User: demo Topic: Climate Change
Category: Impacts :: Generic
Last updated: Jul 03 2015 18:40 IST RSS 2.0
 
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Financing the sustainable development goals – podcast transcript 3.7.2015 The Guardian -- World Latest

Who will pay for the ambitious plans set out in the sustainable development goals? In the run-up to the finance talks in Addis Ababa, we discuss the key issues

Listen to the podcast

Reports and presenters:

Hugh Muir

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TTIP aim to lift US oil export ban goes against climate targets | Sam Lowe 3.7.2015 Guardian: Environment

EU push to lift restrictions on US crude oil and liquefied natural gas exports as part of controversial trade deal could explode Canada’s tar sands carbon bomb and push up carbon emissions

Early this year US climate campaigners claimed a totemic victory when president Obama used his veto to block the approval of the Keystone XL pipeline. This proposed pipeline would carry dirty Canadian tar sand crude oil to refineries along the Gulf coast.

While the battle is far from over - what with Republicans vowing to continue pushing for its approval - Obama’s decision holds strong strategic significance in the fight to keep fossil fuels in the ground.

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Prince Charles: To limit climate change we will need to see profound changes 3.7.2015 Guardian: Environment

Read the heir to throne’s ‘Rewiring the economy’ speech in full, in which he addresses the challenges of climate change, sustainable development and economic reform


As you are all very well aware, even if many others may not be, 2015 is a vital year for the future of humanity. Targets, plans and timetables being agreed this year, in Addis Ababa, New York and Paris, will be absolutely critical in ensuring peoples’ – and Nature’s – long-term health, wealth and security. So we must all hope and pray for the right outcomes.

But what happens then? Achieving the targets and goals arising from these historic global gatherings is going to require integrated action across all sectors. And that is not something we have ever come close to achieving in the past.

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Oceans face massive and irreversible impacts without carbon cuts – study 3.7.2015 Guardian: Environment

Business-as-usual carbon emissions would cause global warming that brings serious ocean acidification, death of corals and mangroves, scientists say

Time is rapidly running out for the world’s oceans and the creatures that live in them as the Earth’s climate continues to warm, say scientists.

Only “immediate and substantial” reductions in greenhouse gas emissions can hope to prevent “massive” impacts on marine ecosystems, warn the experts.

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New study warns of dangerous climate change risks to the Earth’s oceans | Dana Nuccitelli 2.7.2015 The Guardian -- Front Page
Immediate, serious efforts to curb carbon pollution are needed to minimize ocean ecosystem changes A new paper just published in Science summarizes the projected impacts of climate change on the world’s oceans, and consequently on humans and our economy. The study concludes that global warming beyond the international limit of 2°C above pre-industrial temperatures would pose serious threats to marine ecosystems and their millions of human dependents. It builds on the consensus science published by the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change last year. The study concludes, Ocean changes associated with a 2°C warming of global surface temperature carries high risks of impacts and should not be ...
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Engaging Minnesotans in global climate talks 2.7.2015 MinnPost
CC/Flickr/Jim Brekke Ninety-four percent of Minnesota participants are either very concerned (67 percent) or moderately concerned (27 percent) about the impacts of climate change. In early June, the Jefferson Center and Macalester College hosted 70 Twin Cities metro area residents at the Science Museum in St. Paul to  discuss climate and energy issues as part of a global day of public deliberation . Organized by the World Wide Views Alliance, 75 countries around the world conducted World Wide Views on Climate and Energy forums in the largest global citizen consultation on climate change to date. The goal was to gather quantifiable public input to inform decisionmakers at every level, but particularly negotiators at the 2015 UN Climate Change Conference (COP21). Participants worldwide were selected to reflect the demographics of their country or community. In the Twin Cities, we selected to match the political, ethnic, and socioeconomic profile of the seven-county metro area. Kyle Bozentko Each of the 96 ...
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Great Barrier Reef spared Unesco's 'in-danger' listing 2.7.2015 Guardian: Environment

Unesco world heritage committee passes draft ruling that reef’s status remain unchanged, but says Australia must do more to prevent further damage

The UN has ruled against listing the Great Barrier Reef as “in danger”, congratulating Australia on its conservation plan but giving it five years to halt deterioration of the natural icon.

Unesco’s world heritage committee in Germany on Wednesday unanimously passed an earlier draft ruling that the reef’s status remain unchanged but that Australia show significant progress in pushing its plan by the end of 2016.

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In the Warming Arctic Seas 1.7.2015 Truthout.com
The sea ice atop the Arctic Ocean can - as shown in this photograph - look more like Swiss cheese or a bright coastal wetland. As ice melts, the liquid water collects in depressions on the surface and deepens them, forming melt ponds. These fresh water ponds are separated from the salty sea below and around it, until breaks in the ice merge the two. (Photo: NASA Goddard Space Flight Center / Flickr ) Arctic National Wildlife Refuge - I was standing in the back of the sled when it broke through the ice, plunging into the frigid water of the Hulahula River. Just in time, Robert yanked the machine. The heavy sled, instead of falling on me, gradually moved out of the shallow water. It must have been about 40 degrees below zero. I began to settle into hypothermia. Robert Thompson and his cousin Perry Anashugak quickly set up the tent and lit both burners of the Coleman stove. Inside a sleeping bag, I began to warm up. That day, I escaped death, barely. "The river is supposed to have solid ice on the surface ...
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Climate change a security risk second only to terrorism, says defence report 1.7.2015 Guardian: Environment

Defence white paper consultation report flags consequences of environmental pressures as a significant security risk for Australia

The Abbott government’s energy white paper made headlines for its curious reluctance to mention climate change – but the looming defence white paper may prove to be a different story.

A report on community consultations associated with the defence white paper flags the consequences of climate change, extreme weather events and environmental pressures as a significant security risk for Australia – second only to the risks posed by terrorism.

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U.S., Brazil Pledge to Combat Climate Change 1.7.2015 Wall St. Journal: World
The U.S. and Brazil pledged to work toward new commitments to reduce the impact of climate change, extolling a revived relationship during a long-delayed visit by the Brazilian leader.
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Commission 'to back Heathrow runway' 1.7.2015 BBC: Business
The Airports Commission will back building a new runway at Heathrow but still leave the door open for an alternative at its rival Gatwick, sources tell the BBC.
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House by house, Bill McKibben finds cause for optimism in U.S. energy future 30.6.2015 MinnPost
When Bill McKibben reports a sensation of hope in regard to climate change, take notice. This “fairly rare emotion” arose, he reports in the New Yorker for June 29,  as he stood in the kitchen of a small house in Vermont – home to a special-ed teacher, a school-bus driver, their two children – and perused their shrunken utility bills. Thanks to insulation upgrades, LED lighting, a small solar panel on the garage roof, and replacement of a water heater and an oil-burning furnace with heat pumps, the Borkowskis of Rutland had seen their energy consumption plummet. No more oil deliveries, of course, and a 16 percent drop in electric usage, even with the new load of the heat pumps. Better yet, from the planetary point of view: an 88 percent reduction in household carbon footprint. And even though they were now making monthly payments for these clean-and-green upgrades to their electric utility, which had organized and financed the project, their monthly bills were smaller, too. By how much, I guess, is ...
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U.S., Brazil Agree on Climate-Change Steps 30.6.2015 Wall St. Journal: World
The U.S. and Brazil pledged to work toward new commitments to reduce the impact of climate change ahead of President Obama’s goal of reaching a global accord this December.
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New blow to UK fracking is a delay but not the end of the road 30.6.2015 New Scientist: Living World
Opencast coal mines were once routinely delayed by local councils amid unfounded health concerns. The same is happening with fracking, warns Paul ...
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Letter to the Editor: Affordable impact 30.6.2015 Steamboat Pilot
When it comes to climate change, I’m neither a denier, an industry apologist nor an ideologue. Even so, I couldn’t help but notice a recent letter touting the benefits of EPA’s Clean Power Plan completely ignored any mention of what those benefits might actually be, instead offering self congratulatory horn-blowing about past successes of the renewable energy lobby in Colorado, and a reminder that we’re fortunate to live in such a progressively trending state. Lost completely on the writer was the notion that regular earthlings might not see the spending of $60 in order to generate 51 cents in savings as a fabulous deal. For those from the planet Renupiter, this sort of economic trade-off is considered great success. For the rest of us, it’s a sad reminder of how economic considerations are no longer weighed seriously when it comes to protecting the environment.  No cost is too high, no perceived benefit is too low. The projected costs of the CPP are astronomical, while the hoped for benefits will be ...
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'Incongruous' turbine plan refused 29.6.2015 BBC: Business
Councillors refuse plans for a wind farm south of Hawick due to concerns over its adverse impact on the landscape.
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Pope Francis’s environmental message brings thousands on to streets in Rome 28.6.2015 The Guardian -- World Latest

Vatican officials to discuss climate change and environment with scientists and activists including Naomi Klein

Thousands of campaigners and religious leaders have marched through Rome, backing Pope Francis’s uncompromising environmental message ahead of an unprecedented Vatican conference on climate change, and urging world leaders to take action.

Holy See officials will this week discuss the environment with activists and scientists at a meeting at which Naomi Klein, a high-profile social activist, will take centre stage alongside Cardinal Peter Turkson, one of the pontiff’s most senior aides.

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The Disparate Impact of Climate Change 28.6.2015 Truthout - All Articles
The Pope's new encyclical illuminates a concept we should all get to know better: disparate impact. (Image: Coal power via Shutterstock) Do you want media that’s accountable to YOU, not to corporate sponsors? Help publish journalism with real integrity and independence - click here to donate to Truthout! Constitutional lawyers who work on issues of equal rights use the term "disparate impact," a term describing laws that—despite being facially neutral—have a very different effect upon citizens who are differently situated. Sometimes that different impact is intended; often it is not. What brought that bit of "legalese" to mind was this recent headline in the New York Times: "Pope Francis to Explore Climate's Impact on the World's Poor." The article began by discussing a recent meeting between high-level representatives of the U.N. and the Pope: Mr. Ban, the United Nations secretary general, had brought the leaders of all his major agencies to see Pope Francis , a show of organizational muscle and respect ...
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Mark Carney calls on businesses to disclose carbon footprints 26.6.2015 Guardian: Environment

Bank of England governor says investors need such information to guide their decisions and repeats his mantra that the age of irresponsibility is over

Mark Carney has called for companies to disclose their carbon footprints to help investors to make clearer decisions about whether or not to back them.

London has a responsibility to lead if the age of irresponsibility is over.

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Barack Obama sets sizzling climate action pace in push to leave legacy 26.6.2015 Guardian: Environment

The president has used his executive power to spit out climate initiatives at a dizzying rate in 2015 but some see his actions on oil production as contradictory

The White House has churned out about 40 new measures to fight carbon pollution just since the start of 2015, stepping up the pace ahead of critical talks for a global climate change deal.

Two years after Barack Obama’s sweeping promise to fight climate change on 25 June 2013, the president has used his executive powers to spit out new climate events or announcements at a dizzying rate of one every 4.5 days this year, according to the running tally kept by the White House.

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