User: demo Topic: Climate Change
Category: Impacts :: Forest
Last updated: Feb 07 2016 22:30 IST RSS 2.0
 
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"Making the Promises Real": Labor and the Paris Climate Agreement 7.2.2016 Truthout.com
A labor climate program can serve as the leading edge of a campaign to realize such traditional labor goals as full employment, job security, equality, human rights on the job and protection against the economic insecurities of working people's lives. The Eiffel tower, covered by a green visual forest during the 2015 Paris Climate Conference, December 2, 2015. A labor climate program can draw together workers, unions and allies around protecting jobs by protecting the climate. (Photo: Petr Kovalenkov / Shutterstock.com ) As nearly 200 nations gathered in Paris approved the UN Climate Change Agreement, the AFL-CIO issued a statement that broke new ground on climate. [1] While the AFL-CIO opposed the Kyoto climate agreement and never supported the failed Copenhagen agreement, it "applauded the Paris climate change agreement as "a landmark achievement in international cooperation" and called on America "to make the promises real." Although it has frequently pointed out the harm that workers and communities ...
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Call for urgent inquiry into world heritage forest fires in Tasmania 4.2.2016 Guardian: Environment

Experts say fires like those that continue to ravage Tasmanian forests, and look set to burn for days or weeks to come, could be the ‘new normal’

A national inquiry into the fires devastating world heritage forests in Tasmania is urgently needed, say conservationists and academics. The call comes as experts say fires like those could be the new normal.

The Australian Conservation Foundation has called for the public inquiry as dozens of fires continue to ravage the world heritage forests and look set to burn for days or weeks to come.

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Big Oil and Gas Want Them Out, but One Small Clan Is Standing Up to Pipeline Expansion 1.2.2016 Truthout.com
This clan of the Wet'suwet'en First Nation has occupied its traditional territory in northern British Columbia for more than five years, a response to a proposed network of pipelines full of crude oil and fracked natural gas that would cross this landscape from the energy nexus in Alberta. Barbed wire along the Wedzin Kwah. (Photo: Stephen Miller) Down a logging road in northern British Columbia, signs of modern life slowly disappear. Blue, snow-capped mountains fill the landscape, their yellowed forests bearing the scars of clear-cutting and the ravenous pine beetle, while the road begins to mimic the path of a river.  Forty miles into the wilderness, visitors reach a bridge checkpoint: an entrance into Unist'ot'en territory. A young man in thick winter gear walks across a bridge to meet them. He asks for names. The volunteer communicates by radio to the clan's spokesperson, who arrives shortly and takes visitors through a protocol used by generations of indigenous peoples to determine entry onto their ...
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The Dark Side of Clean Energy in Mexico 29.1.2016 Truthout.com
The production of electricity from wind power in Mexico's Tehuantepec Isthmus region is seen by the government, developers and industry as a win-win development model. But local communities, including Indigenous farmers, are resisting so-called green development that may actually pollute their land. Bartolo is an Indigenous Zapotec who has been surrounded by the wind farm company Gas Natural Fenosa. (Photo: Santiago Navarro F.) A palm hat worn down by time covers the face of Celestino Bortolo Teran, a 60-year-old Indigenous Zapotec man. He walks behind his ox team as they open furrows in the earth. A 17-year-old youth trails behind, sowing white, red and black corn, engaging in a ritual of ancient knowledge shared between local people and the earth. Neither of the two notices the sound of our car as we arrive "because of the wind turbines," Teran says. Just 50 meters away, a wind farm has been installed by the Spanish company Gas Natural Fenosa. It will generate, at least for the next three decades, what ...
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Best defense against climate change is... 29.1.2016 New Kerala: World News
Washington D.C, Jan 29 : Intact nature offers the best defense against the climate change, according to a recent study.
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Is El Niño to Blame for the Zika Virus Outbreak? 28.1.2016 Mother Jones
The ongoing outbreak of Zika virus in Latin America took a surreal turn last week when health officials in El Salvador advised women there not to get pregnant for the next two years. Similar, though less extreme, warnings have been issued by Brazil, Colombia, and several other countries. The virus has infected more than a million people during the current epidemic, and health officials say that it may be linked to a spike in microcephaly, a rare condition in which infants are born with unusually small heads. Behind the outbreak is a complex combination of environmental and economic factors. Here's what you need to know: What is Zika? Zika was first identified in monkeys in Uganda's Zika Forest in 1947. In the years since, the disease has slowly migrated eastward around the globe, following oceanic trade routes with the help of infected sailors and mosquitoes trapped in the holds of ships. The first serious outbreak occurred in 2007 in Micronesia , where up to 60 people were infected, followed by cases in ...
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Australia drops 10 spots in Greg Hunt's most trusted climate rankings 28.1.2016 Guardian: Environment

Environment minister has described Yale’s environmental performance index as ‘the most credible ... in the world’ but Australia performs badly in latest ratings

The index that Greg Hunt used to defend Australia’s record on climate change has placed the country lower in its rankings, leaving only Saudi Arabia with a worse ranking among wealthy nations in some categories.

Yale’s environmental performance index ranks countries’ performance in protecting human health and ecosystems, and looks at nine areas including air quality, climate and energy, forests and water resources.

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Nature Conservancy climate director advocates restoring landscape's ability to resist climate change 28.1.2016 Steamboat Pilot
Doing more to restore and enhance the capacity of the world’s soils to store carbon could become one of the most effective and economical tools for mitigating climate change, The Nature Conservancy’s Tim Sullivan told a packed audience in Steamboat Springs on Tuesday. “We really believe investments in nature can be our best intermediate path to addressing climate change, including greenhouse gasses,” Sullivan said, adding that natural systems can be a “bridge to long-term solutions" for the health of the planet. “Cows Save the Planet and Other Improbable Ways of Restoring Soil to Heal the Earth” Judith G. Schwartz Sullivan is The Nature Conservancy’s climate director for North America, a resident of Steamboat and TNC’s former Colorado director. His remarks Tuesday at Creekside Cafe addressed the role of land-based solutions to the global climate strategy. Sullivan said his presentation would be predicated on the assumption that climate change is real and people should be doing something about it. As ...
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World heritage forests burn as global tragedy unfolds in Tasmania 27.1.2016 Guardian: Environment

‘Devastating’ long-term prognosis for ancient Gondwana ecosystem as bushfires turn trees more than 1,000 years old to tinder

A global tragedy is unfolding in Tasmania. World heritage forests are burning; 1,000-year-old trees and the hoary peat beneath are reduced to char.

Fires have already taken stands of king billy and pencil pine – the last remaining fragments of an ecosystem that once spread across the supercontinent of Gondwana. Pockets of Australia’s only winter deciduous tree, the beloved nothofagus – whose direct kin shade the sides of the South American Andes – are now just a wind change away from eternity.

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A war on drugs? We'd be better off paying for a war on hunger | Natasha Horsfield 21.1.2016 The Guardian -- Front Page

Deforestation, limiting access to pain relief, forcing farmers into poverty: we need to wake up to the fact that prohibiting drugs causes more harm than good

Global drug control policies, much like tax or climate change, impact heavily on many areas of development and inevitably on efforts to meet many of the sustainable development goals that were launched by the UN last year and came into force on 1 January.

Since the mid-20th century, global drug policy has been dominated by strict prohibition and the criminalisation of drug cultivation, production, trade, possession and use, with the intention of creating a drug-free world.

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Today's Slaves Often Work For Enterprises That Destroy The Environment 21.1.2016 NPR News
Kevin Bales' book, Blood and Earth, explains why slavery in the world's lawless zones is essential to operate mines that pose a grave threat to the environment.
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Ice age delayed by humans 14.1.2016 CNN: Top Stories
Could this be good news about global warming? Latest research suggests that human intervention has postponed the beginning of the next ice age.
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Campaigners call for new British charter for trees 13.1.2016 Guardian: Environment

Conservation groups want a new national charter to save trees and woods from the ‘unprecedented threat’ of development, disease and climate change

A coalition of UK conservation groups is calling for a new national charter for trees, woods and people.

Led by the Woodland Trust, 48 conservation and cultural groups have launched a campaign for a new charter in 2017, the 800-year anniversary of the signing of the original Charter of the Forest by Henry III. This protected and restored the right of people to access and use the royal forests - crucial at the time for grazing livestock, collecting firewood and foraging for food.

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Researchers: Small Colorado glacier could melt in 20 years 13.1.2016 Seattle Times: Local

DENVER (AP) — DENVER — A small glacier in the mountains west of Boulder, Colorado, could disappear in about 20 years because of regional climate warming and drought, and similar thawing could be underway elsewhere in Colorado’s high country, researchers said Tuesday. A severe drought and high temperatures in the early 2000s caused a rapid […]
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Could artificial trees be part of the climate change solution? 12.1.2016 Guardian: Environment
Real trees are forced to work harder as more carbon is released into the atmosphere. Technology could share the load

In the fight against climate change, trees are an ally. They suck in carbon dioxide, reducing the harmful greenhouse gases. But there’s a problem: we’re asking them to work overtime.

Trees can’t absorb enough of the carbon dioxide humanity is throwing at them unless we turn every inch of available land into a dense forest, according to Christophe Jospe, chief strategist at Arizona State’s Center for Negative Carbon Emissions.

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The solution for the melting polar ice caps may be hiding in the rainforest | Jessica Lee 11.1.2016 Guardian: Comment is Free
Reducing carbon emissions is truly important to mitigating climate change. But in the meantime, it’s faster and cheaper to save and regrow tropical trees There was already dramatic evidence that our planet is undeniably warming before 30 December 2015, when the world heard that the ice at the North Pole was melting. (The temperature on 30 December 2015 was, by some reports, 33ºF [0.7ºC], 50ºF above average). And yet one immediate, effective way to fight climate change and save polar ice caps is half a world away, in the tropics. Tropical forest conservation and restoration could constitute half of the global warming solution, according to a recent peer reviewed commentary in Nature Climate Change ...
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Is Zero Deforestation Possible for the Brazilian Amazon? 10.1.2016 Truthout.com
This Voices piece is published in collaboration with the academic journal Elementa as part of its special feature "The extinction of deforestation in the Brazilian Amazon: Is it possible?" From 2005 to 2014, the rate of deforestation in the Amazon rainforest went from 19,014 square kilometers  (7,342 square miles) to 5,012 square kilometers (1,935 square miles): a reduction of about 70 percent. Impressive, to be sure, but the rate still remains high. Additionally, when the effects from deforestation are combined with changes in climate, the near-term trend is still severe degradation of the Amazon. It is urgent that the deforestation still happening in the region stop completely to interrupt this process of biological impoverishment. Zero deforestation is vital to maintain the environmental services the Amazon provides: water provision, climate regulation, carbon storage, pollination, biodiversity, natural pest control, scenic beauty, tourism and more. For example, the Amazon forest has an important ...
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Brown's budget earmarks big money for natural disasters 8.1.2016 LA Times: Commentary

After one of the most destructive fire seasons in California history and with an eye toward the increased potential effects of climate change, Gov. Jerry Brown has proposed spending more on fighting wildfires than the state has in more than a decade.

Brown’s $170.7 billion budget proposal includes...

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Nation's 2015 wildfire season just set an amazing and troubling new record 6.1.2016 Chicago Tribune: Nation
Last year's wildfire season set a record with more than 10 million acres burned. That's more land than Maryland, the District of Columbia and Delaware combined. More than half the total was the result of mega-fires in Alaska, where dryness due to historically low mountain snowpack and a freak ...
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What does the Paris Agreement mean for the world's other 8 million species? 6.1.2016 Guardian: Environment
In December, the world’s nations agreed on the the most significant and aggressive plan yet to combat climate change. But what, if anything, will the landmark Paris Agreement do for thousands of species – named and unnamed, known and unknown – already under threat due to global warming? The word ‘biodiversity’ is employed once in the Paris Agreement’s 32 pages. ‘Forests’ appears a few times, but ‘oceans,’ like biodiversity, scores just a single appearance. There is no mention of extinction. Wildlife, coral reefs, birds, frogs, orchids, polar bears and pikas never show up anywhere in the document. This is hardly surprising: the landmark agreement in Paris – the boldest yet to tackle climate change (which is saying something, but not nearly enough) – was contrived by one species for the benefit of one species. It was never meant to directly address the undeniable impacts of global warming on the world’s eight million or so other species – most of them still unnamed. But many experts say this doesn’t mean ...
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