User: demo Topic: Climate Change
Category: Impacts :: Forest
Last updated: Mar 06 2015 04:36 IST RSS 2.0
 
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Our Planet's Lungs Are Dying 6.3.2015 Truthout.com
31 July, 2011- Satellite photo of the Amazon Rainforest. (Photo: NASA Goddard Space Flight Center ) Trees are like our planet's lungs. Every second of every day, they're absorbing CO2 from the atmosphere, and converting it into energy. In fact, according to a study by researchers at NASA, each year, tropical rainforests absorb a staggering 1.4 billion metric tons of CO2 from Earth's atmosphere. Through the process of photosynthesis, they're "inhaling" that CO2, and keeping it from further damaging our planet and speeding up the process of climate change. See more news and opinion from Thom Hartmann at Truthout here. Photosynthesis is a process used by trees and other plants to convert sunlight into chemical energy that can be used later as fuel. During photosynthesis, plants absorb CO2, which is combined with water - H2O - to produce a mixture of carbon, oxygen and hydrogen called "carbohydrates" - everything from roots to stems to leaves and fruits. And by absorbing and binding the carbon in carbon ...
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Our Planet's Lungs Are Dying 6.3.2015 Truthout.com
31 July, 2011- Satellite photo of the Amazon Rainforest. (Photo: NASA Goddard Space Flight Center ) Trees are like our planet's lungs. Every second of every day, they're absorbing CO2 from the atmosphere, and converting it into energy. In fact, according to a study by researchers at NASA, each year, tropical rainforests absorb a staggering 1.4 billion metric tons of CO2 from Earth's atmosphere. Through the process of photosynthesis, they're "inhaling" that CO2, and keeping it from further damaging our planet and speeding up the process of climate change. See more news and opinion from Thom Hartmann at Truthout here. Photosynthesis is a process used by trees and other plants to convert sunlight into chemical energy that can be used later as fuel. During photosynthesis, plants absorb CO2, which is combined with water - H2O - to produce a mixture of carbon, oxygen and hydrogen called "carbohydrates" - everything from roots to stems to leaves and fruits. And by absorbing and binding the carbon in carbon ...
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Europe blazes trail against climate change 4.3.2015 New Scientist: Health
Come flood, drought or heatwave, Europe is getting ready a whole host of projects designed to climate-proof the ...
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Hungry insects may halve forest carbon sink capacity 2.3.2015 New Scientist: Living World
Forests may only achieve half of their predicted increase in carbon sink capacity because insects munch more when CO2 levels ...
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Plague Outbreaks That Ravaged Europe Were Driven by Climate Changes in Asia 1.3.2015 Truthout - All Articles
(Image: L. Sabetelli / Wellcome, CC BY ) The Black Death struck Europe in 1347, killing 30-50% of the European population in six violent years. It wasn’t a one-off epidemic: it signalled the start of the second plague pandemic in Europe that lasted for hundreds of years and only slowly disappeared from the continent after the Great Plague of London in 1665-1666. These outbreaks were traditionally thought to be caused by rodent reservoirs of infected rats lurking in Europe’s cities, or potentially by rodent reservoirs in the wilderness. But our research , published in the journal PNAS, suggests otherwise. If the “reservoir” thesis were correct, we would expect plague outbreaks to be associated with local climate fluctuations, through changes in agricultural yields and primary productions in forests, affecting the number of urban and wildlife rodents, resulting in more plague. We found that Europe’s plague outbreaks were indeed associated with climate fluctuations – but in Asia. Body collecting in London, ...
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Climate change gets a boost; environment ministry budget trimmed 1.3.2015 New Kerala: World News
Read Full story of 'Climate change gets a boost; environment ministry budget trimmed' at newkerala.com.
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Climate-warmed leaves change ecosystems: Study 28.2.2015 New Kerala: World News
Read Full story of 'Climate-warmed leaves change ecosystems: Study' at newkerala.com.
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Amazon deforestation soars after a decade of stability 28.2.2015 New Scientist: Being Human
Satellite images of the Amazon show that deforestation in Brazil has, at points, risen to levels 467 per cent of last ...
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To save the rainforest, let the locals take control 28.2.2015 New Scientist: Being Human
Global intervention in tropical forests to combat climate change could sideline their most effective guardians, warns Fred ...
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The critical flaw in the EU's climate plan 25.2.2015 Guardian: Environment
A successful EU climate pledge must look beyond emissions within Europe and include collaborative proposals to reduce pollution in developing nations as well Today the EU will unveil its latest commitment to fighting climate change – a pledge to cut internal emissions by at least 40% by 2030. The new target represents a good step forward, a hard-fought political compromise at a time of considerable economic difficulty. The EU hopes to leverage this pledge at December’s climate talks in Paris, when Europe will press other nations to forge a new agreement to reduce global climate pollution 60% by 2050 . Yet, the EU’s climate plan has a critical flaw: it is incomplete. The EU’s regulations would only reduce emissions within Europe, whereas success on climate depends on Europe also taking steps to cut pollution outside of Europe as ...
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Wolverines expanding range in North Cascades 25.2.2015 AP Washington
YAKIMA, Wash. (AP) -- Wildlife biologist Aja Woodrow has a system to get one of the Northwest's most elusive animals - the wolverine - to pose for pictures....
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Should We Experiment With Climate Geoengineering? 23.2.2015 Truthout.com
The US National Academy of Sciences announced its long-awaited reports on climate geoengineering in mid-February. The reports intelligently state at the outset that geoengineering is no substitute for reducing emissions. But the call for experimentation and research - and for federal government funding for it - is pervasive, loud and clear. And worrisome. A similar call for research was published as a commentary in Nature. Help Truthout keep publishing stories like this: They can't be found in corporate media! Make a tax-deductible donation today. The US National Academy of Sciences (NAS) announced its long-awaited reports on climate geoengineering in mid-February. The reports intelligently state at the outset that geoengineering is no substitute for reducing emissions. But the call for experimentation and research - and for federal government funding for it - is pervasive, loud and clear. And worrisome. A similar call for research was published as a commentary in Nature, conveniently timed just a few ...
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REDD and Neocolonialism in the Land of the Pataxo Warriors 22.2.2015 Truthout - All Articles
It’s 5 o’clock in the morning, southern cone time, on Oct. 13, 2014. The Pataxo indigenous people of the far southern region of the state of Bahía, in the northeast of Brazil, form three barricades across the BR101 Highway in the region of Monte Pascoal, in the city of Itamaraju, one of the main roads connecting the northern and southern parts of the country. They have blocked the highway that runs along the edge of their territory with branches, sticks, and old tires,  stopping hundreds of trucks transporting merchandise from transnational corporations. It doesn’t take police long to arrive. The indigenous people are aware of the possibility of repression. Some have painted their bodies with a mixture of colors– yellow, red, black–colors that their grandfathers used to announce war. Others contrast in white, the sign of peace. Indelible colors on the skin of these people, survivors of an unjust war that has lasted for over five centuries. The atmosphere grew tense as Federal Police came in, although ...
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Millions at risk from rapid sea rise in swampy Sundarbans 18.2.2015 AP Top News
BALI ISLAND, India (AP) -- The tiny hut sculpted out of mud at the edge of the sea is barely large enough for Bokul Mondol and his family to lie down in. The water has taken everything else from them, and one day it almost certainly will take this, too....
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New Map Shows the World’s Ecosystems in Unprecedented Detail 17.2.2015 Wired Top Stories
Ecology has always been a bit doughy compared to subject like physics, chemistry, and hell, even biology. But cut ecologists some slack. The places they study, like alpine prairies, peat bogs, or oases, are the diametric opposite of controlled lab settings. So how do you bring hard data to the study of life on our soft planet? A new ...
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Swamps, wetlands may be key in fight against climate change 16.2.2015 New Kerala: Technology
Read Full story of 'Swamps, wetlands may be key in fight against climate change' at newkerala.com.
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NASA warns of 'megadroughts' 14.2.2015 CNN: Top Stories
If greenhouse gas emissions don't drastically drop, there is no precedent in contemporary weather records for the kinds of droughts facing the country's West, a NASA study said.
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Scientists: No, We Can't Fight Climate Change by Burning Trees 14.2.2015 Mother Jones
This article originally appeared at the Huffington Post and is republished here as part of the Climate Desk collaboration. A group of 78 scientists is criticizing an Environmental Protection Agency memo they say may dramatically undermine President Barack Obama's directive to cut planet-warming emissions. In a letter to EPA Administrator Gina McCarthy, a group that includes climate scientists, engineers, and ecologists criticizes a November 2014 EPA policy memo that discounts emissions generated by burning biomass, including plants, trees, and other wood products known as sources of biogenic carbon dioxide . Critics said they fear the memo shows how biomass might be treated under the EPA's forthcoming Clean Power Plan, which will set the first regulations on greenhouse gas emissions from power plants. The EPA is expected to finalize those regulations by summer. The EPA memo states that using biomass as a source of power is "likely to have minimal or no net atmospheric contributions of biogenic [carbon ...
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Deep in the Amazon, a Tiny Tribe Is Beating Big Oil 13.2.2015 Truthout - All Articles
Sarayaku lies in southern Ecuador, where the government is selling drilling rights to a vast swath of indigenous lands - except for Sarayaku. The community has become a beacon of hope to other indigenous groups and to global climate change activists as it mobilizes to stop a new round of oil exploration. The people of Sarayaku are a leading force in 21st-century indigenous resistance. October 11, 2007: People traveling by canoe on the river Bobonaza at Sarayaku. (Photo: Heather Cowper ) Patricia Gualinga stands serenely as chaos swirls about her. I find this petite woman with striking black and red face paint at the head of the People’s Climate March in New York City on September 21, 2014. She is adorned with earrings made of brilliant bird feathers and a thick necklace of yellow and blue beads. She has come here from Sarayaku, a community deep in the heart of the Amazon rainforest in Ecuador. Behind Gualinga, 400,000 people are in the streets calling for global action to stop climate change. Beside her, ...
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More good news than bad for our birds, as expert surveys the Minnesota scene 12.2.2015 MinnPost
Creative Commons/Caleb Putnam The golden-winged warbler, which has been “showing an extremely sharp decline” across the U.S. since the mid-1960s, is maintaining a stable population in Minnesota. You don’t have to be a passionate birder to be aware of recently gloomy news about the health of bird populations across our continent and even worldwide. Within the last several months we’ve had the Audubon Society’s groundbreaking “Birds and Climate Change” report , which overlaid climate models on its huge bird-count databases to conclude that half of North America’s species may see their normal range shift away from them by the end of this century. Then there was “State of the Birds 2014,” fifth in an annual series by a broad consortium of U.S. government agencies and conservation organizations, and far more discouraging than the previous four in its assessment of how habitat loss, pollution and other environmental pressures are threatening birds. A fine piece of investigative/analytical journalism at ...
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