User: demo Topic: Housing
Category: Federal Housing Policy :: HUD
Last updated: Aug 15 2017 11:52 IST RSS 2.0
 
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Comcast expands its $9.95/monthly internet services for low-income households 15.8.2017 Headlines: All Headlines
Comcast's Internet Essentials program, which offers discounted broadband service to low-income households, is speeding up and expanding its reach, the company plans to announce on Tuesday.
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2 senators question effects of a reverse-mortgage proposal 12.8.2017 Seattle Times: Business & Technology

There is concern that a small wording change in the Trump administration’s proposed budget request for the Department of Housing and Urban Development could undo some of the protections for the spouse of a borrower who takes out a reverse mortgage and later dies.
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The Trump administration's alternative Christianity 11.8.2017 LA Times: Commentary

Evangelicals have never had it so good, politically speaking.

Since President Trump took office in January, the White House has become a Christian roundtable, with just about every top-tier seat filled by a faithful member of the fold or someone who is happy to further the fold’s agenda.

The lineup...

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Your condo association prohibits pets, but you need a ‘comfort’ animal. What do you do? 11.8.2017 Washington Post
Your condo association prohibits pets, but you need a ‘comfort’ animal. What do you do?
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Millions of poor families could benefit from housing aid Trump wants to cut 10.8.2017 Washington Post
Millions of poor families could benefit from housing aid Trump wants to cut
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Homeless coalition gets new shot at 59-acre Federal Center property in Lakewood temporarily halted 10.8.2017 Denver Post: Local
A U.S. District Court judge issued a ruling this week that the federal government temporarily refrain from selling a 59-acre property at the Federal Center in Lakewood.
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Carson Promises To Help Residents Of Housing Projects His Department Is Shutting Down 9.8.2017 NPR: Morning Edition
HUD Secretary Ben Carson visited the struggling Illinois river port, where his department is closing two public housing projects. Many of the town's remaining residents live in those developments.
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The Trump Administration Just Dealt a Big Setback to Affordable Housing 6.8.2017 Mother Jones
This story originally appeared on ProPublica. For years, Westchester County insisted its zoning laws did not prevent black and Latino families from moving into wealthy suburbs north of New York City—even in a town like Pound Ridge, which is 94 percent white. Almost all homes in that bucolic community accommodate single families. Apartments are hard to come […]
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Aspen Ideas Festival: Being Latino in America today 3.8.2017 Minnesota Public Radio: News
What role will Hispanics play in America's long-term prosperity? Former San Antonio Mayor Henry Cisneros says Latinos are the biggest story in the whole multi-cultural evolution of the United States. Now 55 million people, what impact will they have on the American dream?
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Money for repairs in doubt as Manitou Incline closure looms 1.8.2017 Denver Post: Local
Plans to close the Manitou Incline this month for repairs may be endangered by funding issues.
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Colorado homeless advocates win delay of Federal Center property auction 28.7.2017 Denver Post: Business
In response to a federal lawsuit filed by the Colorado Coalition for the Homeless federal officials have delayed the sale of 59 acres to developers, giving some hope that the land could be used to shelter homeless people.
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He’s Back! Trump Returns to Youngstown 27.7.2017 American Prospect
(AP Photo/Carolyn Kaster) President Trump greets Melania Trump after she introduces him at the rally in Youngstown on July 25, 2017. During the 2016 presidential campaign, Donald Trump visited the Youngstown area three times. On Tuesday, President Trump returned. Officially sponsored by his 2020 campaign, the rally at Youngstown’s Covelli Center provided him an opportunity to be buoyed by the cheers of 7,000 fans. While many of those attending Tuesday’s rally came from outside of the city and the region, Trump has significant support here, rooted in the politics of resentment. Distrust of government—and especially of politicians—developed in the aftermath of plant closings and downsizings that began in the late 1970s, as tens of thousands of workers in Youngstown and the surrounding Mahoning Valley lost jobs in steel mills, auto plants, and related industries. Many blamed environmental regulations, trade agreements, and corporate pursuit of cheap foreign labor, and they vowed to make those who negotiated ...
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Colorado homeless coalition sues federal housing agency over Federal Center land 26.7.2017 Denver Post: Local
The Colorado Coalition for the Homeless has sued the U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development seeking to halt an auction of 59 acres at Denver Federal Center claiming the decision to do so may violate the Homeless Assistance Act.
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Senators on hot mic: Trump is 'crazy,' 'I'm worried' 25.7.2017 Washington Post: Politics
Sens. Reed and Collins also discussed Rep. Farenthold's “duel" comments.
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Carson pledges to fight homelessness amid budget cut plans 19.7.2017 Seattle Times: Nation & World

WASHINGTON (AP) — Housing Secretary Ben Carson pledged Tuesday to “work toward a time when no family is without a home” — even as the Trump administration seeks sharp budget cuts that critics say would lead to more people living on the streets. “A man will not beat addiction from a gutter, he will not […]
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Census Bureau Found No Need For LGBT Data Despite 4 Agencies Requesting It 19.7.2017 NPR News
At least four federal agencies asked the Census Bureau to add questions about sexual orientation and gender identity to the American Community Survey, NPR has learned.
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Group led by ex-alderman, unions acquires Chicago Sun-Times 13.7.2017 AP Business
CHICAGO (AP) -- An investment group led by a former Chicago alderman and a coalition of labor unions are the new owners of the Chicago Sun-Times, officials announced Thursday....
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Trump has secretive teams to roll back regulations, led by hires with deep industry ties 12.7.2017 Minnesota Public Radio: Politics
A ProPublica-New York Times investigation found many appointees with potential conflicts of interest, including two who might personally profit if particular regulations are undone.
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A surprising way to increase property values: build affordable housing 7.7.2017 Washington Post
A surprising way to increase property values: build affordable housing
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Despite the lawsuits, media spotlight, and conventional wisdom, affordable housing developments built in poor, heavily black communities can lead to greater racial and income integration, according to new research by Stanford economists. Such housing, funded by federal tax credits, also raises property values and lowers crime in surrounding neighborhoods as higher-income white residents move in, the researchers found. “When a corporate developer comes in and builds nicer, new housing, it makes the neighborhood more desirable as a potential place to live,” said Rebecca Diamond, a professor at Stanford’s Graduate School of Business who authored the study with her colleague Tim McQuade. The surprising findings, to be published in the Journal of Political Economy, are being widely circulated this week among academics following a New York Times story asserting that federal tax credits for affordable housing promotes racial segregation despite the program’s intent. While it’s true that such housing is disproportionately located in minority communities, the federal program actually results in more racially desegregated neighborhoods over time, said the researchers who analyzed a decade’s worth of relevant data around more than 7,000 developments built with federal tax credits in 15 states. Building affordable housing in low-income, high-minority neighborhoods lowers the share of black residents in the surrounding community by about 3 percentage points, Diamond and McQuade found. It also improves racial integration in wealthier, high-minority communities. “That’s a pretty big effect just by developing one building,” Diamond said. Most of the impact occurs within half a mile of the housing development. The most intense effect is felt within less than a quarter mile, she said. In neighborhoods where median incomes fell below $26,000 a year, the researchers saw home values appreciate 6.5 percent within a tenth of a mile of the housing development. But the benefits disappear when the affordable housing complexes are built in wealthier, white neighborhoods, the researchers found. In such neighborhoods with median incomes above $54,000, property values dropped 2.5 percent within a tenth of a mile of the housing development, or about two city blocks. The affordable apartments also decrease diversity, but does not impact crime rates. “People have a preference of who their neighbors are, and perhaps higher income people just don’t want to live with lower-income residents,” Diamond said. Congress is trying to address the issue of wealthier neighborhoods rejecting the construction of affordable housing with bipartisan legislation that would prohibit states from considering local opposition as a factor in funding developments. The bill , sponsored by Senator Maria Cantwell, D-Wash., and Senate Finance Committee Chairman Orrin Hatch, R-Utah, would no longer require state agencies to notify local officials when siting a proposed housing development. The goal is to prevent “Not In My Backyard” opposition from interfering with housing credit allocation. That could encourage more affordable housing in higher-income, whiter communities, says Daniel Hemel, who teaches tax law at the University of Chicago and who wrote a blog post this week highlighting the role affordable housing tax credits play in integrating neighborhoods. Previous long-term research has shown that giving families living in public-housing projects vouchers to move into wealthier neighborhoods improves children’s future earnings. But the effect on individual families does not outweigh the community benefits of locating affordable housing developments in low-income neighborhoods, Diamond said. “The neighborhood spillover effect for low-income communities are quite large — larger than the benefits of moving the lucky few into a high-income neighborhoods,” Diamond said. “A building is investing in a neighborhood whereas a voucher is just a subsidy to one household.” Policy makers need to consider the benefits of doing both, economists say. “We should not have affordable housing all going into low poverty neighborhoods or high poverty neighborhoods. It can’t be all or nothing,” said Katherine O’Regan, a public policy and planning professor at New York University’s Wagner Graduate School of Public Service who served as the assistant secretary for policy development and research at the U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development under President Barack Obama. O’Regan’s research also shows that the use of federal tax credits for affordable housing is linked to declines in racial segregation in cities. Her work with Keren Horn was the first paper to consider, at a national level, the changes in racial composition in the neighborhood surrounding these developments. The federal government has a documented history of perpetuating racist housing policies, leading to segregated communities and the creation of white-only suburbs. But tax credits for affordable housing is not one of them. The tax credit program for low-income housing, valued at more than $8 billion annually, began in 1987 and has become the country’s key source of federal support for the creation of affordable rental housing. Developers apply to their states for the credits, then use them to leverage private capital to build units for low-income people. The future of the tax credit program is in question given the uncertainty around President Trump’s tax reform plan, economists say. Trump has proposed $6.2 billion in cuts to affordable housing programs at the Department for Housing and Urban Development, but the tax credits program is administered by the Internal Revenue Service. “No one really knows what the tax code is going to look like,” said Mark Zandi, chief economist of Moody’s Analytics. “That means less construction until this uncertainty is resolved because people are unsure about the value of these tax credits.” 7.7.2017 Salt Lake Tribune
Despite the lawsuits, media spotlight, and conventional wisdom, affordable housing developments built in poor, heavily black communities can lead to greater racial and income integration, according to new research by Stanford economists. Such housing, funded by federal tax credits, also raises property values and lowers crime in surrounding neighborhoods as higher-income white residents move in, the researchers found. “When a corporate developer comes in and builds nicer, new housing, it makes t... <iframe src="http://www.sltrib.com/csp/mediapool/sites/sltrib/pages/garss.csp" height="1" width="1" > </frame>
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