User: demo Topic: Energy
Category: Solar
1 new since Apr 17 2014 12:19 IST RSS 2.0
 
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Fish helped grow these greens (Cached) 17.4.2014 Durango Herald
In the mountain climate between Bayfield and Pagosa Springs, farmer Matt Brewer plans to harvest 400 to 600 of pounds of leafy greens each week from just one of his aquaponic greenhouses this summer. At Chimney Rock Farms on the Piedra River, Brewer has built two commercial-scale aquaponic greenhouses that house fish tanks and thousands...
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State attorneys general take up fossil fuels boom as IPCC and feds lean green 17.4.2014 Denver Post: News: Local
Days after the U.N.-backed climate change panel of scientists urged a radical shift toward wind and solar energy to slow accelerating greenhouse-gas pollution, U.S. state attorney generals on Wednesday focused on ramped-up production of fossil ...
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Man Reaches For The Sun For A Solution To Pakistan's Gas Crisis 17.4.2014 NPR News
A plan to replace imported oil with domestic natural gas has led to fuel shortages and long lines in Pakistan. A businessman has spent $500,000 of his own money to develop an affordable solar car.
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Owens Valley mobilizes against proposed DWP solar project 16.4.2014 LA Times: Top News
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Turns Out, You Can Make Solar Panels Work in Cloudy Cities 16.4.2014 Mother Jones
This story originally appeared in The Atlantic Cities and is republished here as part of the Climate Desk collaboration. Solar panels have always made sense in cities that get a lot of sun, at least intuitively. But in recent years, scientists have figured out ways to make them more useful for perpetually gloomy cities like London and Seattle. The solution comes down to organic photovoltaics . Unlike traditional solar panels, made of silicon, OPV cells are made of organic semiconductors, which can be 3D-printed or coated over large areas, as seen in the video below. The promise of OPV's isn't necessarily that they'd produce more power than traditional panels, but that they're more efficient at generating power from limited lighting. Silicon cells require direct sunlight (rays must shine at at least 90 degrees) before they start outputting energy. But newer technologies like OPV generate energy regardless of the angle of the rays. On a cloudy day, though there is less sunlight overall, rays still hit the ...
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Top 10 eco homes: Plummerswood 15.4.2014 The Guardian -- Front Page
Our expert panel have created a shortlist of 10 houses all in the running for the title of UK's best eco home. Between 21-24 April, we're inviting you to vote for your favourite. Day six: Plummerswood, a Brettstapel structure on the Scottish borders

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1. Marsh House in Nottingham
2. Princedale road in London
4. Hemp Cottage in County Down, Northern Ireland Continue reading...
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Plane 'flies forever' without a drop of fuel 15.4.2014 CNN: Top Stories
Flight pioneers Bertrand Piccard and Andre Borschberg have unveiled a sun-powered plane that will attempt the first round-the-world solar flight.
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Renewable energy could cut energy bills but the government must help 15.4.2014 The Guardian -- Front Page
The big six still present obstacles, but pioneering local projects in the south-west are showing what can be achieved independently Continue reading...
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Get ready for smaller, better hard drives (Cached) 15.4.2014 New Kerala: Technology
Singapore, April 15 : The hard drives in your computer could get even smaller as scientists have now discovered a novel technique to understand better the new properties that arise when two materials are put together.
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Letter: Feds are bullying ranchers 15.4.2014 Salt Lake Tribune
With regards to forcing Bundy’s cattle off of supposed “federal land.” The alternatives for the BLM are a giant solar power plant for a foreign conglomerate, or perhaps fracking leases for some oil companies. More money is to be made off from gas, oil or solar leases than they can get from the few ranchers they can bully. Our illustrious leadership in Washington will do nothing, since they will get far more donations from these corporations than from a few ranchers. The BLM is even breaking ...
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Apple Buys Tiny Dams to Power Its Data Centers 15.4.2014 Wired Top Stories
Apple is buying up a hydro-electric project in Oregon, hoping to lock into an environmentally sustainable way of powering its massive data ...
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Best of the Web Today: Meet the New Boss 15.4.2014 Wall St. Journal: Opinion
Sebelius steps down, and ObamaCare supporters pretend to rejoice.
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MIT, Harvard scientists find way to produce solar power without sunshine 15.4.2014 Boston Globe: Technology
Scientists at MIT and Harvard say they have developed a material that can produce solar power for times when the sun is not ...
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If You Were Watching Game of Thrones Last Night, You Missed Neil Tyson's Solution to Global Warming 14.4.2014 Mother Jones
Last night's episode of Fox's Cosmos series didn't seem political or controversial, at least on the surface. Rather, it introduced us to the world on the molecular and atomic scale, at one point venturing inside of a dewdrop (packed with extremely cool tiny organisms like tardigrades ) and, later, inside of a plant cell. It was kind of reminiscent of what you learned in your ninth grade bio class—albeit much less sleep inducing. Yet fresh from ticking off creationists, this time around host Neil Tyson managed to work in the science of climate change. Plants, after all, are the reigning global masters of clean energy. They use 100 percent solar power: The chloroplast, the so-called "powerhouse" of a plant cell, is a "3 billion-year-old solar energy collector" and a "sub-microscopic solar battery," as Tyson put it. Basically, chloroplasts use sunlight, carbon dioxide, and water to store energy in sugars, and give off oxygen as a by-product. And without this fundamental green energy technology, life on this ...
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'Big Bird' space neutrino has highest energy yet seen 14.4.2014 New Scientist: Being Human
A playfully named subatomic particle is confirmed, and beats rivals Bert and Ernie in terms of energy. Next step: to find a cluster of space ...
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No option left but to suck CO2 out of air, says IPCC 14.4.2014 New Scientist: Being Human
It's too late to avoid dangerous climate change just by switching to renewable energy, so we will also have to pull the greenhouse gas out of the ...
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German energy crisis points towards climate solution 14.4.2014 New Scientist: Being Human
Europe's powerhouse is leading the fight against climate change, but its push for renewables has left it burning ever more ...
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Triumph of the Drill: How Big Oil Clings to Billions in Government Giveaways 14.4.2014 Mother Jones
Advertise on MotherJones.com Over the past century, the federal government has pumped more than $470 billion into the oil and gas industry in the form of generous, never-expiring tax breaks. Once intended to jump-start struggling domestic drillers, these incentives have become a tidy bonus for some of the world's most profitable companies. Taxpayers currently subsidize the oil industry by as much as $4.8 billion a year, with about half of that going to the big five oil companies—ExxonMobil, Shell, Chevron, BP, and ConocoPhillips—which get an average tax break of $3.34 on every barrel of domestic crude they produce. With Washington looking under the couch cushions for sources of new revenue, oil prices topping $100 a barrel, and the world feeling the heat from its dependence on fossil fuels, there's been a renewed push to close these decades-old loopholes. But history suggests that Big Oil won't let go of its perks without a brawl.   There Will Be Subsidies How the oil companies hit a gusher of tax ...
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A Brief History of Big Tax Breaks for Oil Companies 14.4.2014 Mother Jones
Over the past century, the federal government has pumped more than $470 billion into the oil and gas industry in the form of generous, never-expiring tax breaks. How it all got started: 1916 The petroleum industry takes off as Americans' love affair with the automobile begins. A new tax provision allows oil companies to write off dry holes as well as all "intangible drilling costs" in their first year of exploration. Over the next 15 years, oil and gas subsidies will average $1.9 billion a year in today's dollars. 1926 Congress approves the "depletion allowance," which lets oil producers deduct more than a quarter of their gross revenues. Texas Sen. Tom Connally, who sponsored the break, later admits, "We could have taken a 5 or 10 percent figure, but we grabbed 27.5 percent because we were not only hogs but the odd figure made it appear as though it was scientifically arrived at." 1937 Treasury Secretary Henry Morgenthau calls the depletion allowance "perhaps the most glaring loophole" in the tax code. ...
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Do you want renewable energy? (Cached) 14.4.2014 Durango Herald
La Plata Electrical Association is getting into gardening x2013 solar gardening.LPEAx2019s board of directors has approved a policy agreement with four community solar gardens that will allow its customers to purchase or invest in solar panels to offset their electrical costs.Policy 366, as LPEA is calling it, will set...
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