User: cassels Topic: Health in Canadian Media
Category: Research Studies
1 new since Sep 03 2014 01:53 IST RSS 2.0
 
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Children's eating patterns seem set in infancy 3.9.2014 CBC.ca: Health
hi-baby-food-852-cp-699201

Children who don’t eat fruits and vegetables as babies are less likely to eat the healthy foods at age six, according to a new series of U.S. nutritional studies on infant feeding.

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Widower goes back to university to study cancer that killed his wife 2.9.2014 Toronto Star: Living
EDMONTON—Powel Crosley was lost after his wife died of a rare form of ovarian cancer. But he felt compelled to carry on her fight somehow against the disease and to help find a treatment for others — so he went back to school. The 60-year-old man, whose long grey hair is often pulled back in a ponytail, stands out as the oldest student in most of his classes at the University of Alberta, where he has been enrolled as an undergrad student since 2010. At times, he has been mistaken for a professor. It wasn’t easy for Crosley to sit in a classroom again. It had been decades since he studied geography in university and he’d already had a career in information technology. But he was determined to learn as much about cancer as possible. He took introductory courses in biochemistry and oncology. Then one of his profs asked him to do lab research alongside masters and doctoral students. Recently, the science rookie was awarded $60,000 in grants to keep studying granulosa cell tumour of the ovary, otherwise known ...
Many B.C. seniors prescribed multiple drugs despite risks: report 2.9.2014 Vancouver Sun: News
A new set of statistics shows B.C. doctors are continuing to prescribe multiple medications to seniors even though research suggests doing so can be harmful.
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Widower goes back to university to study the cancer that killed his wife 2.9.2014 Calgary Herald: Top news
EDMONTON — Powel Crosley was lost after his wife died of a rare form of ovarian cancer. But he felt compelled to carry on her fight somehow against the disease and to help find a treatment for others — so he went […]
Grassy Narrows: Why is Japan still studying the mercury poisoning when Canada isn't? 2.9.2014 CBC.ca: Health
Dr. Akitomo Shimoji, Bill Fobister

While Japanese scientists have tracked the effects of mercury contamination on the people at Grassy Narrows in northwestern Ontario for decades, the full extent of the human health effects has never been systematically investigated by Canadian health officials.

Grassy Narrows: The lost science of mercury poisoning 2.9.2014 CBC.ca: Health
Dr. Akitomo Shimoji, Bill Fobister

While Japanese scientists have tracked the effects of mercury contamination on the people at Grassy Narrows in northwestern Ontario for decades, the full extent of the human health effects has never been systematically investigated by Canadian health officials.

The lost science of mercury poisoning at Grassy Narrows 2.9.2014 CBC.ca: Health
Dr. Akitomo Shimoji, Bill Fobister

While Japanese scientists have tracked the effects of mercury contamination on the people at Grassy Narrows in northwestern Ontario for decades, the full extent of the human health effects has never been systematically investigated by Canadian health officials.

TV viewers snack more during action shows, study finds 2.9.2014 CBC.ca: Health
Scarlett Johansson and Ewan McGregor in The Island

Given access to piles of candy and other snacks, TV watchers ended up eating far more when watching an action movie than when viewing the public-television interview show Charlie Rose.

Devin Scullion defies odds at 18 fighting rare rapid aging disease 1.9.2014 CBC.ca: Health
Devin Scullion and his Mom

Devin Scullion just turned 18 and has already survived two strokes and other health scares not normally associated with the young. But the Hamilton teen is defying the odds - he's one of the world's oldest survivors of progeria, a rare disorder that causes rapid aging.

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Devin Scullion defies odds at 18 with aging disease progeria 1.9.2014 CBC.ca: Health
Devin Scullion and his Mom

Devin Scullion just turned 18 and has already survived two strokes and other health scares not normally associated with the young. But the Hamilton teen is defying the odds - he's one of the world's oldest survivors of progeria, a rare disorder that causes rapid aging.

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New heart failure drug could reduce death by 20 per cent, trial shows 1.9.2014 Calgary Herald: Top news
A new drug for heart failure could reduce the number of deaths from the disease by 20 per cent, and is the first treatment in two decades to show a higher survival rate for patients, says one of B.C.’s top cardiologists.
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Ice-bucket challenge gets mixed review from ALS victim 1.9.2014 Calgary Herald: Top news
Ask Archie Rolland, confined to a bed and unable to move, how he feels about the ALS ice-bucket challenge and his response is one of extreme frustration.
Back to School: Looking beyond the 3 R's 1.9.2014 Toronto Star: Living
Back in Grade 8 when he was choosing a high school, Nobu Chern-Warwick ruled out one well-known collegiate because he’d heard it was a social pressure cooker. But was it? As he enters Grade 12 at Danforth Collegiate, the 16-year-old wishes there had been a more reliable way to judge a school beyond just its test scores. Does a school’s student council have any clout? Does the school help kids find places to volunteer? Does staff even recognize student stress? “I think it’s possible — even necessary — to measure beyond the 3 R’s, even really abstract things like ‘student voice,’” said Nobu, who spent part of this summer working to bolster his own student council constitution. A report card on how well a school nurtures body and soul as well as brain “would be a wonderful thing,” he said, “and something we could all share.” In a startling move, educators across Canada are about to tackle this – develop objective ways to actually measure how well a school promotes creativity , social skills, citizenship, a ...
Norway’s ‘Doomsday Vault’ holds a priceless treasure: Seeds 31.8.2014 Toronto Star: Living
LONGYEARBYEN, NORWAY—In the middle of a savage civil war, a team of scientists in Syria has been quietly rescuing tiny bits of a global treasure: seeds with genetic roots running back to the beginning of civilization. Most of the seeds, which could prove crucial to feeding millions of people as the world’s climate warms and deserts spread along with pests and diseases, are now in safe storage behind heavy steel doors, deep in a mountainside in Norway’s High Arctic. The struggle to rescue the Syrian seeds is part of a worldwide effort to preserve and nurture the genetic heritage of plants that feed us today, along with strains abandoned by commercial farmers long ago or others that only grow wild. Preserving the widest variety of seeds allows scientists to look for solutions to future food crises in the genes of species passed over in favour of those that now dominate modern agriculture. It’s also prudent insurance against the day-to-day earthquakes, fires, wars and other catastrophes. “The most common ...
When science meets aboriginal oral history 31.8.2014 Toronto Star: Living
In Inuit oral history, the Tuniit loom both large and small. They inhabited the Arctic before the Inuit came, and they were a different stock of people — taller and stronger, with the muscularity of polar bears, the stories say. A Tuniit man could lift a 1,000 pound seal on his back, or drag a whole walrus. Others say the Tuniit slept with their legs in the air to drain the blood from their feet and make them lighter, so they could outrun a caribou. But despite their superior strength and size, the Tuniit were shy. They were “easily put to flight and it was seldom heard that they killed others,” according to one storyteller in the book “Uqalurait: An Oral History of Nunavut.” The Inuit took over the best hunting camps and displaced the conflict-averse Tuniit. Soon enough, these strange people disappeared from the land. This week, the prestigious journal Science published an unprecedented paleogenomic study that resolves long-held questions about the people of the prehistoric Arctic. By analyzing DNA from ...
Learning what income inequality really looks like 31.8.2014 Toronto Star: Living
With a high-stakes election just two months away, it’s increasingly clear that Toronto, circa 2014, offers up a tale of two cities, and seemingly many more. In recent months, realtors have reported that average home prices have topped $1 million. At the same time, local politicians and social activists warn that one in four Toronto young people can’t find work. The downtown hums with Manhattan-style construction, tech startups and trendy restaurants. Some suburban enclaves, meanwhile, grapple with child poverty rates as high as 50 per cent, according to a report released this week. While affluence and poverty collide in gentrifying neighbourhoods like Parkdale, the reality is that these disparities have become more pronounced, and more localized. As University of Toronto sociologist David Hulchanski has shown in his Three Cities study, Toronto neighbourhoods in the past two generations have seen increasing concentrations of rich or poor residents, while middle class communities are rapidly ...
Health Canada pulling last of citronella-based bug sprays 31.8.2014 CBC.ca: Health
Citronella-bug-spray

Health Canada is pulling the last citronella-based bug sprays off the shelves by December because of “the absence of adequate safety data.” The move has left scientists who advised Health Canada on the issue, befuddled by the phase-out. So are many consumers who prefer natural bug sprays.

Ice-bucket challenge gets mixed review from ALS victim 31.8.2014 Montreal Gazette: News
Ask Archie Rolland, confined to a bed and unable to move, how he feels about the ALS ice-bucket challenge and his response is one of extreme frustration.
Ebola survivor urges ZMapp manufacturer to speed up drug production 31.8.2014 CBC.ca: Health
Liberia Ebola

A Liberian health worker who recovered from Ebola after receiving an experimental drug is urging the manufacturer to speed up its production and send it to Africa,

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EPA says smog rules should be up to 20% stronger 30.8.2014 CBC.ca: Health
ns-pulp-mill_620x349_1

The Environmental Protection Agency's staff has concluded that the government needs to tighten smog rules by somewhere between 7 and 20 per cent.

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