User: demo Topic: Climate Change
Category: Impacts :: Forest
Last updated: May 04 2016 24:49 IST RSS 2.0
 
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Why today’s global warming has roots in Indonesia’s genocidal past | Joshua Oppenheimer 3.5.2016 The Guardian -- World Latest
The mass killings in 1965 live on in global emissions from forced forest fires – and through human rights abuses in the palm oil fields There has been tremendous concern over the ways climate change will affect human rights, but little attention to how human rights abuse affects our global climate. Fifty years ago, Indonesia went through a genocide. The massacres may be relatively unknown, but in a terrible way the destruction continues, and threatens us all. In 1965, the Indonesian army organised paramilitary death squads and exterminated between 500,000 and 1 million people who had hastily been identified as enemies of General Suharto’s new military dictatorship. Today, the killers and their protégés are comfortable establishment figures whose impunity, political power and capacity for intimidation ...
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Will the Paris Climate Agreement Deliver? 29.4.2016 Truthout.com
The Paris Agreement A historic event took place on Earth Day 2016. It was a decisive moment for the planet. On Friday, April 22, around 60 heads of state gathered at the United Nations in New York for the signing of the Paris Climate Agreement. About 175 governments took the first step of signing onto the deal, and according to the White House at least 34 countries representing 49 percent of greenhouse gas emissions have formally ratified the Paris Agreement. It was "the largest ever single-day turnout for a signing ceremony," indicating "strong international commitment to deliver on the promises." I was at COP21 in Paris when negotiators finally agreed the Paris Agreement, the first legally binding global climate deal. The agreement is the culmination of 21 years of international negotiation and United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change (UNFCCC) process: a massive global political mobilization in response to the looming threat of catastrophic climate change. It scales up ambition from the ...
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"Nestlé Is Trying to Break Us": A Pennsylvania Town Fights Predatory Water Extraction 25.4.2016 Truthout - All Articles
Kunkeltown, Pennsylvania. (Photo: Shaun Mullins) Residents of Kunkeltown, Pennsylvania, are fighting Nestlé's attempts to construct a water extraction facility in their town -- and community members are winning. The bottling plant is another example of the beverage corporation's attempt to profit from a public good and global water scarcity. Help Truthout keep publishing stories like this: They can't be found in corporate media! Click here to make a tax-deductible donation today. Donna Diehl, a 55-year-old school bus driver from Kunkeltown, Pennsylvania, a small historic town located on the edge of the Poconos, wanted to do three things this year: drive the bus, paint her bathroom and learn to crochet. Instead, Diehl, along with dozens of her neighbors, is spending her time trying to stop the largest food and beverage corporation in the world from taking her community's water, putting it in bottles and selling it for a massive profit. Kunkeltown, Pennsylvania. (Photo: Shaun Mullins) Nestlé Waters, the ...
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The Senate Says Burning Trees Is Carbon Neutral. Oh Really Now? 23.4.2016 Wired Top Stories
The Senate Says Burning Trees Is Carbon Neutral. Oh Really Now?
The Senate just passed an energy bill that says biomass (or wood pellets) is a carbon neutral energy source. A lot of scientists aren't too happy about it. The post The Senate Says Burning Trees Is Carbon Neutral. Oh Really Now? appeared first on WIRED.
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The Latest: China to ratify climate deal before G-20 meeting 22.4.2016 Washington Post: World
The Latest on the U.N. signing ceremony for the climate change agreement (all times local):
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9 WIRED Stories You Should Read This Earth Day 22.4.2016 Wired Top Stories
9 WIRED Stories You Should Read This Earth Day
The post 9 WIRED Stories You Should Read This Earth Day appeared first on WIRED.
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At UN, Forest Whitaker calls on leaders to ensure benefits of global goals 'touch everyone' 22.4.2016 New Kerala: World News
New York, Apr 22 : Peacebuilding advocate and Academy Award-winning actor Forest Whitaker addressed world leaders on Thursday at the United Nations, asking them to ensure that the benefits of the Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs) can touch everyone worldwide.
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UN event spotlights 17 goals to end poverty and save planet 22.4.2016 Seattle Times: Nation & World

UNITED NATIONS (AP) — A 17-year-old Honduran-American activist called for a youth movement to eradicate poverty and preserve the planet. The president of the tiny Pacific island nation said urgent funds are needed to develop his country and prevent the devastating impact of climate change. Actor and advocate Forest Whitaker urged people around the globe […]
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Hope and action on Earth Day — and what you can do 22.4.2016 Seattle Times: Opinion

We can ensure our kids and grandkids are left with a vibrant, equitable and healthy home, and can tell their own stories about how nature shapes and enriches their lives.
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With landmark Paris deal ratification, this Earth Day is special (Curtain Raiser) 21.4.2016 New Kerala: India News
New Delhi, April 21 : This Earth Day - April 22 - is special, not only because over one billion people would join hands to tackle higher carbon emission and land erosion, but also because for the first time 120 countries are to come together to sign and adopt the Paris Climate Agreement at the UN, New York, to create an 'Environment Democracy', in commemoration of the 46th 'International Mother Earth Day'.
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Protesters criticise Drax over use of subsidies for coal and wood power 21.4.2016 Guardian: Environment

Activists in London and Yorkshire call on government to ‘axe Drax’, which they claim receives £1m a day in renewable energy subsidies

Drax faced protests during its annual general meeting in London over its use of public subsidies to support its massive coal and wood-burning power station.

Banners were unfurled by campaigners seeking to “axe Drax” outside its AGM in the capital on Wednesday, as well as at the Drax power station site near Selby, North Yorkshire.

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As the planet warms, how do we decide when a plant is native? 20.4.2016 Guardian: Environment
Yale Environment 360 : The fate of a tree planted at poet Emily Dickinson’s home raises questions about whether gardeners can - or should - play a role in helping plant species migrate in the face of rising temperatures and swiftly changing botanical zones On rare occasions, the townsfolk of Amherst, Massachusetts, would catch a glimpse of a ghostly figure dressed in white, leaning over to tend her flowers by flickering lantern light. The mysterious recluse, who was better known to neighbors for her exquisite garden than for her lyric poems that revealed a passionate love of nature, differed from fellow 19th-century American writers whose thinking became the bedrock of modern environmentalism. While Thoreau famously declared wild places to be “the preservation of the world,” Emily Dickinson was finding nature’s truth and power in an ordinary dandelion. Among the plants that survive on the family property where Dickinson confined herself for much of her adult life are picturesque old trees called umbrella ...
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Interior secretary calls for ‘course correction’ to protect public lands 20.4.2016 Durango Herald
WASHINGTON, D.C. – The country is in need of “a major course correction” to conserve public lands and prevent harm from climate change, Secretary of the Interior Sally Jewell said Tuesday in Washington, D.C., to mark National Park Week. A record number of visitors came to national parks in 2015, with 307 million...
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West Coast fisheries are at risk as climate change disturbs the ocean's chemistry 19.4.2016 LA Times: Science

The West Coast's abundant fisheries are at risk as the region's waters become more acidic, a group of scientists warn.

Researchers from the West Coast Ocean Acidification and Hypoxia Science Panel released a report this month that projects dire changes to ocean chemistry and marine life, and recommends...

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'Even though I know my life is at risk, I still try to save the forest’ 18.4.2016 Guardian: Environment

After 20 years defending Cambodia’s rainforest, human rights lawyer Ouch Leng has won the world’s leading environmental award for his work

You could not see the logging camp from the narrow track on the edge of the once vast Prey Lang forest in central Cambodia. But human rights lawyer and forest defender Ouch Leng had recced the location on motorbike, identified its owners, studied aerial pictures from a drone and within minutes of arriving was crawling through the dense undergrowth and tree stumps towards it.

Twenty minutes later Leng was inside the secret timber yard which stretched over several acres and was stacked with hundreds of logs and planks waiting to be taken to China or Vietnam. Some were precious species worth tens of thousands of dollars each. Others were unidentifiable. All, he said, came from protected forest.

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Avaaz Ignored Libya Lessons When Advocating for Syria No-Fly Zone 17.4.2016 Truthout.com
Also see: As in Libya, Avaaz Campaigned for Syria No-Fly Zone That Even Top Generals Opposed A recent two-part series in The New York Times laid out in detail the pivotal role that then-Secretary of State Hillary Clinton played in President Obama's decision to join in France and Britain's 2011 military campaign against long-time Libyan leader Muammar Gaddafi. The Times articles make the case that Clinton bears a heavy part of the responsibility for the tragic, increasingly chaotic aftermath of that campaign in which Gaddafi was ousted and killed. As The Times summaries of the articles put it, Gaddafi's fall "seemed to vindicate Hillary Clinton. Then militias refused to disarm, neighbors fanned a civil war, and the Islamic State found refuge," leaving Libya "a failed state and a terrorist haven." While neocons, right-wingers and humanitarian interventionists back in 2011 were seeking regime change in Libya, there was one non-governmental organization that was alone among progressive groups in mobilizing ...
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UN agency and Google collaborate on satellite data tools to manage natural resources 16.4.2016 New Kerala: World News

New York, Apr 16 : The United Nations Food and Agriculture Organization (FAO) and Google on Friday announced plans to work together to make high-resolution satellite data a common tool in managing the world's natural resources, ultimately boosting efforts towards the pursuit of sustainable development.
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Why Should Baby Pandas Get All the Love? 15.4.2016 Mother Jones
Late last year, the World Wildlife Fund (WWF), the world's largest independent conservation organization, released " Ten to Watch in 2010 ", a list of endangered species facing natural and man-made threats around the world. Animals include the polar bear, the tiger, the Magellanic penguin, and the giant panda. As it turns out, just three of the ten—the blue-fin tuna, the leatherback turtle, and the Javan rhinoceros —fall under the International Union for Conservation of Nature 's (IUCN) category of "Critically Endangered", one step up from "Extinct in Nature." (The IUCN Red List is widely considered to be the standard-bearer for classifying endangered species). So why did the WWF select the critters that they did? Simply put, household names are more likely to open the hearts, and wallets, of enviro-friendly folks. According to the WWF, "Our conservation efforts are directed towards flagship species, iconic animals that provide a focus for raising awareness and stimulating action and funding for broader ...
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Duping Progressives into Wars 14.4.2016 ConsortiumNews.com
The online advocacy group, Avaaz, has pulled progressives into support of U.S. “humanitarian” wars in Libya and Syria by promoting sweet-sounding ideas like “no-fly zones,” as John Hanrahan explains. By John Hanrahan A recent two-part series in The New York Times laid out in detail the…Read more →
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Great Barrier Reef: new chapter opens in the fight to save natural wonder from mining 10.4.2016 Guardian: Environment

Landmark case may force minister to consider coal’s impact on reef and block new fossil fuel projects

Here on Heron Island, you could be forgiven for thinking everything is calm on the Great Barrier Reef. There are kilometres of gorgeous coral and a bustling ecosystem around it – huge schools of colourful fish, turtles, rays and sharks.

It is the reef you grew up seeing on documentaries.

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