User: demo Topic: Katrina
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Last updated: Sep 16 2014 21:53 IST RSS 2.0
 
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Poetry longlist announced for National Book Awards 16.9.2014 Seattle Times: Top stories
Two former U.S. poets laureate, Louise Glueck and Mark Strand, have made the longlist for the National Book Awards.
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Bill Clinton's gift to America 12.9.2014 CNN: Top Stories
Bill Clinton's speech accepting the Democratic nomination for president in 1992 went through 22 drafts. But from the first to the last, he insisted on including a call to service.
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FEMA wants at least $5.8M in Sandy aid repaid 11.9.2014 AP National
NEW YORK (AP) -- After Superstorm Sandy hit the East Coast nearly two years ago, the federal government quickly sent out $1.4 billion in emergency disaster aid to the hurricane's victims....
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Evan Christopher at the Dakota; Replacements film 'Color Me Obsessed' 10.9.2014 MinnPost
Artscape is on break and full coverage will return Wednesday, Sept. 24. We’ll leave you with ideas for must-sees, hears, and dos – an ample supply of picks as new seasons begin and we head into fall. Tonight (Wednesday, Sept. 10) at the Dakota: Evan Christopher’s Clarinet Road. Born in California, now living in New Orleans, Christopher spends much of his time in Europe, where there’s a lot less gasbaggery about jazz being dead. He’s an exceptional player of a once-popular instrument (Benny Goodman, Artie Shaw, Woody Herman) that fell out of favor with the rise of bebop. What will you hear if you go? “I play the New Orleans clarinet,” Christopher told us last week. “That aesthetic is always a priority for me. After I returned to New Orleans about six years ago” – like many musicians, Christopher was displaced by Hurricane Katrina – “I decided to concentrate more on New Orleans than to concentrate on jazz. It put me in a frame of mind where melody was the most important thing. So it may sound corny, but I ...
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Louisiana's St. Tammany Parish Comes One Step Closer to Fracking 10.9.2014 Truthout - All Articles
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The Gulf Is Still So Far From Recovering. Just Ask This Oyster Farmer. 10.9.2014 Mother Jones
John Tesvich slices open oysters on the deck of his boat, the "Croatian Pride". Tim McDonnell/Climate Desk John Tesvich is a fourth-generation oyster farmer in Empire, a tiny Gulf Coast enclave south of New Orleans. He's spent his life working in the rich oyster beds here, the most productive in the nation, and has weathered his share of storms: During Hurricane Katrina, his house ended up under 17 feet of water. But last week, as he navigated his 40-foot oyster boat out into open water, he admitted that the turmoil this region has faced in the last decade was beginning to wear him down. "A lot has changed over the years," he said. "It seems like one crisis after another sometimes." One crisis was particularly damaging to Tesvich's industry: The 2010 Deepwater Horizon oil spill. The fourth anniversary of the busted undersea well's sealing (after it gushed crude into the Gulf for nearly five months) is coming up next week, and Tesvich, who also chairs the oyster industry's main statewide lobbying group, ...
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His own words help bring down New Orleans prosecutor 10.9.2014 LA Times: Nation
Sal Perricone always had something to prove. Growing up poor and Italian in a city dominated by Creoles and Anglos, Perricone found respect on the streets after high school by becoming a cop. He pulled graveyard shifts to put himself through college and eventually took night classes to earn a...
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Q&A: One Student's Educational Saga In New Orleans 9.9.2014 NPR News
A high school senior looks back on five schools pre- and post-Katrina.
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Ray Nagin, former New Orleans mayor, begins serving 10-year sentence 9.9.2014 LA Times: Nation
Former New Orleans Mayor Ray Nagin, who became a national figure in the wake of Hurricane Katrina, reported to federal prison Monday to begin serving a 10-year term for corruption that unfolded as the city sought to rebuild in the aftermath of the 2005 storm. 
Ex-New Orleans Mayor Ray Nagin reports to federal prison; sentenced to 10 years for corruption 8.9.2014 Star Tribune: Politics
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Nine Years After Katrina, Coastal Restoration Plans Remain Distant Dream for New Orleans 3.9.2014 Truthout - All Articles
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Global Warming and Economic Crisis Lead to One Solution: Climate Jobs 1.9.2014 Truthout - All Articles
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New Orleans Enters The Charter School Era 30.8.2014 NPR: All Things Considered
Hurricane Katrina ravaged New Orleans and swept away many of the city's public schools. Now, the district is unveiling a transformed school system, composed entirely of charter schools.
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Why the Legacy of Katrina on New Orleans Is Different From Disasters That Befell Other Cities 29.8.2014 American Prospect
  Rescue personnel search from victims as they traverse the New Orleans 8th Ward in the flooded city of New Orleans on Tuesday, Aug. 30, 2005. Water continued to rise after the onslaught of Hurricane Katrina, which pounded the coast on August 29. How to remember Hurricane Katrina? I consider this each year as the anniversary approaches. I assume it’s something that most people do when the anniversary of a traumatic event draws near. New Orleans is not my hometown; I grew up two hours northwest from it in Louisiana’s fourth largest city, Lafayette . The day before Katrina reached land, my sister, who was in law school at Loyola University, called me (I was living in New York at the time) and said she was driving home. Everything from news to gossip portended the same: that Katrina was a beast and everyone should get out, or, at the very least, find adequate shelter. She fit as much from her apartment into her car as was humanly possible, boarded up her windows as best she could and called me before she ...
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ERROR: Missing Story Title 29.8.2014 Boston Globe: Latest
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ERROR: Missing Story Title 29.8.2014 Boston Globe: Latest
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Landrieu claims parents’ home as her own, raising questions of Louisiana residency 29.8.2014 Washington Post: Politics
NEW ORLEANS — In Washington, Sen. Mary Landrieu lives in a stately, $2.5 million brick manse she and her husband built on Capitol Hill. Here in Louisiana, however, the Democrat does not have a home of her own. She is registered to vote at a large bungalow in New Orleans that her parents have lived in for many decades, according to a Washington Post review of Landrieu’s federal financial disclosures and local property and voting ...
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Crime Scene – New Orleans 27.8.2014 GregPalast.com
By Greg Palast [Lower Ninth Ward, New Orleans]  Nine years ago this week, New Orleans drowned.  Don’t you dare blame Mother Nature.  Miss Katrina killed no one in this town.  But it was a homicide, with nearly 2,000 dead victims.  If not Katrina, who done it?  Read on. The Palast Investigative Fund is making our [...]
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The Fire This Time: America's Withdrawal From the Fight Against Racism Guarantees More Fergusons 25.8.2014 American Prospect
(AP Photo/St. Louis Post-Dispatch, J.B. Forbes) A protester shouts as she moves away from a line of riot police in Ferguson, Missouri, on Wednesday, Aug. 13, 2014. (AP Photo/St. Louis Post-Dispatch, J.B. Forbes) This article originally appeared on the  Policy Shop  website of Demos.   I remember the stunned reaction of so many Americans back in the summer of 2005 when legions of poor black people in desperate circumstances seemed to have suddenly and inexplicably materialized in New Orleans during the flooding that followed Hurricane Katrina. Expressions of disbelief poured in from around the nation: “How can this be happening?” “I had no idea conditions were that bad.” “My God, is this America?” People found themselves staring at the kind of poverty they thought had been largely wiped out decades earlier. President George W. Bush seemed as astonished as anyone. He made an eerie, oddly-lit, outdoor appearance in the city’s French Quarter on the evening of September 15 to announce that his administration ...
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Insurance Sector Could Use a Rainy Day 25.8.2014 Wall St. Journal: US
Ahead of the Tape: A common misconception is that property and casualty insurers thrive during times of calm. But that is when pricing tends to soften.
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