User: demo Topic: Climate Change
Category: Impacts :: Disease
Last updated: May 27 2017 07:44 IST RSS 2.0
 
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Climate change may be keeping Americans awake at night. Literally. 27.5.2017 Washington Post
Researchers calculated that every nighttime temperature increase of 1 degree Celsius produced an additional three nights of restless sleep per 100 people per month.
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It’s not just programs for the poor; Trump’s budget calls for vast changes to government 24.5.2017 Washington Post
Dozens of smaller budget cuts would amount to a major realignment of the government’s role in society.
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Foreign aid under the ax in State Department budget proposal 23.5.2017 Washington Post
Foreign aid under the ax in State Department budget proposal
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Fungal Diseases Are on the Rise -- Is Environmental Change to Blame? 21.5.2017 Truthout - All Articles
Scientists and physicians are looking for clues to a worrying increase in fungal infections and exploring ways to reduce the threat. (Photo: Pixabay ) Why doesn't this site have ads? In order to maintain our integrity, Truthout doesn't accept any advertising money. Help us keep it this way -- make a donation to support our independent journalism. Fungi are everywhere -- from the mushrooms that decompose fallen logs in the forest, to the mold that grows in your bathtub, to the microscopic fungal cells that reside naturally on your skin. Scientists estimate there are 1.5 million species of fungi on the planet. They're a diverse group, bunched together by their ability to use digestive enzymes to break down and absorb nutrients from their surroundings -- a characteristic that makes some of them great decomposers. Fungi are, in essence, nature's first compost bin. Many of them also help plants grow or carry out other important ecosystem functions. And some fungi are pathogens, causing disease in plants and ...
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Climate Impacts Happening Now: Westward Migration of Forests 21.5.2017 Truthout - All Articles
A recent article in The Atlantic implies climate change to be wrongly viewed as something we don't yet know much about. This article, "American Trees Are Moving West, and No One Knows Why," is half correct. The authors in the study reported upon reveal the reasons why trees are shifting west (as well as north), and that the shift is intrinsically related to climate change. That "No One Knows Why" these trees are shifting westward is fundamentally not a part of this research. The authors say that the westward shift is because climate change has changed moisture patterns, that increased moisture in western portions of the eastern U.S. is the cause for this seemingly counterintuitive westward shift, and it is predominant among young trees that are more resistant to drought even in the face of sporadic drought pulses in the west. From the paper: "The observed differential shift rates could also be due to the fact that saplings are more sensitive to droughts in terms of survival than adult trees, as ...
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Will the government help farmers adapt to a changing climate? 18.5.2017 Minnesota Public Radio: Law & Justice
The livelihoods of farmers and ranchers are intimately tied to weather and the environment. But they may no longer be able to depend on government research to help them adapt to climate change.
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The Daily 202: Trump’s chaotic White House once again makes a bad story worse 16.5.2017 Washington Post: Politics
‘Reckless’ disclosure to the Russians is part a pattern of poor judgment
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Tick-Borne Illnesses Could Boom This Year, Thanks to Climate Change 16.5.2017 Truthout.com
Been bitten by a tick this year? As we edge toward the summer months, scientists warn that more of us could be in for that irritating nip, as tick numbers seem set to soar–and with them, the potential for a boom in cases of usually rare infections like the Powassan virus. According to the CDC , Powassan, or POW, is extremely uncommon. Only 75 cases have been reported in the United States over the past 10 years. Like other tick-borne illnesses, they usually occur in the Northeast and the Great Lakes, where grass cover is thick and the climate is moderate. Most of us are familiar with the symptoms of other tick-borne illnesses, like Lyme disease , and POW has some overlap. Signs can include -- but aren't limited to -- weakness, confusion, headaches and vomiting. However, POW can become more serious, potentially leading to fever, seizures and long-term neurological impairment. There is no specific treatment for POW, but hospitalization is often necessary. People who have contracted the virus will need ...
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Peat moss: Good for plants but bad for the planet? 11.5.2017 Washington Post
Peat moss: Good for plants but bad for the planet?
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Giraffes Are Quietly Disappearing, but the US Can Help Stop Their Silent Extinction 2.5.2017 Truthout.com
Despite their stature as the tallest land animal on earth, and status as one of the most iconic and beloved species in the world, giraffes have been quietly disappearing from the landscape at an alarming rate. Now, however, there's hope the US will act to ensure their survival by  protecting them  as an endangered species. Since the mid-1980s, the population of giraffes has declined by a startling  40 percent , leaving only an estimated 97,560 individuals in the wild. There are now fewer giraffes left in existence than elephants. In December, concerns about the threat of extinction  prompted  the International Union for the Conservation of Nature (IUCN) to change their status from a species of Least Concern -- skipping right over Near Threatened -- to  Vulnerable  on the IUCN Red List of Threatened Species. Unfortunately, they continue to face mounting pressure from a growing human population, human-wildlife conflicts, disease, habitat loss and fragmentation, predators, civil unrest, drought, climate ...
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"Superman Is Not Coming": Erin Brockovich on the Future of Water 27.4.2017 Truthout.com
Erin Brockovich speaks at the 2016 Arizona Ultimate Women's Expo at the Phoenix Convention Center in Phoenix, Arizona, October 9, 2016. (Photo: Gage Skidmore ) "It's not just one Flint. It's hundreds of Flints," says environmental activist Erin Brockovich, describing how water supplies throughout the US have become repositories for industrial waste. More than 200 million Americans are exposed to the carcinogen Chromium 6 alone. With regulation-blocking Scott Pruitt in charge of our drinking water, we must mobilize to prevent widespread illness and death. Erin Brockovich speaks at the 2016 Arizona Ultimate Women's Expo at the Phoenix Convention Center in Phoenix, Arizona, October 9, 2016. (Photo: Gage Skidmore ) Want to see more original stories like this? Make a tax-deductible donation to support the independent investigative reporting and analysis at Truthout! Come take a ride on America's toxic water slide: First stop: Flint, Michigan, where two years later, people are still contending with lead-laced ...
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At least global warming may get Americans off the couch more 24.4.2017 Minnesota Public Radio: News
Places like North Dakota, Minnesota and Maine are likely to see the most dramatic increases in physical activity, usually the result of more walking. A rare, small benefit of climate change, a new study finds.
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Why doctors are being urged to join the March for Science 22.4.2017 LA Times: Commentary
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Will climate change help ticks and mosquitoes spread disease? 22.4.2017 Minnesota Public Radio: Law & Justice
he disease-spreading bugs are creeping north in the states. But will they bring diseases like Lyme and Zika with them?
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#CuriousGoat: Will Climate Change Help Ticks And Mosquitoes Spread Disease? 22.4.2017 NPR News
The disease-spreading bugs are creeping north in the states. But will they bring diseases like Lyme and Zika with them?
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Inaction on Climate Change Equals Human Annihilation 20.4.2017 Truthout.com
Only dramatic and concerted action on multiple fronts can prevent the human disasters now unfolding in Nigeria, Somalia, South Sudan and Yemen from becoming the global norm. (Photo: Asian Development Bank ) Not since World War II have more human beings been at risk from disease and starvation than at this very moment. On March 10th, Stephen O'Brien, under secretary-general of the United Nations for humanitarian affairs, informed the Security Council that 20 million people in three African countries -- Nigeria, Somalia, and South Sudan -- as well as in Yemen were likely to die if not provided with emergency food and medical aid. "We are at a critical point in history," he declared . "Already at the beginning of the year we are facing the largest humanitarian crisis since the creation of the U.N."  Without coordinated international action, he added, "people will simply starve to death [or] suffer and die from disease." Major famines have, of course, occurred before, but never in memory on such a scale in ...
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How gardeners can combat climate change 20.4.2017 Washington Post
How gardeners can combat climate change
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Why doctors are being urged to join the March for Science on Saturday 18.4.2017 LA Times: Commentary

The editors of the prestigious Annals of Internal Medicine are urging their colleagues in the medical community to join the March for Science. To make sure they leave no room for doubt, the headline on their editorial reads, “Alternative Facts Have No Place in Science.”

Published by the American...

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Team Trump Ponders Climate ‘Engineering’ 5.4.2017 ConsortiumNews.com
Exclusive: Rather than take prudent steps to reduce the release of global-warming gases, some Trump advisers are pondering risky gambles to re-engineer the Earth’s climate, as Jonathan Marshall explains. By Jonathan Marshall While President Trump floors the accelerator to speed…Read more →
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Thinning of forests aims to reduce fire risk in Central Cascades 4.4.2017 Seattle Times: Local

The Nature Conservancy is selectively logging dry forests as part of a long-term plan to make privately owned forestland more resilient to fire, disease and climate change.
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