User: esg Topic: Health
Category: Diseases :: Lifestyle
Last updated: Apr 22 2018 01:34 IST RSS 2.0
 
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Fit & Proper: Lifestyle changes that may help prevent cancer 22.4.2018 Business Standard: News Now
Cancer cells thrive in acidic environments. It promotes tumor growth and is a breeding ground for almost all viruses, pathogens and bacteria
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People wrapping up work early 21.4.2018 Hindu: Medicine & Research
Children most vulnerable, say doctors
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Urban rural divide in providing medical care must end: Vice President 21.4.2018 Govt of india: PIB
The Vice President of India, Shri M. Venkaiah Naidu has said that urban rural divide in providing medical care must end adding that people living in rural areas must have access to affordable and quality healthcare.
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Merck, Tata to collaborate on cancer care in Africa 21.4.2018 General News
Merck Foundation, the philanthropic arm of Merck KGaA Germany, and the Tata Memorial Centre, a premier cancer centre in India, today announced the signing of an MOU to provide fellowship programs to African candidates.This initiative is a part of Merck Foundation's 'Merck Cancer Access Program' to increase the number of oncologists across Africa.Dr. Rasha Kelej, CEO of Merck Foundation said, "We are delighted to formalize today our collaboration with the Tata Memorial centre under the umbrella of newly launched Merck Foundation. We have started our collaboration in 2016, during these two years; we have provided more than 30 African doctors with one-year oncology fellowship at Tata Memorial Centre. We believe that our partnership with India has a long way to go and together we can play a vital role in Africa and Asia.""I strongly believe that building capacity is the right strategy to improve cancer care since lack of professional skills is the key challenge in Africa and developing ...
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Merck, Tata to collaborate on cancer care in Africa 21.4.2018 Sify Finance
[India], April 21 (Businesswire-India): Merck Foundation, the philanthropic arm of Merck KGaA Germany, and the Tata Memorial Centre, a premier cancer centre in India, today announced the signing of
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Mother's early menopause affects daughter's fertility 21.4.2018 General News
Mother's premature menopause can affect her daughter's fertility and is known as hereditary infertility.Menopause is the time that marks the end of the menstrual cycle due to the natural depletion of ovarian oocytes from ageing.The transition to menopause usually starts in 40's. But if it happens early, medically stated as premature menopause, it can lead to mood swings and irritability.Most women have to also cope up with the additional physical and emotional concerns.Dr. Anubha Singh, Gynecologist and IVF Expert explained this and said "A mother's menopausal age holds vital clues to the daughter's fertility. Mothers who experience early menopause have daughters with compromised levels of the hormones needed for ovulation and egg reserve indication.""Menopause seems accelerated in women whose mothers experienced early menopause or premature ovarian failure" added Dr. Anubha Singh.Symptoms of premature menopause are often the same as those experienced by women undergoing natural ...
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Heavy exercise does not suppress immune system 21.4.2018 General News
Researchers have debunked a nearly four-decade old myth that strenuous exercise suppresses the immune system.A study, conducted by the Department for Health at the University of Bath, reinterprets scientific findings from the last few decades and emphasises that exercise - instead of dampening immunity - may instead be beneficial for immune health.In a detailed analysis of research articles that have been published since the 1980s, this new review of the literature has reinterpreted findings, based on fundamental principles of immunology and exercise physiology, to clarify misconceptions and misinterpretations that have formed over the years.In their study, the authors explain that, for competitors taking part in endurance sports, exercise causes immune cells to change in two ways. Initially, during exercise, the number of some immune cells in the bloodstream can increase dramatically by up to 10 times, especially 'natural killer cells' which deal with infections.After exercise, some .
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Beer belly bad for your heart 21.4.2018 All News-IANS Stories
If you have developed a spare tyre, it is time you saw a doctor to assess your cardiovascular health as researchers have found that belly fat, even in people who are not otherwise overweight, is bad for the heart.
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Healing herbs for new moms 21.4.2018 Cinema-Showbiz
New mothers who struggle with post-delivery weakness can find respite in natural ingredients which help heal the postpartum body, experts say.
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How India's urban development is increasing spread of infectious diseases 21.4.2018 Top Stories
The growing attention paid to epidemiology of viruses can be clearly seen as a direct result of urban transition taking place in India over the last 30 years
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Belly Fat May Put Your Heart At Risk: 5 Foods To Cut Belly Fat  21.4.2018 NDTV News - Latest
The excess wight around your abdominal area may be cause of worry for your heart, claims a new study
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Fatty Liver Diet: Symptoms, Causes, Diet Tips And Foods To Avoid 21.4.2018 NDTV Food - Latest
We suggest some foods that may help reverse the effects of fatty liver
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Happy feet, happy heart 21.4.2018 General News
Faster walking patients with heart disease are hospitalised less, a recent study has found.The three-year University of Ferrara study was conducted in 1,078 hypertensive patients, of whom 85% also had coronary heart disease and 15% also had valve disease.Patients were then asked to walk 1 km on a treadmill at what they considered to be a moderate intensity.3 Patients were classified as slow (2.6 km/hour), intermediate (3.9 km/hour) and fast (average 5.1 km/hour). A total of 359 patients were slow walkers, 362 were intermediate and 357 were fast walkers.The researchers recorded the number of all-cause hospitalisations and length of stay over the next three years. Participants were flagged by the regional Health Service Registry of the Emilia-Romagna Region, which collects data on all-cause hospitalisation.Study author Dr Carlotta Merlo said: "We did not exclude any causes of death because walking speed has significant consequences for public health. Reduced walking speed is a marker of
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Is your belly putting your heart at risk? 21.4.2018 General News
Belly fat, even in people who are not otherwise overweight, is bad for the heart, a recent study revealed."See your doctor if your waist is bigger than your hips," said study author Dr Jose Medina-Inojosa from the Mayo Clinic, Rochester, Minnesota.Body mass index (BMI), which is weight relative to height in kg/m2, is used to categorise adults as underweight, normal weight, overweight or obese. However, BMI does not account for the amount and distribution of fat and muscle.Central obesity is a store of excess fat around the middle of the body and is a marker of abnormal fat distribution. This study tested the hypothesis that people with normal weight and central obesity would have more heart problems than people with normal weight and normal fat distribution.In 1997 to 2000 the study enrolled 1,692 residents of Olmsted County, Minnesota, aged 45 years or older. The sample was representative of the county population for age and sex. Participants underwent a clinical examination and ...
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You share everything with your bestie. Even brain waves 20.4.2018 Business Standard: News Now
Researchers have also been intrigued by evidence of friendship among nonhuman animals, and not just in obvious candidates like primates, dolphins and elephants
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Chip-based cancer test may replace painful bone biopsy 20.4.2018 General News
Scientists have developed a low-cost, reliable blood test for multiple myeloma that uses a small plastic chip about the size of a credit card, which could make painful bone biopsies a relic of the past. The diagnosis and treatment of multiple myeloma, a cancer affecting plasma cells, traditionally forces patients to suffer through a painful bone biopsy, said researchers from University of Kansas in the US. During that procedure, doctors insert a bone-biopsy needle through an incision to get a bone marrow sample - or make a larger incision and remove a section of bone via surgery. The blood test, described in the journal Integrative Biology, uses a small plastic chip about the size of a credit card that can deliver the same diagnostic information as a bone biopsy - but using a simple blood draw instead. "For the last 10 years, we have been developing a blood-based test for a variety of cancer diseases - one of them is multiple myeloma," said Steven Soper, a professor at the University .
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Slow walking heart patients are hospitalized more 20.4.2018 General News
Heart disease patients, who walk faster, are hospitalised less, as suggested by a research.The three-year study was conducted in 1,078 hypertensive patients, of whom 85% also had coronary heart disease and 15% also had valve disease.Patients were then asked to walk 1 km on a treadmill at what they considered to be a moderate intensity. Patients were classified as slow (2.6 km/hour), intermediate (3.9 km/hour) and fast (average 5.1 km/hour). A total of 359 patients were slow walkers, 362 were intermediate and 357 were fast walkers.The researchers recorded the number of all-cause hospitalisations and length of stay over the next three years. Participants were flagged by the regional Health Service Registry of the Emilia-Romagna Region, which collects data on all-cause hospitalisation.Study author Dr Carlotta Merlo, a researcher at the University of Ferrara, Ferrara, Italy, said: "We did not exclude any causes of death because walking speed has significant consequences for public health.
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Dog gut bacteria more similar to humans than previously thought 20.4.2018 All News-IANS Stories
Dogs could be more like us than we previously thought as a new study says that canine and human gut microbiomes have more similar genes and responses to diet than earlier believed.
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Young adults more at risk of liver function abnormalities, says survey (April 19 is World Liver Day) 19.4.2018 General News
Owing to a sedentary lifestyle coupled with non-adherence to a balanced diet, an increasing number of young adults below 40 are facing liver function abnormalities, which if not attended to early can lead to liver diseases, finds a survey.
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Obesity Linked To Irregular Heartbeat: Avoid These 4 Foods To Manage Obesity 19.4.2018 NDTV News - Latest
Obese people have a 40 per cent more chance of having atrial fibrillation than people with a normal body weight, says a new study.
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