User: demo Topic: Katrina
Category: Insurance
Last updated: Sep 19 2017 17:59 IST RSS 2.0
 
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Don't expect the insurance industry to protect you from climate change 19.9.2017 LA Times: Commentary

Banks and insurance experts are reporting that, with 2 ½ months to go, the 2017 Atlantic hurricane season is already one of the most expensive to date for the insurance industry.

Here’s the weird part: Insurance companies are quietly happy about this. About the time that Hurricane Irma was making...

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Hurricanes provided many painful lessons about the power of nature 18.9.2017 Washington Post
There was positive news in the destructive wake of Harvey and Irma, none more important then the countless reaffirmations that in a crisis, neighbors help neighbors. But the storms were not without moments of confusion and chaos, as well as tragic mistakes.
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Harvey and Irma are the new normal. It’s time to move away from the coasts. 15.9.2017 Washington Post
Harvey and Irma are the new normal. It’s time to move away from the coasts.
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FEMA insurance chief: Harvey losses could top $11 billion 13.9.2017 AP Politics
WASHINGTON (AP) -- The head of the National Flood Insurance Program said Wednesday early estimates show Hurricane Harvey will result in about $11 billion in payouts to insured homeowners, mostly in southeast Texas....
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Congress could make it easier for hurricane victims to tap into 401(k) plans 12.9.2017 Washington Post
Congress could make it easier for hurricane victims to tap into 401(k) plans
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Neil deMause on Hurricanes and Poverty 8.9.2017 Truthout - All Articles
Janine Jackson: You still sometimes hear things like "disasters don't discriminate," or "it's wrong to politicize a tragedy." But as we continue to assess the ravages of Hurricane Harvey, it seems like maybe we're moving a bit beyond that. Sure, we know that no one ordered up a hurricane, but public policy and political choices do play a role, do make some disasters worse than they might be, and do leave some people more vulnerable than others. Media may be moving beyond "nature, what are ya gonna do?," but where will they end up? Accountability, translated through the corporate media machine, often winds up just being blame -- and blame and accountability are not the same thing. It's not a question of who to be mad at; it's about who has the power to make things different, and what should they do? Media themselves are, of course, important players here, so what can we say about their work so far in covering this natural, and not-so-natural, disaster? We're joined now by journalist Neil deMause; he ...
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Harvey Is Not a Natural Disaster 7.9.2017 American Prospect
(Kim Brent/The Beaumont Enterprise via AP) Evacuees make their way to Max Bowl, which was converted to a shelter for those displaced by Harvey, in Port Arthur, Texas, on August 30, 2017. It is long past time to stop calling events like Hurricanes Sandy, Katrina, and now Harvey and Irma, natural disasters. There is no such thing. These may be natural events. But many of the costs of recovery—and who pays those costs—are the results of decisions people make. There is nothing natural about the catastrophic consequences of these choices. Planning (or the lack thereof), underfunding the nation’s infrastructure, and a wide range of public policies and private practices that concentrate low-income and non-white families in vulnerable communities are just a few of the “unnatural” factors that have shaped the events unfolding in Houston now. Twelve years ago, Americans saw those same unnatural factors on display in New Orleans and southern Louisiana. That Houston has experienced its third “500-year” flood in the ...
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Past disasters show a long recovery for small businesses 6.9.2017 AP Business
NEW YORK (AP) -- After Hurricane Katrina hit New Orleans in 2005, an antique store needed more than six years to fully recover. A Long Island restaurateur couldn't reopen one of his locations for a year and a half after Superstorm Sandy struck in 2012....
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Americans Who Live Far From Coasts Should Also Be Worried About Flooding 5.9.2017 Truthout.com
Catastrophic flooding in Houston from Hurricane Harvey is the latest reminder that floods  kill more people in the United States  than any other type of natural disaster and are the  most common natural disaster worldwide . Many communities along US coastlines have begun to take heed and have slowed development in coastal flood zones. The bad news, as Harvey shows, is that inland communities are also at risk -- and in some, development in flood zones is increasing. With post-doctoral research associate Yi Qiang and graduate students, I recently studied  development patterns in the United States from 2001 to 2011 . We found that while new urban development in flood zones near coasts has generally declined, it has grown in inland counties. This is a worrisome trend. It implies that people who have experienced flooding on the coast migrate inland, but may not realize that they are still vulnerable if they relocate to an inland flood zone.  That's what we have seen firsthand here in Louisiana. Thousands of ...
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The Finance 202: Tax overhaul faces big hurdles as Congress returns 5.9.2017 Washington Post: Politics
It's hardly the only thing on the GOP's plate.
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Harvey began with raging winds, but its legacy will be water 5.9.2017 AP Top News
Hurricane Harvey began with raging winds, but its legacy will be water. Seemingly endless, relentlessly insidious water - a staggering 40 inches or more that swamped parts of Houston in just five days....
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Bipartisan shift on Harvey aid emerging in Congress 4.9.2017 Seattle Times: Nation & World

With parts of Texas and Louisiana underwater, shelters overflowing and the search for survivors still underway, the two parties appear inclined to cooperate with each other on at least the first steps toward an emergency response that could eventually top $100 billion.
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Hurricane floodwaters put car-loving Houston in a big-time jam 4.9.2017 Washington Post
Harvey appears to be the most destructive event for cars in the nation’s history, with flooding that destroyed hundreds of thousands of vehicles in a sprawling region in which residents rely primarily on private cars and trucks to get to work and school.
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What Katrina taught me: A hurricane's wounds can be treated but never healed 3.9.2017 LA Times: Commentary

Every year I tell myself I’m over Hurricane Katrina, and every year I’m wrong. This year I got a double reminder that Katrina’s wounds can be treated but never healed. First, in early August, a “rain event” flooded numerous New Orleans neighborhoods. Parts of the city were inaccessible. Two African...

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Texans’ do-it-ourselves rescue effort defines Hurricane Harvey 3.9.2017 Washington Post
Texans’ do-it-ourselves rescue effort defines Hurricane Harvey
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An equal opportunity storm: ‘Harvey didn’t spare anyone’ 2.9.2017 Seattle Times: Nation & World

HOUSTON (AP) — Harvey did not discriminate in its destruction. It raged through neighborhoods rich and poor, black and white, upscale and working class. Across Houston and surrounding communities, no group sidestepped its paralyzing deluges and apocalyptic floods. “Harvey didn’t spare anyone: The whole city is traumatized,” said Lynnette Borrel, whose backyard pool filled with […]
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Harvey’s estimated damage: $80 billion. And who will foot most of the bill? Taxpayers. 2.9.2017 Washington Post
It's too early to know the final financial toll for Harvey. But current estimates differ widely, from $50 billion $190 billion. The vast majority of that bill will be paid by taxpayers, since private insurance rarely covers flooding.
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AP Exclusive: Fewer carrying flood insurance despite risk 2.9.2017 Seattle Times: Business & Technology

PLANTATION, Fla. (AP) — Amanda Spartz nearly did not renew her home’s flood insurance policy after her first year in Florida. Two hurricanes came close to the Fort Lauderdale suburbs last year, but they didn’t hit and her home isn’t in a high-risk flood zone. She figured she could put the $450 annual premium, due […]
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Harvey is one of the costliest disasters in U.S. history. Most of the victims have no flood insurance. 2.9.2017 LA Times: Nation

Tropical Storm Harvey, which destroyed thousands of homes and businesses across southeastern Texas, is now estimated to be one of the costliest disasters in American history, with damages that could exceed $100 billion.

Rebuilding efforts along the Gulf Coast, already expected to take years, will...

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AP Exclusive: Fewer Americans buy insurance in coastal areas 2.9.2017 Seattle Times: Nation & World

PLANTATION, Fla. (AP) — Amanda Spartz nearly did not renew her home’s flood insurance policy after her first year in Florida. Two hurricanes came close to the Fort Lauderdale suburbs last year, but they didn’t hit and her home isn’t in a high-risk flood zone. She figured she could put the $450 annual premium, due […]
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