User: demo Topic: Climate Change
Category: Impacts :: Forest
Last updated: Jun 19 2017 21:50 IST RSS 2.0
 
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Religious, indigenous leaders demand rainforests be saved 19.6.2017 AP Business
HELSINKI (AP) -- Religious and indigenous leaders on Monday called for an end to deforestation in the first international multi-faith, multi-cultural plea to reduce the emissions that fuel climate change....
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Ask Your Doctor if the Paris Climate Agreement Is Right for You 16.6.2017 Truthout - All Articles
Medical professionals are often the first to deal with the health harms caused by air pollution, heat waves, drought, famine and war brought on by climate change. The newly formed Medical Society Consortium on Climate and Health representing 11 major medical specialty organizations in the US is working to build awareness among the public and lawmakers about the looming public health crisis precipitated by climate change. (Photo: Global Landscapes Forum ; Edited: LW / TO) President Trump's withdrawal from the Paris Climate Agreement has been condemned throughout the world for a long list of reasons. It's a manifestation of complete detachment from the reality of climate science. The US economy will crawl into hibernation in a cramped den of dirty energy while the rest of the world eagerly exploits the enormous economic opportunities of clean energy. And it has quickly and decisively knocked the US off the leadership podium on the most important issue in the history of mankind. The White House, cheered on ...
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Comparison testing tears apart Sonshi lies 13.6.2017 The Navhind Times
ABDUL WAHAB KHAN | NT   PANAJI In what could be a  big expose  on manipulations of  mining firms operating in Sonshi village in Sattari taluka, a comparative study on monitoring equipment conducted by the Goa State Pollution Control Board has shown  ambient air quality machines of mining firms faulty and gave erroneous results. The ...
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Metro car depot at Aarey colony to stay, commercial tag may go 9.6.2017 Mumbai – The Indian Express
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Brazil’s rollback of environment rules a blow to Paris pact 7.6.2017 Seattle Times: Nation & World

This comes at a time when the Amazon and Atlantic rain forests are being cut at the fastest rate in nearly a decade, and the violent struggle for control of forested land is in on the rise.
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18-year-old man dies after falling 100 feet in Angeles National Forest 7.6.2017 LA Times: Commentary

An 18-year-old man from Whittier died Tuesday night after falling about 100 feet off a cliff in Angeles National Forest, authorities said.

Jeremy Tyler St. Julian was hiking with five friends at Chantry Flat when he fell just before 8 p.m., the Los Angeles County Coroner said.

Los Angeles County...

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Harsh Vardhan-led Indian delegation participates in CEM8 in Beijing 6.6.2017 New Kerala: World News
Harsh Vardhan-led Indian delegation participates in CEM8 in Beijing
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Quietly, Surely, We're Losing a Whole Pine Species En Masse and Nobody Gives a Damn 4.6.2017 Mother Jones
This story was originally published by High Country News and is reproduced here as part of the Climate Desk collaboration. U.S. Forest Service research ecologist Bob Keane has studied whitebark pine, a coniferous tree of the high country, for more than thirty years. Still, when asked to describe a whitebark to someone who's never seen one, he takes a breath and pauses for a moment. "Gosh," he says. The shape of the tree is very distinctive, Keane says. Instead of growing cone-shaped like other conifers, whitebarks branch like hardwoods. "A lot of the undergrowth is very small, so you see these open park-like stands of beautiful spreading trees," he says. This shape is an adaptation that shows Clark's nutcrackers flying past that a tree below has many nutritious cones and might be worth a travel stop. Clark's nutcrackers cache thousands of whitebark seeds, dispersing the pine across the high country, where the tree is a keystone species. Whitebark pine is one of the first trees to break ground after a ...
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Putin: ‘Don’t worry, be happy’ as Trump ditches climate deal 3.6.2017 Seattle Times: Nation & World

WASHINGTON — While other world leaders have strongly condemned President Donald Trump’s decision to abandon the Paris climate accord, Russian President Vladimir Putin said Friday he won’t judge. “Don’t worry, be happy!” Putin quipped after being asked for his reaction at an economic forum in St. Petersburg, Russia. He said the climate deal doesn’t formally […]
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On the Thawing Tundra, Researchers Race to Understand Black Carbon's Climate Impact 2.6.2017 Truthout.com
The Alaskan Peninsula, February 10, 2011. (Photo: NASA Goddard Space Flight Center ) Editor's note: Reporting for this story was supported by a grant from the Fund for Investigative Journalism . On a morning in September 2015, sterile, gray Arctic light filtered through a blanket of woolly clouds as Matt Gunsch and Tate Barrett parked their rented pickup truck on a dirt road and clomped in rubber boots down a long, icy boardwalk to their air-monitoring laboratory on the tundra. From the outside, the lab looked unglamorous -- a dingy, white shack perched on a metal frame in a meadow speckled with snow and grass stubble. It felt distinctly like the middle of nowhere -- though it was just a couple of miles beyond the main streets of Utqiaġvik, Alaska, the northernmost town in America. Inside the shack, a cracked window was patched with red tape. There was a shelf stacked with steel-toed and military-style "bunny" boots designed for extreme cold, tables scattered with miscellaneous lab supplies, a toaster ...
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Strange bright object sighted in sky over Minnesota 31.5.2017 Minnesota Public Radio: Law & Justice
The sun came out today. Some Minnesotans cowered at the unusual bright light in the morning sky. Others simply started in silent awe. Yes, I digresses and jest. But seriously it seems we’ve lived in a perpetual state of gray this month. If you have to think twice to remember the last sunny day, you might live…
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Sun returns! 80 degrees this week? 31.5.2017 Minnesota Public Radio: Law & Justice
Warmer days ahead.
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These Stunning Photos Show the Real Cost of a Pipeline 27.5.2017 Mother Jones
This story was originally published by Reveal and is reproduced here as part of the Climate Desk collaboration. As police in riot gear swept the last protesters from camps near the Standing Rock Sioux Reservation in late February, two dozen men and women arrived in this small ranching and lumber town 1,200 miles to the northwest. They were armed with maps, posters, doughnuts and coffee, and hoped to sell locals on an oil pipeline—one larger and potentially more hazardous than the Dakota Access. They wore its name on their matching green jackets: Trans Mountain. Town officials were already on board. They had signed on in exchange for about $330,000 (420,000 Canadian dollars) from the pipeline's American owner, Kinder Morgan Inc. But a few miles downriver, the Lower Nicola Indian Band was putting the company's offer to a vote the following day. The 14 other First Nations directly on the pipeline route already had agreed to welcome crews onto their reserves in exchange for money and jobs from the company. ...
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The populist ethical issue hurting Virginia Democrats 27.5.2017 Washington Post: Op-Eds
Public financing could help them seem less beholden to corporate interests.
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In NE Minnesota, planting pines to fight climate change 24.5.2017 Minnesota Public Radio: News
The Nature Conservancy is planting 50,000 trees this spring in "conifer strongholds," places the trees are expected to thrive, even in a warmer climate. One expert calls it a "test kitchen" for saving northern forests.
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Stop hoping we can fix climate change by pulling carbon out of the air, scientists warn 23.5.2017 Salt Lake Tribune
Scientists are expressing increasing skepticism that we’re going to be able to get out of the climate change mess by relying on a variety of large-scale land use and technical solutions that have been not only proposed, but often relied upon in scientific calculations. Two papers published last week debunk the idea of planting large volumes of trees to pull carbon dioxide out of the air — saying there just isn’t enough land available to pull it off — and also various other strategies for “carbon...
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Stop hoping we can fix climate change by pulling carbon out of the air, scientists warn 23.5.2017 Washington Post
Stop hoping we can fix climate change by pulling carbon out of the air, scientists warn
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Climate change taking toll on clarity of Lake Tahoe water 23.5.2017 Seattle Times: Top stories

CRYSTAL BAY, Nev. (AP) — Climate change is causing Lake Tahoe to warm sooner in the spring than it has historically, disrupting the normal mixing of shallow and deep water and undercutting gains made in reversing the loss of clarity of the cobalt mountain lake, scientists say. “Climate change is impacting not only Lake Tahoe’s […]
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Fungal Diseases Are on the Rise -- Is Environmental Change to Blame? 21.5.2017 Truthout - All Articles
Scientists and physicians are looking for clues to a worrying increase in fungal infections and exploring ways to reduce the threat. (Photo: Pixabay ) Why doesn't this site have ads? In order to maintain our integrity, Truthout doesn't accept any advertising money. Help us keep it this way -- make a donation to support our independent journalism. Fungi are everywhere -- from the mushrooms that decompose fallen logs in the forest, to the mold that grows in your bathtub, to the microscopic fungal cells that reside naturally on your skin. Scientists estimate there are 1.5 million species of fungi on the planet. They're a diverse group, bunched together by their ability to use digestive enzymes to break down and absorb nutrients from their surroundings -- a characteristic that makes some of them great decomposers. Fungi are, in essence, nature's first compost bin. Many of them also help plants grow or carry out other important ecosystem functions. And some fungi are pathogens, causing disease in plants and ...
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Climate Impacts Happening Now: Westward Migration of Forests 21.5.2017 Truthout - All Articles
A recent article in The Atlantic implies climate change to be wrongly viewed as something we don't yet know much about. This article, "American Trees Are Moving West, and No One Knows Why," is half correct. The authors in the study reported upon reveal the reasons why trees are shifting west (as well as north), and that the shift is intrinsically related to climate change. That "No One Knows Why" these trees are shifting westward is fundamentally not a part of this research. The authors say that the westward shift is because climate change has changed moisture patterns, that increased moisture in western portions of the eastern U.S. is the cause for this seemingly counterintuitive westward shift, and it is predominant among young trees that are more resistant to drought even in the face of sporadic drought pulses in the west. From the paper: "The observed differential shift rates could also be due to the fact that saplings are more sensitive to droughts in terms of survival than adult trees, as ...
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