User: cassels Topic: Health in Canadian Media
Category: Research Studies
Last updated: Apr 17 2014 08:21 IST RSS 2.0
 
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What will happen as school closure, replacement moves ahead? 17.4.2014 Edmonton Journal: News
Edmonton Public Schools will meet with communities over the next two months to choose three aging, low-enrolment schools that are close enough together to be replaced with a single, new K-9 school. The district is studying three options for the new $20-million building funded by Alberta Education.
Sweet tuition deal for Quebec university students 17.4.2014 Montreal Gazette: News
Quebec students’ hard-fought battle to keep tuition fees low means that the province’s university students have to work significantly fewer hours at minimum wage jobs than their counterparts across the country to pay for their education, according to new interactive research from the Canadian Centre for Policy Alternatives (CCPA).
Ontario rolls out stricter vaccine requirements for kids 17.4.2014 Ottawa Citizen: News
After a winter of measles outbreaks, Ontario is toughening vaccine requirements for school-age children. Beginning in September, Ontario students will have to show proof they have been vaccinated against chickenpox, whooping cough (pertussis) and meningococcal diseases before they enter school.
Ebola virus in Guinea unique, study shows 17.4.2014 CBC.ca: Health
Ebola new strain

Finding means virus did not spread to Guinea from other African nations, which could have implications in controlling the outbreak.

Casual pot users may show brain changes that could foreshadow trouble 17.4.2014 CBC.ca: Health
Marijuana Drug Policy

A small study of casual marijuana smokers has turned up evidence of changes in the brain, a possible sign of trouble ahead, researchers say.

Funding in vitro fertilization the wrong move for Ontario: Cohn 16.4.2014 Toronto Star: Living
Motherhood is the quintessential motherhood issue for politicians. But even the most family-friendly politician knows to tread carefully around that most emotive of motherhood issues: in vitro fertilization. For a pro-family politician, it’s hard to be anti-in-vitro at voting time. But when post-election realities set in, it’s even harder to find the funding. IVF has become Ontario’s political perennial: Seeking re-election in 2007, Dalton McGuinty made a campaign commitment to formally study IVF funding. As premier, he set up a citizens’ panel as promised — but had second thoughts, two years later, when its report called for funding in vitro. Seeking re-election in 2014, Kathleen Wynne has made a pre-campaign commitment to set up yet another panel on IVF funding. This time, McGuinty’s successor has promised to proceed with partial funding — in principle. Ontario would become only the second province, after Quebec, to pay for IVF. But the precise details won’t be ready for another year — well after an ...
Why hasn’t the nursing crisis improved since a 2008 story on Canada's shortage? 16.4.2014 Toronto Star: Living
The headline gets straight to the point: “Nursing crisis worse than ever.” The first four sentences lay out the problem: “It’s a damning, disastrous cycle: Not enough nurses to fill shifts. Rushed and harried staff who must scramble to provide proper care for patients. Young nurses scared off by poor working conditions, just when they are desperately needed to fill vacancies. Mid-career nurses who burn out and flee the profession, creating even more empty spaces.” The story makes a case that change is needed — and quickly — to improve working conditions for nurses, a move that would also help patients receive better care. Six years later, the 1,000-word article — part of a 2008 Toronto Star series examining the impact of Roy Romanow's royal commission on health care — reads as though it was written today. This according to Ann Tourangeau , associate dean of academic programs at the University of Toronto’s Lawrence S. Bloomberg Faculty of Nursing. And to the thousands of nurses who recently have read and ...
Canadians spending more out of pocket on health care 16.4.2014 CBC.ca: Health
hi-drug-shortage-cp-0228297

Canadians' out-of-pocket spending for prescription drugs, dental care and insurance premiums rose over a 12-year period for all families, especially people with lower incomes who may have reduced their use of health-care services, a new report suggests.

Opinion: Let’s clear the smoke on cannabis 16.4.2014 Edmonton Journal: News
As the world watches the effects of the legalization of cannabis (also known as marijuana) south of the border in Colorado and Washington states, many Canadians are debating the future of our nation’s most used illicit drug.
U of C student charged with murder in stabbing deaths of five people at northwest Calgary house party|video 16.4.2014 Edmonton Journal: News
The son of a senior Calgary police officer stands accused of the worst mass homicide in the city's history: the unprovoked stabbing deaths of five people early Tuesday at a house party celebrating the end of their university term.
U of C student charged with murder in stabbing deaths of five people at northwest Calgary house party|video 16.4.2014 Calgary Herald: Top news
The son of a senior Calgary police officer stands accused of the worst mass homicide in the city's history: the unprovoked stabbing deaths of five people early Tuesday at a house party celebrating the end of their university term.
Rules to diagnose by: Ottawa researchers’ best practices used south of border 16.4.2014 Ottawa Citizen: News
Years ago, when Dr. Ian Stiell was just starting out in the emergency room, he noticed a problem that seemed to be plaguing the department. “It became apparent to me we were ordering a lot of X-rays and CT scans that we didn’t need,” Stiell said.
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Five killed in 'worst mass murder' in Calgary's history 16.4.2014 Edmonton Journal: News
Police Chief Rick Hanson confirmed the suspect arrested in what he called the "worst mass murder in Calgary's history" is the son of a veteran Calgary police officer.
Toronto researchers raise doubts about morning sickness drug Diclectin 15.4.2014 Toronto Star: Living
Several Toronto-based researchers are again raising questions about a medication commonly prescribed to pregnant women for morning sickness. In a commentary published Tuesday in the Journal of Obstetrics and Gynecology Canada , they point to key flaws in a study on the drug Diclectin. The drug is a combination of an antihistamine and vitamin B6. Lead author Dr. Nav Persaud says Canadian guidelines that recommend Diclectin for pregnant women who need medication for nausea and vomiting are based on a meta-analysis published in 1997 by researchers at Motherisk Canada, part of the Hospital for Sick Children in Toronto. A meta-analysis is a study that gathers together and synthesizes the available clinical trial results on a drug or a treatment. Persaud says that the 1997 meta-analysis contained errors, the result of which is that the evidence supporting Diclectin’s safety is not as strong as the meta-analysis authors suggested. The major flaw is that the drug combination was studied in far fewer women than ...
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Sobeys to fight rule targeting loyalty programs 15.4.2014 Calgary Herald: Top news
Grocery giant Sobeys Inc. says it will mount a legal challenge against a move that will stop shoppers from getting Air Miles and other incentives for purchasing pharmacy drugs. Sobeys Inc. spokesman John Graham said the company, which also owns Safeway stores, “strongly” disagrees with the ban enacted by the Alberta College of Pharmacists, set to come into effect on May 1.
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Stabbing suspect at Brentwood house party is son of police officer | Video | Gallery 15.4.2014 Calgary Herald: Top news
A suspect has been arrested after five people were killed at a northwest Calgary house party early this morning. Police said they received reports of a stabbing around 1:20 a.m. in the 100 block of Butler Crescent N.W. Officers arrived to find three people dead. Two more were taken to hospital, where they succumbed to their injuries.
Health leaders offer ‘enthusiastic support’ for proposed cycle network 15.4.2014 Calgary Herald: Top news
Public health leaders are wading into the debate over a proposed downtown Calgary bike network, giving a thumbs-up to the $15-million plan for its potential contribution to physical activity and good health. In an endorsement letter to city council this month, Dr. Richard Musto, Calgary’s lead medical officer of health for Alberta Health Services, offered his “enthusiastic support” for the cycle track network proposal.
Ban on e-cigarettes urged in public paces 15.4.2014 Calgary Herald: Top news
The popularity of electronic cigarettes has sparked a debate on whether the battery-operated devices should be banned in bars, restaurants and other public venues where tobacco smoke is prohibited. Air Canada made headlines this week after a businesswoman on a flight from Calgary to Toronto claims that a fellow passenger puffed on an e-cigarette in the cabin.
Sobeys to fight rule targeting loyalty programs 15.4.2014 Edmonton Journal: News
Grocery giant Sobeys Inc. says it will mount a legal challenge against a move that will stop shoppers from getting Air Miles and other incentives for purchasing pharmacy drugs. Sobeys Inc. spokesman John Graham said the company, which also owns Safeway stores, “strongly” disagrees with the ban enacted by the Alberta College of Pharmacists, set to come into effect on May 1.
Also found in: [+]
Ottawa pediatrician’s research could transform outlook for premature babies 15.4.2014 Ottawa Citizen: News
Parenthood began earlier than Stephanie and Ata Iemsisanith were expecting when their tiny twin daughters were born last December, three months ahead of schedule at less than 27 weeks’ gestation.
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