User: esg Topic: Health
Category: Diseases :: Age-Related :: Alzheimers
Last updated: Aug 09 2018 24:16 IST RSS 2.0
 
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Indian-origin biochemist, Meghan Markle on UK's most influential women list 31.5.2018 General News
An Indian-origin biochemist has been named alongside the likes of actress-turned-royal Meghan Markle, human rights lawyer Amal Clooney and bestselling author J K Rowling as the 25 most influential and aspirational women in the UK by 'Vogue' magazine. Priyanka Joshi has been chosen for her cutting-edge research in the inaugural 'The Vogue 25' list released today, which includes artists, activists and executives across different fields. "Priyanka Joshi had barely completed her PhD when 'Forbes' named her one of the most important young faces in science. A research fellow at Downing College, Cambridge, the 29-year-old sits at the cutting edge of Alzheimer's research, and has been praised for her ground-breaking work building a 'library' of drug-like molecules to target irregular proteins that cause degenerative brain diseases, notes the citation on the young biochemist. "With dementia now the leading cause of death for women in England and Wales, her early breakthroughs and research ...
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New type of vertigo identified 29.5.2018 General News
Scientists have identified a new type of vertigo with no known cause, that may respond to treatments. With vertigo, people have episodes of dizziness that can last from minutes to days. Vertigo can be caused by serious conditions, such as tumours, or conditions that are fairly benign, such the inner ear disorder Meniere's disease. However, for some people, no cause can be found. In a study published in the journal Neurology, scientists have identified a new type of vertigo where treatment may be effective. "These conditions can be difficult to diagnose and quite debilitating for people, so it's exciting to be able to discover this new diagnosis of a condition that may respond to treatment," said Ji-Soo Kim, of Seoul National University in South Korea. To diagnose this new condition, the person sits in a dark room and the examiner moves the patient's head forward and then the head is shaken horizontally for about 15 seconds. Then the patient opens his or her eyes and a video recording .
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Suven Life gets product patents from New Zealand, USA 29.5.2018 General News
Suven Life Sciences today said it has been granted a product patent by New Zealand and USA each corresponding to a new chemical entity (NCE) for treatment of disorders associated with neurodegenerative diseases. These patents are valid through 2034, the company said in a BSE filing. "We are pleased by the grant of these patents to Suven for our pipeline of molecules in the CNS arena, which are being developed for cognitive disorders with high unmet medical need with a huge market potential globally," Suven Life CEO Venkat Jasti said. The granted claims of patents are being developed as therapeutic agents useful in treatment of cognitive impairment associated with neurodegenerative disorders like Alzheimer's disease, attention deficient hyperactivity disorder (ADHD), Huntington's disease, Parkinson's and schizophrenia and and sleep disorders such as Narcolepsy, it added. Suven Life Sciences shares were trading 2.13 per cent down at Rs 192.60 on BSE.
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Exercise may helps treat addiction: Study 29.5.2018 General News
Aerobic exercise can help treat drug or alcohol addiction by altering the brain's reward system, a study has found. Also known as "cardio," aerobic exercise is brisk exercise that increases heart rate, breathing and circulation of oxygen through the blood, and is associated with decreasing many negative health issues, including diabetes, heart disease and arthritis. It also is linked to numerous mental health benefits, such as reducing stress, anxiety and depression. Scientists at the University at Buffalo in the US identified a key mechanism in how aerobic exercise can help impact the brain in ways that may support treatment and prevention strategies for addiction. "Several studies have shown that, in addition to these benefits, aerobic exercise has been effective in preventing the start, increase and relapse of substance use in a number of categories, including alcohol, nicotine, stimulants and opioids," said Panayotis Thanos, senior research scientist at University at Buffalo. "Our
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Yellow Spots In Eye Could Be Indicators of Dementia: 4 Foods For Brain Health  29.5.2018 NDTV News - Latest
These spots known as "hard drusen" are made of fat and calcium deposit that form in a layer underneath the retina, said the researchers.
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Develop drugs to cure diabetes: VP to scientists at IIIM 28.5.2018 General News
Applauding the Indian Institute of Integrative Medicine (IIIM) for playing a major role in supporting the drug regulatory system of the country, Vice President M Venkaiah Naidu today asked scientists here to develop drugs to cure diabetes and prevent diseases like malaria, chikungunya and dengue. "Pay more attention on diabetes and other diseases such as malaria, chikungunya and dengue so that a large number of people get benefited from your (IIIM) research," he said. The vice president said he was glad to know that the institute has started a Technology Business Incubator with the objective of creating jobs for the youngsters of the state. "I am happy to note that a number of startups within the IIIM campus are currently incubating under this initiative, which is being supported by the department of science & technology", Naidu said. He said it was heartening to know that institute has a very robust drug pipeline in the areas of Oncology, Arthritis, Tuberculosis, Alzheimer's and .
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UK to launch first human trials of Alzheimer's drug 28.5.2018 All News-IANS Stories
Scientists in the UK are set to launch the first human trials of a ground-breaking drug shown to repair DNA damage that contributes to Alzheimer's, the media reported.
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Yellow spots in eye could be new biomarker for dementia: Study 28.5.2018 All News-IANS Stories
Do you have tiny yellow spots in the eye? Watch out, it could be an early indicator of dementia, a new study suggests.
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More about follow-up care after concussion 27.5.2018 General News
Being discharged from a hospital trauma center after receiving treatment for a traumatic brain injury (TBI) does not necessarily mean that a patient has fully recovered. Proper follow-up care needs to be ensured for a full recovery.According to a study conducted by the National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke, many patients may not be receiving follow-up care, even though TBI can lead to long-lasting physical and cognitive symptoms.Patients in the Transforming Research and Clinical Knowledge in Traumatic Brain Injury (TRACK-TBI) initiative, a large, long-term, NIH-funded study of patients who are treated at the emergency room for mild TBI or concussion, were surveyed about their care after hospital discharge.Follow-up care in this study referred to receiving TBI-related educational materials at discharge, a call from the hospital within two weeks after release, seeing a healthcare provider within two weeks, or seeing a healthcare provider within three months.According ..
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US warns employees in China after consulate staff member suffers possible sonic attack 24.5.2018 General News
The US State Department has issued a health alert to its employees in China after one of them experienced a possible sonic attack and suffered a mild traumatic brain injury, an incident termed as "very similar" to suspected attacks on American diplomatic staff in Cuba. The Trump administration said they are taking these reports seriously and have taken up the matter with Chinese officials. "A US State Department government employee in China recently reported subtle and vague, but abnormal sensations of sound and pressure," the US Embassy in China said yesterday. "We do not currently know what caused the reported symptoms and we are not aware of any similar situations in China, either inside or outside of the diplomatic community," it said. Embassy spokeswoman Jinnie Lee said the employee had suffered a "variety of physical symptoms" between late 2017 and April 2018 while working at the US consulate in the southern city of Guangzhou. The employee was sent back to the US, and on May 18 .
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Decoding dementia: It's not a demon (Health Tips) (May 21-27 is Dementia Action [Awareness] Week) 24.5.2018 All News-IANS Stories
Dementia affects the memory, thinking, behaviour and the ability to perform everyday activities. Alzheimer's disease is the most common form of dementia. While it is true that most cases of dementia cannot be treated, early diagnosis can greatly help in managing the symptoms in most cases.
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Australian archbishop guilty of concealing child abuse steps down 23.5.2018 General News
An Australian archbishop who became one of the world's highest-ranked church officials found guilty of covering up child sex abuse announced Wednesday he will stand down from his official duties. Adelaide Archbishop Philip Wilson, 67, was accused of concealing abuse in the 1970s by notorious paedophile priest Jim Fletcher in New South Wales state by failing to report the allegations. He denied the charges but was found guilty by a Newcastle court this week of concealing a serious indictable offence of another person. Wilson, who faces up to two years in jail, said Wednesday he was stepping aside from his church duties while he weighs up the magistrate's verdict. "I am still considering those reasons together with my legal advisors," he said in a statement. "While I do so, it is appropriate that, in the light of some of his Honour's findings, I stand aside from my duties as Archbishop." Wilson's legal team had made four attempts to have the case thrown out, arguing his diagnosis of ...
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Australian archbishop guilty of concealing child sex abuse 22.5.2018 General News
An Australian archbishop was today found guilty of covering up child sex abuse in the 1970s -- one of the highest-ranked church officials globally to be successfully prosecuted for such offences. Adelaide Archbishop Philip Wilson, 67, was accused of concealing abuse by notorious paedophile priest Jim Fletcher in the Hunter region of New South Wales state by failing to report the allegations. He denied the charges and his legal team made four attempts to have the case thrown out, arguing Wilson's diagnosis of Alzheimer's should preclude him from trial -- even though it did not prevent him retaining his position in the church. Magistrate Robert Stone found him guilty at Newcastle Local Court of concealing a serious indictable offence of another person, with the archbishop facing a maximum of two years in jail. Sentencing will be at a later date. "I am obviously disappointed at the decision published today," Wilson said in a brief statement. "I will now have to consider the reasons and ..
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New drug could prevent brain damage caused by cosmic rays 22.5.2018 General News
Scientists have identified a drug that could prevent the brain damage caused by exposure to cosmic radiation. In the study published in the journal Scientific Reports, researchers found that the drug prevents memory impairment in mice exposed to simulated space radiation. Humans venturing beyond the Earth's protective magnetic fields will be exposed to levels of cosmic radiation estimated to be 1000 times higher than what we experience on Earth or even in the International Space Station's low-Earth orbit. Protecting astronauts from this harmful radiation will be key to making deep space exploration - and perhaps one day colonisation - possible. The researchers at The University of California, San Francisco (UCSF) in the US have previously found that exposing mice to simulated space radiation causes problems with memory, social interactions, and anxiety. They have also linked these symptoms of radiation exposure to activation of cells called microglia - part of the brain's immune ...
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Suven Life gets product patents from New Zealand, Norway 22.5.2018 General News
Suven Life Sciences today said it has been granted a product patent by New Zealand and Norway each corresponding to a new chemical entity (NCE) for treatment of disorders associated with neurodegenerative diseases. These patents are valid till 2034 and 2027, respectively, the company said in a BSE filing. "We are pleased by the grant of these patents to Suven for our pipeline of molecules in the CNS arena, which are being developed for cognitive disorders with high unmet medical need with a huge market potential globally," Suven Life CEO Venkat Jasti said. The granted claims of patents are being developed as therapeutic agents useful in treatment of cognitive impairment associated with neurodegenerative disorders like Alzheimer's disease, attention deficient hyperactivity disorder (ADHD), Huntington's disease, Parkinson's and schizophrenia, it added. Suven Life Sciences shares were trading 1.86 per cent up at Rs 183.80 on BSE.
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Gene to combat Alzheimer's, Parkinson's identified 17.5.2018 All News-IANS Stories
Scientists have identified a gene that can help prevent the development of neurological disorders like Alzheimer's and Parkinson's disease.
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Exercise does not slow cognitive decline in dementia patients 17.5.2018 General News
Exercising does not slow mental impairment in people with dementia, and may even worsen symptoms, according to a study which contradicts the belief that physical exercise can slow cognitive decline. Although the exercise programme improved physical fitness, it cannot be recommended as a treatment option for cognitive impairment in dementia, researchers said. Nearly 47.5 million people worldwide have dementia and the view that exercise might slow cognitive decline has gained widespread popularity. However, recent reviews of trials of exercise training in people with dementia have shown conflicting results. Researchers including those from University of Oxford and University of Warwick in the UK decided to estimate the effect of a moderate to high intensity aerobic and strength exercise training programme on cognitive impairment and other outcomes in people with dementia. The trial involved 494 people with mild to moderate dementia (average age 77 years) living in the community across ..
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Suven gets product patents by Australia, Singapore 17.5.2018 General News
Suven Life Sciences today said it has been granted two product patents by Australia and one by Singapore corresponding to a new chemical entity (NCE) for treatment of disorders associated with neurodegenerative diseases. These patents are valid till 2034, the company said in a BSE filing. "We are pleased by the grant of these patents to Suven for our pipeline of molecules in the CNS arena, which are being developed for cognitive disorders with high unmet medical need with a huge market potential globally," Suven Life CEO Venkat Jasti said. The granted claims of patents are being developed as therapeutic agents useful in treatment of cognitive impairment associated with neurodegenerative disorders like Alzheimer's disease, attention deficient hyperactivity disorder (ADHD), Huntington's disease, Parkinson's and schizophrenia, it added. Suven Life Sciences shares were trading 1.46 per cent down at Rs 188.90 on BSE.
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Suven Life Sciences secures Product Patents in Australia and Singapore 17.5.2018 General News
The granted claims of the patents include the class of selective H3 Inverse agonists and 5HT6 compounds respectively and are being developed as therapeutic agents for major depressive disorders and for the treatment of cognitive impairment associated with neurodegenerative disorders like Alzheimer's disease, Attention deficient hyperactivity disorder (ADHD), Huntington's disease, Narcolepsy, Parkinson and Schizophrenia respectively.
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Ray Wilson, member of England's 1966 World Cup winning side, dies 16.5.2018 General News
Ray Wilson, a member of the England team that beat West Germany in the 1966 World Cup final, has died aged 83, former club Everton announced. An outstanding left-back, Wilson won 63 caps with 1966 a memorable year for him as he won the FA Cup with Everton at Wembley and a few weeks later the World Cup as hosts England beat West Germany 4-2 at the same stadium. Wilson had bene diagnosed with Alzheimers in 2004. "Everton Football Club is deeply saddened to learn of the passing of Ray Wilson," read a statement on the club website. "Unquestionably one of the finest footballers to wear the royal blue jersey, Ray passed away on Tuesday evening, aged 83." Wilson, named Ramon after pre-World War II film star Ramon Navarro and married for 61 years to Pat, who survives him, and the father of two boys, Russell and Neil, never lost his love for Everton whom he joined in 1964. "He loved it at Goodison, absolutely loved it," Pat said last year. "He still does. If they are on television, that is it.
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