User: demo Topic: Climate Change
Category: Impacts :: Generic
Last updated: Dec 21 2014 21:49 IST RSS 2.0
 
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Utah Land Defenders Stand Up to Dirty Politics 21.12.2014 Truthout - All Articles
New technologies like fracking - along with government subsidies - have ushered in an energy boom reliant on extreme extraction methods to produce oil and natural gas. Now the Uinta Basin is ground zero for what threatens to become the next phase in extreme energy extraction: strip mining for tar sands and oil shale. After clear-cutting trees and sagebrush, U.S. Oil Sands digs open-pit mines to test their tar sands extraction process. If the company starts producing tar sands on a commercial scale, 32,000 acres in Utah’s Uintah Basin could be covered with these pits, along with tailings ponds that would store huge amounts of waste water and chemicals used in the extraction process. (Courtesy of Before It Starts) Also see: Subsidy Spotlight: Publicly Funding a Utah Disaster in the Making Lauren Wood grew up in a family of river guides in the Uinta Basin region of Utah. She navigates tributaries of the Colorado River like her urban counterparts navigate subway systems. She learned to ride a horse, and then ...
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Obama expresses scepticism over Keystone pipeline 20.12.2014 The Guardian -- Front Page
President says pipeline’s extension from Canada to Nebraska would do little to reduce American energy prices, and generate only a limited number of US jobs Women journalists shut out men at Obama’s year-end press conference US President Barack Obama has delivered his most sceptical remarks yet on the future of the Keystone oil pipeline, claiming its controversial extension from Canada to Nebraska would do little to reduce American energy prices and generate only a limited number of US jobs, but could add to the infrastructure costs of climate change. Speaking during an end-of-year press conference just one day after Republicans promised fresh legislation designed to force the project’s approval, the president departed from official White House neutrality on an upcoming review by the State Department to deliver a withering assessment of its merits, claiming his opponents were wrong to insist the pipeline was a “magic formula” for economic ...
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Videogame Designers Could Learn a Lot From 19th-Century Board Games 19.12.2014 Wired Top Stories
If we put a videogame from 2014 into a time capsule, what would the people playing it 100 years later think about us? Julia Keren-Detar wants to get us thinking about this before it ...
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Against Excellence 19.12.2014 Guardian: Science

Universities are currently agonising about the Research Excellence Framework. Jack Stilgoe doesn’t have a problem with research assessment. He thinks that the real trouble lies with the word ‘excellence’.

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Report suggests forest-cutting can have an immediate effect on climate 19.12.2014 Washington Post: World
RIO DE JANEIRO — The critical role that vast tropical forests like Brazil’s Amazon play in suppressing climate change is well-known: They store huge quantities of carbon, acting as “carbon sinks.”But as a new report out this week argues, scientists are making the case that cutting down these forests does more than simply release carbon into the atmosphere — it has a direct and more immediate effect on the climate, from changes in rainfall patterns to rising temperatures. The amount of water that forests pump into the air is key to this. But scientists don’t agree on how that happens.Read full article ...
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Sustainable development goals: eight ways to make reality match ambition 19.12.2014 The Guardian -- Front Page
The development targets that will come into force next year reflect high ideals, but delivering on them will involve a transformation of the global economy Next year, governments will agree a new global development framework of breathtaking ambition. We already know the likely shape of the sustainable development goals (SDGS) , which will include targets ranging from ending poverty to reducing inequality both within and between countries; from better governance and peaceful societies to action on climate change, ecosystem restoration, and a big shift towards sustainable consumption and production. But the real test of governments’ commitment isn’t the loftiness of the goals. It’s what they’re prepared to do to reach them. The SDGs are far more ambitious than the millennium development goals (MDGs), which they will replace, and delivering them will be harder. Unfortunately, there seems little prospect of a deal on delivery that is as ambitious as the goals ...
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White House Proposes Vetting Projects for Climate Change 19.12.2014 Wall St. Journal: Policy
The White House is calling on federal agencies to consider the climate-change impact of a wide range of energy projects that require government approval.
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Little Progress in Lima Climate Talks 18.12.2014 Truthout.com
Leaders at the Twentieth Conference of the Parties of the United Nations Climate Change (COP20) in Lima, Peru, November 28, 2014. (Photo: Ministerio de Relaciones Exteriores / Flickr ) Want to support Truthout and double your impact? Click here to make a donation that will be matched dollar-for-dollar - but only if we meet our matching grant goal in time! With yet another United Nations-hosted climate change conference making very little real progress, a near miracle will be required if countries are to reach a meaningful and binding global agreement on carbon emissions in Paris next December. The "Lima Call for Climate Action" document, agreed to on Sunday by 194 countries, is not a new "deal" for the climate. It is a 12-month work plan leading to COP (Conference of the Parties) 21 a year from now. The major change - a victory for rich countries - expects countries with rising economies, such as China and India, to take action on climate change in much the same way rich countries will contribute. A ...
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UK using less energy, report finds 18.12.2014 BBC: Business
People in the UK are using less energy, even though the economy is growing, new figures confirm.
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Large California pensions consider divesting of coal industry assets 17.12.2014 Guardian: Environment

Legislators seek to limit support for fossil fuel industries they say contribute to global warming

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As Fossil Fuel Divestment Movement Grows, UN Negotiators Consider a "Zero Emissions" Future 16.12.2014 Truthout.com
For the first time ever, delegates at the U.N. Climate Change Conference are talking about entirely phasing out fossil fuels by 2050, setting up a showdown with the energy industry that profits from their extraction. We speak to Jamie Henn of 350.org about the state of the U.N. talks, the world’s growing divestment movement, and President Obama’s comments casting doubt on the Keystone XL this week on "The Colbert Report." TRANSCRIPT: AMY GOODMAN: Jamie, talk about what those decisions are and what you see as something that has changed, for example, in the text in the agreement that may soon come out. JAMIE HENN: One of the most interesting things that’s happening in the text right now is discussions about this long-term goal of where this treaty is really headed. In the past, it’s just been put in, in terms of temperature targets or percentage reductions. Now, for the first time, delegates are really talking seriously about phasing out fossil fuels completely by 2050 and going to zero carbon emissions. ...
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Climate Change and Inequalities: How Will They Impact Women? 16.12.2014 Truthout.com
(Image: Setting sun via Shutterstock)The success of climate change actions depend on elevating women's voices, making sure their experiences and views are heard at decision-making tables and supporting them to become leaders in climate adaptation. United Nations - Among all the impacts of climate change, from rising sea levels to landslides and flooding, there is one that does not get the attention it deserves: an exacerbation of inequalities, particularly for women. Especially in poor countries, women’s lives are often directly dependent on the natural environment. Women bear the main responsibility for supplying water and firewood for cooking and heating, as well as growing food. Drought, uncertain rainfall and deforestation make these tasks more time-consuming and arduous, threaten women’s livelihoods and deprive them of time to learn skills, earn money and participate in community life. But the same societal roles that make women more vulnerable to environmental challenges also make them key actors ...
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Emissions-Cutting Deal Reached at COP 20 Lima, but Will It Help Prevent Catastrophic Climate Change? 16.12.2014 Truthout.com
After more than 30 hours of extended talks, a global agreement on climate change was reached over the weekend at the United Nations Climate Change Conference in Lima, Peru. Negotiators from nearly 200 countries agreed to a new deal that forms the basis for a global agreement on addressing climate change. Supporters say it marks the first time all nations have agreed to cut back on carbon emissions. The final draft says all countries have "common but differentiated responsibilities" to deal with global warming. The countries most dissatisfied with the outcome in Lima were those who are poor and already struggling to rebuild from the impacts of climate change. We host a roundtable with guests from three continents: in Peru, Suzanne Goldenberg, U.S. environment correspondent for The Guardian; in London, Asad Rehman, head of international climate for Friends of the Earth; and in New Delhi, Nitin Sethi, associate editor at Business Standard. TRANSCRIPT: AMY GOODMAN: After more than 30 hours of extended talks, ...
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The renewable energy sector needs to commit to getting off subsidies 16.12.2014 The Guardian -- Front Page
The renewable power industry needs a fresh approach if it is to win the public’s support and reach its full potential, says OVO Energy’s Jessica Lennard The energy debate has left the territory of the rational. Graphs, logic, or claims to the moral high ground hold scant weight now. The impact of statistics about green growth and export opportunities is negligible . It no longer matters what national polls say about belief in climate change; or whether low-carbon generation is obviously preferable long term to finite, dirty fossil fuels from unstable parts of the world. Renewable sources of power, such as wind and solar, have been caught in the crossfire of this debate. Blamed for rising bills, the sector has become a particular bugbear for some politicians, who are increasingly intent on reining back the industry. With the political tide at risk of turning against it, the renewables industry needs a change of perspective and a fresh approach if it is going to reach its full ...
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If We Can't Stop This Tiny Alaskan Town From Falling Into the Sea, What Hope Is There for the Rest of Us? 16.12.2014 Mother Jones
This story originally appeared in the Huffington Post and is republished here as part of the Climate Desk collaboration. It's a Wednesday morning in late August, the first day of classes at the Shishmaref School. The doors of the pale blue building haven't opened yet, and the new principal is hurriedly buttering toast in the kitchen for the students' breakfasts. Teachers are scrambling to make last-minute adjustments to their classrooms, while anxious kids, ranging from pre-K students through high schoolers, wait on the porch, their jackets zipped against the chill of the early-morning air. It's all so incredibly normal, you might not know that, just a few years ago, no one thought Shishmaref would be here anymore. The remote village of 563 people is located 30 miles south of the Arctic Circle, flanked by the Chukchi Sea to the north and an inlet to the south, and it sits atop rapidly melting permafrost. In the last decades, the island's shores have been eroding into the sea, falling off in giant chunks ...
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"We Are on a Course Leading to Tragedy": At UN Talks, Kerry Delivers Urgent Plea on Climate Change 15.12.2014 Truthout - All Articles
The United Nations Climate Change Conference in Lima, Peru, has entered its final day of scheduled talks. Deep divisions remain between wealthy and developing nations on emission cuts and over how much the world’s largest polluters should help poorer nations address climate change. On Thursday, Secretary of State John Kerry flew into Lima and made an impassioned plea for all nations to work for an ambitious U.N. climate deal next year in Paris. Kerry said time is running out to reverse "a course leading to tragedy." TRANSCRIPT: AMY GOODMAN: We’re broadcasting from COP 20, the United Nations Climate Change Conference here in Lima, Peru. The talks have entered their final scheduled day as deep divisions remain between wealthy and developing countries on emission cuts and over how much the world’s largest polluters should help poorer nations address climate change. On Thursday, U.S. Secretary of State John Kerry flew into Lima and made an impassioned plea for all nations to work for an ambitious U.N. ...
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Pipe Dreams? Labor Researchers Say Keystone XL Project May Kill More Jobs Than It Creates 15.12.2014 Truthout - All Articles
While the U.S. Chamber of Commerce has claimed that the proposed Keystone XL pipeline would create 250,000 jobs, labor researchers say the jobs figures have been vastly distorted. We speak to Sean Sweeney, director and founder of the Global Labor Institute at Cornell University, and Bruce Hamilton, vice president of Amalgamated Transit Union. TRANSCRIPT: AMY GOODMAN: We’re broadcasting from the [U.N.] Climate Change Conference here in Lima, Peru. We’re broadcasting from Peru, which is the first time a COP, the Conference of Parties, this U.N. climate summit, in 20 years has been held in the heart of Amazon country. Well, on Thursday, I spoke to the man who crunched the numbers on the Keystone XL job creation, has raised a lot of questions about. SEAN SWEENEY: My name is Sean Sweeney. I co-direct Cornell University’s Global Labor Institute, and I’m also here representing Trade Unions for Energy Democracy. AMY GOODMAN: So, I just tried to ask Secretary Kerry about Keystone XL. He didn’t answer the ...
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What kind of climate deal will we get in Lima? – podcast transcript 15.12.2014 Guardian: Environment

With the stakes higher than ever for a climate deal at talks in Peru next week, we talk to some of the key players in Lima

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Lima conference in danger of missing the rainforest for the trees 15.12.2014 Guardian: Environment
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Climate Change Creates New Geography of Food 14.12.2014 Truthout - All Articles
Coffee rust at a farm in Cauca, southwestern Colombia. (Photo: Neil Palmer / CIAT ) Lima, Peru - The magnitude of the climate changes brought about by global warming and the alterations in rainfall patterns are modifying the geography of food production in the tropics, warned participants at the climate summit in the Peruvian capital. That was the main concern among experts in food security taking part in the 20th session of the Conference of the Parties (COP20) to the United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change (UNFCCC), held Dec. 1-12 in Lima. They are worried about rising food prices if tropical countries fail to take prompt action to adapt. The International Food Policy Research Institute (IFPRI estimates that climate change will trigger food price hikes of up to 30 percent. The countryside is the first sector directly affected by climate change, said Andy Jarvis, a researcher at the International Centre for Tropical Agriculture (CIAT) who specialises in low-carbon farming in the CGIAR ...
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