User: flenvcenter Topic: Air and Climate-Independent
Category: Climate Change :: Climate Change Science
Last updated: Dec 06 2019 17:24 IST RSS 2.0
 
6,128 to 6,147 of 6,151    
America Unprepared for Climate Change, Say Policy Advisers 13.3.2009 CommonDreams.org Headlines

America is woefully unprepared for climate change, and the government agencies charged with delivering the latest science to decision makers are not up to the task, a new report said today.

The National Research Council, a policy advice centre that is part of the US National Academy of Sciences, said that government agencies and political leaders, concerned more than ever about climate change, were not getting the information or the guidance they needed.

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Pachauri to Head New Yale Climate and Energy Institute 12.3.2009 ENS
http://www.ens-newswire.com/ens/mar2009/2009-03-11-091.asp
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Ocean Expected to Rise 5 Feet Along Coastlines 12.3.2009 CommonDreams.org Headlines

SAN FRANCISCO - Driven by global warming, the ocean is expected to rise nearly 5 feet along California's coastline by the end of the century, hitting San Francisco Bay the hardest of all, according to a state study released Wednesday.

Nearly half a million people and $100 billion in property, two-thirds of it concentrated around the bay, are at risk of major flooding, researchers found in the most comprehensive study to date of how climate change will alter the state's coastal areas.

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J. Carl Ganter: 5 Feet Under: Calif. Study Projects Impacts of Sea Level Rise 12.3.2009 Green on HuffingtonPost.com
Did you know that Sun and Google headquarters may be below sea level? California published today its comprehensive risk assessment of coastline vulnerabilities to rising...
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85 Per Cent of Amazonian Rainforest at Risk of Destruction, Researchers Warn 12.3.2009 CommonDreams.org Headlines

COPENHAGEN - The Amazonian rainforest is likely to suffer catastrophic damage even with the lowest temperature rises forecast under climate change, researchers have found.

Damage will be so severe that it will cause irreversible changes to the world's weather patterns, which would be expected to bring more storms, floods and heatwaves to Britain.

Up to 40 per cent of the rainforest will be lost if temperature rises are restricted to 2C, which most climatologists regard as the least that can be expected by 2050.

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New renewables to power 40 per cent of global electricity demand by 2050 11.3.2009 Environmental News Network
With global cooperation and investment, renewables' share will exceed all previous estimates With adequate financial and political support, renewable energy technologies like wind and photovoltaics could supply 40 percent of the world's electricity by 2050, according to findings from the International Scientific Congress "Climate Change: Global Risks, Challenges & Decisions." However, if such technologies are marginalized, its share is likely to hover below 15 percent.
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Rising Seas Could Swamp One in 10 People by 2100 11.3.2009 ENS
http://www.ens-newswire.com/ens/mar2009/2009-03-10-03.asp
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Geoengineering: Time to Get Serious? 11.3.2009 Energy & Climate | Greenbiz.com
Imagine a fleet of 1,500 remote-controlled, wind-powered ships, sailing the oceans, spewing salt water into the air to whiten clouds, so they block more of the sun to cool an overheating planet. Think of artificial trees that suck a ton of carbon from the atmosphere daily. Or iron filings sprinkled on seas to rapidly grow phytoplankton to absorb CO2. Geoengineering. Marc Gunther asks, "Is it time to get serious about it?" ...
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Sea levels to surge at least a metre by 2100, scientists warn at Copenhagen meeting 10.3.2009 Grist News
COPENHAGEN -- Months before make-or-break climate negotiations, a conclave of scientists warned Tuesday that the impact of global warming was accelerating beyond a forecast made by U.N. experts two years ago. Sea levels this century may rise several times higher than predictions made in 2007 that form the scientific foundation for policymakers today, the meeting heard. In March 2007, the U.N.'s Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change concluded that global warming, if unchecked, would lead to a devastating amalgam of floods, drought, disease and extreme weather by the century end. The world's oceans would creep up 18 to 59 centimeters (7 to 23 inches), enough to wipe out several small island nations and wreak havoc for tens of millions living ...
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Teryn Norris: Want to Save the World? Make Clean Energy Cheap. 10.3.2009 Green on HuffingtonPost.com
By Teryn Norris & Jesse Jenkins Over 12,000 young adults attended the recent Power Shift 2009 summit in Washington, DC. Their goal? Building the largest...
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Bill Chameides: Non-Climate Scientist 'Climate Scientist' Sets the Record Straight 10.3.2009 Green on HuffingtonPost.com
Dr. Bill Chameides, a climate scientist, is the dean of Duke University's Nicholas School of the Environment and a member of the National Academy of...
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More fuzzy economics 10.3.2009 Gristmill
By Tony Kreindler With Congress moving forward aggressively to cap global warming pollution, opponents of strong climate legislation are muddying the economics to derail action. First the good news: Congressional leaders have announced they will move forward with broad energy and climate legislation that will include a cap on global warming pollution -- the single most important step we can take to fight climate change. The bad news: with Congress on the cusp of action, opponents are once again circulating analyses suggesting that a cap on carbon will hurt the economy and overburden consumers with higher energy costs. The latest comes from the George Marshall Institute. Like several similar studies we saw during last year's debate over ...
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Scientists to Issue Stark Warning Over Dramatic New Sea Level Figures 10.3.2009 Truthout.com
Rising sea levels pose a far bigger eco threat than previously thought. This week's climate change conference in Copenhagen will sound an alarm over new floodings - enough to swamp Bangladesh, Florida, the Norfolk Broads and the Thames estuary. Scientists will warn this week that rising sea levels, triggered by global warming, pose a far greater danger to the planet than previously estimated. There is now a major risk that many coastal areas around the world will be inundated by the end of the century because Antarctic and Greenland ice sheets are melting faster than previously estimated. Low-lying areas including Bangladesh, Florida, the Maldives and the Netherlands face catastrophic flooding, while, in Britain, large areas of the Norfolk ...
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Anti-Science Environmentalism: Iron Seeding Experiment Protested...Again 9.3.2009 TreeHugger
R/V Polarstern – a floating large scale laboratory. Image credit: , Alfred Wegener Institute Surprising how often ideological opposites rely on similar tactics. It's happening now with environmental lobbyists opposing field experiments to validate a non-violent and potentially cost-effective way to put Patient Earth in the Climate Emergency Room: where stabilization and prognosis for a long term cure are possible. In this example, citizen activists appear to be following the Bush Administration's anti-science play book. Read on for a detailed example.... ...
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Scientists to Issue Stark Warning Over Dramatic New Sea Level Figures 8.3.2009 CommonDreams.org Headlines

Scientists will warn this week that rising sea levels, triggered by global warming, pose a far greater danger to the planet than previously estimated. There is now a major risk that many coastal areas around the world will be inundated by the end of the century because Antarctic and Greenland ice sheets are melting faster than previously estimated.

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Olivier Kamanda: Climate Change Changes More Than Just the Weather 7.3.2009 Green on HuffingtonPost.com
This month, ten underprivileged youth from Kenya, Tanzania, and Ghana will climb Mount Kilimanjaro in order to draw international attention to climate change in Africa.
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Adapting to Climate Change -- An Urgent Societal Priority 6.3.2009 Energy & Climate | Greenbiz.com
Image Courtesy of the World Environment Center

As more definitive scientific evidence on the impacts of climate change at the global, regional and local levels continues to accumulate, a greater sense of urgency is arising across political capitals, in the business community and within civil society. Of special concern are studies which now conclude that climate impacts from greenhouse gas levels expected by 2050 will persist for about 1,000 years regardless of how well decision makers reduce future emissions.

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A roomful of cynics 6.3.2009 Gristmill
By Coby Beck What is to be done when the world's leading experts in a field come together in the largest, most extensively peer-reviewed inquiry in the history of science and arrive at a conclusion that is diametrically opposed to your own long held world view? Most of us would reevaluate our ideas so they actually mesh with reality. That's called learning But if you are the staunchly "free market," anti-regulation think tank called the and the conclusion is that humanity must cooperate to get the world out of a worsening climate crisis ... well, then what you do is simply manufacture a conclusion that is more to your liking. Make no mistake, this is what the 's " " is all about. Set to begin Sunday in New York, the gathering's guest list ...
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Laurie David: Veteran Meteorologist Bravely Calls It Like He Sees It 6.3.2009 Green on HuffingtonPost.com
Local TV weathermen, who despite their careful tracking of weather disasters and trends, are hell bent on denying that global warming is happening. That's why today I have to take my hat off to veteran meteorologist Bob Ryan.
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Drought threatens Amazon, speeds global warming: study 6.3.2009 Grist News
PARIS -- Drought is killing off trees in Brazil's fragile Amazon rain forest and depleting the region's carbon reservoirs -- an ecological double-whammy with devastating implications, according to a study published Thursday. The Amazon's lush vegetation in a typical year absorbs nearly two billion tonnes of carbon dioxide, one of the chief culprits causing climate change. But a 30-year study published by the journal Science found that the world's largest tropical rain forest is surprisingly sensitive to drought, and that the resulting loss of vegetation will have a greater-than-anticipated effect in causing a sharp spike in greenhouse gases. The Amazon tree canopy which absorbs massive amounts of greenhouse gases often succumbs to the effects ...
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