User: demo Topic: Katrina
Category: Insurance
Last updated: Nov 15 2017 04:52 IST RSS 2.0
 
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House passes bill to renew flood insurance program 15.11.2017 AP Politics
WASHINGTON (AP) -- The House on Tuesday backed legislation that will increase flood insurance premiums for many property owners to help firm up a program under stress from ever-more frequent and powerful storms....
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The Bond Market Doesn’t Care About Climate Change 31.10.2017 Mother Jones
This story was originally published by Slate and appears here as part of the Climate Desk collaboration.  Early this month, when the annual king tide swept ocean water into the streets of Miami, the city’s Republican mayor, Tomás Regalado, used the occasion to stump for a vote. He’d like Miami residents to pass the “Miami Forever” bond issue, a $400-million […]
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After the smoke clears: Wine Country economy expected to rebound 15.10.2017 SFGate: Business & Technology
“When the smoke clears, things will get back to normal.” It’s a truism recited with hopefulness by scores of people affected by the devastating Wine County fires. Of course, those who lost loved ones, their homes or their businesses will continue to struggle with the impact of the inferno that has engulfed their lives even after the smoke clears. But when it comes to the impact on the economy, the adage is likely to be true. The financial blow from the wildfires is likely to subside fairly quickly and be cushioned by insurance and government relief, and Wine Country soon will resume business as usual, economists and other experts say.
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Trump lashes out at Puerto Rico as House passes aid package 13.10.2017 AP Business
WASHINGTON (AP) -- President Donald Trump lashed out at hurricane-devastated Puerto Rico on Thursday, insisting in tweets that the federal government can't keep sending help "forever" and suggesting the U.S. territory was to blame for its financial struggles....
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Trump lashes out at Puerto Rico as House weighs aid package 12.10.2017 Minnesota Public Radio: News
The president insisted that federal help will be limited and blamed the U.S. territory for its financial struggles.
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In Puerto Rico, Trump praises hurricane responders and his own administration 4.10.2017 LA Times: Commentary

Nearly two weeks after Hurricane Maria ravaged Puerto Rico, President Trump arrived Tuesday, bearing a message that the battered U.S. territory was not being slighted in its quest for recovery help.

In a televised meeting with leaders of the recovery effort in a hangar at Muniz Air National Guard...

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The Daily 202: Trump’s Katrina? Influx of Puerto Ricans after Hurricane Maria could tip Florida toward Democrats. 28.9.2017 Washington Post: Politics
Botched response could have ripple effects in America’s biggest swing state in 2020.
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Don't expect the insurance industry to protect you from climate change 19.9.2017 LA Times: Commentary

Banks and insurance experts are reporting that, with 2 ½ months to go, the 2017 Atlantic hurricane season is already one of the most expensive to date for the insurance industry.

Here’s the weird part: Insurance companies are quietly happy about this. About the time that Hurricane Irma was making...

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Hurricanes provided many painful lessons about the power of nature 18.9.2017 Washington Post
There was positive news in the destructive wake of Harvey and Irma, none more important then the countless reaffirmations that in a crisis, neighbors help neighbors. But the storms were not without moments of confusion and chaos, as well as tragic mistakes.
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Harvey and Irma are the new normal. It’s time to move away from the coasts. 15.9.2017 Washington Post
Harvey and Irma are the new normal. It’s time to move away from the coasts.
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FEMA insurance chief: Harvey losses could top $11 billion 13.9.2017 AP Politics
WASHINGTON (AP) -- The head of the National Flood Insurance Program said Wednesday early estimates show Hurricane Harvey will result in about $11 billion in payouts to insured homeowners, mostly in southeast Texas....
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Congress could make it easier for hurricane victims to tap into 401(k) plans 12.9.2017 Washington Post
Congress could make it easier for hurricane victims to tap into 401(k) plans
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Neil deMause on Hurricanes and Poverty 8.9.2017 Truthout - All Articles
Janine Jackson: You still sometimes hear things like "disasters don't discriminate," or "it's wrong to politicize a tragedy." But as we continue to assess the ravages of Hurricane Harvey, it seems like maybe we're moving a bit beyond that. Sure, we know that no one ordered up a hurricane, but public policy and political choices do play a role, do make some disasters worse than they might be, and do leave some people more vulnerable than others. Media may be moving beyond "nature, what are ya gonna do?," but where will they end up? Accountability, translated through the corporate media machine, often winds up just being blame -- and blame and accountability are not the same thing. It's not a question of who to be mad at; it's about who has the power to make things different, and what should they do? Media themselves are, of course, important players here, so what can we say about their work so far in covering this natural, and not-so-natural, disaster? We're joined now by journalist Neil deMause; he ...
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Harvey Is Not a Natural Disaster 7.9.2017 American Prospect
(Kim Brent/The Beaumont Enterprise via AP) Evacuees make their way to Max Bowl, which was converted to a shelter for those displaced by Harvey, in Port Arthur, Texas, on August 30, 2017. It is long past time to stop calling events like Hurricanes Sandy, Katrina, and now Harvey and Irma, natural disasters. There is no such thing. These may be natural events. But many of the costs of recovery—and who pays those costs—are the results of decisions people make. There is nothing natural about the catastrophic consequences of these choices. Planning (or the lack thereof), underfunding the nation’s infrastructure, and a wide range of public policies and private practices that concentrate low-income and non-white families in vulnerable communities are just a few of the “unnatural” factors that have shaped the events unfolding in Houston now. Twelve years ago, Americans saw those same unnatural factors on display in New Orleans and southern Louisiana. That Houston has experienced its third “500-year” flood in the ...
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Past disasters show a long recovery for small businesses 6.9.2017 AP Business
NEW YORK (AP) -- After Hurricane Katrina hit New Orleans in 2005, an antique store needed more than six years to fully recover. A Long Island restaurateur couldn't reopen one of his locations for a year and a half after Superstorm Sandy struck in 2012....
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Americans Who Live Far From Coasts Should Also Be Worried About Flooding 5.9.2017 Truthout.com
Catastrophic flooding in Houston from Hurricane Harvey is the latest reminder that floods  kill more people in the United States  than any other type of natural disaster and are the  most common natural disaster worldwide . Many communities along US coastlines have begun to take heed and have slowed development in coastal flood zones. The bad news, as Harvey shows, is that inland communities are also at risk -- and in some, development in flood zones is increasing. With post-doctoral research associate Yi Qiang and graduate students, I recently studied  development patterns in the United States from 2001 to 2011 . We found that while new urban development in flood zones near coasts has generally declined, it has grown in inland counties. This is a worrisome trend. It implies that people who have experienced flooding on the coast migrate inland, but may not realize that they are still vulnerable if they relocate to an inland flood zone.  That's what we have seen firsthand here in Louisiana. Thousands of ...
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The Finance 202: Tax overhaul faces big hurdles as Congress returns 5.9.2017 Washington Post: Politics
It's hardly the only thing on the GOP's plate.
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Harvey began with raging winds, but its legacy will be water 5.9.2017 AP Top News
Hurricane Harvey began with raging winds, but its legacy will be water. Seemingly endless, relentlessly insidious water - a staggering 40 inches or more that swamped parts of Houston in just five days....
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Bipartisan shift on Harvey aid emerging in Congress 4.9.2017 Seattle Times: Nation & World

With parts of Texas and Louisiana underwater, shelters overflowing and the search for survivors still underway, the two parties appear inclined to cooperate with each other on at least the first steps toward an emergency response that could eventually top $100 billion.
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Hurricane floodwaters put car-loving Houston in a big-time jam 4.9.2017 Washington Post
Harvey appears to be the most destructive event for cars in the nation’s history, with flooding that destroyed hundreds of thousands of vehicles in a sprawling region in which residents rely primarily on private cars and trucks to get to work and school.
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