User: demo Topic: Climate Change
Category: Impacts :: Agriculture
Last updated: Sep 24 2017 19:53 IST RSS 2.0
 
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In the Caribbean, Colonialism and Inequality Mean Hurricanes Hit Harder 24.9.2017 Truthout.com
Hurricane Maria, the  15th tropical depression  this season, is now battering the Caribbean, just two weeks after Hurricane Irma wreaked havoc in the region.  The devastation in Dominica is "mind-boggling," wrote the country's prime minister, Roosevelt Skerrit,  on Facebook  just after midnight on September 19. The next day, in Puerto Rico,  NPR reported  via member station WRTU in San Juan that "Most of the island is without power…or water."  Among the Caribbean islands  impacted by both deadly storms  are Puerto Rico, St Kitts, Tortola and Barbuda.  In this region, disaster damages are frequently amplified by needlessly protracted and incomplete  recoveries . In 2004,  Hurricane Ivan  rolled roughshod through the Caribbean  with wind speeds of 160 mph . The region's economy took more than three years to recover.  Grenada's surplus of US$17 million  became a deficit of $54 million, thanks to decreased revenue and the outlays for rehabilitation and reconstruction. Nor were the effects of a 7 magnitude ...
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The Energy 202: Climate change terms altered in another corner of EPA’s website 22.9.2017 Washington Post
The Energy 202: Climate change terms altered in another corner of EPA’s website
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The dystopian future is already underway in Maja Lunde's novel 'The History of Bees' 22.9.2017 LA Times: Commentary

“Our children and grandchildren” is a phrase often wheeled out in conversations about climate change. For politicians searching for heartstrings to tug, this is a logical rhetorical strategy, appealing to voters’ instincts to protect their kin. But it backfires in projecting the changing world...

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Leonardo DiCaprio announces USD 20 mn environmental grants 21.9.2017 New Kerala: World News
Los Angeles [U.S.A], Sept. 21 : Leonardo DiCaprio is using his money and fame for a good cause.
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Federal regulations: Less is worse 21.9.2017 Seattle Times: Opinion

The Sammamish letter writer (“Federal regulations: Less is better”) agreed with President Donald Trump’s killing and weakening 860 regulations. I challenge Trump supporters to share which of these hundreds of actions have “bettered our country.” Please explain how endorsing killer mattresses; allowing toxic chemicals in your food and water; abolishing consumer protections (remember the Great […]
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The Energy 202: Hurricanes are dominating the news. But forest fires are raging out West. 20.9.2017 Washington Post
The Energy 202: Hurricanes are dominating the news. But forest fires are raging out West.
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Decolonization in Action: Māori Town Revives Lost Language 18.9.2017 Truthout.com
One might mistake Otaki as a sleepy seaside town in the bucolic Kapiti Coast District of the North Island of New Zealand. That assumption would be wrong. Otaki is alive and kicking after nearly two centuries of Crown domination. This town of nearly 6,000 is experiencing a momentous resurgence thanks to a sensational revival of Māori language and culture . "Colonization convinced Māori to stop believing in themselves. Otaki was no different," said Mereana Selby in her opening remarks at the International Funders for Indigenous Peoples Pacific Hui. The hui, a Māori word for a gathering, brought together indigenous advocates and philanthropists from the Pacific Islands and beyond. Their focus was to foster collaborative partnerships to resource indigenous designed solutions for climate change, environmental sustainability and healthy food systems. "The loss of our native language also led to the disappearance of the Māori mind," shared Selby, one of the hui participants. Selby is the first female CEO of Te ...
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Syria Holds the Secret to Our Species’ Survival 18.9.2017 Mother Jones
This story was originally published by Food and Environment Reporting Network.  Salvatore Ceccarelli knew he was engaging in a subversive act when, in 2010, he took two 20 kilo sacks of bread and durum wheat seeds from a seed bank outside of Aleppo, Syria and brought them to Italy during a visit back to his […]
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Morning Bits 18.9.2017 Washington Post: Op-Eds
Morning Bits
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Jellyfish clogging Italy’s warming seas. Can’t beat ’em? eat ’em 18.9.2017 Seattle Times: Top stories

The jellyfish invasion has now reached the point where there may be little to do but find a way to live with huge numbers of them, scientists say. One researcher thinks the answer is to eat them, as Japanese and Chinese diners do.
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The Everglades have always been hit by hurricanes. Thanks to climate change, Irma could be a different matter. 16.9.2017 Washington Post
The Everglades have always been hit by hurricanes. Thanks to climate change, Irma could be a different matter.
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Socialist Ideals in Practice: Democratic Socialists of America Mucks Out Flooded Houston Homes 14.9.2017 Truthout - All Articles
In Texas, where Republican policies have dismantled the social safety net and left large numbers of people without reliable social services, the Democratic Socialists of America (DSA) are stepping in to provide much-needed aid to Hurricane Harvey's most vulnerable victims. Amy Zachmeyer of Houston's DSA expresses hope that the ongoing mobilization will help more people realize that socialists "are not just this thing people complain about on Fox News." Democratic Socialists help repair damage caused by Hurricane Harvey. (Photo: Houston DSA) Support from readers provides Truthout with vital funds to keep investigating what mainstream media won't cover. Fund more stories like this by donating now! Since election night 2016, the streets of the US have rung with resistance. People all over the country have woken up with the conviction that they must do something to fight inequality in all its forms. But many are wondering what it is they can do. In this ongoing "Interviews for Resistance" series, experienced ...
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APNewsBreak: Walruses in Alaska may have died in stampede 14.9.2017 AP National
ANCHORAGE, Alaska (AP) -- Thousands of Pacific walrus are coming to Alaska's northwest shore again in the absence of summer sea ice and not all are surviving....
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APNewsBreak: Stampede suspected in dozens of walrus deaths 14.9.2017 Seattle Times: Local

ANCHORAGE, Alaska (AP) — Thousands of Pacific walrus are coming to Alaska’s northwest shore again in the absence of summer sea ice and not all are surviving. A survey Monday of a mile of coastline near the Inupiaq Eskimo village of Point Lay found 64 dead walruses, the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service told The […]
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Pacific Northwest Winemakers Worry Wildfire Smoke Could Ruin Harvest 13.9.2017 NPR News
The smoke and ash hanging in the air from the still-burning Eagle Creek Fire in the Columbia River Gorge could easily transfer to the grapes, potentially changing the quality of the wine.
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What You Do Want to Know About Haiti's Sewage Crisis 13.9.2017 Truthout.com
(Photo: Tony Marcelli) Earlier this summer I opened my voicemail to a message from my dear friend Anne, who had left a message for me during her evening commute. She called me from the side of the road after having been so deeply moved by an unexpected NPR segment on the sanitation crisis in Haiti and the courage of Haiti's latrine cleaners, the  bayakou , across the country. Unlike Anne, who has long known of SOIL's work to  transform waste  in Haiti, most loyal NPR listeners in the US learned about Haiti's sewage system -- or lack thereof -- for the first time that day as they listened to Weekend Edition. As somebody who has taken every opportunity over the last decade to talk about waste treatment in Haiti to anybody that would listen, I was so moved to see  NPR shed light on the enormity of Haiti's sanitation crisis  and heartened by the corresponding reaction to the piece across the globe. In the weeks that have followed, I've heard from so many people, both friends and strangers, who were moved to ...
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I Was an Exxon-funded Climate Scientist 13.9.2017 Truthout - All Articles
ExxonMobil's deliberate attempts to  sow doubt  on the reality and urgency of climate change and their  donations to front groups  to disseminate false information about climate change have been public knowledge for a long time, now. Investigative   reports  in 2015 revealed that Exxon had its own scientists doing its own climate modeling as far back as the 1970s: science and modeling that was not only accurate, but that was being used to plan for the company's future.  Now, a  peer-reviewed study  published August 23 has confirmed that what Exxon was saying internally about climate change was quantitatively very different from their public statements. Specifically, researchers  Geoffrey Supran  and  Naomi Oreskes  found that at least 80 percent of the internal documents and peer-reviewed publications they studied from between 1977 and 2014 were consistent with the state of the science -- acknowledging that climate change is real and caused by humans, and identifying "reasonable uncertainties" that any ...
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Tampa dodged Irma’s worst, but still at risk and unprepared 13.9.2017 Seattle Times: Top stories

ST. PETERSBURG, Fla. (AP) — As monster Hurricane Irma buzz-sawed its way up Florida’s Gulf Coast, it looked for several hours like the heavily populated Tampa Bay area could face catastrophic wind damage and flooding from the first major storm to roar ashore there in 96 years. There was good reason to worry. Since 1921, […]
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Coffee, bees and climate change are linked in ways you may not have expected 12.9.2017 Minnesota Public Radio: Law & Justice
A new study projects that by 2050, climate change could reduce the amount of ground usable to grow coffee in Latin America by up to 88 percent. Bees play a key role in increasing coffee yields.
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Coffee, Bees and Climate Change Are Linked In Ways You May Not Have Expected 12.9.2017 NPR Health Science
A new study projects that by 2050, climate change could reduce the amount of ground usable to grow coffee in Latin America by up to 88 percent. Bees play a key role in increasing coffee yields.
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