User: demo Topic: Agriculture
Category: GE GM Agriculture
Last updated: Mar 29 2017 14:13 IST RSS 2.0
 
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Cargill link to anti-GMO group spurs farmer criticism 29.3.2017 Salt Lake Tribune
Cargill Inc.’s efforts to supply food companies with non-genetically modified ingredients have come under attack from the other side of its business: farmers. In common with several other large agribusinesses, Cargill is adapting to a shift in consumer taste toward more products labeled non-GMO. And just like those companies, it too has agreed to allow the Non-GMO Project, a U.S. non-profit group, to verify some of its supplies to ensure they’re free of ingredients such as modified soy and corn.... <iframe src="http://www.sltrib.com/csp/mediapool/sites/sltrib/pages/garss.csp" height="1" width="1" > </frame>
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What are the key issues for Brexit talks? 29.3.2017 BBC: Business
As the government formally triggers Article 50, BBC editors set out the key negotiation areas.
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Sean P. Means: Utah artist explores the 'progress' brought by wartime 24.3.2017 Salt Lake Tribune
The German philosopher Georg Wilhelm Friedrich Hegel once wrote that “war is progress, peace is stagnation.” It’s a sad truth that many advances in technology — nuclear power, radar, GPS technology, the internet, even canned food — were prompted by the needs of the military in wartime. That parallel march of war and technology has long fascinated Tanja London, a German-born, Salt Lake City-based dancer and performance artist who is exploring those ideas in a new work, “Save Your Own Skin,” bei...
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Behind a Corporate Monster: How Monsanto Pushes Agricultural Domination 19.3.2017 Truthout.com
A farmhand loads genetically modified corn seed into a planter on Bo Stone's farm in Rowland, North Carolina, April 20, 2016. (Photo: Jeremy M. Lange / The New York Times) Monsanto, one of the world's biggest pesticide and seed corporations and leading developer of genetically modified crop varieties, had a stock market value of US$66 billion in 2014. It has gained this position by a combination of deceit, threat, litigation, destruction of evidence, falsified data, bribery, takeovers and cultivation of regulatory bodies. Its rise and torrid controversies cover a long period starting with polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs, chemicals used as insulators for electrical transformers) in the 1940s and moving on to dioxin (a contaminant of Agent Orange used to defoliate Vietnam), glyphosate (the active ingredient in Roundup herbicide), recombinant bovine growth hormone (rBGH, a hormone injected into dairy cows to increase their milk production), and genetic modified organisms (GMOs). Its key aim in dealing with ...
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U.K. grants doctors first licence to create 3-parent babies 16.3.2017 Hindu: News
Britain’s Parliament had voted last year to approve the IVF treatment, which involves removal of faulty mitochondria
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The world of 'Logan' isn't a dystopia. We're already living in it. 8.3.2017 Washington Post: Op-Eds
The world of 'Logan' isn't a dystopia. We're already living in it.
Just One Small Problem With This Major Report on GMO Safety 5.3.2017 Mother Jones
About a year ago, the prestigious National Academies of Sciences, Engineering and Medicine produced a 584-page report assessing the health, environmental, and agronomic impact of genetically modified crops. The conclusion: GMOs have so far proved to be neither a disaster nor a triumph. They haven't been shown to pose a threat to human health, as some critics have argued they do; but they also haven't discernibly raised crop yields, as some boosters insist they have. Not surprisingly, the report did little to "end the highly polarized dispute over biotech crops," concluded New York Times reporter Andrew Martin in an article just after the report's release. He added that both sides of the debate "pointed approvingly to findings that buttressed their viewpoint and criticized those that did not." And a new paper , published in the peer-reviewed journal PLOS-One, ups the temperature of that long-simmering debate. The authors— Sheldon Krimsky , a professor in the Department of Urban and Environmental Policy ...
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Three types of genetically engineered potatoes OK'd 28.2.2017 Salt Lake Tribune
Boise • U.S. officials say three types of potatoes genetically engineered to resist the pathogen that caused the Irish potato famine are safe for the environment and safe to eat. The approval by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency and the U.S. Food and Drug Administration late last week gives Idaho-based J.R. Simplot Company permission to plant the potatoes this spring and sell them in the fall. The company says the potatoes contain a potato gene resistant to late blight. Late blight is pat...
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US approves 3 types of genetically engineered potatoes 28.2.2017 Seattle Times: Local

BOISE, Idaho (AP) — U.S. officials say three types of potatoes genetically engineered to resist the pathogen that caused the Irish potato famine are safe for the environment and safe to eat. The approval by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency and the U.S. Food and Drug Administration late last week gives Idaho-based J.R. Simplot Company […]
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US approves 3 types of genetically engineered potatoes 28.2.2017 AP Business
BOISE, Idaho (AP) -- U.S. officials say three types of potatoes genetically engineered to resist the pathogen that caused the Irish potato famine are safe for the environment and safe to eat....
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This California gubernatorial candidate wants state-funded 'universal basic income' for everyone 23.2.2017 LA Times: Commentary
Essential Politics: Lawmaker says California needs an estate tax if the federal version is scrapped, Sanders thanks supporters in Los Angeles Feb. 22, 2017, 4:20 p.m. This is Essential Politics, our daily look at California political and government news. Here's what we're watching right now: If...
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Punitive damages allowed in farmer lawsuit against Syngenta 23.2.2017 Seattle Times: Nation & World

MINNEAPOLIS (AP) — A Minnesota judge will let some farmers seek punitive damages against the Syngenta seed company for selling genetically modified corn seeds before China approved imports of crops grown from them. In an order unsealed Tuesday, Hennepin County District Judge Thomas Sipkins wrote that there’s evidence Syngenta knew the risks of commercializing Viptera […]
Are cyborgs in our future? 'Homo Deus' author thinks so 22.2.2017 Minnesota Public Radio: Law & Justice
Yuval Noah Harari expects we'll soon engineer our bodies in the same way we design products. "I think in general medicine ... will switch from healing the sick to upgrading the healthy," he says.
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Are Cyborgs In Our Future? 'Homo Deus' Author Thinks So 22.2.2017 NPR: All Things Considered
Yuval Noah Harari expects we'll soon engineer our bodies in the same way we design products. "I think in general medicine ... will switch from healing the sick to upgrading the healthy," he says.
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Forget genius. Science is the product of less-than-brilliant minds 20.2.2017 LA Times: Commentary

We scientists tend to tell our story via breakthroughs — paradigm shifts that shake the foundations of knowledge and remake everyone’s understanding of how the world works. It’s a tale of high-flying, singular brilliance, of Einsteins and Darwins, of pure genius.

Such a narrative of exceptionalism...

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Rejoice! Scientists may actually slow down ageing 19.2.2017 New Kerala: World News
Rejoice! Scientists may actually slow down ageing
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Bill Gates: Bioterrorism could kill more than nuclear war — but no one is ready to deal with it 19.2.2017 Washington Post: World
No one on his panel at the Munich Security Conference argued with him.
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Chinese national in Kansas guilty in engineered rice theft 17.2.2017 Seattle Times: Nation & World

KANSAS CITY, Kan. (AP) — A Chinese national living in Manhattan, Kansas, is guilty of conspiring to steal proprietary rice seeds developed in the U.S. and giving them to visitors from China. A federal jury on Thursday convicted 50-year-old Weiqiang Zhang of conspiracy to steal trade secrets, conspiracy to commit interstate transportation of stolen property […]
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Coffee overpriced, Playboy underdressed, ‘Bachelorette’ confessed 15.2.2017 SFGate: Business & Technology
After 33 seasons of resembling a Silicon Valley engineering quad, but better-looking, “The Bachelor” reality TV franchise is getting an African American lead. Rachel Lindsay, a current “Bachelor” contestant, will star in the new season of “The Bachelorette,” Jimmy Kimmel revealed on his late-night show Monday. Naked women are back in Playboy magazine, ending a year-old ban on the nudity that made the magazine famous. #NakedIsNormal marked Twitter and Facebook posts celebrating the release of Playboy’s March-April issue. The magazine had banished naked women from its print edition because it felt the content had become passe in the era of easily accessible online porn. [...] Cooper Hefner, Playboy’s chief creative officer and the son of magazine founder Hugh Hefner, called the nudity ban a mistake in a tweet.
Scientific panel says editing heritable human genes could be OK in the future 14.2.2017 Minnesota Public Radio: News
The National Academy of Medicine and National Academy of Sciences say a long-standing taboo on editing human genes could be lifted -- even if the changes can be carried through to future generations.
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