User: cassels Topic: Medical Scanning
Category: PET Scan
Last updated: Jan 07 2016 22:37 IST RSS 2.0
 
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Could CT scans cause cancer? 7.1.2016 CNN: Top Stories
Jean Hanvik decided that enough was enough. When a painful intestinal inflammation flared in 2014, the 55-year-old benefits communications consultant balked at her doctor's recommendation that she undergo another abdominal CT scan — her fourth in eight years.
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Publicly funded fertility treatment comes to Ottawa, but doesn't meet demand 22.12.2015 Ottawa Citizen: News
The waiting list has been growing at the Ottawa Fertility Centre since the Ontario government announced earlier this year it would begin paying for in vitro fertilization for women under 43 by the end of the year. As of this week, the fertility centre will start calling patients on that list to begin treatment under the new […]
Colombian clan could lead researchers to Alzheimer’s cure 21.11.2015 Toronto Star: Living
MEDELLIN, COLOMBIA—The man who would become known as Patient No. 1 was a 47-year-old farmer who had forgotten how to farm. His name was Pedro Julio, and his family had travelled through the mountains, on horseback and then by bus, to San Vicente de Paul hospital in Medellin. They wanted to know if Pedro Julio was developing the terrible sickness that had robbed his mother and grandmother of their senses. La bobera, they called it. The foolishness. Dr. Francisco Lopera was the physician on staff that day, a few weeks before Christmas in 1984. He was a young neurology resident whose boyhood obsession with UFOs had sparked an early interest in astronomy, until he decided the mysteries of the human brain were more interesting. Pedro Julio was a mystery that would define his career. Lopera had never seen dementia in patients so young. Soon after, a lottery ticket seller from another rural town arrived with the same symptoms and family history. He was 45. Intrigued, Lopera travelled through the countryside to ...
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Mizzou Coach Gary Pinkel to resign after season, cites lymphoma diagnosis 14.11.2015 Washington Post
Mizzou Coach Gary Pinkel to resign after season, cites lymphoma diagnosis
Cancer patient waits months for scans due to lack of radioactive dye 21.10.2015 CBC.ca: Health
Erica Malanchuk

A Calgary woman with cervical cancer has waited months to find out whether she needs more chemotherapy because her PET-CT scans have been postponed — due to a radioactive dye shortage also affecting others in the province.

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A blood test for Alzheimer's 19.10.2015 CBC.ca: Health
Alzheimer's disease brains

Would you want to take a blood test that diagnoses Alzheimer's disease? It's closer than you think.

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Modest gains reported in experimental Alzheimer's drug studies 22.7.2015 CBC.ca: Health
MED Alzheimers Drugs

Researchers at the Alzheimer's Association International Conference in Washington on Wednesday updated ongoing research with three experimental drugs that aim to fight Alzheimer's by targeting a sticky protein that clogs the brain.

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Study: Women with mild memory problem worsen faster than men 21.7.2015 Chicago Tribune: Health
Older women with mild memory impairment worsened about twice as fast as men, says new research that illustrates the especially hard toll that Alzheimer's takes on ...
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Studies: Better sleep may be important for Alzheimer’s risk 21.7.2015 Seattle Times: Nation & World
WASHINGTON (AP) — To sleep, perchance to… ward off Alzheimer’s? New research suggests poor sleep may increase people’s risk of Alzheimer’s disease, by spurring a brain-clogging gunk that in turn further interrupts shut-eye. Disrupted sleep may be one of the missing pieces in explaining how a hallmark of Alzheimer’s, a sticky protein called beta-amyloid, starts […]
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Study peeks into healthy brains to hunt Alzheimer's culprit 27.5.2015 Denver Post: National News Headlines
WASHINGTON (AP) — Sticky plaque gets the most attention, but now healthy seniors at risk of Alzheimer's are letting scientists peek into their brains to see if another culprit is lurking.
Study peeks into healthy brains to hunt Alzheimer’s culprit 26.5.2015 Seattle Times: Local
WASHINGTON (AP) — Sticky plaque gets the most attention, but now healthy seniors at risk of Alzheimer’s are letting scientists peek into their brains to see if another culprit is lurking. No one knows what actually causes Alzheimer’s, but the suspects are its two hallmarks — the gunky amyloid in those brain plaques or tangles […]
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Peeking into healthy brains to see if Alzheimer’s is brewing 26.5.2015 Seattle Times: Local
WASHINGTON (AP) — Sticky plaque gets the most attention, but now healthy seniors at risk of Alzheimer’s are letting scientists peek into their brains to see if another culprit is lurking. No one knows what actually causes Alzheimer’s, but the suspects are its two hallmarks — the gunky amyloid in those brain plaques or tangles […]
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Peeking into healthy brains to see if Alzheimer's is brewing 25.5.2015 Denver Post: National News Headlines
WASHINGTON (AP) — Sticky plaque gets the most attention, but now healthy seniors at risk of Alzheimer's are letting scientists peek into their brains to see if another culprit is lurking.
Veterans show signs of brain injury that afflicts football players 7.4.2015 CNN: Top Stories
After his last tour in Iraq, it took master gunner Shane Garcie about six weeks to notice he'd changed.
HIV's hiding places at last revealed by simple scan 9.3.2015 New Scientist: Health
Drugs can clear HIV from the blood, but the virus can hide out around the body. Now we have a way to reveal its hiding places – the first step to getting rid of it ...
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World's longest hockey game: 4,223 goals, $1.1M for cancer 17.2.2015 CANOE News: Canada

As fireworks encompassed the skies surrounding Saiker's Acres the World's Longest Hockey Game went out with a bang on Family Day.
Alzheimer's research volunteers face risk of knowing 8.2.2015 Star Tribune: Health
Researchers are studying how people respond to being told of their risks.
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Lack of cancer scanner in Sudbury a key issue with voters 5.2.2015 Toronto Star: Living
Convoys of Liberal and NDP staff from Toronto streamed north to get their voters to the polls Thursday in a high-stakes Sudbury byelection , where a key issue concerns sick patients forced to travel south for cancer scans. In the last few years, local activists have raised $650,000 toward a PET scanner — short for positron emission technology — used to diagnose and stage cancers and heart disease, among other things. “The thought of driving from Sudbury to Toronto, let alone in the middle of winter, is very stressful,” said New Democrat MPP France Gélinas, of the adjacent riding of Nickel Belt and her party’s health critic. The Liberal government, which hopes to regain Sudbury from the NDP in what polls suggest is a close race between the two parties, has long maintained there are not enough patients in northeastern Ontario to justify the multi-million dollar cost of a machine there, leaving patients to make the eight-hour round trip. But Health Minister Eric Hoskins is awaiting a new recommendation from ...
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Brainstormers: Obama’s big research push kicks off with a meeting of the minds 3.1.2015 Washington Post
The motley group included men and women, old and young, in sweatshirts and three-piece suits, shod in socks and sandals, wingtips and heels. They were a kind of neuroscience dream team, more than 100 scientists gathered in a Bethesda, Md., hotel not to talk about their latest breakthroughs — there weren’t any yet — but to meet and get to know one another.Read full article >>
New hope for Alzheimer's treatment tempered by earlier failures 4.12.2014 Star Tribune: Health
History proves that success in early tests for a new treatment may amount to nothing.
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