User: flenvcenter Topic: Air and Climate-Independent
Category: Climate Change :: Climate Change Impacts
Last updated: Jun 24 2016 17:28 IST RSS 2.0
 
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Evicted by climate change 24.6.2016 High Country News Most Recent
Government regulations forced the Yup’ik to give up their semi-nomadic existence. Now, the land where they settled is vanishing.
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The Case for a Child-Centered Energy and Climate Policy 23.6.2016 Truthout.com
Children suffer the most from fossil fuel burning. Fossil fuel combustion and associated air pollution and carbon dioxide (CO2) is the root cause of much of children's ill health children today as well as their uncertain future. There are strong scientific arguments, as well persuasive economic ones, for reducing the world's dependence on energy generated by the burning of fossil fuels such as coal, oil, diesel and gasoline. These include the 7 million adult deaths per year attributed to ambient air pollution, most of it from fossil fuel burning. Less recognized is the huge and largely silent toll on children's health and development from both air toxics and climate change. Children, whose bodies and brains are especially vulnerable to harm as they develop in utero and in the first years of life, bear a disproportionate burden of disease from both air pollution and climate change. Exposure to toxic air pollutants released during fossil fuel combustion contributes to low birth weight, cognitive and ...
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Climate change may soon diminish crop yields 22.6.2016 TreeHugger
Rising temperatures are posing a threat to global food security.
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Climate Change This Week: Requiem for a Reef, Developing Divestment, and More! 22.6.2016 Green on HuffingtonPost.com
REQUIEM FOR A REEF: THE DEVASTATION OF THE GREAT BARRIER From This ... To This. The devastation of this reef, one of the most beautiful undersea wonders of the world, will not recover in our children's lifetimes, if ever. Diving photographers were saturated with the stench of rotting corals. OO The Great Barrier Reef: Almost A Quarter of All Corals Just Killed, The Rest In Danger due to hot waters that stressed, bleached then killed the corals; the rest are endangered from continuing climate change and pollution. An area the size of Scotland is largely dead. Giant Clams, Too: Beautiful in Life, Starving, then Bleached and Dead - like corals, these Great Barrier giant clams can get heat stressed, ejecting the algae they rely on, and then undergo a slow, starving, bleaching death. Surveys have revealed that 90+ % of the almost 3,000 individual reefs making up the Great Barrier have been touched by bleaching, and almost a quarter - 22% - of coral over the entire Great Barrier Reef has been killed by this ...
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The Case for a Child-Centered Energy and Climate Policy 21.6.2016 Commondreams.org Views
Dr. Frederica Perera

Children suffer the most from fossil fuel burning.

Fossil fuel combustion and associated air pollution and carbon dioxide (CO2) is the root cause of much of children’s ill health children today as well as their uncertain future. There are strong scientific arguments, as well persuasive economic ones, for reducing the world’s dependence on energy generated by the burning of fossil fuels such as coal, oil, diesel and gasoline.

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Climate Change Could Alter the Chemistry of Deepwater Lakes and Harm Ecosystems 21.6.2016 Truthout - All Articles
In an age of rapid global population growth, demand for safe, clean water is constantly increasing. In 2010 the United States alone used 355 billion gallons of water per day . Most of the available fresh water on Earth's surface is found in lakes, streams and reservoirs, so these water bodies are critical resources. As a limnologist, I study lakes and other inland waters. This work is challenging and interesting because every lake is an ecosystem that is biologically, chemically and physically unique. They also are extremely sensitive to changes in regional and global weather and long-term climate patterns. For these reasons, lakes are often called "sentinels of change." Like the figurative canary in the coal mine, lakes may experience change to their ecosystem dynamics before we start to see shifts in the greater watersheds around them. In a study I recently co-authored with Goloka Behari Sahoo, S. Geoffrey Schladow, John Reuter , Robert Coats and Michael Dettinger , we projected that future climate ...
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Scorching Hot Southwest Is Climate Change In Action 21.6.2016 Green on HuffingtonPost.com
Deadly, record-breaking heat and wildfires sweeping across the Southwestern U.S. are a clear sign of manmade climate change at work, scientists say. Triple-digit temperatures began scorching Nevada, California, Arizona, Utah and New Mexico early this week. Some of the most intense heat was recorded throughout Arizona, where  four hikers  died in separate heat-related incidents. On Sunday, the National Weather Service announced temperature records for that calendar day in Yuma at 120 degrees, Phoenix at 118, Tucson at 115 and Flagstaff at 93, NOAA spokeswoman Maureen O'Leary told The Huffington Post. Tucson's heat tied for the third hottest day every recorded in the city.  Michael Mann, a leading climate scientist and professor of meteorology at Penn State University, was in Phoenix on Friday when temperatures hit 106 degrees. He was speaking at a Democratic National Platform committee meeting, where he pointed to the extreme weather as "an example of just the sort of extreme heat that is on the increase ...
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In praise of a wild West 17.6.2016 High Country News Most Recent
A 21st-century vision for Western public lands, including their role in solving challenges like climate change.
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Why our relationship to the public lands must evolve 17.6.2016 High Country News Most Recent
A 21st-century vision for Western lands, including their role in solving challenges like climate change.
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This Father's Day, We Want a Safer Climate for Our Kids 17.6.2016 Green on HuffingtonPost.com
With Father's Day approaching, I'm thinking about the world that my kids, and their kids, will inherit -- and I can't help but worry about the dramatic changes in the climate they will experience. Already, Michaela and Rory are growing up in a world that's made less safe because of global warming. Rising heat is increasing the risk of bad-air days, and for both of my children, who suffer from asthma but love sports and the outdoors, high smog levels are a double whammy. At the same time, here in New England, flooding and storms are starting to become the new normal. Our research shows that since I was about my kids' age, extreme rain and snow storms have increased by more than 30 percent . In fact, everyone in Massachusetts lives in a county recently hit by at least one federally-declared weather disaster - like the snow storms from last year that dumped more than 100 inches, shattering previous records. We were relatively lucky during last year's storms. We made it through with a few leaks from ice dams ...
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Climate Change This Week: Killer Crops, No More Fossil Fuel Subsidies, and More! 15.6.2016 Green on HuffingtonPost.com
Today, the Earth got a little hotter, and a little more crowded. Sheltering Beautiful Biodiversity, such as this Common Indian Crow Butterfly caterpillar found in Indian forests, is another reason to conserve these important carbon-storing ecosystems. Credit Maneesh Kaul at flickr Forests: the cheapest way to store carbon This Red Billed Parrot Will Be Protected in the new reserve in northern Peru. Source Nature and Culture International OO Peru: Private Conservation Area Will Protect 30% Of Northern Montane Forests - Nature and Culture International (NCI) announced the creation of a nearly 67,000 -acre protected area in northern Peru, the Chicuate Chinguelas Private Conservation Area. OO India: Nearly 24,000 Industrial Projects Replaced Forests Over 30 Years destroying 15,000 sq km of forests that cannot be replaced artificially, the government acknowledged. When we harm forests, we harm ourselves. * KILLER CROPS Climate Change Clobbers Crops Credit Pawel Kopcynski at Reuters OO Extreme Weather ...
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CDC publishes new map showing US locations of potential Zika-carrying mosquitoes 14.6.2016 Environmental News Network
A few months ago, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention published a startling map that showed the parts of the U.S. that could harbor mosquitoes capable of carrying Zika. The map made it look like a vast swath of the country was at risk for Zika, including New England and the Upper Midwest. Well, not quite. On Thursday, CDC scientists published another mosquito map for the U.S. And it paints a very different picture.
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The psychological cost of climate change 11.6.2016 rabble.ca - News for the rest of us

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After the Deluge: Texas and France Split on Climate Science 9.6.2016 Green on HuffingtonPost.com
Texas and France have a number of things in common. They're roughly the same size. They were both republics. They have delectable, widely loved cuisines. And, just last week, both were battered by torrential rains and flooding turbocharged by human-made global warming. What's different between them? Plenty, to be sure, but given that the recent deluge is the topic du jour, what's most interesting are the diametrically opposite views French and Lone Star State officials hold about the climate change connection. For the French, it's "mais oui, bien sûr!" But as far as the Texans are concerned, "it just ain't happenin'." But before diving into that, let's survey the damage. Paris, France, was particularly hard-hit. The Seine crested at 20 feet above its usual levels last Saturday, more than 19,000 metro area homes lost electric power, and 20,000 people in Nemours and other towns had to temporarily evacuate their homes. May was the country's rainiest month since 1886, according to Radio France International, ...
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Climate change and Pacific food systems: navigating a perfect storm 9.6.2016 Green on HuffingtonPost.com
This World Oceans Day, we must remember one of the most important things the Ocean offers us: food and sustenance. Yet climate change is set to wreak havoc on the Ocean's ability to sustain us, and nowhere is this more evident than in the Pacific Island Region. A new report released today highlights the most pressing issues facing this region, while shedding light on potential opportunities to be gained under climate change. The 22 Pacific Islands countries and territories are at the frontline of climate change. They are termed "small island states" in the language of the climate negotiators - It helps to think of them as 'large ocean states', as oceans make up 98% of their combined jurisdictions. Rising sea-levels, ocean acidification, more violent tropical cyclones, rising temperatures, and more frequent droughts are all on the horizon, and food, fishing and farming will suffer these impacts first. This puts increasing pressure on fishers and farmers who produce staple foods for local consumption as ...
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Increased Extreme Weather Events Predicted Due to Effect of Climate Change on the Arctic 8.6.2016 Commondreams.org Newswire
Greenpeace The effects of climate change on the Arctic — including melting ice and sea level rise — may possibly alter weather patterns in the northern hemisphere. These effects could include hotter, drier summers in some areas, wetter summers in other areas, and cold, stormy winters in others, according to studies compiled by the Greenpeace Research Laboratories in the report, “ What happens in the Arctic doesn't stay in the Arctic ” which is published ...
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These Are the Three Stories the Candidates Are Not Talking About in California, But Should Be 8.6.2016 Politics on HuffingtonPost.com
Last week, the LA Times Editorial Board observed our presidential candidates' silence on climate change . The Board acknowledged two sad truths: first, climate change is dangerously absent from the national discussion, despite its importance; and second, we shouldn't be surprised that our politicians don't talk about it because it doesn't resonate with voters. The second is a bad excuse for the first. The Board and our candidates are ignoring the devastating influence of climate change on our community. Had I been in the editorial board meeting, I would have pitched a different piece. I would have suggested an editorial that urged the candidates to visit the places in California where voters are already deeply affected by climate change and the industries that perpetuate it. Presidential campaigns search high and low to find "real people" who can break through the campaign bubble and tell the stories that underpin a candidate's vision; unfortunately, it's increasingly easy to find Californians who ...
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After all the Accolades Some Inconvenient, Inexplicable and Inexcusable Truths Still Remain 7.6.2016 Green on HuffingtonPost.com
Al Gore's pivotal film, An Inconvenient Truth (AIT), put climate change on the world map, and got many Americans thinking, and talking, about this worsening existential threat. There has been real progress with much of it coming in late 2015, including President Obama's executive actions, Pope Francis' encyclical Laudato Si and the pivotal Paris Agreement. Last week's tributes to Gore and the film's producers were welcome and deserved. Some of us who had been concerned, and communicating about global warming for years prior, thought AIT would change everything. It didn't. A decade later there remain glaring gaps that are key to wider public acceptance and much needed mass action. What's still missing comprises a long list, but at the top I put a lack of credible information and inspiration, programming aimed at the general public coming from mainstream news outlets, both broadcast and cable, and on the television and radio networks. There's a sustainability revolution underway but you'd never know it if ...
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Are Drought Truthers The New Climate Change Deniers? 6.6.2016 Green on HuffingtonPost.com
Presumptive GOP presidential nominee  Donald Trump has said some incredibly questionable and inaccurate things over the course of his campaign for the White House. But his comments last month on the California drought may have hit a new low, at least as far as science is concerned. At a rally in Fresno on May 27, Trump suggested that he had the answer to California’s water problem: to simply "open up the water" for farmers because “ there is no drought .” Trump’s remarks might be the most high-profile example of drought trutherism yet. So could Trump, who has described climate change as a “man-made” “hoax” despite the overwhelming evidence to the contrary, help spur a new breed of drought deniers? Peter Gleick, a water and climate analyst and co-founder of the Pacific Institute , is doubtful, and in an email said he anticipated Trump's remarks “will be seen by most as nonsense -- as I think they have." “Even climate deniers have trouble denying drought when they see parched hills, empty reservoirs, dying ...
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The Mainstream Media's Climate Malpractice 3.6.2016 Truthout - All Articles
A storm front rolls into Portarlington, Australia, on December 2, 2010. (Photo: mrpbps ) A state of disaster has been declared in 31 flooded Texas counties as rivers in the region are cresting at historic highs. Six people have died, up to four more people are missing and hundreds of people were evacuated from their homes in Houston as the Brazos River reached over 54 feet in Fort Bend County. On the East Coast, the National Hurricane Center declared that Tropical Depression Bonnie, which caused significant flash flooding in the US Southeast over Memorial Day weekend, has "revived" off the coast of North Carolina. See more news and opinion from Thom Hartmann at Truthout here. It's not just remarkable that Bonnie "revived" itself as a Tropical Depression -- it's remarkable that 2016 is the second year in a row that the Atlantic hurricane season has begun before June 1. Over in Europe meanwhile, the French government issued an orange alert in response to days of torrential rains that brought the Seine's ...
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