User: demo Topic: Agriculture
Category: GE GM Agriculture
Last updated: Apr 25 2017 19:50 IST RSS 2.0
 
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International Monsanto Tribunal Calls for Human Rights Over Corporate Rights 25.4.2017 Truthout - All Articles
On Tuesday, April 18, representatives of the Organic Consumers Association and our  Regeneration International  project gathered in The Hague, Netherlands, along with members of other civil society groups, scientists and journalists. We assembled to hear the opinions of the five judges who presided over the International Monsanto Tribunal. After taking six months to review the testimony of 28 witnesses who testified during the two-day citizens' tribunal held in The Hague last October, the judges were ready to report on their 53-page  Advisory Opinion . The upshot of the judges' opinion? Monsanto has engaged in practices that have violated the basic human right to a healthy environment, the right to food, the right to health, and the right of scientists to freely conduct indispensable research. The judges also called on international lawmakers to hold corporations like Monsanto accountable, to place human rights above the rights of corporations, and to "clearly assert the protection of the environment and ...
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1st farmer lawsuit on deck against Syngenta over China trade 23.4.2017 AP Business
MINNEAPOLIS (AP) -- The first of tens of thousands of U.S. lawsuits is about to go to trial against Swiss agribusiness giant Syngenta over its decision to introduce a genetically engineered corn seed variety to the U.S. market before China had approved it for imports....
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1st farmer lawsuit on deck against Syngenta over China trade 23.4.2017 Seattle Times: Business & Technology

MINNEAPOLIS (AP) — The first of tens of thousands of U.S. lawsuits is about to go to trial against Swiss agribusiness giant Syngenta over its decision to introduce a genetically engineered corn seed variety to the U.S. market before China had approved it for imports. The lawsuits allege that Syngenta’s move wrecked an increasingly important […]
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When should voters march to the beat of scientists? 22.4.2017 Washington Post: Op-Eds
When should voters march to the beat of scientists?
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Florida tests bacteria-infected mosquitoes to kill off bugs 19.4.2017 Seattle Times: Top stories

MIAMI BEACH, Fla. (AP) — Thousands of bacteria-infected mosquitoes were released in the wild Tuesday near Key West, testing a new way to kill mosquitoes that carry Zika and other viruses. The Florida Keys Mosquito Control District released 20,000 male mosquitoes infected by the Kentucky-based company MosquitoMate with naturally occurring Wolbachia bacteria. The offspring produced […]
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Activists’ tribunal alleges Monsanto hurts environment 18.4.2017 Washington Post: World
A tribunal brought together by a rights group that aims to highlight what it claims are abuses by U.S. seed company Monsanto Co. has delivered an advisory opinion alleging that the company “engaged in practices which have negatively impacted” people’s rights to a healthy environment, food and good health.
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GMO crops, neonicotinoids will be phased out on Boulder County-owned land 15.4.2017 Denver Post: Local
Boulder County will phase out the cultivation of genetically modified corn and sugar beets and the use of neonicotinoid pesticides on county-owned farmland.
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Boulder County to proceed with GMO crop phaseout 14.4.2017 Headlines: All Headlines
Boulder County commissioners voted 2-1 on Thursday to approve the latest version of their plan for phasing out the growing of genetically modified corn and sugar beets on county-owned farmland.
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Pruitt's Rejection of Chlorpyrifos Ban Seems Based on "Alternative Facts" 9.4.2017 Truthout - All Articles
EPA chief Scott Pruitt fails to explain what data prompted his decision to allow continued use of toxic pesticides. (Photo: Pixabay ) The US Environmental Protection Agency under President Trump may have stepped into the brave new world of alternative facts. Last November, after several years of study, the EPA had  announced  that the insecticide chlorpyrifos poses an unacceptable risk to humans, especially children, when its residue is found in fruits, vegetables, and drinking water. The finding cited a 2014  Columbia University study  and other research showing that young people have suffered diminished cognitive abilities and reduced IQ after chronic exposures. This led the EPA to recommend a ban on all agricultural uses of chlorpyrifos -- by far the most heavily used insecticide in the US with  4 to 8 million pounds applied annually . On a pounds per acre basis, the  heaviest applications of chlorpyrifos  in the US have been on the Hawaiian island of Kauai, where several large agribusiness have been ...
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Glyphosate: Health Concerns About the Most Widely Used Pesticide 5.4.2017 Truthout.com
Glyphosate is a synthetic herbicide patented in 1974 by the Monsanto Company, and now manufactured and sold by many companies in hundreds of products around the world. Glyphosate is best known as the active ingredient in Monsanto's Roundup branded herbicides. Here are some key facts about glyphosate: Most Widely Used Pesticide  According to a February 2016 study in  Environmental Sciences Europe , glyphosate is the  most widely used pesticide . "In the US, no pesticide has come remotely close to such intensive and widespread use," according to the study. Findings include: Americans have applied 1.8 million tons of glyphosate since its introduction in 1974. Worldwide 9.4 million tons of the chemical has been sprayed on fields -- enough to spray nearly half a pound of Roundup on every cultivated acre of land in the world. Globally, glyphosate use has risen almost 15-fold since so-called "Roundup Ready," genetically engineered glyphosate-tolerant crops were introduced in 1996. Cancer Concerns  In 2015, the ...
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Cargill link to anti-GMO group spurs farmer criticism 29.3.2017 Salt Lake Tribune
Cargill Inc.’s efforts to supply food companies with non-genetically modified ingredients have come under attack from the other side of its business: farmers. In common with several other large agribusinesses, Cargill is adapting to a shift in consumer taste toward more products labeled non-GMO. And just like those companies, it too has agreed to allow the Non-GMO Project, a U.S. non-profit group, to verify some of its supplies to ensure they’re free of ingredients such as modified soy and corn.... <iframe src="http://www.sltrib.com/csp/mediapool/sites/sltrib/pages/garss.csp" height="1" width="1" > </frame>
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What are the key issues for Brexit talks? 29.3.2017 BBC: Business
As the government formally triggers Article 50, BBC editors set out the key negotiation areas.
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Sean P. Means: Utah artist explores the 'progress' brought by wartime 24.3.2017 Salt Lake Tribune
The German philosopher Georg Wilhelm Friedrich Hegel once wrote that “war is progress, peace is stagnation.” It’s a sad truth that many advances in technology — nuclear power, radar, GPS technology, the internet, even canned food — were prompted by the needs of the military in wartime. That parallel march of war and technology has long fascinated Tanja London, a German-born, Salt Lake City-based dancer and performance artist who is exploring those ideas in a new work, “Save Your Own Skin,” bei...
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Behind a Corporate Monster: How Monsanto Pushes Agricultural Domination 19.3.2017 Truthout.com
A farmhand loads genetically modified corn seed into a planter on Bo Stone's farm in Rowland, North Carolina, April 20, 2016. (Photo: Jeremy M. Lange / The New York Times) Monsanto, one of the world's biggest pesticide and seed corporations and leading developer of genetically modified crop varieties, had a stock market value of US$66 billion in 2014. It has gained this position by a combination of deceit, threat, litigation, destruction of evidence, falsified data, bribery, takeovers and cultivation of regulatory bodies. Its rise and torrid controversies cover a long period starting with polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs, chemicals used as insulators for electrical transformers) in the 1940s and moving on to dioxin (a contaminant of Agent Orange used to defoliate Vietnam), glyphosate (the active ingredient in Roundup herbicide), recombinant bovine growth hormone (rBGH, a hormone injected into dairy cows to increase their milk production), and genetic modified organisms (GMOs). Its key aim in dealing with ...
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U.K. grants doctors first licence to create 3-parent babies 16.3.2017 Hindu: News
Britain’s Parliament had voted last year to approve the IVF treatment, which involves removal of faulty mitochondria
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The world of 'Logan' isn't a dystopia. We're already living in it. 8.3.2017 Washington Post: Op-Eds
The world of 'Logan' isn't a dystopia. We're already living in it.
Just One Small Problem With This Major Report on GMO Safety 5.3.2017 Mother Jones
About a year ago, the prestigious National Academies of Sciences, Engineering and Medicine produced a 584-page report assessing the health, environmental, and agronomic impact of genetically modified crops. The conclusion: GMOs have so far proved to be neither a disaster nor a triumph. They haven't been shown to pose a threat to human health, as some critics have argued they do; but they also haven't discernibly raised crop yields, as some boosters insist they have. Not surprisingly, the report did little to "end the highly polarized dispute over biotech crops," concluded New York Times reporter Andrew Martin in an article just after the report's release. He added that both sides of the debate "pointed approvingly to findings that buttressed their viewpoint and criticized those that did not." And a new paper , published in the peer-reviewed journal PLOS-One, ups the temperature of that long-simmering debate. The authors— Sheldon Krimsky , a professor in the Department of Urban and Environmental Policy ...
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Three types of genetically engineered potatoes OK'd 28.2.2017 Salt Lake Tribune
Boise • U.S. officials say three types of potatoes genetically engineered to resist the pathogen that caused the Irish potato famine are safe for the environment and safe to eat. The approval by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency and the U.S. Food and Drug Administration late last week gives Idaho-based J.R. Simplot Company permission to plant the potatoes this spring and sell them in the fall. The company says the potatoes contain a potato gene resistant to late blight. Late blight is pat...
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US approves 3 types of genetically engineered potatoes 28.2.2017 Seattle Times: Local

BOISE, Idaho (AP) — U.S. officials say three types of potatoes genetically engineered to resist the pathogen that caused the Irish potato famine are safe for the environment and safe to eat. The approval by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency and the U.S. Food and Drug Administration late last week gives Idaho-based J.R. Simplot Company […]
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US approves 3 types of genetically engineered potatoes 28.2.2017 AP Business
BOISE, Idaho (AP) -- U.S. officials say three types of potatoes genetically engineered to resist the pathogen that caused the Irish potato famine are safe for the environment and safe to eat....
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