User: demo Topic: Climate Change
Category: Impacts :: Ecosystems
Last updated: Nov 15 2017 16:46 IST RSS 2.0
 
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Revving Up Rural Public Transit 15.11.2017 American Prospect
When the sun rises over Plainview, Nebraska, Arnold Oltjenbruns is already up and ready for work. Beginning at 7:30 A.M., he picks up the kids that he drives to school. “I like hauling the kids the best,” he says. “As soon as they get in the van they’re talking away, and telling me what’s going on.” Oltjenbruns drives Plainview’s “Handivan”—a small, accessible van that provides public transit for Plainview’s 1,200 residents. Whether he’s taking people to school, medical appointments, stores, (or to a nursing home in a neighboring town so that one gentleman could visit his girlfriend), Oltjenbruns and the Handivan can be the difference between isolation and strong social ties in the small northeastern Nebraska city. Oltjenbruns, a retired farmer, had recently moved to Plainview. He wanted something to do with his free time, took the volunteer job, and got certified to drive the van and assist riders with disabilities. Yet Oltjenbruns, like most rural transit operators, is “much more than just a driver,” ...
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Climate One: Aligning profits with the planet 15.11.2017 Minnesota Public Radio: Business
Is a win for the environment a loss for the economy?
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Here’s What Climate Change Is Doing to the West 14.11.2017 Mother Jones
This story was originally published by High Country News and appears here as part of the Climate Desk collaboration.  The complexity of climate change means it’s hard to trace simple lines from cause to effect in daily life, much less plan for the future. That’s one reason the federal government updates its National Climate Assessment every four years—to provide […]
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This endangered snail lives only in the L.A. area. Can the little creatures be saved? 14.11.2017 LA Times: Commentary

Before Los Angeles was developed, the San Gabriel chestnut snail was a common sight from Compton to the San Gabriel Mountains. But today, experts say, it survives only in the Angeles National Forest and on adjacent private lands between Glendora and Altadena after being threatened by development,...

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Thousands of scientists issue bleak 'second notice' to humanity 14.11.2017 Washington Post
In 1992, scientists published a dire “warning to humanity” about a host of impending ecological disasters. A quarter-century later, most of them have gotten worse: “Soon it will be too late to shift course away from our failing trajectory,” the authors of the new statement write.
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Drilling, Drilling, Everywhere: Will the Trump Administration Take Down the Arctic Refuge? 9.11.2017 Truthout - All Articles
(Photo: Robynm ; Edited: LW / TO)   The stories at Truthout equip ordinary people with the facts and resources to create extraordinary change. Support this vital work by making a tax-deductible donation now. What happens in the Arctic doesn't just stay up north. It affects the world, as that region is the  integrator  of our planet's climate systems, atmospheric and oceanic. At the moment, the northernmost places on Earth are  warming  at more than twice the global average, a phenomenon whose impact is already being felt planetwide. Welcome to the world of  climate breakdown  -- and to the world of Donald Trump. The set of climate feedbacks contributing to further warming in the Arctic are about to be aided and abetted by President Trump, his Interior Department, and a Republican-controlled Congress. The impact of their decisions will be experienced around the world. While the United States is still recovering from the deaths, suffering, and devastation caused by extreme hurricanes Harvey, Irma, and ...
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Perigord black truffle grown in Monmouthshire 6.11.2017 BBC: Business
Researchers believe climate change enabled it to be grown in Monmouthshire.
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First black Perigord truffle cultivated in Britain 6.11.2017 Hindu: International
‘Climate change could make it a new British crop’
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The world is warming even faster than expected. Trump isn't going to act. The rest of us need to step up 4.11.2017 LA Times: Commentary

The global climate is in trouble, worsening faster than experts believed only two years ago, and ambitious international steps to address the problem have been insufficient thus far. In December 2015, nearly every nation on earth committed themselves to the Paris agreement to reduce greenhouse...

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Climate change driven almost entirely by human action, dire report released by Trump administration finds 3.11.2017 Washington Post
Climate change driven almost entirely by human action, dire report released by Trump administration finds
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Humans didn't outsmart the Neanderthals. We just outlasted them. 1.11.2017 Washington Post
A new study suggests that our cousins' demise was a result of population dynamics and bad timing.
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Economic Inequalities and Climate Apartheid: Ashley Dawson on "Extreme Cities" 29.10.2017 Truthout.com
Climate change is past the point of being resolved by nature's resilience. Only radical social and economic change will halt global warming and "climate apartheid." A good place to start would be in the "extreme cities" of Ashley Dawson's new book of that title. "Radical demands can quickly come to seem acceptable if enough social movement energy gathers behind them," Dawson tells Truthout. Floodwaters surround office buildings on September 5, 2017, in Houston, Texas. The decrepancy of treatment between Houston and Puerto Rico, which was later hit by Hurricane Maria, is an example of "climate apartheid," according to author Ashley Dawson. (Photo: Justin Sullivan / Getty Images) Today's big cities are ground zero for the impacts of climate disruption -- at risk from floods, cyclones and heat waves. In his new book, Ashley Dawson examines the dangers facing the world's megacities and the urban movements fighting to make city living not just safer, but more fair and equal. Order your copy of Extreme Cities: ...
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5 years after Superstorm Sandy, the lessons haven't sunk in 27.10.2017 AP National
Five years after Superstorm Sandy was supposed to have taught the U.S. a lesson about the dangers of living along the coast, disaster planning experts say there is no place in America truly prepared for climate change and the tempests it could bring....
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The Myth of the Managed Wildfire: How US Forest Service Policies Perpetuate Deadly Wildfires 26.10.2017 Truthout.com
The idea that wildfires can be controlled is a dangerous and costly myth, promoted in large part by the timber industry, which views wildfires as a waste of economic resources, not the forest's way of rejuvenating itself. Ecologically speaking, fighting wildfires makes about as much sense as fighting hurricanes, yet we spend nearly $3 billion annually on the effort. Tanker helicopters fight a wildfire on October 16, 2017, in Oakville, California. At least 40 people were killed with many are still missing, and at least 5,700 buildings have been destroyed since wildfires broke out a week ago. (Photo: Elijah Nouvelage / Getty Images) Research is clear  that the wildfires the US experienced this year are more widespread and increasingly intense as our climate heats up. Consistent with the US government's head-in-the-sand approach to the climate crisis generally, our national wildfire "management" policy flies in the face of science and reason. If we don't learn to adapt to climate change's growing coastal ...
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Lincoln Institute of Land Policy to Partner with Champion Mayors for Inclusive Growth 25.10.2017 New Kerala: World News
CAMBRIDGE, Mass: The Lincoln Institute of Land Policy will join the Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development (OECD) and mayors from across the globe this week to adopt the Seoul Implementation Agenda, a framework for cities to foster inclusive growth and respond to the challenges of climate change.
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Reinventing Development Regulations Urges Zoning Reform 23.10.2017 New Kerala: World News
CAMBRIDGE, Mass: Every community across the land can and should revise their zoning -and subdivision regulations - a move that will build sustainability and resilience, increase affordability, and improve quality of life, say the authors of a new book published by the Lincoln Institute of Land Policy.
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EPA yanks scientists’ conference presentations, including on climate change 23.10.2017 Washington Post
Two staff members and a contractor were instructed not to speak as planned at the session on the status of Narragansett Bay, New England’s largest estuary, and the challenges it faces.
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Road Kill: Side-Swiping the Environmental Protection Act 22.10.2017 Truthout.com
The Pacific walrus was denied protected status early this month. (Photo: US Geological Survey ) Ready to challenge injustice and spark real change? So are we. Support Truthout's mission today by making a tax-deductible donation. A senate appropriations subcommittee, led by Sen. Lisa Murkowski (R-AK) will resist the Trump administration's efforts to slash spending for the Environmental Protection Agency and the Interior Department this week. Last summer, Murkowski warned the White House that there was no chance her panel would agree to cut the EPA's $8 billion budget by almost a third. But the budget isn't the only thing that's endangered. The administration is leading a campaign to toss out a growing list of rules and regulations that protect our environment and the all plants and animals that are trying to thrive alongside us. To see more stories like this, visit Moyers & Company at Truthout. An Endangered Act The Endangered Species Act itself is under attack. Since January, congressional Republicans ...
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What dolphin diets reveal about climate change's effects off the California coast 20.10.2017 LA Times: Science

Scientists studying dolphins dining off the California coastline have found that the marine food web is starting to look a little threadbare. The length of food chains in that web appears to have gotten shorter in response to environmental changes — such as those caused by El Niño events.

The finding...

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Dolphin diets show how climate change could alter food chains off the California coast 20.10.2017 LA Times: Science

Scientists studying dolphins dining off the California coastline have found that the marine food web is starting to look a little threadbare. The length of food chains in that web appears to have gotten shorter in response to environmental changes — such as those caused by El Niño events.

The finding...

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