User: demo Topic: Housing
Category: Housing
Last updated: Dec 14 2018 05:37 IST RSS 2.0
 
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Soap Factory halts arts programs, seeks funding 14.12.2018 Minnesota Public Radio: Law & Justice
The Minneapolis arts nonprofit is selling the converted soapflake factory, its longtime home.
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St. Paul City Council funds police mental health unit expansion 14.12.2018 Minnesota Public Radio: Law & Justice
Less than a year after the St. Paul Police Department debuted a mental health unit, the city council agreed to fund its expansion.
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Ex-cons get a deeper look from employers in tight Minnesota job market 13.12.2018 Minnesota Public Radio: Law & Justice
With Minnesota's near-record jobless rate and more openings than people looking for work, there's new opportunity for people who've historically had the hardest time landing jobs &mdash: people with criminal records.
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5 questions as Minneapolis opens experimental homeless shelter 11.12.2018 Minnesota Public Radio: News
The "navigation center" is the first of its kind in Minnesota and could be a model for sheltering homeless across the state, if it succeeds. Here's what it's about.
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Minneapolis City Council adopts 2040 plan 8.12.2018 Minnesota Public Radio: Politics
The Minneapolis City Council has approved a controversial long-range comprehensive plan.
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Guaranteeing More Equitable Incomes 7.12.2018 American Prospect
A man and his daughter walk past a mural in Harvey, Illinois, outside Chicago.  It’s no revelation that Americans are living in a time of extreme divisiveness in our national politics. One party controls most of the government, and yet action out of Washington is slow to be seen, much less felt, by the American people. At these times of intense polarization among federal leaders the adage “all politics is local” comes into sharp relief.  While what’s happening in Congress or the White House can feel a million miles away, voters are concerned with what’s going on in their states, their cities, their communities, their neighborhoods. A wide swath of the American public sees the same thing: The costs of living and housing rise, yet their incomes don’t. This imbalance is felt even more acutely in communities of color, where there is a higher likelihood that residents work lower-paying jobs while already struggling with a wide income and  wealth gap .  That’s why we were inspired to develop pilot programs in ...
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California gives final OK to requiring solar panels on new houses 6.12.2018 Minnesota Public Radio: Law & Justice
Single and small multi-family homes must include solar panels starting in 2020. Recent extreme weather events such as wildfires and drought make the need clear, a state official says.
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Developer to build 70 homes in response to Mpls homeless camp 6.12.2018 Minnesota Public Radio: News
A Twin Cities affordable housing developer plans to build a 70-unit apartment building in Minneapolis in response to the homeless encampment along Franklin and Hiawatha avenues.
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3 key questions as Minneapolis readies homeless camp shelter 3.12.2018 Minnesota Public Radio: Science
Even as the city and its partners rush to open an emergency shelter for people living in tents along Franklin and Hiawatha avenues, questions vital to the effort's success remain unanswered.
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How America’s Bluest State Can Be a Model for the Other 49 3.12.2018 American Prospect
AP Photo/Rich Pedroncelli Lieutenant Governor Gavin Newsom shakes hands with an election night crowd after he defeated Republican John Cox to become 40th governor of California in Los Angeles.  In the 2018 “blue wave” that flipped the House of Representatives, California flipped the most. Of the  seven target  congressional races in the state, all seven were won by Democrats. Orange County—a key launching pad for the anti-government ideologies of the modern Republican Party—will now be represented in Congress entirely by Democrats. Democrats also won every statewide office and will enjoy super-majorities—sufficient to pass tax legislation—in both state houses. (They’ll hold at least 60 of the 80 Assembly seats and 29 of the 40 in the Senate.) Golden State progressives may be permitted a brief moment – well, maybe a long weekend – of celebration. After all, the state that gave the nation Ronald Reagan, tax-cutting frenzy, and anti-immigrant hysteria now seems to have a Democratic advantage locked-in; even ...
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Mpls. council moves to shift $1.1 million from police department 1.12.2018 Minnesota Public Radio: Law & Justice
The amendment to Mayor Jacob Frey's proposed budget would provide ongoing funding for violence prevention and other programs.
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How the Blue Wave Swelled to a Tsunami in Orange County 30.11.2018 American Prospect
AP Photo/Chris Carlson, File Democratic Representative-elect Katie Porter speaks during an election night event on in Tustin, California.  Ever since California’s Orange County helped power the rise of Barry Goldwater and the Reagan Revolution, political observers have viewed it as the quintessential Republican stronghold.  Such congressional representatives as Dana Rohrabacher and Robert Dornan personified the belligerent far right, the Orange County Register promoted a hard-edged libertarian worldview, and Republican lawmakers such as Christopher Cox, Darrel Issa, and Ed Royce wielded considerable clout on Capitol Hill.      Named for orange groves long vanished, the suburban region south of Los Angeles was known for Disneyland, beautiful beaches, master planned communities, and a powerful conservative business class that exercised national political influence via the Lincoln Club, a high-rolling conservative fundraising group. Republican senators from across the nation made the pilgrimage to Orange ...
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'It's like a friend coming in': Nonprofit connects seniors to groceries, companionship 29.11.2018 Minnesota Public Radio: News
Volunteers with Help At Your Door deliver groceries in the Twin Cities, but also do chores like raking leaves or cleaning gutters in an effort to help seniors live independently as long as possible. As Minnesota's population ages, this kind of service may be increasingly in demand.
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An old Minnesota jail is now a leader for inmate mental health 28.11.2018 Minnesota Public Radio: Law & Justice
Clay County's jail was, not long ago, the oldest in Minnesota. Now, it's home to what officials are calling the state's most unique approach to mental health care of inmates.
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Minneapolis plans to close homeless camp once emergency shelter opens 28.11.2018 Minnesota Public Radio: Law & Justice
Until now, it was unclear what would happen with the site near Franklin and Hiawatha avenues in south Minneapolis.
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Minneapolis moves forward city IDs for undocumented immigrants 27.11.2018 Minnesota Public Radio: News
A council committee voted unanimously Monday to move ahead with the program that could give people easier access to housing, banking and health care.
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DNR signs deal to transform Fort Snelling buildings into homes 22.11.2018 Minnesota Public Radio: Law & Justice
It was once the military capital of the Dakotas, and George Armstrong Custer's superior officer commanded there for a time. It served the armed forces from the Spanish American War until after the dropping of the atomic bomb.
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Airbnb Quit the Settlement Business. If Only Israel Would. 21.11.2018 American Prospect
AP Photo/Tsafrir Abayov A cat jumps at a guest house advertised on Airbnb in the Nofei Prat settlement in the West Bank.  An old friend from America who's a tour operator came to Jerusalem and I went to meet him. His tour group was staying in a hotel in the center of town that I'd never noticed because, in the past, it was probably a down-on-its-luck apartment building or home to small offices of lawyers, accountants, and companies of indistinct purposes. Converting it to a hotel made sense, my friend said, because even in the November off-season, every hotel room in Jerusalem is full. Tourism is roaring. So are short-term rentals of apartments and of rooms in them. A 2017 survey of tourists in Tel Aviv  found that half  were staying in Airbnb or similar accommodations. Young friends tell me of Jerusalem university students making the rent by going home to mom and dad on weekends and renting their apartments to tourists. Then again, the rent is likely higher because some landlords are moving their ...
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Find a home for the homeless? It's no easy task in Minnesota 21.11.2018 Minnesota Public Radio: Law & Justice
Finding a Twin Cities landlord willing to work with someone who's homeless is a huge challenge, even when a tenant has the rent money, and even when the would-be tenant is a woman carrying a newborn.
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The Revolving Door and the Assault on Community Reinvestment 21.11.2018 American Prospect
Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call/via AP Images Joseph Otting, Comptroller of the Currency, prepares to testify during a House Financial Services Committee hearing in Rayburn Building in Washington.  The Community Reinvestment Act (CRA) is a piece of 1977 legislation that requires banks to reinvest in their communities. The Republicans have been gunning for it, and now proposed regulations would weaken it in several key respects. At the heart of this story is the federal regulator of national banks, whose title is U.S. Comptroller of the Currency, a man named Joseph Otting. Conflicts of interest and revolving doors in the Trump administration are such a common story that they barely make news, but this one is worth telling. In his previous job, the CRA nearly cost Otting a $24 million payday.  Congress approved the Community Reinvestment Act in 1977 to combat redlining and other forms of discriminatory lending. Senator William Proxmire, then chair of the Senate Banking Committee, authored the measure amidst ...
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