User: demo Topic: Katrina
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Last updated: Jul 29 2015 20:49 IST RSS 2.0
 
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This museum lets you take a peek into the South's culinary attic 29.7.2015 LA Times: Commentary
The Southern Food and Beverage Museum in New Orleans' reemerging Central City is reminiscent of a huge attic filled with things that explain a unique cuisine and culinary heritage.
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Total Experience Gospel Choir returns to a still distressed New Orleans 24.7.2015 Seattle Times: Top stories
Returning to New Orleans after 10 years, the Total Experience Gospel Choir brings hope and help to a still distressed city.
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30 years of devastating hurricanes 22.7.2015 CNN: Top Stories
Some of the most significant hurricanes to hit the U.S. Atlantic in the last 30 years
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5 things to start your day 16.7.2015 CNN: Top Stories
Donald Trump is Richie Rich rich. Bill Clinton admits a mistake. And Caitlyn Jenner says accept her as she is.
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Bill Clinton: I made mass incarceration problem worse 16.7.2015 CNN: Top Stories
Bill Clinton said Wednesday that the crime bill he signed into law as President in 1994 worsened the nation's criminal justice system by increasing prison sentences.
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$20-million settlement reached in guest-worker lawsuits 15.7.2015 LA Times: Top News
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What we can learn from the children who thrived after Hurricane Katrina 9.7.2015 MinnPost
This story was produced by  The Hechinger Report , a nonprofit, nonpartisan education-news outlet based at Teachers College, Columbia University. WASHINGTON, D.C. — With less than two hours to go before her graduation from D.C.’s Howard University, Talitha Halley, 22, stood in front of her dorm-room closet, staring down at the tangle of shoes on the floor, wondering which pair to wear — the red heels or, perhaps, the snakeskin print. She turned to Angelica Cooper, her best friend since middle school, for help. Not long before, the two had been rummaging through the jumble of clothes, sheets and miscellany on Halley’s bed, trying to figure out if they had enough press-on rhinestones to spell out Halley’s personal statement on her graduation cap: “Everything I am not made me everything I am,” the title of a song by Kanye West. Halley is “determined for greatness,” according to her sister, Regina Halley, 33. That, she says, is why her little sister not only survived Hurricane Katrina, but went on to ...
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Organizing for Affordable Housing in the South 9.7.2015 Truthout.com
Stagnant wages, ballooning rental costs and the shrinking supply of affordable housing are heaping an ever-growing burden on low-income families.  "Out of Reach,"  a new study by the National Low Income Housing Coalition, found minimum-wage workers can no longer afford an average one-bedroom apartment in any state in America. Since 2009, the federal baseline wage has remained stagnant, but rents have jumped 15.2 percent. Nationally, a renter needs to make $15.50 per hour to afford a one-bedroom unit and $19.35 for two bedrooms. In the South, where most states' minimum wage is the federally mandated $7.25 an hour, that lopsided equation is forcing difficult budget decisions. Many families must share space with other renters in crowded homes, seek substandard, below-market housing or turn to shelters. Some breadwinners take on second jobs or cut back on other necessities like food, healthcare and clothing to spend more than the recommended 30 percent of income on housing. In West Virginia and Kentucky, for ...
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The Federal Reserve Board, Jobs and the Rewriting of Economic History 29.6.2015 Truthout - All Articles
Former US Federal Reserve Chairman Alan Greenspan. (Photo: Rob Crandall / Shutterstock.com ) The support of readers like you got this story published - and helps Truthout stay free from corporate advertising. Can you sustain our work with a tax-deductible donation today? As most people know, economists are good at rewriting history. We have seen this in the last few years as the collapse of the housing bubble and the ensuing downturn has been turned into one of those unavoidable tragedies that could not have been prevented. After all, no one could have imagined that house prices wouldn't keep going up forever or that anything bad might happen if prices actually fell. In reality it was possible, and in fact easy, for those who pay attention to data to know that house prices would fall and that the consequences for the economy would be very bad . But most discussions of the crisis treat it as a natural disaster like Hurricane Katrina, and absolve the economists in policy positions from any ...
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Air conditioning is a matter of life and death 29.6.2015 Chicago Tribune: Opinion
The last thing in the world I want to do is to get on the wrong side of God, the Catholic Church or any of my Catholic friends. But I feel compelled to say that Pope Francis, however infallible he might be in matters spiritual, is just plain wrong about air ...
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Next frontier for gays is employment and housing discrimination 26.6.2015 LA Times: Commentary
Even as a lesbian in a conservative Southern state, Katrina Martir managed to thrive in central Kentucky. She married - in another state - is raising an adopted child with her wife and recently started her own consulting business.
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Federal judge halts release of massive Brazilian emerald 26.6.2015 LA Times: Commentary
The more than six-year legal battle over the Bahia Emerald seemed to have reached a conclusion last month, when a Los Angeles Superior Court judge finally determined the owners of the prized gem.
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From California To Kathmandu, Task Force 2 Responds To Disasters 22.6.2015 NPR News
An elite search-and-rescue team from Los Angeles County is always ready to respond to emergencies around the world — most recently, in earthquake-ravaged Nepal.
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When Charters Go Union 19.6.2015 American Prospect
The April sun had not yet risen in Los Angeles when teachers from the city’s largest charter network—the Alliance College-Ready Public Schools—gathered outside for a press conference to discuss their new union drive. Joined by local labor leaders, politicians, student alumni, and parents, the importance of the educators’ effort was not lost on the crowd. If teachers were to prevail in winning collective bargaining rights at Alliance’s 26 schools, the audience recognized, then L.A.’s education reform landscape would fundamentally change. For years, after all, many of the most powerful charter backers had proclaimed that the key to helping students succeed was union-free schools. One month earlier, nearly 70 Alliance teachers and counselors had sent a letter to the administration announcing their intent to join United Teachers of Los Angeles (UTLA), the local teachers union that represents the 35,000 educators who work in L.A.’s public schools. The letter asked Alliance for a “fair and neutral process”—one ...
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Brian Williams will leave 'NBC Nightly News' and join MSNBC 18.6.2015 Chicago Tribune: Popular
Brian Williams, the popular NBC News anchor who became embroiled in controversy over false statements he made about his reporting, will no longer be the anchor of the network's evening newscast and will be assigned to handling breaking news on cable network MSNBC, people familiar with the ...
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He offers praise for candidates who regularly attack his wife 14.6.2015 CNN: Top Stories
Says Hillary is 'a rock' | Bemoans 'trust deficit' | 2016 field | Watch 'State of the Union' on CNNgo
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The Derelict Theme Park Where Jurassic World’s Dinos Roam 13.6.2015 Wired Top Stories
Six Flags New Orleans shut down after Katrina, but it's found new life as a filmmaker's perfect blank ...
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After Katrina, the Residents of New Orleans Saved Themselves 12.6.2015 Truthout.com
(Image: Nation Books)New Orleans is much like the great Live Oak trees that line its streets, grace its parks, provide shade and shelter during the relentlessly hot summers, and buffer storm winds. The people of the city are strong, disaster resistant, and amazingly resilient. We're Still Here Ya Bastards is a tribute to the residents who returned to New Orleans after Hurricane Katrina and their extraordinary individual and collective efforts to rebuild. In this excerpt, Roberta Brandes Gratz demolishes the myth that Katrina was a "natural" disaster and details the overwhelming failure of the federal government and private contractors during and after the hurricane. (Image: Nation Books) "There is no other cavalry coming. ...We are the cavalry." So says a New Orleans resident in We're Still Here Ya Bastards, an extraordinary look at the city's revival in the years following Hurricane Katrina. Roberta Brandes Gratz tells the stories of local people who returned to their homes to take the rebuilding of ...
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Clinton brushes aside foundation criticism 12.6.2015 CNN: Top Stories
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See inside CNN 'time capsule' 11.6.2015 CNN: Top Stories
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