User: esg Topic: Health
Category: Diseases :: Non-communicable :: All
Last updated: Feb 24 2018 05:58 IST RSS 2.0
 
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Stephen Fry recovering from prostate cancer surgery 24.2.2018 General News
British comedian and TV presenter Stephen Fry in a video has revealed that he had been suffering from prostate cancer and underwent a surgery last month to have his prostate removed.Fry, who stepped down as the presenter of the British Academy Film Awards (BAFTA) film awards last month, described prostate cancer as an "aggressive little bugger" in the 13-minute clip, The Guardian reported.The 60-year-old comedian explained that he had visited the doctor for an influenza vaccine and after undergoing a regular medical checkup. However, his health report revealed that his prostate-specific antigen (PSA) levels were high and an MRI scan confirmed that Fry was diagnosed with prostate cancer.The doctors offered Fry two options- either undergoing radiotherapy or having his prostate removed surgically. Fry chose the latter and has been recovering since."It doesn't seem to have spread because what you don't want is it to spread from one area to another, but one of the lymph nodes had something
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The champions of clean air 23.2.2018 Hindu: S & T
Clean air is turning into a rare commodity as India’s towns and cities become the dumping ground for a variety of pollutants. In this seemingly bleak scenario, the author profiles five Indians whose courageous battle for cleaner air offers a ray of hope to fellow citizens
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Actor Stephen Fry Reveals Battle With Prostate Cancer 23.2.2018 NDTV News - Latest
Stephen Fry said he underwent surgery to remove part of his prostate and lymph nodes in January
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Billy Graham: The Pastor who filled stadiums and counselled presidents 23.2.2018 Business Standard: News Now
A central achievement of his was encouraging evangelical Protestants to regain the social influence they had once wielded
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The ultimate care 23.2.2018 Deccan Herald - Supplements
Many studies have strongly suggested that the trillions of microorganisms that inhabit the human body influence our current and future health and may account for the rising incidence of several serious medical conditions now plaguing young and old. The research indicates that caesarean deliveries and limited breast-feeding can distort the population of microorganisms in a babys gut and may explain the unchecked rise of worrisome health problems in children and adults, including asthma, allergies, coeliac disease, Type 1 diabetes and obesity. These conditions, among others, are more likely to occur when an infants gut has been inadequately populated by health-promoting bacteria. Starting point A growing number of researchers and consumers are now paying more attention to where it all begins, especially how this huge population of microbes in our bodies, called the microbiome, is affected, for good or bad, by how babies are born and nourished. As this still-evolving information trickles down to prospective ...
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Wipro and Amrita Vishwa Vidyapeetham win Aegis Graham Bell Award 2017 23.2.2018 General News
In 'Innovation in mHealth' category
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Missouri Governor indicted over sexual misconduct allegations 23.2.2018 General News
Governor Eric Greitens of the US state of Missouri has been indicted amid looming allegations of sexual misconduct and blackmail following an admission of an affair last month.
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Jindal plans Namibia's second iron ore mine: documents 23.2.2018 General News
WINDHOEK (Reuters) - Plans to open Namibia's second iron ore mine are being pursued by an Indian-controlled company called Blake Trading, documents seen by Reuters on Friday show.
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British actor Stephen Fry reveals battle with prostate cancer 23.2.2018 Reuters: Entertainment News
LONDON (Reuters) - British actor Stephen Fry said on Friday he has had surgery to remove his prostate after battling cancer for two months, adding in a video posted on Friday that the operation appears to have been ...
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Woman saves husband by donating part of her liver 23.2.2018 General News
A 34-year-old woman donated part of her liver to her husband who was suffering from liver failure. The woman was operated by the doctors at a private hospial here on February 13 and removed the right part of her liver and transplanted to her husband, Chairman, of the hospital C Palanivelu told reporters here today. The trasplantaion was successful and the husband and wrife are in good condition, he said.
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Biocon to expand presence in Hyderabad, Syngene to set up R&D lab 23.2.2018 All News-IANS Stories
India's largest biopharmaceutical company Biocon will expand its presence in Hyderabad while its subsidiary Syngene will set up a research and developmentm an official statement said on Friday.
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'Shortcomings in study claiming toxic metals in e-cigarette vapours' 23.2.2018 All News-IANS Stories
Raising strong objection against the latest study claiming that common e-cigarette "vapours" contain lead and other toxic metals and may raise major health issues, an expert on Friday argued that the sample size used in the research was not appropriate.
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16 Benefits of Sprouting and the Right Way to Do it 23.2.2018 NDTV Food - Latest
Learn all about sprouting the right way and the many benefits of the process.
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Chronic kidney disease linked to lower IQ in kids 23.2.2018 General News
Children with chronic kidney disease are more likely to face problems related to attention, visual and verbal memory, besides their declining physical health, finds a study.
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Sipping red wine may ward off your gum disease 23.2.2018 All News-IANS Stories
Suffering from gum disease? Sipping a glass of red wine may help combat the harmful bacteria and other pathogens that cause cavities in the mouth, claimed a new study.
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Chronic kidney disease may lower IQ in kids: study 23.2.2018 General News
Chronic kidney disease (CKD) may hamper academic skills, executive function and memory, a study has found. CKD in children clearly affects their physical health, but research also indicates that it can have impacts on neurocognitive function. "This research provides relevant information on the areas of need - for example, working memory and mathematics - for which children with CKD may need guidance, practice and assistance, particularly for children on dialysis," said Kerry Chen from the University of Sydney in Australia. "It also suggests hypotheses for why the overall intellectual and educational outcomes of children with CKD are reduced compared with the general population, and how best to prevent deficits," Chen said. For the study, published in the journal CJASN, the researchers examined all of the published evidence on cognitive and academic outcomes in children and adolescents with CKD. Their analysis included 34 studies with more than 3,000 CKD patients under the age of 21 ...
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Stephen Fry says he had surgery for prostate cancer 23.2.2018 General News
Actor-comedian Stephen Fry has announced that he underwent an operation in January to treat prostate cancer. The 60-year-old actor, who stepped down last month as Bafta film awards presenter, shared details about his illness in a video on Twitter. "For the last 2 months I've been in the throes of a rather unwelcome and unexpected adventure. I'm sorry I haven't felt able to talk about it till now, but here I am explaining what has been going on," he wrote. In the video, Fry described cancer as an "aggressive little bugger" but believed an early detection saved his life. Fry said he discovered he had cancer after an MRI scan. He had gone to the doctor for flu but a health check revealed that his prostate-specific antigen (PSA) levels were high. The actor was offered the choice of radiotherapy or having his prostate removed to treat cancer and he chose surgery. "It doesn't seem to have spread, because what you don't want is to spread from one area to another, but one of the lymph nodes .
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Tamil Nadu-run college now conducts free breast reconstruction surgery for poor; causes social media outrage 23.2.2018 DNA: Money
The Tamil Nadu health department on Wednesday launched a free clinic to conduct breast reconstruction surgery for those who want to alter their breast size, a decision that has been slammed on social media, as the department would only organize such clinics for breast cancer survivors. According to an Indian Express report, the free clinic is being done by the government-run Stanley Medical College and Hospital. Health officials said the move was to ensure that the underprivileged women get access to such beauty surgeries. “Nearly 80% of breast cancer patients in the country undergo mastectomy while the remaining undergo breast conservation surgeries with poor cosmetic results,” Dr C B Koppiker told The Indian Express last year. While speaking to UK's The Guardian , state health minister C Vijaya Bhaskar said, "“If we don’t offer (the procedure for free), they may opt for dangerous methods or take huge loans for it,” said C Vijaya Baskar, the state health minister. The head of plastic surgery at the ...
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Board of Rose Merc appoints CFO and Company Secretary 23.2.2018 General News
At meeting held on 23 February 2018
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Kids' snacking patterns may be genetic: study 23.2.2018 General News
Parents, take note! The type of snacks your child chooses may be determined by the genes, according to a study. Researchers at the University of Guelph in Canada investigated whether genetic variants in taste receptors related to sweet, fat and bitter tastes influence the snacks preschoolers choose. They found that nearly 80 per cent of the participants carried at least one of these genotypes that could predispose them to poor snacking habits. These findings could help parents tailor their kids' diets based on their genetics of taste. "Kids are eating a lot more snacks now than they used to, and we think looking at how genetics can be related to snacking behaviour is important to understanding increased obesity among kids," said Elie Chamoun from the University of Guelph. "This new research could help parents understand how their kids taste, and tailor their diet for better nutritional choices," Chamoun said. The study, published in the journal Nutrients, entailed tracking the ...
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