User: cassels Topic: Health in Canadian Media
Category: Research Studies
Last updated: Jul 30 2014 21:58 IST RSS 2.0
 
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Drinking too much soda could affect adolescent memory, ability to learn 30.7.2014 CBC.ca: Health
Drinking too much soda could impair teenagers' ability to learn and remember information, according to new ...
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Research identifies 140 human trafficking victims in Ottawa 30.7.2014 Ottawa Citizen: News
Researchers say they discovered 140 human trafficking victims in Ottawa over the course of a nine-month investigation into the scope of sexual exploitation in the city. According to a report released Wednesday, the victims were almost exclusively female, most frequently ranged in age from 12 to 25 years old and 16-year-olds were the most vulnerable […]
Website helps parents, coaches recognize concussion signs in kids, what to do 30.7.2014 Edmonton Journal: News
Deciding whether a child may have sustained a concussion can be difficult because tell-tale symptoms may not show up right away. But a new online resource could help make that determination a whole lot easier.
Medical marijuana debate: Doctors take issue with national body 30.7.2014 Calgary Herald: Top news
Some doctors are raising concerns that the national body representing them has outdated views on medical marijuana that are creating barriers for patients who could benefit from the herb. Dr. Louis Hugo Francescutti, president of the Canadian Medical Association, recently told the Citizen there isn’t enough medical evidence to support medical marijuana use, and that […]
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Ontario urges action on Grassy Narrows mercury poisoning 29.7.2014 Toronto Star: Living
Steve Fobister Sr. was once a sport fishing guide to the rich and famous. But the walleye the Grassy Narrows First Nation elder caught in the Wabigoon-English River system was contaminated with mercury poisoning from a nearby paper mill has left his body ravaged. “The struggle goes on,” Fobister, 63, told a news conference Tuesday at Queen’s Park on the second day of a hunger strike to protest that mercury survivors receive inadequate health care and compensation. Helped from his wheelchair by a friend and standing at the lectern with the aid of a cane, he said it is time for action. “There are people that are in need right now — it’s not something that we are going to talk about forever,” said the former Treaty 3 grand chief, who has not yet decided whether to continue fasting. Aboriginal Affairs Minister David Zimmer, who will travel to Grassy Narrows near Kenora on Aug. 6, met with Fobister for three hours on Sunday night to discuss the situation. “It moves the soul and it moves everyone to want to do ...
Jugs or bags? The milk debate rages on 29.7.2014 Ottawa Citizen: News
Perhaps the biggest difference between the United States and Canada (or at least in Quebec and Ontario) isn’t universal health care, the metric system or a parliamentary system of governance. It’s milk. South of the border, milk is served in large, plastic gallon — sorry, 3.89 litre — jugs with a screw top. But in Ontario and Quebec, […]
Medical marijuana debate: Doctors take issue with national body 29.7.2014 Ottawa Citizen: News
Some doctors are raising concerns that the national body representing them has outdated views on medical marijuana that are creating barriers for patients who could benefit from the herb. Dr. Louis Hugo Francescutti, president of the Canadian Medical Association, recently told the Citizen there isn’t enough medical evidence to support medical marijuana use, and that […]
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Mini Med School examines your brain 29.7.2014 Ottawa Citizen: News
They’ve already taught Ottawa subjects ranging from the heart to where babies come from. Now the faculty of Mini Medical School has a new frontier: The brain. Mini Med, a popular feature at the University of Ottawa faculty of medicine, offers plain-language lectures for ordinary people given by real medical professors. The fall and spring sessions of […]
Website helps parents, coaches recognize concussion signs in kids, what to do 29.7.2014 Vancouver Sun: News
TORONTO - Deciding whether a child may have sustained a concussion while engaged in play or sport can be difficult because tell-tale symptoms may not show up right away. But a new online resource aimed at parents and coaches could help make that determination a whole lot easier.
Fist bumps spread fewer bacteria than handshakes or high-fives 29.7.2014 Calgary Herald: Top news
By Mike Stobbe NEW YORK — When it comes to preventing the spread of germs, maybe the president is on to something with his fondness for fist bumps. The familiar knocking of knuckles spreads only one-twentieth the amount of bacteria […]
Fist bumps spread fewer germs than handshakes, study says 29.7.2014 CBC.ca: Health
USA-OBAMA/

Ditching handshakes in favour of more informal fist bumps could help cut down on the spread of bacteria and illnesses, according to a study released on Monday.

Report on mercury poisoning never shared, Grassy Narrows leaders say 28.7.2014 Toronto Star: Living
“There is no doubt that there was high mercury exposure in these two communities in the late ’60sand early ’70s ,” the report said. “There is no doubt that at these levels of exposure many persons were suffering from mercury-related neurologic disorders. Following the results of exposure and effects in 1975, as well as earlier mercury in blood monitoring study conducted by Health Canada since 1970, there should have been extensive examinations and followup of these communities from that time forward, and assistance with respect to health and nutrition,” the report said. But for years, both the province and the federal government have denied people have been poisoned by substantial levels of mercury, Fobister said. “How are we supposed to know about this report if the government keeps it to themselves? We are reacting to the same amazement as anyone else would,” he said on Friday. Scott Cavan, a spokesperson for Ontario’s Ministry of Aboriginal Affairs, said that to the best of the province’s knowledge, ...
Whales, dolphins in captivity at Vancouver Aquarium debated at park board meeting 28.7.2014 Vancouver Sun: News
The Vancouver park board is holding an unusual weekend meeting today to discuss the controversial issue of keeping cetaceans in captivity at the Vancouver Aquarium. More than 130 supporters and opponents have registered to speak today, which means the meeting could be held over until next week. Each will have three minutes to plead their case.
Ex-Canadian Geographic writer, 81, found safe 28.7.2014 Ottawa Citizen: News
Alan Rayburn, 81, a former writer for Canadian Geographic who specialized in research about place names, had been missing since Friday afternoon when he went out for his daily walk.
Alberta considers funding in vitro fertilization 27.7.2014 Edmonton Journal: News
Health Minister Fred Horne says Albertans should know by late fall whether the province will begin to fund in vitro fertilization procedures. The government is nearing the end of a year-long study of the technology, during which it has sought contributions from several health and policy experts.
Alberta lake health warnings become a rite of summer 26.7.2014 Calgary Herald: Top news
Warnings about the health of Alberta lakes have become a rite of summer. But extraordinary measures are being considered by some volunteer groups and the province to improve water quality as residents fight to keep their lakes premier recreational destinations.
Lake health warnings now a rite of summer 26.7.2014 Edmonton Journal: News
Warnings about the health of Alberta lakes have become a rite of summer. But extraordinary measures are being considered by some volunteer groups and the province to improve water quality as residents fight to keep their lakes premier recreational destinations.
Caregivers honoured as Heroes in the Home 26.7.2014 Ottawa Citizen: News
Caregivers play an essential role in the health-care system. Faced with unimaginable challenges, caregivers provide medical care, emotional support and daily assistance to those in need. It isn’t easy.
Ontario hospital staff not washing hands as often as reported: study 26.7.2014 Toronto Star: Living
Ontario hospital staff are talking the talk but not washing the wash when it comes to hand hygiene. That’s according to a new study outing the bias in the Ontario Ministry of Health’s data on the rates of hand washing in the province’s hospitals. The problem, it seems, is who is watching the washers. Dr. Michael Gardam is the Toronto University Health Network’s director of infection prevention and control. He’s the co-author of a report which finds that healthcare workers wash their hands three times more often when under the watch of an observer than not. In other words, the health ministry’s data on hand hygiene, collected from every Ontario hospital since the 2008 C. difficile outbreak , is wrong. Collected weekly and published monthly, most Ontario hospitals boast hand-washing rates above 90 per cent. That means for every opportunity hospital staff had to wash their hands, they did at least nine times out of 10. But in reality those numbers are less than 30 per cent, according to Gardam. “We’re ...
Town Talk: Lawn bowlers roll out for annual cystic fibrosis research fundraiser 26.7.2014 Vancouver Sun: News
EYE ON THE BALL: Complications of cystic fibrosis carried Eva Markvoort away in 2010 at age 26. No amount of money compensates for death. But Duncan Gillespie and brothers Andrew and Graham Dalik set out to raise some via Lawn Summer Nights. It was a tournament for Markvoort’s contemporaries they staged at the Fir-off-16th Granville Park Lawn Bowling Club. Cystic Fibrosis Canada gained $11,000 from that first event.
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