User: demo Topic: Housing
Category: Affordable Housing
Last updated: Aug 18 2018 07:58 IST RSS 2.0
 
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Groups work together to help Mpls. homeless encampment 18.8.2018 Minnesota Public Radio: Law & Justice
Members of St. Stephen's Human Services, Natives Against Heroin and other community organizations tried to alleviate some of the issues facing the residents of an encampment in Minneapolis.
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Mpls. mayor wants to go big on spending for housing 16.8.2018 Minnesota Public Radio: Law & Justice
Minneapolis Mayor Jacob Frey's proposed 2019 budget calls for $40 million for affordable housing.
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Ben Carson moves forward with push to change fair housing rule 14.8.2018 Minnesota Public Radio: Law & Justice
HUD Secretary Ben Carson is moving to overhaul an Obama-era rule intended strengthen the 1968 Fair Housing Act and combat housing segregation.
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St. Paul mayor Carter proposes property tax rise, and to keep the number of officers level 10.8.2018 Minnesota Public Radio: Politics
St. Paul Mayor Melvin Carter proposes an 11.5 percent increase in the property tax levy to pay for more programs for youth, businesses and to reconstruct streets. He also says the police department should not add dozens of new officers.
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The new housing crisis: Shut out of the market 6.8.2018 Minnesota Public Radio: News
Ten years after a housing collapse during the Great Recession, home values have rebounded but there are too few homes on the market. Buyers face intense competition, and that means higher prices.
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Elections bring battle for Rochester's soul 6.8.2018 Minnesota Public Radio: Politics
With three prominent offices open this election, a crowded field of candidates is running to shape Rochester's future as the Destination Medical Center project remakes the city.
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Taking on Class and Racial Discrimination in Housing 2.8.2018 American Prospect
AP Photo/Jacquelyn Martin Senator Cory Booker on Capitol Hill Zoning laws are not usually the stuff of which presidential campaigns are made. But Senator Cory A. Booker, who is often talked about as a presidential contender, says bad zoning laws are making housing more segregated and less affordable, and he has just introduced legislation to do something about it.  Booker was born in Washington, D.C., one year after the passage of the 1968 Fair Housing Act. That legislation, which outlawed racial discrimination in the sale and rental of housing, helped make it possible for Booker’s parents, African American executives, to become the first black family to reside in Harrington Park, New Jersey, an affluent white community outside of Newark with strong public schools. Those schools helped launch Booker to Stanford, Oxford, Yale Law and beyond. But as a child Booker quickly became aware that a single law couldn’t wipe out entrenched inequalities of housing opportunity.  He visited relatives living in ...
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San Francisco squalor: City streets strewn with trash, needles and human feces 2.8.2018 Minnesota Public Radio: News
The city's streets are so filthy that at least one infectious disease expert has compared San Francisco to some of the dirtiest slums in the world.
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How SNAP and Medicaid Work Requirements Will Hurt Workers 2.8.2018 American Prospect
trickle-downers.jpg On any given day, you’re likely to interact with a lot of people who work in the low-wage labor market. They’re the laborers you pass on the street, the retail clerks in a shop you frequent, the cooks or wait staff at a restaurant you like. They might be your family, friends, and coworkers. Maybe you yourself work in one of these occupations—after all, many millions of Americans do. While conservatives might paint adults who receive Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program (SNAP, commonly called food stamps) benefits and Medicaid as idle people who don’t want to work, the data don’t validate that assumption. Adults who rely on SNAP and Medicaid for help paying for their groceries and health care are often those same low-wage workers. But their work is largely volatile and unstable, and it comes without such key work supports as paid sick and family leave and affordable child care. That’s why the recent policy push to institute harsh work requirements in both SNAP and Medicaid is ...
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Who's on the DFL primary ballot in the 5th? Meet the candidates 30.7.2018 Minnesota Public Radio: News
Voters in Minneapolis and neighboring suburbs will elect a new member of Congress this year. The 5th Congressional District seat has been in Democratic hands since 1963, which means the August DFL primary will likely decide who goes to Washington.
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House Votes to Repeal Tax on Medical Devices 25.7.2018 Wall St. Journal: US Business
The House voted to repeal a 2.3% excise tax on medical devices, again showing bipartisan support for eliminating the levy.
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Rochester construction is booming, but affordable housing lags 23.7.2018 Minnesota Public Radio: News
A Rochester city survey of residents shows that a strong majority is worried there isn't enough affordable housing for people working in the city's growing service industries.
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St. Paul City Council proposes steps to address housing problems in city 23.7.2018 Minnesota Public Radio: Business
Council members unanimously passed what they described as a call for action "to create and preserve housing that is affordable at all income levels, address racial, social and economic disparities in housing, and create infrastructure needed to stabilize housing for all in Saint Paul."
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St. Paul City Council candidate's behavior forces cancellation of forum 18.7.2018 Minnesota Public Radio: News
David Martinez was arrested Monday after a topless photo of his wife was posted on his campaign website. He's already been banned from the city's libraries following an arrest at a downtown location, and from Target Field in Minneapolis after a confrontation with security.
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Section Wait: Federal housing vouchers hard to get, hard to use 18.7.2018 Minnesota Public Radio: Law & Justice
Snagging a federal Section 8 housing voucher can be a godsend for low-income people in a tight Twin Cities rental market, but it's a difficult road. In Dakota County this week, 5,000 people are expected to enter a lottery to get on the waitlist.
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2nd District candidates Lewis and Craig clash on health care 18.7.2018 Minnesota Public Radio: Politics
In their rematch for Congress, Jason Lewis and Angie Craig have sharply differing views on how to make health care more affordable.
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Report: Affordable housing is a problem statewide 13.7.2018 Minnesota Public Radio: Law & Justice
A Minnesota Housing Partnership report found that someone who's working full time and earning minimum wage can't afford to rent a one-bedroom apartment in any of Minnesota's counties.
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Here’s How Democrats Can Expose What Kavanaugh Threatens 11.7.2018 American Prospect
AP Photo/Susan Walsh Supreme Court nominee Brett Kavanaugh visits the office of Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell on Capitol Hill. If President Donald Trump wished to replace retired Supreme Court justice Anthony Kennedy with a successor likely to back the White House in any Russia investigation showdown with Special Counsel Robert Mueller, or, more broadly, to legitimate Trump’s penchant for sabotaging laws he disfavors, he could not have done better than nominate Brett Kavanaugh. Senate Minority Leader Chuck Schumer has stated that his caucus’ campaign to contest Kavanaugh’s nomination will target two issues—the threat to authorize states to ban abortion by overruling Roe v. Wade, and the threat to gut health insurance or even invalidate the Affordable Care Act. Both issue areas are priority concerns for progressive constituencies, and progressive views on them command considerable support among the electorate. But Democrats and progressives should not neglect the nominee’s absolutist vision of ...
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Brett Kavanaugh supported broad leeway for presidents under investigation 10.7.2018 Minnesota Public Radio: News
President Trump's new nominee for the Supreme Court argued that presidents should be protected from lawsuits and investigations while they're in office.
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Questions for Kavanaugh 10.7.2018 American Prospect
(Alex Edelman/picture-alliance/dpa/AP Images) Brett Kavanaugh speaks following President Trump's announcment of his nomination to the Supreme Court on July 9, 2018, at the White House. From what we’re now learning about Brett Kavanaugh, it’s clear he thinks indicting a sitting conservative president would be a disaster. Whether he feels that way about a sitting liberal pope—in this case, Francis—isn’t so clear. President Trump’s pick to succeed Anthony Kennedy on the Supreme Court has written a great deal about how our system needs to defer to presidential power, and it’s also apparent that he’s a charter member of the Antonin Scalia/Pope Benedict Society for the Preservation of Patriarchal Norms (the Older, the Better). One newer norm that Kavanaugh looks poised to uphold is that of answering no substantive questions during his upcoming Senate confirmation hearings. A newly released study documents that Trump’s previous court pick, Neil Gorsuch, set the record for the highest percent of questions evaded ...
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