User: demo Topic: Climate Change
Category: Impacts :: Forest
Last updated: Aug 03 2015 22:51 IST RSS 2.0
 
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Busted: 3 myths about Obama's climate plan 3.8.2015 CNN: Top Stories
On Sunday morning, President Obama released a video "memo to America." It pointed to droughts, super-storms and increases in asthma as evidence that climate change is not just a problem for future generations, but our own.
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Obama to unveil major climate change proposal 2.8.2015 CNN: Top Stories
The Obama administration will unveil a major climate change plan Monday aimed at a large reduction in greenhouse gas emissions from the nation's coal-burning power plants, a senior administration official told CNN.
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Why We All Need to Learn the Word "Anthropogenic" 30.7.2015 Truthout - All Articles
The wettest rainforest in the continental United States had gone up in flames and the smoke was so thick, so blanketing, that you could see it miles away. Deep in Washington's Olympic National Park, the aptly named Paradise Fire, undaunted by the dampness of it all, was eating the forest alive and destroying an ecological Eden. In this season of drought across the West, there have been far bigger blazes but none quite so symbolic or offering quite such grim news. It isn't the size of the fire (though it is the largest in the park's history), nor its intensity. It's something else entirely - the fact that it shouldn't have been burning at all. When fire can eat a rainforest in a relatively cool climate, you know the Earth is beginning to burn. And here's the thing: the Olympic Peninsula is my home. Its destruction is my personal nightmare and I couldn't stay away. Smoke Gets in My Eyes "What a bummer! Can't even see Mount Olympus," a disappointed tourist exclaimed from the Hurricane Ridge visitor center. ...
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Orangutans face extinction on Borneo where deforestation is unsustainable: UN 30.7.2015 New Kerala: World News
New York, Jul 30 : The massive conversion of Borneo's forests for the production palm oil together with the impact of climate change is driving to extinction the orangutan on Asia's largest island, making it "clear that a future without sustainable development will be a future with a different climate and, eventually, without orangutans, one of our closest relatives," a new United Nations report revealed on Wednesday.
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Drought, urbanization and climate: big business opportunities for long-term thinkers 28.7.2015 Guardian: Environment
Resource scarcity is a major business challenge, but evolving market conditions mean companies that can adapt quickly could reap big profits As São Paulo, Brazil, suffers from the worst drought in its history, multinational pulp company Fibria, which is headquartered in the city, is one of many that has felt the pinch. At times, water has been shut off to 40% of the city and even now, after the rainy season, only 6-13% of the city’s reservoir’s capacity has been filled. In response, the company is working to reduce the amount of water it uses for forest irrigation. This isn’t the first time that Fibria has had to adapt to a shifting environment. Over the last several years, the rising scarcity of several essential resources – including water, fertilizer, labor and land – has pushed the company to reconsider its business model. It has diversified into renewable energy, biofuel production and sustainable real estate development. Fibria’s goal is to make these portfolio additions 20% of total free cash flow ...
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Rocky Mountain resorts race to defend their businesses against climate change 28.7.2015 LA Times: Commentary
Not everyone arriving in this Rocky Mountain resort steps from a private jet.
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Beneath Alaskan wildfires, a hidden threat: Long-frozen carbon's thaw 27.7.2015 Minnesota Public Radio: Law & Justice
As millions of acres of forests burn across the state this summer, there's growing concern about what impact that might have on permafrost -- and how melting permafrost might affect climate change.
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Alaskan villages imperiled by global warming need resources to relocate | Victoria Herrmann 27.7.2015 Guardian: Comment is Free
Climate change rendering coastlines uninhabitable is starkest in the Arctic, but places like New Jersey and California will soon be at risk too The Arctic is warming at a rate almost twice the global average , making climate change’s effects there far more intense and rapid than any other ecosystem in the world. While nature photographs of polar bears and melting ice dominate media narratives, the top of the world is home to 4m people who face an uncertain ...
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Beneath Alaskan Wildfires, A Hidden Threat: Long-Frozen Carbon's Thaw 27.7.2015 NPR News
As millions of acres of forests burn across the state this summer, there's growing concern about what impact that might have on permafrost — and how melting permafrost might affect climate change.
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Sebastião Salgado focuses on big picture with parable of reforestation in Brazil | John Vidal 27.7.2015 Guardian: Environment

At a Paris climate change meeting, the celebrated Brazilian photographer joined Bishop Fredrick Shoo of Tanzania in extolling the merits of reseeding forests

When the renowned Brazilian photographer Sebastião Salgado took over family land in the state of Minas Gerais, instead of the tropical paradise that he remembered as a child, he found the trees cut down and the wildlife gone. He was devastated.

It was 1994 and he had just returned from a traumatic assignment reporting on the genocide in Rwanda, he told a meeting of religious leaders discussing climate change in Paris this week.

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Alaska’s terrifying wildfire season and what it says about climate change 27.7.2015 Washington Post
FAIRBANKS, Alaska — Hundreds of wildfires are continually whipping across this state this summer, leaving in their wake millions of acres of charred trees and blackened earth.At the Fairbanks compound of the state’s Division of Forestry recently, workers were busy washing a mountain of soot-covered fire hoses, which stood in piles roughly six feet high and 100 feet long. About 3,500 smokejumpers, hotshot crews, helicopter teams and other workers have traveled to Alaska this year from across the country and Canada. And they have collectively deployed about 830 miles of hose this year to fight fires.Read full article ...
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Building Islands and Burying Reefs in the South China Sea 24.7.2015 Truthout.com
Island-building isn't new. San Francisco built Treasure Island in the 1930s for the Golden Gate International Exposition. Miami's exclusive Star Island was constructed by the Army Corps of Engineers back in the 1920s. And of course there are more recent examples, such as Dubai's infamous Palm Islands.   Chinese development at the newly reclaimed Fiery Cross Reef, which lies on the west side of Spratly Island. China's island-building boom is widely seen as an attempt to tighten its control over the South China Sea. Now, China is fervently adding to that list at an unprecedented rate. For the past 18-plus months, China has been "reclaiming land" in the Spratly Islands, an island chain that consists of more than 200 identified reefs, atolls, islands, and islets in the South China Sea. A half-dozen nations make territorial claims over the strategically important area, and China's island-building boom is widely seen as an attempt to tighten its control over the South China Sea. So far, China has completed the ...
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Mangroves help protect against sea-level rise 24.7.2015 New Kerala: World News
London, July 24 : Mangrove forests could play a crucial role in protecting coastal areas from sea-level rise caused by climate change, a new study has found.
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5 telltale techniques of climate change denial 23.7.2015 CNN: Top Stories
There is overwhelming scientific evidence that humans are causing global warming. Nevertheless, a small proportion of the population continues to deny the science. This can be problematic when the small number denying climate science includes half of the U.S. Senate.
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Act on climate change now, top British institutions tell governments 21.7.2015 The Guardian -- World Latest

Joint letter by 24 scientific, medical and engineering bodies say mitigation will also bring economic and health benefits

An unprecedented coalition of the UK’s most eminent scientific, medical and engineering bodies says immediate action must be taken by governments to avert the worst impacts of climate change.

But the joint communiqué, issued by 24 academic and professional institutions, also says that tackling global warming would drive economic progress, benefit the health of millions by cutting air pollution and improve access to energy, water and food. To have a reasonable chance of keeping warming below 2C, the internationally agreed danger limit, the world must end all emissions within the next few decades, the communiqué warns.

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America must lead the climate change fight or our leadership record is toast | Senators Ben Cardin and Sheldon Whitehouse 20.7.2015 The Guardian -- Front Page

More prosperous countries have the largest carbon emissions and poorer countries bear the consequences

The atmosphere is warming. Ice is melting. Droughts are worsening; seas are warming, rising and acidifying. We’re past theory and well into measurement on those points. Pope Francis recently observed that “[n]ever have we so hurt and mistreated our common home as we have in the last 200 years.” The matter of climate change is urgent, and it commands a moral dimension.

Related: The Earth, our home, is beginning to look like an immense pile of filth

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Government makes 'outrageous' U-turn over fracking in precious wildlife sites 16.7.2015 Guardian: Environment

Green MP Caroline Lucas says decision to backtrack on vow to ban fracking in sites of special scientific interest shows ministers cannot be trusted on issue

The government has made a U-turn on its promise to exclude fracking from Britain’s most important nature sites, arguing that the shale gas industry would be held back if it was excluded from them.

Campaigners accused ministers of putting wildlife at risk and reneging on their pledge earlier this year to ban fracking in sites of special scientific interest (SSSIs), which cover around 8% of England and similar proportions of Wales and Scotland.

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Lawmakers back coal mine, criticize Interior Department 11.7.2015 Durango Herald
WASHINGTON, D.C. – Several members of Colorado’s congressional delegation sent a letter to Interior Secretary Sally Jewell this week expressing concerns surrounding the Colowyo Mine. Environmental groups have filed a lawsuit seeking to close the mine near Craig.“The Colowyo Coal Mine is a significant contributor to...
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Is climate change fueling more wild fires? 10.7.2015 Minnesota Public Radio: News
On this week's Climate Cast, we looked at how climate change contributes to these fires in boreal forests and is also fueled by them in what MPR Meteorologist calls a feedback loop.
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ERROR: Missing Story Title 8.7.2015 Boston Globe: Latest
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