User: demo Topic: Climate Change
Category: Impacts :: Forest
Last updated: Dec 19 2014 15:54 IST RSS 2.0
 
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Report suggests forest-cutting can have an immediate effect on climate 19.12.2014 Washington Post: World
RIO DE JANEIRO — The critical role that vast tropical forests like Brazil’s Amazon play in suppressing climate change is well-known: They store huge quantities of carbon, acting as “carbon sinks.”But as a new report out this week argues, scientists are making the case that cutting down these forests does more than simply release carbon into the atmosphere — it has a direct and more immediate effect on the climate, from changes in rainfall patterns to rising temperatures. The amount of water that forests pump into the air is key to this. But scientists don’t agree on how that happens.Read full article ...
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Quiz: Extinct or Endangered? 18.12.2014 Wired Top Stories
Do you know your extinct and endangered animals? Above is an Amur leopard, a species that is still around but critically endangered. Unfortunately, there are many examples of animals lost forever, or close to the brink of extinction. Take the quiz and see if you know whether these animals are extinct or extant (still living).  ...
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Climate Change and Inequalities: How Will They Impact Women? 16.12.2014 Truthout.com
(Image: Setting sun via Shutterstock)The success of climate change actions depend on elevating women's voices, making sure their experiences and views are heard at decision-making tables and supporting them to become leaders in climate adaptation. United Nations - Among all the impacts of climate change, from rising sea levels to landslides and flooding, there is one that does not get the attention it deserves: an exacerbation of inequalities, particularly for women. Especially in poor countries, women’s lives are often directly dependent on the natural environment. Women bear the main responsibility for supplying water and firewood for cooking and heating, as well as growing food. Drought, uncertain rainfall and deforestation make these tasks more time-consuming and arduous, threaten women’s livelihoods and deprive them of time to learn skills, earn money and participate in community life. But the same societal roles that make women more vulnerable to environmental challenges also make them key actors ...
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Yurok tribe hopes California's cap-and-trade can save a way of life 16.12.2014 LA Times: Environment
This winter, Yurok tribe forestry crews will be four-wheeling down muddy fire roads, hiking through steep, slippery brush and trekking across more than 20,000 acres of forest to count and measure trees.
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Climate change will leave Christmas trees in hot water 16.12.2014 New Scientist: News
Declining snowfall in winter will leave Norwegian spruce trees at the mercy of sub-zero temperatures and insect ...
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How a Flying Laser Built a 3-D Map of a Massive Alaskan Forest 16.12.2014 Wired Top Stories
This summer, a team of scientists mapped carbon storage in a massive Alaskan forest using airborne ...
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Tropical rainforests not absorbing as much carbon as expected, scientists say 15.12.2014 Guardian: Science

Findings could indicate some forests are not helping mitigate effects of climate change by removing excess carbon dioxide from atmosphere

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Climate Change Creates New Geography of Food 14.12.2014 Truthout - All Articles
Coffee rust at a farm in Cauca, southwestern Colombia. (Photo: Neil Palmer / CIAT ) Lima, Peru - The magnitude of the climate changes brought about by global warming and the alterations in rainfall patterns are modifying the geography of food production in the tropics, warned participants at the climate summit in the Peruvian capital. That was the main concern among experts in food security taking part in the 20th session of the Conference of the Parties (COP20) to the United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change (UNFCCC), held Dec. 1-12 in Lima. They are worried about rising food prices if tropical countries fail to take prompt action to adapt. The International Food Policy Research Institute (IFPRI estimates that climate change will trigger food price hikes of up to 30 percent. The countryside is the first sector directly affected by climate change, said Andy Jarvis, a researcher at the International Centre for Tropical Agriculture (CIAT) who specialises in low-carbon farming in the CGIAR ...
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Hu tieu, a Vietnamese dish spiced with prosperity and climate change 14.12.2014 The Guardian -- Front Page

The rice noodle soup, a specialty of the Mekong Delta, tells the tale of the changing economy and environment in the region. Is Vietnam becoming a victim of our appetites?

On a visit last month to the town of My Tho, the capital of the Tien Giang province in Vietnam’s Mekong Delta, I found a riverside restaurant that served the local specialty, a dish called hu tieu. It’s a delicious soup, dense with stretchy rice noodles and topped with succulent locally farmed shrimp.

These two ingredients of hu tieu have set the delta on a remarkable path to prosperity. In provinces like Tien Giang and neighboring Ben Tre, as one drives east toward the South China Sea, the landscape is stitched together with fertile rice paddies and brackish ponds teeming with shrimp. This transformation has taken place in just one generation.

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Deal reached at U.N. climate change talks in Peru 14.12.2014 L.A. Times - World News
After late-night wrangling at U.N.  talks in Peru, negotiators early Sunday reached a watered-down deal that sets the stage for a global climate pact in Paris next year.
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A Tiny Island. Millions of Crabs. Terrifyingly Awesome Photos 12.12.2014 Mother Jones
An Australian wildlife official inspects migrating red crabs on Christmas Island, in 2013. Xu Yanyan/Xinhua/ZUMA This month, an eerily precise annual migration began in earnest on a tiny Australian island about 500 miles off the coast of Indonesia. Every year, millions of adult red crabs—first the males, then the females— scamper out from Christmas Island's central forests, across the island, and finally to beaches that meet the Indian Ocean. Their goal is to stage one giant crab sex party: to mate and spawn. The local government has constructed underground crab-ways to accommodate the migration. Parks Australia According to Christmas Island National Park authorities , "the females will spend two weeks brooding their eggs before making their way to the cliffs and beaches to spawn. This should occur about the 18th-19th of December. Before sunrise on these mornings the females will release their eggs into the ocean—timed perfectly for the receding tide." Amazing. Watch them below making their slow, ...
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"We Are Like the Walking Dead": Latin American Indigenous Groups Decry Corporate Destruction of Land 12.12.2014 Truthout.com
As the United Nations Climate Conference in Peru enters its final phase, thousands of people marched in downtown Lima on Wednesday to call for action on global warming. We hear from some of the voices who took to the streets: frontline indigenous and rural communities from across Latin America who are among the most impacted by both the industrial practices that fuel climate change and the impacts of global warming. TRANSCRIPT: This is a rush transcript. Copy may not be in its final form. AMY GOODMAN: We’re broadcasting from COP 20, the United Nations climate conference in Lima, Peru, where Secretary of State John Kerry is due to arrive today as the talks enter their final two days. The last time a U.S. secretary of state attended the summit was Hillary Clinton in 2009 in Copenhagen. Leaders from about 190 nations are trying to work out a draft deal to limit rising global greenhouse gas emissions ahead of next year’s summit in Paris, where an agreement is expected to be finalized. On Wednesday, the ...
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Community Agriculture Alliance: Lodgepole pine, a story of resilience 12.12.2014 Steamboat Pilot
Sometimes it seems that lodgepole pine doesn’t get the respect it deserves. In the wake of the recent mountain pine beetle epidemic, some people question whether it’s a good thing to plant lodgepole seedlings on their property. “Won’t the beetles just get them?” they ask. Others question its value as lumber, since they have become accustomed to paying loggers to harvest them, and "Isn’t climate change going to make them extinct around here, anyway?" Let’s take a deeper look at this remarkable and resilient tree that is such an integral part of our local forests, and in the process, let's attempt to address some of these concerns. Lodgepole pine forests cover more than 1.5 million acres in Colorado, or approximately 7 percent of the state’s forested lands — that is roughly the same percentage in Routt County of pure lodgepole, around 72,000 acres. They can grow between 6,000 and 11,000 feet in elevation, but tend to grow best between 8,000 and 10,000 feet. The common name of “lodgepole pine” derives from, ...
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Brazilian Indigenous Leader: Carbon Trading Scheme "REDD" a False Solution to Climate Change 11.12.2014 Truthout.com
The controversial carbon trading scheme known as REDD, or Reducing Emissions from Deforestation and Forest Degradation, has set off protests not only in Africa, but also in South America, especially in the Amazon region. We speak to Chief Ninawa Huni Kui, president of the Federation of the Huni Kui, an indigenous group in Brazil. He has traveled to the U.N. climate summit in Lima to voice his opposition to REDD. TRANSCRIPT: AMY GOODMAN: We turn right now to the controversial carbon trading that [Nnimmo Bassey] was talking about, known as REDD—again, Reducing Emissions from Deforestation and Forest Degradation, R-E-D-D, which has set off protests not only in Africa, but also in South America, especially in the Amazon. Earlier this week, I interviewed Chief Ninawa Huni Kui, president of the Federation of the Huni Kui, an indigenous group in Brazil. He traveled to Lima to voice his opposition to REDD. NINAWA HUNI KUI: [translated] My name is Ninawa, and I am the president of the Federation of the Huni Kui ...
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From South America to Africa, "Capitalist" Solutions to Climate Change Seen as Path to Catastrophe 11.12.2014 Truthout.com
We are broadcasting from the United Nations climate summit in Lima, Peru, where high-level talks have just gotten under way. On Tuesday, Bolivian President Evo Morales called on delegates to include the wisdom of indigenous people in the global agreement to address climate change and criticized the summit for failing to address capitalism as the root of the crisis. We discuss the state of the climate talks with Nnimmo Bassey, a Nigerian environmental activist, director of Health of Mother Earth Foundation, and author of To Cook a Continent: Destructive Extraction and the Climate Crisis in Africa. Bassey says the carbon trading included in the draft agreement could increase deforestation, displace farmers and contribute to the food crisis in Africa. TRANSCRIPT: AMY GOODMAN: Peruvian musicians who performed yesterday at the opening ceremony of the U.N. climate summit. They were just practicing in the walkways here in Pentagonito. That is the site, the very well-fortified site, where this U.N. climate ...
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Budget deal takes aim, but misses on climate plans 11.12.2014 AP Politics
WASHINGTON (AP) -- A congressional deal to finance the government chips away at some Obama administration energy and environmental programs, but leaves largely intact the president's plans on global warming - at least until Republicans take control of Congress next month....
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Thousands march for climate justice in Lima 11.12.2014 Hindu: International
“Water yes, Oil No”, said a banner at the march for climate in Lima on Wednesday, indicative of the life and death battles over natural resources for the indigenous people in the Pe...
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Budget deal leaves major climate plans intact, but previews wish list of new Congress 11.12.2014 Star Tribune: Politics
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Thousands of marchers demand just solution at UN climate talks in Lima 11.12.2014 Guardian: Environment

Indigenous peoples from the Andes to the Amazon joined trade unionists, students and women’s groups in demonstration in the Peruvian capital

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Fracking, REDD, Lima climate talks. . . all slammed at Nature Rights Tribunal 10.12.2014 Guardian: Environment

13 judges meet in Peru to hear accusations that the rights of “Mother Earth” are being violated

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