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Category: Housing
Last updated: Oct 16 2018 02:38 IST RSS 2.0
 
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DHS Kicks the Ladder from Under Immigrants Seeking Green Cards 16.10.2018 American Prospect
(AP Photo/Alex Brandon) Homeland Security Secretary Kirstjen Nielsen during a huearing of the Senate Committee on Homeland Security and Governmental Affairs on October 10, 2018 Capital & Main  is an award-winning publication that reports from California on economic, political and social issues. The American Prospect is co-publishing this piece. Immigrants who use Medicaid, food stamps, housing assistance or Medicare prescription drug subsidies could be barred from obtaining green cards or visa extensions under a proposed rule the Department of Homeland Security published in the Federal Register on October 10. Currently only those who use cash assistance or who require long-term institutional care at government expense are barred on public charge grounds. Immigrant-rights advocates, health-care providers, and local governments predict devastating results, especially in California and other states with large immigrant populations: Millions of people would go hungry or forego medical treatment for fear they ...
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Yellen Calls Trump's Attack on Fed Counterproductive 15.10.2018 Wall St. Journal: US Business
Former Fed Chairwoman Janet Yellen said President Trump’s attacks on the central bank could be counterproductive if they cause investors to doubt the Fed’s commitment to keeping inflation in check.
Locking Up the Children 15.10.2018 American Prospect
U.S. Department of Health and Human Services Casa Padre in Brownsville, Texas, is the largest child immigrant detention center in the U.S., housing youths aged 10 to 17.  This article appears in the Fall 2018 issue of The American Prospect magazine. Subscribe here .  A child in detention tries to keep from dreaming of the outside world. Afuera. Outside. That place where kids his age are busy jumping in pools under the summer sun or laughing in air-conditioned movie theaters; the kinds of things he used to do with his mother and his sisters before they were separated, and that he hopes to do again once he’s released. But for the moment, afuera feels far off to Martín, who is still a teenager. And while dreaming of freedom provides a temporary escape from the loneliness of confinement, it can also be painful. Just as the shelter monitors circumscribe his actions, so too must Martín police his own thoughts. “In the shelter, it doesn’t feel good thinking about being outside,” says Martín. “It’s ...
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Jack Dorsey's Homeless Mugging 15.10.2018 Wall St. Journal: Opinion
The Twitter CEO makes sense on taxes, gets pounded by the left.
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Housing Market Positioned for a Gentler Slowdown Than in 2007 14.10.2018 Wall St. Journal: US Business
The U.S. housing market is running out of steam, but its slowdown looks nothing like the historic collapse that took down the whole economy in 2007.
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Inside the Texas Tent City Housing More Than 1,000 Migrant Teens 13.10.2018 Wall St. Journal: Policy
The sprawling tent city near El Paso was supposed to serve as home for a few hundred immigrant children for about a month. But since opening in mid-June, its operations have rapidly expanded.
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Mortgages Fast Approaching 5%, a Fresh Blow to Housing Market 11.10.2018 Wall St. Journal: US Business
The cost of borrowing to buy a home is at its highest in over seven years. That could deter purchasers and be a worrying sign for the greater economy.
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Ford site developer proposes fewer homes, less density 11.10.2018 Minnesota Public Radio: News
Many residents of the Highland Park neighborhood remain concerned about the impact of thousands of new residents and workers and their cars.
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The Return of American Socialism 11.10.2018 American Prospect
This article appears in the Fall 2018 issue of The American Prospect magazine. Subscribe here .  In 1960, the young socialist Michael Harrington traveled to Ann Arbor to provide what help he could to the fledgling radical movement at the University of Michigan, and to see if he could recruit some students to the Young People’s Socialist League. He had particularly long talks with the 20-year-old editor of The Michigan Daily (the student newspaper), Tom Hayden. Though the two hit it off, Harrington couldn’t make the sale. “He accepted much of my analysis,” Harrington later was to write, “yet he balked at the socialist idea itself.” Harrington was no slouch at converting progressives to socialism; an unusually high percentage of the members of the Democratic Socialist Organizing Committee (which he founded in 1973) and its successor organization, the Democratic Socialists of America (which he co-founded in 1982) signed up after having been intellectually and emotionally persuaded by one or more Harrington ...
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Fighting the Republicans’ Voter Purges in Ohio 10.10.2018 American Prospect
This article appears in the Fall 2018 issue of The American Prospect magazine. Subscribe here .  Having won a United States Supreme Court ruling in mid-June that allowed him to kick voters off the rolls for not voting in previous elections, Ohio’s Republican Secretary of State Jon Husted wasted no time directing county elections officials to restart his voter-purge program.  In July, Husted instructed Ohio’s 88 county elections boards to mail address-confirmation notices by August 6 to registered voters who haven’t voted in two years. This is step one in the controversial purge, which had been on hold since a federal appeals court ruled in 2016 that Ohio’s method of removing registered voters violated federal law. It’s a safe bet that many Ohioans don’t know that they’ve lost, or they might lose, their right to vote simply by not voting. Under Husted, Ohio has conducted the nation’s most aggressive voter purges. If you fail to vote for two years, fail to respond to the aforementioned mailing, and don’t ...
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HSBC to Pay $765 Million to Settle Probe 10.10.2018 Wall St. Journal: Asia
HSBC will pay $765 million to settle Justice Department claims that it willfully covered up risks associated with residential-mortgage products in the run-up to the last housing-market downturn.
Hennepin County approves new funds to shelter homeless 10.10.2018 Minnesota Public Radio: Business
Action taken Tuesday amends a previous agreement targeted at helping Native Americans experiencing homelessness and substance abuse.
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Banks Brace for Downside of Higher Rates 6.10.2018 Wall St. Journal: Asia
Banks have enjoyed a profit boost from rising interest rates over the past couple of years. But now those higher rates could turn into a drag.
Rising Bond Yields Send Stocks Lower 6.10.2018 Wall St. Journal: Asia
The Dow Jones Industrial Average fell 180 points and bond yields rose to multiyear highs after the jobless rate dropped to its lowest level since 1969, raising fears of higher borrowing costs.
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Red Lake Nation completes first survey of Franklin-Hiawatha encampment 6.10.2018 Minnesota Public Radio: Business
Red Lake find nearly 200 people living in encampment during the week-long survey conducted to gather information about the residents of the camp and their needs.
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Hurricane Sandy and the Inequalities of Resilience in New York 5.10.2018 American Prospect
As the Carolinas continue to grapple with the physical damage and psychological trauma from Hurricane Florence, the region faces difficult choices. Communities must decide which lands and neighborhoods to reclaim and rebuild and which ones are best left to absorb the ravages of intensifying storms. Those decisions will play out very differently depending on the race and the income of the individuals and families hit hardest by the historic flooding. In 2012, Hurricane Sandy slammed a very different region of the country: the Rockaways section of New York. But the aftermath of that historic storm provides some sobering clues about post-hurricane resilience efforts—like the ones that didn’t really help the Rockaways’ low-income residents and people of color. Most visitors to Manhattan or Brooklyn know little about the Rockaways. The finger-like Rockaway Peninsula runs approximately nine miles off the southeast end of Queens. Less than a mile across at its widest, the peninsula is flanked on one side by ...
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Bed Bath & Beyond Is Missing Out on Retail Rally 4.10.2018 Wall St. Journal: US Business
Bed Bath & Beyond survived the recession and outlasted rivals, positioning the seller of home-related items to benefit from a booming U.S. housing market. Instead, the chain is mired in a slump.
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Walter Mondale and Josie Johnson on civil rights in America 2.10.2018 Minnesota Public Radio: Law & Justice
Local civil rights legend Josie Johnson and former Vice President Walter Mondale discuss the ongoing struggle for voting rights, fair housing, and civil rights.
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What's new in the new Minneapolis 2040 Plan? 1.10.2018 Minnesota Public Radio: Politics
The City of Minneapolis released a new draft of its comprehensive plan called Minneapolis 2040 on Friday. For a city planning document, it received a lot of feedback: more than 10,000 comments on its initial draft.
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The American Dream is harder to find in some neighborhoods 1.10.2018 Minnesota Public Radio: Law & Justice
A new data tool finds a strong correlation between where people grew up and their chances of climbing the economic ladder. Charlotte, N.C., hopes to use it to improve residents' economic mobility.
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