User: cassels Topic: Health in Canadian Media
Category: Research Studies
Last updated: Sep 18 2014 01:56 IST RSS 2.0
 
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Artificial sweeteners could lead to diabetes development: study 18.9.2014 Toronto Star: Living
More obesity, diabetes in less walkable areas: study The study from researchers in Israel was released Wednesday by the journal Nature. The work suggests the sweeteners change the composition of normal, beneficial bacteria in the gut. That appears to hamper how well the body handles sugar in the diet, which in turn can result in higher blood sugar levels. This impairment, called glucose intolerance, can eventually lead to diabetes. Some experts who didn’t participate in the work urged caution in interpreting the results. James Hill, an obesity expert at the University of Colorado, called the work good science. Still, overall, “I do not think there is enough data yet to lead to a definitive conclusion about artificial sweeteners and the body’s handling of sugar,” he wrote in an email. “I certainly do not think there is sufficient evidence to conclude that they are harmful.” But Yanina Pepino of Washington University in St. Louis said the results make a convincing case that sweeteners hamper the body’s ...
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Parents weigh benefits of in-school HPV shots for Grade 5 boys 17.9.2014 Calgary Herald: Top news
Kim Jain and her husband have discussed the pros and cons of inoculating their Grade 5 son against the HPV virus, and they’ve decided to go ahead with the shot when it’s offered free this fall for the first time to boys in Alberta schools. The common sexually transmitted virus is linked to almost all mouth and throat cancers in men under age 40, according to information from Alberta Health Services.
Artificial sweeteners linked to obesity epidemic, scientists say 17.9.2014 CBC.ca: Health
hi-diet-pop-852-cp-75622191

Artificial sweeteners may exacerbate, rather than prevent, metabolic disorders such as Type 2 diabetes, a study suggests.

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Hospital cancels Rattle Me Bones run 17.9.2014 Ottawa Citizen: News
The Ottawa Hospital Foundation says organizational changes are behind a decision to cancel its annual Rattle Me Bones zombie run after 20 years of raising money for bone cancer research. Recent changes to the volunteer committee that runs the third-party event made it impossible to continue, said Stephanie Egan, foundation spokeswoman. But she said the […]
Sept. 17, 1940: High school boys to be given military training 17.9.2014 Edmonton Journal: News
High school boys throughout Alberta during the Second World War were about to get the opportunity to learn the science fundamentals of modern warfare and how to shoot a .22-calibre rifle. An official with the provincial education department announced optional wartime cadet training that would help prepare youth to fight would be available within two to three weeks.
Americans' expanding waistlines 'a concern' to obesity expert 17.9.2014 CBC.ca: Health
Unhealthiest City

The number of American men and women with big-bellied, apple-shaped figures — the most dangerous kind of obesity — has climbed at a startling rate over the past decade, according to a government study.

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Brain tumours impact 3 of Sudbury woman's loved ones 17.9.2014 CBC.ca: Health
Christy Tario

Christy Tario will be a guest speaker this Saturday at the annual Sudbury Brain Tumour Walk.

Parents weigh benefits of in-school HPV shots for Grade 5 boys 17.9.2014 Edmonton Journal: News
Kim Jain and her husband have discussed the pros and cons of inoculating their Grade 5 son against the HPV virus, and they’ve decided to go ahead with the shot when it’s offered free this fall for the first time to boys in Alberta schools. The common sexually transmitted virus is linked to almost all mouth and throat cancers in men under age 40, according to information from Alberta Health Services.
New education minister meets with advocate for sexual-minority rights 17.9.2014 Calgary Herald: Top news
While critics slammed Alberta’s newly appointed education minister for his ties to a church that sees homosexuality as a sin, that minister and the premier were arranging a meeting with a well-known advocate for sexual-minority rights. Kris Wells, the director for the Institute for Sexual Minority Studies at the University of Alberta, got a call around supper time Monday night inviting him to a meeting in the premier’s office Tuesday morning.
Canadian soldier dies two weeks after standoff with police 17.9.2014 Ottawa Citizen: News
Master Cpl. Denis Demers, a veteran Canadian soldier who served two tours in Afghanistan, is the latest serving member to commit suicide.
New education minister meets with advocate for sexual-minority rights 17.9.2014 Edmonton Journal: News
While critics slammed Alberta’s newly appointed education minister for his ties to a church that sees homosexuality as a sin, that minister and the premier were arranging a meeting with a well-known advocate for sexual-minority rights. Kris Wells, the director for the Institute for Sexual Minority Studies at the University of Alberta, got a call around supper time Monday night inviting him to a meeting in the premier’s office Tuesday morning.
Blood test could diagnose major depression 17.9.2014 Toronto Star: Living
Ketamine seen as promising new depression drug Samples taken from patients with depression showed different levels of nine markers than patients who were not depressed. Markers are chemicals which can indicate the expression of a particular gene. Testing for the identified markers could allow doctors to find out if a patient is clinically depressed, Redei said. “It’s an objective test, so this will not depend on whether a patient wants to talk or is able to talk to a physician,” she explained. The test also appears to predict whether a patient with depression will respond to cognitive behavioural therapy. Samples taken before therapy showed that patients who improved after therapy had different levels of several markers than patients who did not. Both groups of patients had similar levels of three other markers, which the researchers said could point to a basic genetic predisposition for major depression. The research could also guide scientists looking for similar tests to diagnose other mental ...
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Drug-testing rules broken by Canadian researchers 16.9.2014 Toronto Star: Living
Top Canadian doctors running clinical drug trials failed to report serious side-effects suffered by their human test subjects. The doctors, some of them esteemed researchers from Canada’s most prestigious hospitals and academic institutions, have also routinely broken rules designed to protect participants and botched research of new treatments. Using records obtained through U.S. freedom of information legislation, a Star investigation has found the following problems in the system designed to ensure new drugs are safe and effective : In 2012, a top Toronto cancer researcher failed to report a respiratory tract infection, severe vomiting and other adverse events. A clinical trial run by an Alberta doctor reported that patients responded more favourably to the treatment than they actually did. A Toronto hospital’s chief of medical staff ran a clinical trial of autistic children on a powerful antipsychotic, and he did not report side-effects suffered by four of the children. And numerous doctors across ...
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Not for the squeamish: A peek into the autopsy room 16.9.2014 Montreal Gazette: News
The first moments of an autopsy are weird. Seeing bodies at open-casket wakes is no preparation for the morbid imagery, the messiness and smells of the autopsy experience, and if you feel faint, don’t worry about what the pathologist will say — just sit down and breathe deeply.
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Breast implants in short supply in Venezuela 15.9.2014 CBC.ca: Health
Breast implant

Beauty-obsessed Venezuelans face a scarcity of brand-name breast implants, and women are so desperate that they and their doctors are turning to devices that are the wrong size or made in China, with less rigorous quality standards.

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India’s nuclear nightmare: The village of birth defects 15.9.2014 Toronto Star: Living
JADUGORA, INDIA—Duniya Uram wants to go outside. The veranda is only 10 metres away, but it is a struggle. Her face is streaked with sweat in the 45C heat as the 16-year-old crawls across the cement floor, putting one thin forearm in front of the other. Halfway, she stops to take a deep breath, then continues to the mesh door at the veranda. She uses her head to open it. What should have taken a few strides takes five minutes. As always, her brother Alowati, 18, follows. Their older sister Budhini, 26, looks on grimly. “My parents were sad when they found that Alo ... wasn’t OK,” she says. “But they never thought the next (child) would be the same.” Neither Alowati nor Duniya can walk, nor can they hold anything; their limbs dangle lifelessly. Their legs are skeletal, their arms slightly stronger. Their knees and elbows are rubbed raw from crawling. They can’t speak in sentences and gesticulate loudly when they want something. They can’t feed themselves. They need help to bathe and use the ...
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Terry Fox Run needs promotion, not gimmicks, say runners 15.9.2014 Edmonton Journal: News
The annual Terry Fox Run has raised $650 million for cancer research in the last 33 years. The ALS society raised one-sixth of that, or $100 million, in just one month after its Ice Bucket Challenge went viral on social media during July and August.
GTA hosts three dozen Terry Fox Runs on Sunday: Where’s yours? 14.9.2014 Toronto Star: Living
Runners and walkers from across the region will be lacing up their shoes Sunday to support an iconic Canadian charity. The Terry Fox Foundation is hosting 220 runs across Ontario with about 35 taking place in the GTA. Money raised from the community events supports the Terry Fox Foundation and cancer research. “We want to have a run in everyone’s backyard so they can roll out of bed and come on out,” Martha McClew, provincial director for the Terry Fox Foundation. Ontario event organizers are hoping to build on the success of last year’s community runs and school campaigns – which raised $12.5 million for the Terry Fox Foundation. “We’ve been building steadily over the last couple of years,” said McClew, who added that last year’s community runs attracted about 75,000 participants across Ontario. McClew said the community events would not be possible without the dedication of approximately 10,000 volunteers across Ontario. Since the event does not require participants to register in advance, McClew did ...
Scottish independence polls give contradictory findings 14.9.2014 Toronto Star: Living
The battle over Scotland’s future intensified over the final weekend before the Sept. 18 vote on independence from the U.K., as polls gave conflicting messages on which side will win. The most dramatic findings were in a survey by ICM Research for the Sunday Telegraph that put the “Yes” campaign ahead by the greatest ever margin, leading the “No” side by eight percentage points, 54 per cent to 46 per cent, when excluding undecided voters. It came after a poll by Survation for the Better Together campaign put the pro-U.K. group ahead by the same margin. A third poll, by Opinium Research for the Observer newspaper, showed “No” with 53 per cent to 47 per cent. The ICM poll putting the “Yes” side well ahead “comes with a substantial health warning,” John Curtice, professor of politics at Strathclyde University in Glasgow, said on his blog, citing the small polling sample conducted over the Internet. “The finding, while not wholly disregarded, should clearly be viewed with caution.” The contradictory polling ...
Cancer that claimed Terry Fox's life now highly curable 13.9.2014 CBC.ca: Health
Mba Terry Fox Day 20140730

At the time Terry Fox was treated for the bone cancer that claimed his life in 1981, few patients survived that kind of malignancy. But advances in treatment over the last few decades have dramatically altered that grim prognosis.

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