User: demo Topic: Climate Change
Category: Impacts :: Forest
Last updated: Mar 27 2015 22:35 IST RSS 2.0
 
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What Lies Behind the Recent Surge of Amazon Deforestation 27.3.2015 Truthout - All Articles
After declining by more than 70 percent in recent years, deforestation in the Amazon is soaring. In an interview with Yale Environment 360, scientist Philip Fearnside explains what's driving the clearing of the Amazon and what needs to be done to once again bring deforestation under control. Ecologist Philip Fearnside has lived and worked in the Brazilian Amazon for 30 years and is one of the foremost authorities on deforestation in the world's largest tropical forest. A professor at the National Institute for Research in the Amazon, Fearnside has focused his work on how to sustainably develop the Amazon in the face of enormous pressures to cut and clear the forest. Fearnside is now watching with alarm as, after a decade of declining deforestation rates, the pace of cutting and forest clearing in the Amazon is on the rise again. In an interview with Yale Environment 360, Fearnside explains the factors behind the resurgence in deforestation, including a slowly improving global economy, rising commodity ...
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In vast swaths of rural New South Wales, there's only one election issue: coal seam gas 26.3.2015 The Guardian -- World Latest

CSG is a big vote swinger in the country, with many communities declaring themselves ‘gasfield free’. This is not just about the environment, writes our reporter: it’s also about people wanting to be heard

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State-by-state glance from new report on New England plants 26.3.2015 AP National
A state-by-state look at examples of rare and endangered plants, highlighted by the New England Wild Flower Society in a report being released on Thursday:...
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Study of New England plant life finds many species are threatened, in decline or endangered 26.3.2015 Star Tribune: Nation
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Report: Diversity of New England plant life is threatened 26.3.2015 AP Top News
BOSTON (AP) -- From picturesque coastal estuaries of Cape Cod to the soaring White Mountains, much of New England's rich native flora is fighting for survival against increasing odds, according to what conservationists call the most comprehensive accounting ever made of the region's plant life....
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Climate Cast: Earth’s lungs inhaling less carbon 26.3.2015 Minnesota Public Radio: News
The vast stands of thick rain forecast suck up carbon dioxide and store some of the extra carbon we humans have been belching into the atmosphere for a century. This uptake of atmospheric CO2 is an offset more rapid climate change. But massive deforestation and changes in regional climate are making the Amazon a less effective carbon sink.
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Climate Change: The debate now is about how we adapt 24.3.2015 Seattle Times: Top stories
Science tells us Northwest flooding and fires will intensify as carbon emissions rise.
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Climate Change: The debate now is about how we adapt 24.3.2015 Seattle Times: Opinion
Science tells us Northwest flooding and fires will intensify as carbon emissions rise.
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Eden Project scheme will preserve coast redwood trees for future generations 22.3.2015 Guardian: Environment

Remaining specimens of tallest living things on Earth are under threat in Californian home, due to drought and forest fire

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Bark Beetles Are Decimating Our Forests. That Might Actually Be a Good Thing. 19.3.2015 Mother Jones
There is an eerie feel to this grove of lodgepole pines that I can't quite put my finger on as entomologist Diana Six tromps ahead of me, hatchet in hand, scanning the southwestern Montana woods for her target. But as she digs the blade into a towering trunk, it finally hits me: the smell. There's no scent of pine needles, no sharp, minty note wafting through the brisk fall air. Six hacks away hunks of bark until she reveals an inner layer riddled with wormy passageways. "Hey, looky!" she exclaims, poking at a small dark form. "Are you dead? Yeah, you're dead." She extends her hand, holding a tiny black oval, maybe a quarter of an inch long. Scientists often compare this insect to a grain of rice, but Six prefers mouse dropping: "Beetle in one hand, mouse turd in another. You can't tell them apart." She turns to the next few trees in search of more traces. Pill-size holes pock their ashen trunks—a sign, along with the missing pine scent, of a forest reeling from an invasion. These tiny winged beetles ...
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Study: Amazon Absorbs Less Carbon 19.3.2015 Wall St. Journal: World
An extensive new study suggests the Amazon is losing its ability to suck up excess carbon dioxide being emitted into the atmosphere because of a large-scale death of trees.
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Amazon's trees removed nearly a third less carbon in last decade – study 18.3.2015 Guardian: Science

Fall in amount of carbon absored by rainforest means even greater cuts to manmade emissions are needed to combat climate change, warn scientists

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Depaving Cities, Undamming Rivers: How We're Undoing the Damage 17.3.2015 Truthout - All Articles
Releasing the rivers The largest dam-removal project in history reached completion last fall, when excavators dredged the final tons of pulverized concrete from the Elwha River channel in Western Washington. Native fish, banished for 100 years from their historic spawning habitat, already were rediscovering the Elwha's newly accessible upper stretches. Within weeks of the final explosion in August, threatened bull trout and chinook salmon were spotted migrating beyond the rubble. "It was a thrill," said Olympic National Park spokeswoman Barb Maynes. Before the Elwha Dam was built in 1910, the river produced an estimated 400,000 fingerlings per year, a number that dwindled to 3,000 in recent decades. All five native species of Elwha salmon are expected to repopulate the river. More than 80,000 dams more than six feet high block U.S. waterways, and activists are cheered by the Elwha success story. Two hydroelectric dams once blocked the Elwha; both now are gone. Sediment that was trapped behind them is ...
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Climate Change Is Baking Alaska 16.3.2015 Mother Jones
This article originally appeared in Slate and is republished here as part of the Climate Desk collaboration. Earlier this winter, Monica Zappa packed up her crew of Alaskan sled dogs and headed south, in search of snow. "We haven't been able to train where we live for two months," she told me. Alaska's Kenai Peninsula, which Zappa calls home, has been practically tropical this winter. Rick Thoman, a meteorologist with the National Weather Service in Alaska, has been dumbfounded. "Homer, Alaska, keeps setting record after record, and I keep looking at the data like, Has the temperature sensor gone out or something?" Something does seem to be going on in Alaska. Last fall, a skipjack tuna, which is more likely to be found in the Galápagos than near a glacier, was caught about 150 miles southeast of Anchorage, not far from the Kenai. This past weekend, race organizers had to truck in snow to the ceremonial Iditarod start line in Anchorage. Sen. Lisa Murkowski of Alaska tweeted a photo of one of the piles of ...
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Warming Arctic blamed for worsening summer heatwaves 12.3.2015 New Scientist: News
As the world warms, the Arctic is warming faster than mid-latitudes – a pattern that disrupts northern hemisphere weather systems, causing longer ...
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Developer Gets Approval to Build on Belmont’s Silver Maple Forest 11.3.2015 Boston Globe: Latest
After over 12 years of litigation between developers and environmentalists, a 299-unit apartment complex in Belmont gets the go ...
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The current economic development model is defunct – we need to ditch it - The Guardian 11.3.2015 google news
The current economic development model is defunct – we need to ditch it The Guardian Knowing it has a problem, India announced a plan to double coal taxes to pay for clean, renewable energy alternatives. In China premier Li Keqiang announced a lower economic growth target, a much harder line on environmental safeguards and a reduced ...
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We need regenerative farming, not geoengineering 9.3.2015 Guardian: Science

The quick fix mindset behind geoengineering must be transformed to one that seeks a humble partnership with nature if we are to address climate change

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In warmer climate, a bid to preserve trees threatened by emerald ash borer 9.3.2015 Minnesota Public Radio: Law & Justice
Given that the emerald ash borer is only kept at bay at temperatures of 30 below, experts are seeking ways to save Minnesota's northern forest as the climate changes.
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Our Planet's Lungs Are Dying 6.3.2015 Truthout.com
31 July, 2011- Satellite photo of the Amazon Rainforest. (Photo: NASA Goddard Space Flight Center ) Trees are like our planet's lungs. Every second of every day, they're absorbing CO2 from the atmosphere, and converting it into energy. In fact, according to a study by researchers at NASA, each year, tropical rainforests absorb a staggering 1.4 billion metric tons of CO2 from Earth's atmosphere. Through the process of photosynthesis, they're "inhaling" that CO2, and keeping it from further damaging our planet and speeding up the process of climate change. See more news and opinion from Thom Hartmann at Truthout here. Photosynthesis is a process used by trees and other plants to convert sunlight into chemical energy that can be used later as fuel. During photosynthesis, plants absorb CO2, which is combined with water - H2O - to produce a mixture of carbon, oxygen and hydrogen called "carbohydrates" - everything from roots to stems to leaves and fruits. And by absorbing and binding the carbon in carbon ...
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