User: esg Topic: Health
Category: Diseases :: Age-Related :: Alzheimers
Last updated: Apr 23 2018 19:45 IST RSS 2.0
 
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Health Ministry removes 'fat shaming' tweet after Twitterati outrage 23.4.2018 All News-IANS Stories
In an embarrassment for the government, the Ministry of Health and Family Welfare (MoHFW) on Monday removed a tweet that asked people "What's your choice?" based on a photo that displayed two women -- one overweight, depicting non-veg and processed food items and the other lean with fruits and vegetables.
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Drinking water may help exercising seniors stay mentally sharp 23.4.2018 General News
Older people should drink more water to reap the full cognitive benefits of exercise, a study suggests. The study presented at the American Physiological Society (APS) annual meeting in San Diego, US explores the association between hydration status before exercising and exercise-enhanced cognition in older adults. Dehydration has been shown to impair exercise performance and brain function in young people, but less is known about its impact on older populations. "Middle-age and older adults often display a blunted thirst perception, which places them at risk for dehydration and subsequently may reduce the cognitive health-related benefits of exercise," said Brandon Yates from Spaulding Rehabilitation Hospital in the US The researchers recruited recreational cyclists (average age 55) who participated in a large cycling event on a warm day. The cyclists performed a "trail-making" executive function test - quickly and accurately connecting numbered dots using paper and pencil - before ..
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Lupin gets USFDA nod to market its Tetrabenazine tablets 23.4.2018 General News
Drug firm Lupin today said it has received approval from the US health regulator to market in America its Tetrabenazine tablets used for treatment of involuntary movements associated with Huntington's disease. The company has received final approval to market the 12.5 mg and 25 mg tablets from the United States Food and Drug Administration (USFDA), Lupin said in a filing to BSE. The tablets are generic versions of Valeant Pharmaceuticals North America LLC's Xenazine tablets in the same strengths, it added. As per IQVIA MAT Jan 2018 data, Tetrabenazine tablets, 12.5 mg and 25 mg had annual sales of around USD 288.1 million in the US, Lupin said. The product is indicated for the treatment of chorea associated with Huntington's disease, it added. Shares of Lupin Ltd were trading at Rs 808.80 per scrip on BSE, up 1.31 per cent from its previous close.
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Why exercising older adults should drink more water 23.4.2018 General News
Older people, who drink more water post workout, reap more cognitive health-related benefits of exercise, suggests a study.Dehydration has been shown to impair exercise performance and brain function in young people, but less is known about its impact on older populations."Middle-age and older adults often display a blunted thirst perception, which places them at risk for dehydration and subsequently may reduce the cognitive health-related benefits of exercise," a team of New England-based researchers wrote.The researchers recruited recreational cyclists (average age 55) who participated in a large cycling event on a warm day (78-86 degrees F). The cyclists performed a "trail-making" executive function test--quickly and accurately connecting numbered dots using paper and pencil--before and after the event. Executive function includes the skills needed to plan, focus, remember and multitask. Exercise has been shown to improve intellectual health, including executive function.The ...
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For dental pain relief opt for Ibuprofen over opioids: Study 18.4.2018 All News-IANS Stories
Common painkiller ibuprofen and other nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) alone or in combination with acetaminophen are better at easing dental pain, than opioids, say researchers.
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Top 3 Signs of Ageing: Why This Spice Could Be You Best Anti-Ageing Companion 16.4.2018 NDTV News - Latest
There is nothing that you can do about ageing, but with a healthy lifestyle and diet you may delay signs of it.
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Children in polluted cities at increased risk of Alzheimer's, reveals study 14.4.2018 Business Standard: News Now
The findings indicated that Alzheimer's starts in early childhood
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Don't sit for long hours, it may increase dementia risk, say scientists 14.4.2018 Business Standard: News Now
The researchers recruited 35 people (aged between 45 and 75 years) for the study
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Brain's memory area might be associated with anxiety, depression 14.4.2018 All News-IANS Stories
An area of the brain, commonly linked with memory and dementia, could also yield important clues about a range of mental health illnesses including addiction, anxiety and depression, a study has found.
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Brain's memory region may hold clues for depression 14.4.2018 General News
According to a recent study, the part of the brain commonly associated with memory and dementia could also hold key for emotional regulation.But new University of Toronto Scarborough research found that it might also yield important clues about a range of mental health illnesses including addiction, anxiety and depression.The research, authored by a team of neuroscientists, found that a specific part of the hippocampus could play an important role in emotional regulation, a finding that calls into question our understanding of how exactly this part of the brain works."What this shows is that we may need to rethink how the hippocampus processes information," said researcher Rutsuko Ito.For this study, Ito and her team looked at the ventral hippocampus in rats, a sub-region that correlates to the anterior hippocampus in humans. They wanted to see what role two further subareas of the ventral hippocampus -- called the CA1 and CA3 -- play in terms of approach-avoidance conflict ...
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Children in polluted cities at increased risk of Alzheimer's: study 14.4.2018 General News
Children and young adults living in polluted megacities are at significantly increased risk of developing Alzheimer's, a study has found. Researchers at the University of Montana in the US studied 203 autopsies of Mexico City residents ranging in age from 11 months to 40 years. For the study, published in the Journal of Environmental Research, they tracked two abnormal proteins that indicate development of Alzheimer's, and detected the early stages of the disease in babies less than a year old. "Alzheimer's disease hallmarks start in childhood in polluted environments, and we must implement effective preventative measures early," said Calderon-Garciduenas from the University of Montana. The researchers found heightened levels of the two abnormal proteins - hyperphosphorylated tau and beta amyloid - in the brains of young urbanites with lifetime exposures to fine-particulate-matter pollution (PM2.5). They also tracked Apolipoprotein E (APOE 4), a well-known genetic risk factor for ...
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Jacqueline Bisset to star in 'Honey in the Head' 14.4.2018 General News
Veteran actor Jacqueline Bisset has come aboard the cast of the film "Honey in the Head". The 73-year-old actor joins Nick Nolte, Matt Dillon and Emily Mortimer in the film, which will be directed by Til Schweiger. She will play the mother of Mortimer's character, reported Variety. The film is the English-language remake of the German drama "Honig Im Kopf", which was also directed by Schweiger. The story follows the son of a retired veteran suffering from Alzheimer's disease who convinces his widowed father to move in with him. The production on the project is expected to start in May and it will be filmed in Germany, Italy, and the UK. Bisset will be next seen in the drama "Backstabbing for Beginners" opposite Ben Kingsley and Theo James.
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Youth in polluted cities at increased risk of Alzheimer's 14.4.2018 All News-IANS Stories
Children and young adults living in polluted megacities are at increased risk of developing Alzheimer's, a debilitating brain disease characterised by memory loss, a new study has warned.
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Is pollution putting you at Alzheimer's, suicide risks? 14.4.2018 General News
Smog-filled towns and cities have been linked to increased risks for Alzheimer's and suicide among children and young adults.A University of Montana researcher, Lilian Calderon-Garcidueñas, and her collaborators studied 203 autopsies of Mexico City residents ranging in age from 11 months to 40 years.Metropolitan Mexico City is home to 24 million people exposed daily to concentrations of fine particulate matter and ozone above U.S. Environmental Protection Agency standards. The researchers tracked two abnormal proteins that indicate development of Alzheimer's, and they detected the early stages of the disease in babies less than a year old."Alzheimer's disease hallmarks start in childhood in polluted environments, and we must implement effective preventative measures early," said Calderon-Garcidueñas. "It is useless to take reactive actions decades later."The scientists found heightened levels of the two abnormal proteins - hyperphosphorylated tau and beta amyloid - in the brains of ...
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Just one sleepless night ups Alzheimer's risk 14.4.2018 General News
People who sleep poorly are more likely to develop Alzheimer's disease, according to a recent study.Researchers at the National Institutes of Health found that losing just one night of sleep led to an immediate increase in beta-amyloid, a protein in the brain associated with Alzheimer's disease. In Alzheimer's disease, beta-amyloid proteins clump together to form amyloid plaques, a hallmark of the disease."This research provides new insight about the potentially harmful effects of a lack of sleep on the brain and has implications for better characterizing the pathology of Alzheimer's disease," said researcher George F. Koob.To understand the possible link between beta-amyloid accumulation and sleep, the researchers used positron emission tomography (PET) to scan the brains of 20 healthy subjects, ranging in age from 22 to 72, after a night of rested sleep and after sleep deprivation (being awake for about 31 hours).They found beta-amyloid increases of about 5 percent after losing a ...
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PSRI hospital launches clinic to treat Parkinson's 11.4.2018 General News
The Pushpawati Singhania Hospital & Research Institute (PSRI) here on Wednesday launched its Parkinson's Disease and Movement Disorder Clinic on the occasion of World Parkinson's Day.
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Traumatic brain injury increases Alzheimer's risk: study 11.4.2018 General News
People who experience traumatic brain injury (TBI) may have a significantly higher risk of developing dementia, including Alzheimer's disease, according to a large-scale study published today. Overall risk of dementia in individuals with a history of TBI was 24 per cent higher than those without a history of TBI, after accounting for other risk factors for the disease, researchers said. A single TBI characterised as "severe" increased the risk by 35 per cent; a single "mild" TBI or concussion increased the risk by 17 per cent, according to the study published in The Lancet Psychiatry journal. "What surprised us was that even a single mild TBI was associated with a significantly higher risk of dementia," said Jesse Fann, a professor at the University of Washington. "And the relationship between the number of traumatic brain injuries and risk of dementia was very clear," said Fann. The research encompassed a large study population, 36 years of follow-up, and access to a uniform ...
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Brain injury in teenagers may up Alzheimer's risk: Lancet 11.4.2018 All News-IANS Stories
Sustaining a traumatic brain injury (TBT) in your 20s may increase the risk of developing dementia including Alzheimer's in your 50s by 60 per cent, a review of nearly three million patients has revealed.
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Alzheimer's gene neutralised in human brain for first time 10.4.2018 General News
In a first, scientists have identified and successfully erased the effects of a key gene that significantly increases the risk for Alzheimer's disease. Having one copy of the apoE4 gene more than doubles a person's likelihood of developing Alzheimer's disease, and having two copies of the gene increases the risk by 12-fold, as compared to the most common version of the gene, apoE3. The apoE4 gene creates a protein of the same name. The apoE4 protein differs from the apoE3 protein at only one point, but that single change is enough to alter its main structure and, thus, its function, researchers said. Researchers from the Gladstone Institutes in the US were also able to erase the damage caused by apoE4 by changing it, with a small molecule, into a harmless apoE3-like version. Most Alzheimer's research and drug development are done in mouse models of the disease. However, a succession of clinical trial failures has spurred scientists to turn to other models. Instead, researchers decided
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ALS, rare dementia share genetic link: Study 10.4.2018 All News-IANS Stories
Researchers have identified genetic links between a fatal neuromuscular disorder and a rare form of dementia that may help in potential treatment for both disorders.
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