatures, changing precipitation patterns, climbing sea levels, and more extreme weather events will intensify the challenges of global instability, hunger, poverty, and conflict. They will likely lead to food and water shortages, pandemic disease, disputes over refugees and resources, and destruction by natural disasters in regions across the globe." Climate change will now be factored into several day-to-day decisions , including ...
Also found in: [+]
Scientists Mull Change Of Epoch To Reflect Human Impact On The Planet 17.10.2014 Green on HuffingtonPost.com
By Emma Anderson BERLIN (Reuters) - Scientists from around the world met this week to decide whether to call time on the Holocene epoch after 11,700 years and begin a new geological age called the Anthropocene - to reflect humankind's deep impact on the planet. For decades, researchers have asked whether humanity's impact on the Earth's surface and atmosphere mean we have entered the Anthropocene - or new human era. "What we see is the urban phenomenon and the boom of China has a direct marking in the forms of the strata," said John Palmesino, a London-based architect who has worked with the scientists to capture on film the impact of humans on the Earth. "You can no longer distinguish what is man-made from what is natural." A group of geologists, climate scientists, ecologists and an expert in international law that have been conducting research since 2009, all met face-to-face for the first time in Berlin on Thursday and Friday to discuss the issue. They appeared to agree it is time for a change of ...
Also found in: [+]
Hysteria Over Ebola Fuels Racism, While the Real Disease Is Capitalism 17.10.2014 Commondreams.org Views
Also found in: [+]
Defense Department integrates climate change into all operations 17.10.2014 Business Operations | GreenBiz.com

The Pentagon takes climate resilience seriously, even if politicians do not.

Defense Department integrates climate change into all operations
Also found in: [+]
Could California Be Facing A Mega-Drought? 15.10.2014 Environmental News Network
Agriculture, one of California’s strongest pillars, has taken the biggest hit: the drought will cost at least $2.2 billion in agricultural losses this year alone. Fields of dead almond trees and dried-out crops are a common sight in central California these days. Central Valley towns are also growing desperate. Many have been forced to install porta-potties in their backyards or even steal water from fire hydrants.
Also found in: [+]
Global Climate Deal Shouldn't Be Legally Binding, Top State Department Official Says 15.10.2014 Green on HuffingtonPost.com
By Valerie Volcovici WASHINGTON, Oct 14 (Reuters) - The United States wants to broker a global agreement on climate change that would contain some legal elements but would stop short of being legally binding on an international level, the country's top diplomat on climate change issues said. Todd Stern, the State Department climate change special envoy, addressed one of the thorniest issues in ongoing talks to secure a global plan to curb greenhouse gas emissions - its legal form. Stern said a recent proposal by New Zealand for countries to submit a "schedule" for reducing emissions that would be legally binding and subject to mandatory accounting, reporting and review offers an approach that could get the buy-in of countries like the United States that are wary of ratifying an internationally binding treaty. The content of the schedule itself and the actions each country pledges would not be legally binding at an international level. "Some are sure to disapprove of the New Zealand idea, ...
Also found in: [+]
Space Weather and OUR weather 14.10.2014 Environmental News Network
What is "space weather"? And how might it affect weather on Earth? Researchers have discovered a formerly undetected impact of space weather on the polar atmosphere, which may explain some previously unexplained variations in winter weather patterns. Their results, published today (Tuesday 14 October), in the journal Nature Communications could have important implications for seasonal weather forecasting.
Also found in: [+]
Two Crises Cry Out for a 'Manhattan Project': Climate Change and Ebola 14.10.2014 Green on HuffingtonPost.com
Famed physicists at Los Alamos-- en.wikipedia.org To meet the challenges of climate change and infectious diseases we might find the best answer by revisiting a stunningly successful model: The Manhattan Project. In 1939 the United States initiated a bold and ambitious program to develop an atomic bomb. At the time, scientists knew little about splitting the atom. In establishing the Manhattan Project the U.S. did not apply the knee jerk capitalistic model of mobilizing competition. Had we succumbed to that model, the government might have offered grants and other incentives to encourage individual scientists, universities, private and publically held companies to compete in a race to develop the bomb--with benefits to the winner. Why didn't we go that route? It was well known that Germany was working furiously on developing an atomic bomb and had made significant progress . President Franklin D. Roosevelt feared Nazi Germany beating us to the bomb and bringing the entire world to its knees. It was a ...
Also found in: [+]
Hagel: Military Must Be 'Pro-Active' in Addressing 'Threat Multiplier'of Climate Change 14.10.2014 CommonDreams.org Headlines
Also found in: [+]
The Planet Just Had Its Warmest September On Record, Continuing Hot Streak 14.10.2014 Politics on HuffingtonPost.com
This past September was the warmest since records began in 1880, according to new data released by NASA this weekend. The announcement continues a trend of record or near-record breaking months, including May and August of this year. The newly released data could make it very likely that 2014 will become the warmest year on record . September temperature anomalies (in degrees Celsius) compared to the 1951-1980 average. (PHOTO: NASA Goddard Institute for Space Studies ) Dr. Gavin Schmidt , a climatologist and climate modeler at NASA's Goddard Institute for Space Studies , told The Huffington Post last month that although these temperature records are significant, they are just one piece of the data that "point[s] towards the long-term trends" of warming. He cautioned against focusing too intently on any one month or year, but rather the broader scope of human-caused climate ...
Also found in: [+]
Who Has the Most to Lose If We Do Nothing on Climate Change? 14.10.2014 Green on HuffingtonPost.com
Climate change solutions are usually discussed in terms of what's best for business and the economy. But what about what's best for those who have the most to lose as climate change worsens? Namely, women. "Women are disproportionately vulnerable to environmental changes," reported the United Nations Population Fund (UNFPA) and the Women's Environment and Development Organization (WEDO), citing statistics that speak for themselves: • Women and children are 14 times more likely to die than men during natural disasters (like heat waves, droughts, and hurricanes -- all of which are direct consequences of climate change). • Hurricane Katrina, which struck New Orleans in 2005, predominantly affected African-American women, who were already the region's poorest, most disadvantaged community. • An estimated 87% of unmarried women and almost 100% of married women lost their livelihoods when a cyclone hit the Ayerwaddy Delta in Myanmar in 2008. But notable natural disasters like these aren't the only ways climate ...
Also found in: [+]
Climate Change Brings New Military Challenges As Changing World Spurs Competition 13.10.2014 Green on HuffingtonPost.com
AREQUIPA, Peru (AP) — Defense officials say a report slated for release Monday will lay out plans for the Pentagon to get a better handle on how climate change will affect the military, and determine how best to deal with the challenges. Defense Department leaders have long warned that the evolving change in climate patterns, resulting in rising seas and increased severe weather events, will have a broad and costly impact on the Defense Department's ability to protect the nation and respond to natural and humanitarian disasters in the United States and around the world. Rising sea levels could eventually put vast stretches of Navy docks and other military infrastructure under water, in places like Norfolk, Virginia, Honolulu, Hawaii, and other coastal bases around the world. And increased natural disasters would create a bigger demand for military support for humanitarian relief. U.S. Defense Secretary Chuck Hagel is expected to discuss the plan at a meeting of defense ministers from the Americas here ...
Also found in: [+]
Climate Change This Week: The Walrus Sings, Renewables Rising, and More! 13.10.2014 Green on HuffingtonPost.com
Altaeros Energies is developing turbine-equipped tubular helium balloons that float up to 2,000 feet in the air to capture wind energy. (From Altaeros Energies) OO A Lighter-Than-Air Turbine To Harness High-Altitude Winds * * USGS OO The Latest Climate Refugees: 35,000+ Walrus Mass on Beach as their homes, sea ice, have melted away. OO Largest Massing Ever a Sign of Warming Arctic Wikipedia Why Does This Threaten Walruses? Walruses are built for sea ice and like to cuddle; on land they are prone to overheating in their thick fat coats while trying to rest between foraging. It also increases the energy they must expend to travel to their feeding grounds. Walruses: The Climate Change Canaries of the Arctic OO Giant Walrus Massing Is New ---And We Don't Know How Bad It Will Get OO Oceans Getting Hotter Than Anybody Realized says new data. Credit D. Dixson OO Oceans Acidifying Faster Than Fish Can Adapt - says a new study, which indicates it can take several generations for a fish to start adapting. A new ...
Also found in: [+]
The Gathering Storm 10.10.2014 Politics on HuffingtonPost.com
These last two days, I've been sitting down with British Foreign Secretary Philip Hammond, and this morning at the crack of dawn we left Washington and headed together to my hometown -- Boston -- to help ring a global alarm bell and focus on an issue that doesn't just animate President Obama and Prime Minister Cameron, but an issue that demands urgent attention from all of us: global climate change. In the year I was born, 70 years ago this year, Sir Winston Churchill first talked about the "special relationship" between the United States and Great Britain, and his deep conviction that unless always we kept the United States and the United Kingdom united in that "special relationship," untold destruction would be the result. Seven decades later, our two countries are confronting danger -- and defeating it -- not just on the battlefield against ISIL, but we are also together confronting the kind of "gathering storms" Sir Winston also warned about -- and global climate change is one of the most critical. ...
Also found in: [+]
The Gathering Storm 10.10.2014 Green on HuffingtonPost.com
These last two days, I've been sitting down with British Foreign Secretary Philip Hammond, and this morning at the crack of dawn we left Washington and headed together to my hometown -- Boston -- to help ring a global alarm bell and focus on an issue that doesn't just animate President Obama and Prime Minister Cameron, but an issue that demands urgent attention from all of us: global climate change. In the year I was born, 70 years ago this year, Sir Winston Churchill first talked about the "special relationship" between the United States and Great Britain, and his deep conviction that unless always we kept the United States and the United Kingdom united in that "special relationship," untold destruction would be the result. Seven decades later, our two countries are confronting danger -- and defeating it -- not just on the battlefield against ISIL, but we are also together confronting the kind of "gathering storms" Sir Winston also warned about -- and global climate change is one of the most critical. ...
Also found in: [+]
Doctors March for Climate Change: A Public Health Crisis 9.10.2014 Commondreams.org Views
Also found in: [+]
1 to 20 of 3,647