User: Genecampaign Topic: agriculture
Category: ge-gm
Last updated: May 25 2018 11:27 IST RSS 2.0
 
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How India's young innovators do well by doing good 25.5.2018 Rediff: Top Stories (India)
'Let me talk about young Indian startups with their hearts in the right place and how they are proving that innovations that represent 'affordable excellence' -- breaking the myth that 'affordability' and 'excellence' cannot go together -- is indeed possible!' says Dr R A Mashelkar, the eminent scientist, in this fascinating feature.
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CSIR bags the Clarivate Analytics India Innovation Award 2018 in the Government Research Organizations Category 24.5.2018 Govt of india: PIB
Council of Scientific & Industrial Research has been awarded the Clarivate Analytics India Innovation Award 2018 in the Government Research Organizations Category. This award yet again recognizes CSIR as the top innovator.
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Novel robotic system can grow mini human organs 22.5.2018 DNA: Wide Angle
Scientists have developed an automated robotic system that can rapidly produce mini human organs required for medical research and drug testing. The traditional way to grow cells for biomedical research is to culture them as flat, two-dimensional sheets, which are overly simplistic. In recent years, researchers have been increasingly successful in growing stem cells into more complex, 3D structures called mini-organs or organoids. These resemble rudimentary organs and in many ways behave similarly. While these properties make organoids ideal for biomedical research, they also pose a challenge for mass production. The ability to mass produce organoids is the most exciting potential applications of the new robotic technology, according to the developers. In a study published in the journal Cell Stem Cell, researchers from University of Washington in the US used a robotic system to automate the procedure for growing stem cells into organoids. Although similar approaches have been successful with adult stem ...
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The world's smallest house built using robotics is 300 sq micrometres. But who will live in it? 20.5.2018 DNA: India
 Scientists have created the world's smallest house - build on an area of 300 square micrometres - using a robotic system that can accurately assemble nanomaterials into tiny, desirable structures. The microhouse construction, described in the Journal of Vacuum Science and Technology A, demonstrates how researchers can advance optical sensing technologies when they manipulate ion guns, electron beams and finely controlled robotic piloting. Researchers from the Femto-ST Institute in France, assembled the new microrobotics system that pushes forward the frontiers of optical nanotechnologies. Combining several existing technologies, the micro-Robotex nanofactory builds microstructures in a large vacuum chamber and fixes components onto optical fibre tips with nanometre accuracy. Until now, lab-on-fibre technologies had no robotic actuators for nanoassembly, so working at this scale inhibited engineers from building microstructures. This innovation allows miniaturised sensing elements to be installed on ...
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Winners of cancer research award announced 17.5.2018 The Assam Tribune
Winners of cancer research award announced
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Blocking these two antioxidant enzymes could make cancer cells mortal 17.5.2018 DNA: Money
Scientists have found two specific antioxidant enzymes that are linked to making cancer cells mortal. According to a study conducted by the Ecole Polytechnique F'drale De Lausanne, PRDX1 and MTH1 have the ability to shun the cancer cells completely. Before cell division, the long strings of the cell's DNA are wrapped tightly into the structures we know as chromosomes. This protects the cell's genetic material from physical and chemical damage. The ends of chromosomes are called telomeres. These are specialised structures that have to be replicated with each cell division cycle. But the complete replication of telomeres up to the very ends of chromosomes also requires specialized mechanisms, and these are limited. Telomeres are also very sensitive to oxidative damage, which affects their ability to replicate. Because of this, telomeres shrink over time, limiting the lifespan of cells. Telomere shortening is essentially the cause of cell aging. Now, researchers Joachim Lingner and Wareed Ahmed have ...
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Is GM mustard a hazard for honey bees? 15.5.2018 Rediff: Business
There has been strong opposition from organisations influential with the government against approval to GM foods.
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In rare bone marrow transplant, Delhi man is cured of thalassaemia 5.5.2018 DNA: Opinion
A 25-year-old man who suffered from thalassaemia, a blood disorder, since his childhood and survived on regular blood transfusions is able to live a normal life after undergoing a high-risk bone marrow transplant at a city hospital. Nikhil was suffering from thalassaemia major (TM) since he was six months old as his parents were thalassaemia minor. Thalassaemia is an inherited blood disorder that may lead to anaemia and patients generally have to get frequent blood transfusions to manage their condition. Thalassaemia major occurs when a child inherits two mutated genes, one from each parent. Children born with thalassaemia major usually develop symptoms of severe anaemia within the first year of life as their body fails to produce normal, adult haemoglobin. Nikhil used to manage his condition with regular blood transfusions, but after marriage he became concerned about his future. The possibility of the disorder being passed on to the next generation made him explore various options to cure his ...
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Address by the Hon’ble President of India Shri Ram Nath Kovind on the occasion the Centenary Celebrations of Medical Education programme of Christian Medical College 4.5.2018 Govt of india: PIB
I am happy to be in Vellore for this event to mark the Centenary of Medical Education at the Christian Medical College. I congratulate the institution, which is ranked third among all medical colleges in India as per the Ministry of Human Resource Development, government of India.
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Butterfly wings inspire eye implants for glaucoma patients 2.5.2018 DNA: Popular News
Inspired by tiny structures on transparent butterfly wings, scientists have developed a light-manipulating surface for more effective and longer-lasting eye implants for glaucoma patients. Sections of the wings of a longtail glasswing butterfly are almost perfectly transparent, according to the research published in the journal Nature Nanotechnology. Researchers at California Institute of Technology (Caltech)in the US found that the see-through sections of the wings are coated in tiny pillars, each about 100 nanometres in diameter and spaced about 150 nanometres apart. The size of these pillars - 50 to 100 times smaller than the width of a human hair - gives them unusual optical properties. The pillars redirect the light that strikes the wings so that the rays pass through regardless of the original angle at which they hit the wings. As a result, there is almost no reflection of the light from the wing's surface. In effect, the pillars make the wings clearer than if they were made of just plain glass, ...
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Tiny DNA unicycle successfully completes test drive 11.4.2018 DNA: Urban Tales
Scientists have successfully completed the first test drive of a DNA 'unicycle' - a tiny machine made of genetic material that is powered by chemical energy and can perform directed movements. Nanomachines include structures of complex proteins and nucleic acids. The principle is inspired from nature. Bacteria, for example, propel themselves forward using a flagellum. Researchers from the University of Bonn in Germany and the University of Michigan in the US used structures made of DNA nanorings. The two rings are linked like a chain. "One ring fulfills the function of a wheel, the other drives it like an engine with the help of chemical energy," said Michael Famulok from the Life and Medical Sciences (LIMES) Institute of the University of Bonn. The tiny vehicle measures only about 30 nanometers. The "fuel" is provided by the protein "T7 RNA polymerase", according to the study published in the journal Nature Nanotechnology. Coupled to the ring that serves as an engine, this enzyme synthesises an RNA ...
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Don Bosco University provides water purifiers to 12 villages 11.4.2018 The Assam Tribune
Don Bosco University provides water purifiers to 12 villages
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In Rajasthan Despite ‘heat’, Bt Cotton basks 11.4.2018 DNA: Popular News
Despite agriculture minister Prabhu Lal Saini is raising voice against genetically modified (GM) mustard, agriculture department has extended permission once again for the sale of Bt cotton seed in the state for coming Kharif Season-2018. Commissionerate of agriculture had issued an approval notification on April 3. Through this notification, 31 seeds companies have been given permission for sale of Bt cotton hybrids. The permission is given in the pursuance of the recommendation given by Genetic Engineering Appraisal Committee (GEAC), Union ministry of Environment, Ministry of Science and Department of Biotechnology. It is worth mentioning that Prabhu Lal Saini, on the sidelines of the global agritechnology meeting (GRAM) , had said that the mere touch of Bt cotton caused impotency. He, that time, mentioned that the Bt gene was extracted from a soil bacterium found in Hiroshima and Nagasaki after atomic bombs were dropped on the two cities during the Second World War. But despite all concerns, ...
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Vice President inaugurates “Scientific Convention on World Homoeopathy Day” 10.4.2018 Govt of india: PIB
The Vice President of India Shri. M. Venkaiah Naidu inaugurated the two-day “Scientific Convention on World Homeopathy Day” organized by the Ministry of AYUSH here today. Minister of State (Independent Charge) for AYUSH Shri Shripad Yesso Naik presided over the inaugural function.
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Top 6 apps for for fulfilling medical needs 9.4.2018 DNA: Urban Tales
A rising middle-class, state-of-the-art healthcare facilities, expert physicians, and increased dependency on technology to facilitate healthcare at the prevention stage are driving the growth of the industry in India, thereby expecting the industry to grow rapidly. Indian healthcare market, which is worth USD 100 billion, is likely to grow at 23 percent CAGR to reach USD 280 billion by 2020, as per a Deloitte 2016 report. Thus, opening up doors of opportunities for health tech startups trying to disrupt untapped niche sectors in this space.  On the occasion of World Health Day, here are some listed down healthcare startups which are keeping us healthy and fulfilling all our medical needs:- 1. PharmEasy PharmEasy not only helps patients and their care-takers connect with the local medicine shops but also offers free sample collection service for diagnostic tests by authorised phlebotomists. The startup claims to ensure that medicines are delivered within six hours of prescription validation by a licensed ...
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New human 'organ' that protects vital tissues identified 31.3.2018 DNA: Opinion
Scientists have identified a new human 'organ' consisting of a network of fluid-filled compartments that act like shock absorbers and protects tissues of vital organs from tearing. The findings, published in the journal Scientific Reports, has implications for the function of all organs, most tissues and the mechanisms of most major diseases. Researchers from the New York University in the US showed that layers of the body long thought to be dense, connective tissues - below the skin's surface, lining the digestive tract, lungs and urinary systems, and surrounding arteries, veins, and the fascia between muscles - are instead interconnected, fluid-filled compartments. This series of spaces, supported by a meshwork of strong (collagen) and flexible (elastin) connective tissue proteins, may act like shock absorbers that keep tissues from tearing as organs, muscles, and vessels squeeze, pump, and pulse as part of daily function. The finding that this layer is a highway of moving fluid may explain why cancer ...
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DNA EXCLUSIVE | Rajasthan University’s tech centre gets a cold shoulder from students 28.3.2018 DNA: Top News
Courtesy non-availability of placement cell and permanent staff, admissions at Centre for Converging Technologies, a centre for engineers at University of Rajasthan, has seen a steep decline in past few years. The centre, which has 120 seats, only saw 50 admissions in the year 2015, and the number declined to 45 in 2016. The footfall further declined to 16 students in 2017. “Currently we have a strength of 16, while around 50 had taken admission. Remaining students left the college during the course period. Most of them left during the first month of the session,” said a student from first year. However, Dr Ramvir Singh, director, CCT, is confident that the admissions will not go down this July and the college is not shutting down. “We are making efforts towards promoting the course by visiting schools and interacting with students of class 12. Last year’s admissions were affected due to NEET examination dates,” Singh said. Students believe the admissions declined as in the absence of placement cell, the ...
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Dedicated research being carried out to enhance food production through National Agricultural Research System: Shri Parshottam Rupala 27.3.2018 Govt of india: PIB
The Minister of State for Agriculture and farmers welfare Shri Parshottam Rupala in a written reply to a question on research in food production in Lok Sabha stated that the ICAR is well aware about the fact and dedicated research is being carried out to enhance food production through National Agricultural Research System.
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PCI chief hints at uniform pharmacy syllabus across all colleges 25.3.2018 DNA: Wide Angle
Pharmacy education in the country is all set to undergo a revamp. With the Pharmacy Council of India (PCI) aiming to take admissions online from next year, the syllabus will now be industry relevant. Announcing the same, Dr B Suresh, President, PCI who was in city on Saturday, as part of a meet organized by the Gujarat Technological University (GTU), he said, "We are getting ready for taking pharma education and practice of pharmacy to next level. PCI will now focus on regulation of profession and practice of pharmacists as well as welfare measures for pharmacists. Suresh was addressing a series of meetings with principals and directors of pharmacy colleges and representatives from Chemists and Druggist Associations of Gujarat. Speaking about self-governance, he said, "Although inspections and approvals will remain, we will ensure that no institute will suffer due to regulatory actions. We are uploading and verifying data and will use technology interface more and more. From next year, everything under ...
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AIIMS to build new-age dental research centre 21.3.2018 DNA: Top News
In another step to provide dental care to the increasing number of patients at the country's premier medical institute, the All India Institute of Medical Sciences (AIIMS) will get a new dental research centre in the next two years. The centre will be equipped with all the new-age research technology and will provide an all-round dental and oral health care. The Rs 60-crore budgeted project will focus on regenerative medicine which includes harvesting stem cells that can grow new teeth and jaw bones. The research centre will also have 3-D scanning of teeth and will be the first government centre to operate with such a high-tech equipment. Stem cell research hit a milestone only a few years ago when a team of dentists discovered adult stem cells lays right inside our teeth. If cast correctly, these stem cells can take shape and form a natural tooth without a problem. Studies have proven that when the stem cells take place of your missing tooth, they will quickly assimilate and grow a new tooth in a matter ...
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