User: cassels Topic: Health in Canadian Media
Category: Research Studies
1 new since Apr 24 2014 24:57 IST RSS 2.0
 
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YWCA releases 2014 Women of Distinction Award nominees 24.4.2014 Vancouver Sun: News
The YWCA has released the names of its nominees for the 2014 Women of Distinction Awards.
Aboriginal people in Toronto may face premature death: study 23.4.2014 CBC.ca: Health
Chrissy Smith

The average age of death for Torontonians is 75 but according to a new study, that number is much lower for some of the city's aboriginal population.

Researcher turns to new biobank to explain spike in kidney disease 23.4.2014 Montreal Gazette: News
One question troubling kidney specialist François Madore, director of the Sacré Coeur Hospital research centre, is why has the number of people living with end-stage kidney disease tripled during the past three decades?
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Alcohol blamed for thousands of new cancer cases annually in Ontario 23.4.2014 CBC.ca: Health
LCBO Contract 20130610

Alcohol consumption is linked to an estimated 1,000 to 3,000 new cases of cancer in Ontario a year, including oral malignancies, liver, colorectal and breast cancers, the province’s cancer agency says.

1 in 3 Canadians suffered some form of child abuse 23.4.2014 Calgary Herald: Top news
TORONTO - A new study says one in three adult Canadians suffered some form of child abuse in their past, adding this abuse is associated with a higher risk of mental health disorders later in life.
U of C research could improve recovery from nerve damage 23.4.2014 Calgary Herald: Top news
Temporarily “releasing the brakes” on nerve growth by shutting down a particular protein can help restore connections after injury, University of Calgary researchers say.
Child abuse affects 1 in 3 Canadian adults, mental health study indicates 22.4.2014 CBC.ca: Health
li-kennedy

Child abuse affects nearly a third of Canadian adults, according to a new study that finds "robust associations" between exposure to physical and sexual abuse, and mental conditions.

1 in 3 Canadians suffered some form of child abuse; linked to mental disorders 22.4.2014 Edmonton Journal: News
TORONTO - A new study says one in three adult Canadians suffered some form of child abuse in their past, adding this abuse is associated with a higher risk of mental health disorders later in life.
Reconsider LCBO kiosks in grocery stores, cancer body urges 22.4.2014 Toronto Star: Living
Cancer Care Ontario is asking the province to reconsider plans to open LCBO liquor kiosks in grocery stores on the same day it is releasing a new report showing that up to 3,000 cases of cancer diagnosed annually in the province are caused by alcohol. “We have called for a pause and not broadening of access, because of the evidence (that shows) it takes us in a direction that we don’t want to be going,” said Dr. Linda Rabeneck, vice president of prevention and cancer control for Cancer Care Ontario . Finance Minister Charles Sousa announced a pilot project earlier this month that will see 10 LCBO-run kiosks open in select grocery stores across the province as a one-year pilot project. The LCBO Express stores-within-a-store are expected to open by year’s end. Rabeneck said she hopes the province looks at the health impact of increased availability of alcohol in addition to the extra revenue it generates. A new report by Cancer Care Ontario (CCO), released Tuesday, reveals that between 1,000 and 3,000 ...
Alpha females: you're chasing the wrong guy - look for a Beta man 22.4.2014 Edmonton Journal: News
Too many successful women are making themselves unhappy by trying to marry men as driven as themselves, according to a new book by Dr Sonya Rhodes.
'Housing First' approach may put homeless youth last, report warns 22.4.2014 Calgary Herald: Top news
OTTAWA - A new report says the success of so-called "Housing First" programs could have a limited impact on young Canadians living on the streets.
Cloning advance means human tissues could be regrown, even in old age 22.4.2014 Edmonton Journal: News
Human cloning has been used to create stem cells from adults for the first time, in a breakthrough that could lead to tissue and organs being regrown.
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Alleged Heartbleed hacker known for finding flaws 21.4.2014 Toronto Star: Living
LONDON, ONT.—The young man who stands accused as the Heartbleed hacker has a penchant for pointing out weakness. As a teenage spelling bee champion, he challenged the judges. When he was 14, the computer science prodigy tried to warn his high school administrators the computer system was vulnerable to hacking. They didn’t believe him, so he went in and proved it by finding confidential information, his lawyer is quoted as saying. In university, he was known to send computer science assignments back to his professors with a note saying he’d found an error in the question. And when the so-called Heartbleed bug — a flaw in computer code that was supposed to encrypt private data, but didn’t — made headlines, Stephen Arthuro Solis-Reyes, 19, allegedly tested the security breach and got himself arrested. On Tuesday, the second-year computer science student at Western University turned himself in to authorities in London, Ont., where police are helping the RCMP investigation. A statement that said police ...
Antipsychotic drugs prescribed to seniors at alarming rates, province finds 21.4.2014 Toronto Star: Living
Thousands of seniors in Ontario nursing homes are on a powerful mix of antipsychotics and sedatives, according to a new provincial Health Ministry report that surfaced after a recent Star investigation . The report, commissioned by the ministry and co-authored by a leading doctor and scientist, sheds new light on the widespread use of powerful prescription drugs among the vulnerable elderly. More from thestar.com: Ontario seniors homes plead for help with aggressive residents “These drugs are prescribed so commonly because they are perceived to be benign. That’s not true,” said Dr. David Juurlink, a drug safety expert who co-authored the report. “These drugs are inherently dangerous.” Last week, the Star revealed that some long-term-care homes, often struggling with staffing shortages, are routinely doling out antipsychotics to calm and “restrain” wandering, agitated and sometimes aggressive patients. At close to 300 homes, the Star found, more than a third of the residents are on the drugs, despite ...
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Montreal teen awarded for diabetes research 21.4.2014 Montreal Gazette: News
Work on protein at Jewish General Hospital garners science fair prize
The taboo subject of vaccine injuries 21.4.2014 Ottawa Citizen: News
Gwenn wasn’t thinking about anything but her son’s deteriorating health when she rushed him to the British Columbia Children’s Hospital in 1996. The seven-month-old baby had a fever for about a week, then began having small seizures. But this one was different.
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Transforming Tamara (with video) 21.4.2014 Vancouver Sun: News
For three decades, Tamara Loyer wrestled with the regular demons that haunt so many in the Downtown Eastside: Sex work, drugs, violence, poor health, poverty and homelessness. All the while, an even bigger battle waged inside her; she was a woman trapped in a man’s body, an imbalance that shaped her life from a young boy growing up on a Quebec military reserve to a tormented transsexual on Vancouver’s streets.
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A boy named Mikey: A gender journey in six chapters (with video) 20.4.2014 Edmonton Journal: News
He was born Mikayla Williams, but never felt right as a girl. Four years ago, Mikey’s discovery he was ‘gender confused’ lifted a weight from his slight shoulders and opened his life to new possibilities.
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Vaping: The battle for acceptance is rising 20.4.2014 Toronto Star: Living
Natalia Jakobowska has not tried any of the cheesecake varieties yet. “But I’d love to,” says the 29-year-old nurse, who has settled so far on plain old vanilla as her flavor of choice. There are dozens and dozens of other taste options she could pick from in the connoisseur market that is emerging around electronic cigarette smoking in Canada. But ah, that word — smoking! It’s verboten among the tens of thousands of people in this country who have taken up the tobacco alternative in recent years. “We’re vapers,” Kate Ackerman says emphatically. “Cigarettes produce smoke. So that’s smoking. Electronic cigarettes produce vapour. So that’s vaping,” says Ackerman, a director of the Electronic Cigarette Trade Association of Canada. The vapour electronic cigarettes produce is all but odourless and, many argue, far, far safer than tobacco smoke for users and anyone within second-hand range. While odourless, however, so called e-cigarettes are producing the stench of controversy as their popularity rises. This ...
Transforming Tamara (with video) 20.4.2014 Calgary Herald: Top news
For three decades, Tamara Loyer wrestled with the regular demons that haunt so many in the Downtown Eastside: Sex work, drugs, violence, poor health, poverty and homelessness. All the while, an even bigger battle waged inside her; she was a woman trapped in a man’s body, an imbalance that shaped her life from a young boy growing up on a Quebec military reserve to a tormented transsexual on Vancouver’s streets.
Also found in: [+]
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