User: esg Topic: Bangalore
Category: Lakes
Last updated: May 04 2016 16:23 IST RSS 2.0
 
1 to 20 of 9,734    
Champion athlete Powell is World 10K ambassador 4.5.2016 TOI: All Headlines
Champion athlete Powell is World 10K ambassador
Also found in: [+]
Summer Pics: Let's take a plunge! 4.5.2016 Rediff: GetAhead
Readers share their best summer moments!
Also found in: [+]
Despite harsh summer, a few lakes are not feeling the heat 4.5.2016 TOI: Cities
While stories of drying borewells and depleting water tables paint a grim picture this summer, a few rejuvenated lakes in the city are inspiring hope. They stand as leading examples of how citizen initiatives can work wonders.
Also found in: [+]
IISc report says Bengaluru has a 'bleak future' 3.5.2016 TOI: Bangalore Times
The analysis by the Indian Institute of Science (IISc), Bengaluru, shows that in the urban sustainability index, where five cities were compared, Bengaluru (0.658) and Mumbai (0.590) have the least sustainable urban system.
Also found in: [+]
High level of nitrate in Mandur’s groundwater 3.5.2016 Hindu: Bangalore
Chemical analysis of samples collected as a part of groundwater monitoring, carried out by the Central Ground Water Board (CGWB), has only validated the worst fears of residents of Mandur in Bengalur...
Also found in: [+]
Green tribunal allows construction on Kaikondrahalli lake wetland 3.5.2016 Citizen Matters

National Green Tribunal has allowed the developer to construct the residential project, after the developer modified the project plan by reducing the extent of construction.

Also found in: [+]
Exotic fish farming blamed for fishkill incidents in lakes 2.5.2016 deccanherald.com
The dramatic fishkills in Ulsoor and Devarabisanahalli lakes recently had an obvious reason: asphyxiation with a sudden and considerable fall in the dissolved oxygen (DO) levels. But an Indian Institute of Science (IISc) study has added another human factor of irresponsibility: introduction of exotic fish species such as African Catfish and Tilapia that are a threat to the native fish, and ammonia toxicity. Exotic fish species eliminate native biota and affect local biodiversity, concludes the study led by Dr T V Ramachandra. More such fish-kills could be in the offing due to the indiscriminate growing of such species in lakes across Bengaluru. Killing predator fish To conserve the native fish, the study has recommended total eradication of the African Catfish, which can attain a size of 59.5 kg and get highly predatory, feeding on other species. The predator fish could be controlled by preventing its access to get its oxygen (since it is an air-breathing fish) from the atmosphere. How do you do this? ...
Also found in: [+]
How to manage sewage at zero cost: psst, the answer is biogas! 2.5.2016 Citizen Matters

KSPCB introduces new norms for STP treatment - this is going to affect apartment STPs. Why incur a huge cost of this treatment, when there is a simpler, cheaper option, asks Dr Ananth Kodavasal.

Also found in: [+]
To save a lake, BBMP digs a trench around it 2.5.2016 Hindu: Bangalore
As IT capital loses wetlands, local communities launch a campaign to stop waste dumping
Also found in: [+]
'Way to Convince People about an Idea is to Explain to Them How it Will Help Them' 2.5.2016 The New Indian Express - Education - http://newindianexpress.com/education/
...says Naga Sravan Kilaru as he tells S Guru Srikanth how that idea can also transform into a successful NGO
Also found in: [+]
To save a lake, Bengaluru digs a trench around it 2.5.2016 Hindu: Cities
As IT capital loses wetlands, local communities launch a campaign to stop waste dumping
Also found in: [+]
'Bengaluru will be an unliveable, dead city in 5 years' 1.5.2016 deccanherald.com
Exponential and unbridled growth in real estate in Bengaluru has a direct bearing on environment and human health. Buildings have come up in places where there were once trees or open spaces. What if this continues to happen even on the periphery of Namma Bengaluru? What are its long-term implications on the ecosystem? A study conducted by the Indian Institute of Science (IISc) presents an alarming picture. It shows 525% growth in built-up area in the last four decades, 78% decline in vegetation 79% decline in water bodies. These are not just figures, but the lakes and trees that surrounded you have quietly disappeared as a result of the urban sprawl. 'Senseless growth' Prof T V Ramachandra of the Centre for Ecological Sciences at the IISc calls it 'senseless growth. What's the point earning better when the food that you eat is adulterated? As a result of unplanned urbanisation, Bengaluru is going to be an unliveable and dead city in the next five years, he said. It was not the same case before. ...
Also found in: [+]
Salgaocar, Bagan look to make amends 1.5.2016 TOI: Goa
Panaji: Salgaocar FC romanticize the Federation Cup like no other Goan club.
Also found in: [+]
‘Well-maintained’ and ‘rejuvenated’ lakes fare no better 1.5.2016 Hindu: News
None of them qualified to be clean enough for serving as sources of drinking and bathing water
Also found in: [+]
Toxic lakes, poisoned veg farms 30.4.2016 deccanherald.com
Fresh, green and inviting, the vegetables were neatly decked up in stalls lined up to beckon the weekend customers. But before those greens reached the markets, farmers had to grow them with all the attendant problems. Did that complex process involve irrigation with highly polluted water sourced from the city's lakes and river streams? It is a tough, but heavily loaded question. Loaded, because repeated studies by city-based universities and scientific institutions have clearly indicated heavy metal contamination in vegetables sold in big markets across Bengaluru. Irrigated by sewage-fed lake water on agricultural land, contamination of the greens has been proved beyond doubt. Analyzing samples of water, soil and crop plants, the tests have shown significant traces of zinc, copper, lead and cadmium in the greens that directly influence our food chain. Contamination Twelve years ago, when the Bellandur lake's pollution levels were high but not at today's alarming levels, a Bangalore University study had ...
Also found in: [+]
Farming with waste water a health hazard 30.4.2016 deccanherald.com
Polluted air and water might be Bengaluru's bane, but vegetables grown on farms irrigated with contaminated water have given it a hazardous twist. Interactions with farmers, retailers and consumers indicate that a big chunk of vegetables arriving in markets across the City might show chemical contamination if tested. Puroshottam Gowda, a farmer from Ballari opines that the share of such vegetables could be as high as 75%. "Most of the vegetables are grown near Kengeri and surrounding areas. The farmers grow greens, tomato, cabbage and other vegetables using water from a sewage treatment plant. The water is supposed to be purified but at most places, the plants do not work. This is unfortunate." However, RV Gopi, President, Wholesale Vegetables and Fruits Traders Merchant Association, does not agree. According to him, drainage water was earlier being used by vegetable growers in Kengeri, Gollahalli and Varthur. But now, says he, most of the farmers have stopped vegetable farming there due to encroachment ...
Also found in: [+]
Fishkill and plastic-eating cows 30.4.2016 deccanherald.com
Pollution enters the food chain in multiple ways. If untreated sewage in lakes and river streams contaminates the water that irrigates vegetable farms, poorly managed solid waste could be equally dangerous. Cattle feeding on plastic bags and frequent fishkill in the city lakes are tell-tale signs of an ecosystem gone horribly wrong. Veterinarians are on record citing operations on cows that revealed upwards of 50kg of plastic bags in their stomachs. The more plastic in their stomach, the less food it consumes. This directly reduces the milk production. Scurrying for food in roadside garbage bins, the cows find it tough to tear the plastic bags. Eventually, the entire bag gets in. Instances of fishkill, the death of native fish in thousands, are getting more frequent than before in the city lakes. This trend, last seen in Halasuru lake, has serious consequences for the fish-eating public. Dr T V Ramachandra from the Centre for Ecological Sciences, Indian Institute of Science, attributes this to ...
Also found in: [+]
Say ‘no’ to drought 30.4.2016 The Hindu: Today's Paper
Say ‘no’ to drought
Also found in: [+]
Man Kills Self Over Delay in Marriage 30.4.2016 newindianexpress.com
Also found in: [+]
BWSSB set to begin treatment for sick Bellandur lake 29.4.2016 deccanherald.com
In a bid to restore Bellandur Lake, the city's largest but highly polluted water body, Bangalore Water Supply and Sewage Board (BWSSB) has initiated the process of constructing four sewage treatment plants (STPs) at different locations. Touted as a panacea for the toxic foam on the 900-acre lake, these STPs would be able to treat 55 million litres a day (MLD) of waste water. The project is estimated to cost Rs 165 crore. While the Union government would provide only 33% of the total cost under the Atal Mission for Rejuvenation and Urban Transformation (AMRUT) scheme and the state government would contribute 20%, the board will have to bear 47% of the cost, Ramakrishna S M, chief engineer (Wastewater Management), BWSSB told Deccan Herald. The STPs will come up in Hulimavu (10 MLD), Sarakki (5 MLD), Chikka Begur (5 MLD) and in Agara (35 MLD), all in the Southern part of Bengaluru that connects Bellandur Lake, he said. Ramakrishna also said the board would use funds from AMRUT scheme to take up restoration ...
Also found in: [+]
1 to 20 of 9,734