User: esg Topic: Health
Category: Diseases :: Age-Related :: Alzheimers
Last updated: Feb 15 2018 19:03 IST RSS 2.0
 
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Alzheimer's disease reversed in mice 15.2.2018 General News
In a breakthrough, scientists have successfully reversed the formation of amyloid plaques in the brains of mice with Alzheimer's disease, and improved the animals' cognitive function. The research, published in the Journal of Experimental Medicine, paves the way for drugs that may successfully treat Alzheimer's disease in humans. Scientists from the Cleveland Clinic Lerner Research Institute in the US have found that gradually depleting an enzyme called BACE1 completely reverses formation of amyloid plaques. One of the earliest events in Alzheimer's disease is an abnormal buildup of beta-amyloid peptide, which can form large, amyloid plaques in the brain and disrupt the function of neuronal synapses. Also known as beta-secretase, BACE1 helps produce beta-amyloid peptide by cleaving amyloid precursor protein (APP). Drugs that inhibit BACE1 are therefore being developed as potential Alzheimer's disease treatments but, because BACE1 controls many important processes by cleaving proteins .
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Running may help deal with stress: study 15.2.2018 General News
Running can help stave off the negative effects of stress and protect the brain region responsible for learning and memory, a study has found. "Exercise is a simple and cost-effective way to eliminate the negative impacts on memory of chronic stress," said Jeff Edwards, associate professor at Brigham Young University in the US. Inside the hippocampus, memory formation and recall occur optimally when the synapses or connections between neurons are strengthened over time. That process of synaptic strengthening is called long-term potentiation (LTP). Chronic or prolonged stress weakens the synapses, which decreases LTP and ultimately impacts memory. The study, published in the journal of Neurobiology of Learning and Memory, found that when exercise co-occurs with stress, LTP levels are not decreased, but remain normal. Researchers carried out experiments with mice. One group of mice used running wheels over a 4-week period (averaging five kilometre an per day) while another set of mice ..
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Regular Exercise May Keep Your Memory Sharp; These Foods May Help Too! 15.2.2018 NDTV News - Latest
Engaging in regular exercising may not only help you lose weight but also keep your memory sharp. According to a study published in the Journal of Alzheimer's Disease, engaging in physical activity is...
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Exercise may lower Alzheimer's risk 15.2.2018 General News
Staying physically fit may help keep Alzheimer's disease at bay, say scientists who found that exercising regularly can improve brain health and prevent decline of vital nerve fibres. The study suggests that the lower the fitness level, the faster the deterioration of vital nerve fibres in the brain. This deterioration results in cognitive decline, including memory issues characteristic of dementia patients. "This research supports the hypothesis that improving people's fitness may improve their brain health and slow down the aging process," said Kan Ding, from University of Texas (UT) Southwestern Medical Center in the US. The study published in the Journal of Alzheimer's Disease focused on a type of brain tissue called white matter, which is composed of millions of bundles of nerve fibres used by neurons to communicate across the brain. The team enrolled older patients at high risk to develop Alzheimer's disease who have early signs of memory loss, or mild cognitive impairment ...
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How exercise helps you stay sharp 15.2.2018 General News
Engaging in regular physical activity is good for your brain too, suggests new research that found a link between a lower fitness level and faster deterioration of vital nerve fibres in the brain.
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Scientists reverse Alzheimer's disease in mouse model 15.2.2018 General News
A team of American researchers have found that gradually depleting an enzyme completely could improve the cognitive function of mice with Alzheimer's disease.
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Cold open water plunge may provide instant pain relief: study 13.2.2018 General News
A short, sharp, cold water swim may offer an alternative to strong painkillers and physiotherapy to relieve severe persistent pain after surgery, a study published in the journal BMJ Case Reports claims. Doctors carried out a surgical procedure (endoscopic thoracic sympathectomy) on a 28 year old man to curb his excessive facial flushing. The surgery entailed cutting the triggering nerves inside his chest, according to the case study. The procedure itself was successful, but 10 weeks later, the usual postoperative prescription of strong painkillers and staged physiotherapy had barely made a dent in the severity of his pain. The man explained that exercise and movement just made the pain worse, preventing him from completing his rehabilitation and recovery. The constant pain caused him a great deal of distress and wrecked his quality of life, the authors said. Before his surgery, the young man had been a keen triathlete, and so had swum competitively in open water. He thought that a ...
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Childhood heart defect survivors at high dementia risk 13.2.2018 All News-IANS Stories
People born with heart defects may be at higher risk of developing dementia in adulthood, according to a new research.
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Ashwagandha: The Wonder Herb 11.2.2018 DNA: India
Since childhood, I have been hearing this name but nobody explained what it is exactly. In my late teens, I saw this herb on the footpaths of Mumbai, being sold by self-proclaimed Ayurvedic practitioners. They would sell it primarily for sexual weakness and energy and knew nothing else about it. Yes, it is very good for sexual weakness and stimulates sexual desire in both men and women but that's just one aspect of this wonder herb. The botanical name for Ashwagandha is Withania Somnifera. It is a small shrub with yellow flowers and native to India and North Africa. It has been used in Ayurveda for more than 6000 years, according to the Charak Samhita in Sanskrit Ashwagandha literally means "smell of a horse" referring to its unique smell and ability to increase strength. Let's find out what this wonder herb can actually do. 1. Adaptogenic Its best quality according to me is that it is an adaptogenic herb, which basically means that it doesn't especially do one or two things, it balances out the issues ...
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IISc team identifies an early-stage biomarker for Alzheimer’s 10.2.2018 Hindu: Science
Decrease in F-actin protein level causes early behavioural changes in mice
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Positive attitude towards ageing reduces dementia risk: study 10.2.2018 General News
Older persons who have acquired positive beliefs about old age from their surrounding culture are less likely to develop dementia, a study has found. The research, published in the journal PLOS ONE, examined whether culture-based age beliefs influence the risk of developing dementia among older people, including those who carry the high-risk gene variant. "We found that positive age beliefs can reduce the risk of one of the most established genetic risk factors of dementia," said Becca Levy from the Yale University in the US. "This makes a case for implementing a public health campaign against ageism, which is a source of negative age beliefs," Levy said. The researchers studied a group of 4,765 people, with an average age of 72 years, who were free of dementia at the start of the study. The study demonstrated that APOE e4, a high-risk gene variant, carried with positive beliefs about ageing had a 2.7 per cent risk of developing dementia, compared to a 6.1 per cent risk
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Blood sodium levels linked to cognition in older adults 9.2.2018 All News-IANS Stories
A lower level of sodium in the blood may affect cognitive functions with advancing age, a new study has warned.
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Ball games may boost bone health in school kids: study 9.2.2018 General News
Ball games and circuit strength training may lead to stronger bones, increased muscular strength and improved balance in school children, according to a major Danish study. The study, published in the British Journal of Sports Medicine, examined bone and muscle health in 295 school children from Frederikssund and Copenhagen over a whole school year. The children participated in the 'FIT FIRST' training concept, which looks into the effects of various types of intense interval training at school. Researchers compared the effects on children who took the normal school physical education (PE) classes with children who had intense exercise on the timetable for two hours a week in the form of ball games on small pitches or 'circuit training' consisting of gymnastic and strength exercises using their own body weight. "Our research shows that intense exercise at school has clear positive effects on bone density, muscular strength and balance in 8-10-year-old children," said ...
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Why magpies are so intelligent 8.2.2018 All News-IANS Stories
Living in a large social group makes magpies more intelligent, finds a new study emphasising that social environment plays an important role in cognitive evolution.
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Touchscreen games may boost brain skills of old pooches 8.2.2018 All News-IANS Stories
Spoiling your old dogs in their twilight years by retiring them to the sofa will not help, instead, letting them play games on a touch screen may boost their brain skills and stave off cognitive decline, finds a study.
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'Switch' to turn off inflammation discovered 7.2.2018 General News
Scientists have discovered a process that could be the key to stopping damage caused by uncontrolled inflammation in a range of common diseases including liver disease, Alzheimer's and gout. The researchers at University of Queensland (UQ) in Australia have uncovered how an inflammation process automatically switches off in healthy cells, and are now investigating ways to stop it manually when it goes awry. "Now that we understand how this pathway naturally turns off in health, we can investigate why it does not turn off in disease - so it is very exciting," said UQ Associate Professor Kate Schroder. She focused on inflammasomes, which are machine-like protein complexes at the heart of inflammation and disease. "These complexes form when an infection, injury or other disturbance is detected by the immune system, and they send messages to immune cells to tell them to respond," Schroder said. "If the disturbance can not be cleared, such as in the case of amyloid plaques ..
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'Electric pulses to brain may boost memory by 15 per cent' 7.2.2018 General News
Precisely timed electrical stimulation to the left side of the brain can reliably and significantly enhance learning and memory performance by as much as 15 per cent, according to a study. "We developed a system to monitor brain activity and trigger stimulation responsively based on the subject's brain activity," said Youssef Ezzyat, a senior data scientist at University of Pennsylvania in the US. "We also identified a novel target for applying stimulation, the left lateral temporal cortex," said Ezzyat. In the study published in the journal Nature Communications, the researchers monitored a patient's brain activity in real time during a task. The patient watched and attempted to absorb a list of words, and a computer tracking and recording brain signals made predictions based on those signals. The researchers then prompted an electrical pulse at safe levels and unfelt by the participants, when they were least likely to remember the new information. "During each new word .
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Researchers discover 'switch' which can turn off inflammation 7.2.2018 All News-IANS Stories
Researchers have uncovered how an inflammation process automatically switches off in healthy cells, and are now investigating ways to stop it when it goes awry.
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Zika brain damage may go undetected in pregnancy: Study 6.2.2018 All News-IANS Stories
The damage caused by the Zika virus could go undetected in pregnancy and may later lead to learning disorders, psychiatric illnesses and dementia in babies, researchers including one of Indian-origin has found.
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Pearl Academy hosts executive council meeting of IFFTI in Delhi 6.2.2018 General News
Pearl Academy, India's leading institute in design, fashion, business and media today hosted members of the Executive Council of the International Foundation of Fashion Technology Institutes (IFFTI).This visit assumes significance as Pearl Academy is celebrating its 25 glorious years of creative impact in India and has lived up to its reputation of preparing industry ready professionals every year.Pearl encourages its students and faculty to get global exposure by participating in exchange programs and by collaborating with education institutions of international repute. As a step towards this direction, students at Pearl interacted with international experts in Master Class sessions organized to instill global learning for them. The event also saw the unveiling of new logo of "25 years of Creative Impact by Pearl Academy"Some of the eminent members from IFFTI present on the occasion included Professor Robyn Healy, Head, RMIT's School of Fashion and Textiles, Melbourne, Dr. Deirdre ...
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