User: demo Topic: Climate Change
Category: Impacts :: Forest
Last updated: Jan 25 2015 24:37 IST RSS 2.0
 
1 to 20 of 4,333    
Here’s why Obama won’t get a climate deal with India this trip 24.1.2015 Washington Post: World
SHAKTINAGAR, India — In the hilly Singrauli region of northern India, animals feed on ash-covered grass, smoke stings the eyes and burns the throat and the reservoir is foul with toxins like mercury and arsenic. Even the breakfast eggs are gray. Read full article ...
Also found in: [+]
India's tiger population leaps 20.1.2015 CNN: Top Stories
Wild tigers in India appear to be staging a comeback in the battle against extinction, with the country's Environment Minister announcing a 30% increase in the endangered species' population since 2011.
Also found in: [+]
India’s tiger population increases by almost a third 20.1.2015 Guardian: Environment
Population of the endangered species now at 2,226, with campaigners hailing the latest statistics Continue reading...
Also found in: [+]
Everyday climate change – in pictures 20.1.2015 The Guardian -- Front Page

Inspired by the co-founder of Everydayafrica, photographer James Whitlow Delano launched Everydayclimatechange, an Instagram feed where photographers from five continents share their images as evidence that climate change is real and to raise awareness of the situation around the world

Continue reading...
Also found in: [+]
Water stress takes toll on California's large trees, study says 20.1.2015 LA Times: Environment
Drought, fire-suppression techniques and changes in land use have made California forests denser with smaller trees and more susceptible to fast-moving wildfires, a study to be released Tuesday has found.
Also found in: [+]
Rate of environmental degradation puts life on Earth at risk, say scientists 16.1.2015 Guardian: Environment

Humans are ‘eating away at our own life support systems’ at a rate unseen in the past 10,000 years, two new research papers say

Humans are “eating away at our own life support systems” at a rate unseen in the past 10,000 years by degrading land and freshwater systems, emitting greenhouse gases and releasing vast amounts of agricultural chemicals into the environment, new research has found.

Two major new studies by an international team of researchers have pinpointed the key factors that ensure a livable planet for humans, with stark results.

Continue reading...
Also found in: [+]
Scientists: Human activity has pushed Earth beyond four of nine ‘planetary boundaries’ 16.1.2015 Washington Post
At the rate things are going, the Earth in the coming decades could cease to be a “safe operating space” for human beings. That is the conclusion of a new paper published Thursday in the journal Science by 18 researchers trying to gauge the breaking points in the natural world.Read full article ...
Also found in: [+]
The Indian government won’t stop my fight to save Mahan’s forests | Priya Pillai 14.1.2015 Guardian: Comment is Free
I may have been barred from travelling to the UK but the Greenpeace campaign against a coal mine in one of our oldest forests will go on Mahan in Madhya Pradesh is one of the oldest and largest sal forests in Asia. The local communities are dependent on the forest for their livelihoods and it is also home to several rare and endangered species. But a portion of this reserve is earmarked for open cast coal mining by Essar , a British company registered in London. In order to mine for coal, they would need to cut down the forest and displace those who live there. Essar would destroy more than 1,000 hectares of pristine forests and the biodiversity that it supports, affecting 54 villages. It would also impact on the livelihoods of thousands more who depend on forest produce, and the wildlife, water and air in the ...
Also found in: [+]
Integrated Farming: The Only Way to Survive a Rising Sea 10.1.2015 Truthout - All Articles
Sundarbans, India - When the gentle clucking grows louder, 50-year-old Sukomal Mandal calls out to his wife, who is busy grinding ingredients for a fish curry. She gets up to thrust leafy green stalks through the netting of a coop and two-dozen shiny hens rush forward for lunch. In the Sundarbans, where the sea is slowly swallowing up the land, Mandal's half-hectare farm is an oasis of prosperity. The elderly couple resides in the Biswanathpur village located in what has now been declared a UNESCO World Heritage Site: a massive tidal mangrove forest covering some 10,000 km in the vast Bay of Bengal delta, stretching between India and Bangladesh. In this scenic biodiversity hotspot, there is no longer any doubt about the impact of sea-level rise prompted by global warming – studies show that the region lost some 5.5 square km per year between 2001 and 2009, compared to four square km annually over the previous four decades. As a result, the population here is facing a myriad of crises, a lack of ...
Also found in: [+]
An Interview With Social Movement Leader and Parliamentarian Estela Hernandez 9.1.2015 Truthout.com
La Coordinadora of the Lower Lempa and the Bay of Jiquilisco in El Salvador is a grassroots, community-led organization of 27,000 families in more than 100 communities. It is transforming economic and political power and the health of the environment, across the department of Usulután. Pillars of La Coordinadora are participatory democracy, empowerment of women and youth, and – still in the works - education and health care for all. The communities are generating income through a green economy based on ecological agriculture and fishing. La Coordinadora is working to build food sovereignty , protect ecosystems, and preserve the largest remaining mangrove forest in the area. Estela Hernandez is a leader of La Coordinadora and its affiliated non-profit organization, the Mangrove Association. She is also an elected member of the national legislature. There, Hernandez sits on the Environment and Climate Change Commission, the body that drafts environmental legislation. Beverly Bell: Tell us about how La ...
Also found in: [+]
Commodity boom extracting increasingly heavy toll on Amazon forests 6.1.2015 Guardian: Environment
Falling prices and rising debt are driving some Latin American leaders to relax legislation aimed at protecting the environment Continue reading...
Also found in: [+]
Amid Climate Change, What's More Important? 2.1.2015 Truthout - All Articles
At the latest round of international climate talks this month in Lima, Peru, melting glaciers in the Andes and recent droughts provided a fitting backdrop for the negotiators' recognition that it is too late to prevent climate change, no matter how fast we ultimately act to limit it. They now confront an issue that many had hoped to avoid: adaptation. Adapting to climate change will carry a high price tag. Sea walls are needed to protect coastal areas against floods, such as those in the New York area when Superstorm Sandy struck in 2012. We need early-warning and evacuation systems to protect against human tragedies, such as those caused by Typhoon Haiyan in the Philippines in 2013 and by Hurricane Katrina in New Orleans in 2005. Cooling centers and emergency services must be created to cope with heat waves, such as the one that killed 70,000 in Europe in 2003. Water projects are needed to protect farmers and herders from extreme droughts, such as the one that gripped the Horn of Africa in 2011. ...
Also found in: [+]
Tropical forests absorb far more CO2 than thought: NASA 2.1.2015 New Kerala: World News
Washington, Jan 2 : Tropical forests may be absorbing far more carbon dioxide in response to its rising atmospheric levels than many scientists thought, a new NASA-led study says.
Also found in: [+]
Tropical forests absorb far more CO2 than thought: NASA 2.1.2015 Hindu: News
Tropical forests may be absorbing far more carbon dioxide in response to its rising atmospheric levels than many scientists thought, a new NASA-led study says. Tropical forests absorb 1.4...
Also found in: [+]
South American commodity boom drives deforestation and land conflicts 1.1.2015 Washington Post: World
BOGOTA, Colombia — A commodity boom has helped pull millions out of poverty across South America over the past decade. It has also unleashed a new scramble for oil, minerals and cropland that is accelerating deforestation and fueling a new wave of land conflicts from Colombia to Chile.Read full article ...
Also found in: [+]
From Hidden Snipers to Train Surfers, WIRED’s Best Photo Stories of the Year​ 30.12.2014 Wired Top Stories
The inevitable year-end round ups are in full swing, but we here at Raw File can't help but declare the obvious---2014 was a great year for photography. Digital cameras and smartphones have caused image making to be a ubiquitous part of our everyday lives---photographs are everywhere---and we can't get enough. From visions of Russia to outer space to hidden snipers, Raw File is pleased to present our own ...
Also found in: [+]
Engineering Chestnut Trees? Biotechnology Takes a Walk in the Woods 25.12.2014 Truthout - All Articles
GMO chestnuts appear to be a "Trojan horse" intended to win over a public averse to GMO trees. They should be resisted. (Photo: Harold Neal ) As the holiday season approaches, I just can't keep those traditional Christmas tunes out of my head: "Jingle Bells," "Silent Night," "12 Days of Christmas," and of course "The Christmas Song," with its famous opening line, "chestnuts roasting on an open fire." I grew up in New York. My family used to venture into the city during the Christmas season, and we really did purchase little bags of roasted chestnuts from street vendors. I just love the smell and the sweet, earthy flavor of chestnuts. Reminiscing about that led me to think about food, forests and GMOs. Americans have for far too long been used as guinea pigs by the biotechnology industry - consuming far more GMO containing food than any other country, whether we want to or not. Vermont, where I live, recently passed the nation's first GMO labeling law. Monsanto is now suing the state (via the Grocery ...
Also found in: [+]
Restored forests make inroads against climate change 25.12.2014 Star Tribune: World
Also found in: [+]
Brazil's 'chainsaw queen' appointed new agriculture minister 25.12.2014 The Guardian -- World Latest

In a controversial move, Brazilian president Dilma Rousseff has appointed agribusiness advocate Kátia Abreu as the country’s new agriculture minister

Continue reading...
Also found in: [+]
Report suggests forest-cutting can have an immediate effect on climate 19.12.2014 Washington Post: World
RIO DE JANEIRO — The critical role that vast tropical forests like Brazil’s Amazon play in suppressing climate change is well-known: They store huge quantities of carbon, acting as “carbon sinks.”But as a new report out this week argues, scientists are making the case that cutting down these forests does more than simply release carbon into the atmosphere — it has a direct and more immediate effect on the climate, from changes in rainfall patterns to rising temperatures. The amount of water that forests pump into the air is key to this. But scientists don’t agree on how that happens.Read full article ...
Also found in: [+]
1 to 20 of 4,333