User: Genecampaign Topic: Climate Change
Category: Impacts :: Glacier
Last updated: Aug 28 2018 20:36 IST RSS 2.0
 
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Bolivia's second-largest lake dries up and may be gone forever, lost to climate change 22.1.2016 Guardian: Environment

As Andean glaciers disappear, so do the sources of Lake Poopó’s water, say scientists who blame a warming environment, El Niño and mining

Overturned fishing skiffs lie abandoned on the shores of what was Bolivia’s second-largest lake. Beetles dine on bird carcasses and gulls fight for scraps under a glaring sun in what marshes remain.

Lake Poopó was officially declared evaporated in December. Hundreds, if not thousands, of people have lost their livelihoods and gone.

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Leonardi DiCaprio savages corporate greed of big oil: 'Enough is enough' 20.1.2016 The Guardian -- Front Page

Solution to climate change is to keep fossil fuels in the ground, Hollywood star tells World Economic Forum in Davos

Leonardi Dicaprio has launched a ferocious attack on the greed of the world’s energy industry at the World Economic Forum in Davos.

DiCaprio used an awards ceremony to demand more action on climate change, decrying those who deny it is a problem. And he insisted that fossil fuels must be kept in the ground – backing a campaign launched by the Guardian last year.

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Obama promotes action on climate change on Bear Grylls TV show – video 18.12.2015 Guardian: Environment

The US president treks through a remote part of Alaska with Bear Grylls to promote action on climate change in a special episode of the British adventurer’s reality show, Running Wild With Bear Grylls. Obama and Grylls hike on the Exit glacier in the Kenai mountains, but also discuss the dangers of climate change for the Alaskan landscape

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Obama runs wild with Bear Grylls to promote action on climate change 18.12.2015 The Guardian -- World Latest

US president treks across a glacier and eats a bloody salmon discarded by a bear on British adventurer’s reality TV show

He declined to drink urine but Barack Obama did make tea from glacier water and munch on a bloody salmon previously chewed by a bear in his wilderness bromance with Bear Grylls.

The US president trekked through a remote part of Alaska to promote action on climate change – and show a more human side – in a special episode of the British adventurer’s reality show, Running Wild With Bear Grylls.

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Obama runs wild in Alaska, drinks catkin tea for Bear Grylls show 14.12.2015 DNA: Mumbai
They shared tea made out of catkins, ate wild salmon picked over by a bear, talked about being a dad and discussed climate change - all while snipers kept watch from the mountains and the official food taster looked on warily. US President Barack Obama's "Running Wild" Alaska episode with wilderness expert Bear Grylls airs on NBC television on December 17, and Grylls said the short trip showed an intimate and fun side of Obama that has rarely been seen. "He said it was one of the best days of his presidency," Grylls told reporters. "There were times along the route I had to pinch myself and think, actually, this is the president of America'." The episode was filmed in September on a trek to Alaska's shrinking Exit Glacier that was aimed at drawing world attention to climate change. Last year alone, the Exit Glacier melted and retreated 187 ft (57 m) toward the Harding ice field, which has itself lost 10 percent of its mass since 1950. Obama is the first sitting president of any nation to take part in ...
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Paris climate deal: reaction from the experts 13.12.2015 Guardian: Environment
While the summit delegates herald their ambitious targets, scientists and campaigners have mixed views of the agreement The agreement is extremely welcome. However, we should also be cautious. It is clear that the 1C temperature rise over pre-industrial levels that we have seen so far has triggered a whole range of effects including melting of mountain glaciers, significant sea-level rise, devastating droughts, and flooding. These effects are likely to get much worse with even modest future increases. Keeping temperatures to manageable levels also assumes that we know what the precise link is between atmospheric greenhouse gas concentrations and the global temperature response. We don’t know this, nor the nature and strength of natural feedbacks in the climate system that might drive future warming. Stephen Harrison, University of Exeter For all that is encouraging in the draft agreement, the timescales and lack thereof are worrying. Little substantive will happen until 2020, while clear deadlines for ...
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Climate change means days are getting longer, scientists find 12.12.2015 The Guardian -- World Latest

Duration of day has lengthened by a millisecond over the past 100 years as water from shrinking glaciers slows Earth’s rotation and shifts position of poles

The impact of climate change may appear to be overwhelmingly negative but there is a bright spot for those who struggle to find enough time in the day: melting glaciers are causing the rotation of the Earth to slow thereby lengthening our days, new research has found.

Harvard University researchers have provided an answer to a long-held conundrum over how shrinking glaciers are affecting the rotation and axis of the Earth, calculating that the duration of a day has lengthened by a millisecond over the past 100 years.

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Mount Everest getting warmer and glaciers shrinking, research suggests 7.12.2015 DNA: Opinion
Mount Everest is getting warmer over the past 50 years with the glaciers around the world's highest peak shrinking 'remarkably', according to a Chinese research. The glaciers in 8,844-metre-high Mt Everest, known as Mt Qomolangma in Tibet, have been shrinking 'remarkably' which leads to swelling glacial lakes and rivers downstream, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Hunan University of Science and Technology and Mount Qomolangma Snow Leopard Conservation Centre said in a report said. At the same time, the ecological environment in the area is getting better with increased forest coverage around the Everest. Last month a report released by Institute of Tibetan Plateau Research said Tibet regarded as the roof of the world faced grim scenario as its glaciers were retreating and natural disasters were on the rise due to rising temperatures and increasing human activity. The glacier on the Tibetan plateau has been backing off since the 20th century due to rising temperature and at a faster speed since 1990s, a ...
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Worrying case of the majestic Gangotri glacier 6.12.2015 Rediff: News
A research shows that the health of the majestic Gangotri glacier that feeds the river Ganges has been affected, as the maximum temperature in the region has shot up by 0.9 degree Celsius and snowfall reduced by 37 cm annually.
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Paris climate talks: Africa means business on global warming | Akinwumi Adesina 4.12.2015 The Guardian -- World Latest

Africa has much to offer the world in the battle against climate change, but fellow leaders at the Paris climate talks must also be prepared to do their bit

The term “glacial pace” takes on real and literal meaning with climate change. The disappearance of our glaciers may have hastened dramatically, but our efforts to stop them doing so have moved at a truly glacial pace. This has to change, right now.

Since the Kyoto protocol came into being, we have failed miserably to protect our planet. Current trajectories show the world is on track towards a temperature rise of about 3C by 2100. Climate talks in Paris this month are our last chance to turn the tide.

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Those who contributed least to climate change are fighting for survival | Gyan Chandra Acharya 2.12.2015 Guardian: Environment
On the frontline of climate change, effects are real and measurable. Paris talks must make most vulnerable countries top priority and cap warming at 1.5C The world has often been reminded over the past year that we must leave no one behind as we strive to cement our plans for a sustainable future. The COP 21 Paris talks give the international community the chance to demonstrate that it is indeed leaving no one behind , that all voices are heard and understood. It is a sad reality that while the world’s most vulnerable countries have contributed the least to climate change, they are most at risk from its negative effects and the least equipped to withstand and adapt to it. Small island developing states (Sids), least developed countries (LDCs) and landlocked developing countries (LLDCs) face tremendous challenges. For them the effects of climate change are disproportionately high. As they stand on the frontline of climate change, the impacts are real and ...
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China’s bottled water industry eyes up the Tibetan plateau 16.11.2015 The Guardian -- World Latest

Tibet is encouraging companies to tap the Himalayan glaciers for premium drinking water, but the environmental stakes are high

In the last two decades China has become the world’s largest bottled water consumer and a major producer. With per capita consumption 19% lower than global average, the market is expected to continue to grow.

Although it currently makes up a small proportion of China’s annual bottled water production, water from Tibet’s mountain glaciers is seen as the new point of growth for China’s booming bottled water industry.

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Melting glacier? Yawn. Climate change is boring, worthy – and terrifying | Owen Jones 13.11.2015 The Guardian -- Front Page
It’s easy to switch off when you hear another report of rising sea levels. But unless individuals act, we’re heading for a global catastrophe It’s the existential threat to our species, and it bores us to tears. Admit it. You think the consequences of human-driven climate change are terrifying, but it seems too abstract, too technical and too long term. A recent poll in the US found that, while most Americans accepted that the climate was indeed changing, less than a quarter admitted to be either extremely or very worried about ...
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PM Modi launches Stage-II of Baglihar Hydro Electric Project in Jammu and Kashmir 7.11.2015 DNA: Top News
Launching the 450 MW Baglihar Hydro Electric Project Stage-II in Ramban, Prime Minister Narendra Modi on Saturday underlined the importance of 'bijali', 'sadak' and 'paani' (electricity, road and water) for development. "A society having all these three basic infrastructures crosses the zenith of development," he said. Underlining the importance of power generation from natural resources, the Prime Minister said, "At a time when the entire world is grappling with the problem of global warming and working to save glaciers, our natural resource of potable water, from diminishing, hydro, solar and wind electric generation are important to the future of the mankind." Stating that his goal is to take electricity to 18,000 villages in 1000 days, Prime Minister Modi said, "I have announced a package of Rs.80,000 crore for J&K, and with this package, we wish to use solar energy plant to generate electricity in Leh and Ladakh." Prime Minister Narendra Modi along with Jammu and Kashmir Chief Minister Mufti ...
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Antarctica gaining more ice than it's losing: NASA 2.11.2015 DNA: Mumbai
Antarctica is currently gaining enough ice to outweigh the increased losses from the continent's thinning glaciers, a new NASA study has found. The research challenges the conclusions of other studies, including the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change's (IPCC) 2013 report, which says that Antarctica is overall losing land ice. According to the new analysis of satellite data, the Antarctic ice sheet showed a net gain of 112 billion tons of ice a year from 1992 to 2001. That net gain slowed to 82 billion tons of ice per year between 2003 and 2008. "We're essentially in agreement with other studies that show an increase in ice discharge in the Antarctic Peninsula and the Thwaites and Pine Island region of West Antarctica," said lead author Jay Zwally, a glaciologist with NASA Goddard Space Flight Centre in US. "Our main disagreement is for East Antarctica and the interior of West Antarctica - there, we see an ice gain that exceeds the losses in the other areas," said Zwally. But it might only take a ...
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NASA: Antarctica gaining ice instead of melting 2.11.2015 DNA: Money
A recent NASA study reveals that the mass gains of Antarctic ice sheet are currently adding enough ice to the continent to outweigh the increased losses from its thinning glaciers. The new data offers previously unrecorded gains in Antarctica which show that the increase in ice is greater than the loss in melting, scientists say. This challenges the conclusions of many other reports such as the 2013 Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) study which said that the continent is constantly losing ice. According to NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center, the University of Maryland, the Antarctic ice sheet accumulated a net gain of 112 billion tons of ice per year in the period covering 1992 to 2001. Although it decelerated to 82 billion tons of ice per year in the 2003 to 2008 period. Researchers also found that the thickening of ice in the eastern region of Antarctica has remained steady from 1992 to 2008 at 200 billion tons per year, while the losses in the western region as well as in the Antarctic ...
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India-Africa summit: PM Modi calls for African cooperation to combat climate change 29.10.2015 India News, Latest News in India, Live News India, India Breaking News - Times of India
Prime Minister Narendra Modi on Thursday called for cooperation on climate change with Africa while addressing the India-Africa Forum ...
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Eco-friendly architecture in the Alps hits new heights 21.10.2015 The Guardian -- Front Page
Attitudes to Alpine wilderness have changed in the 150 years since the Matterhorn was first climbed: these cutting-edge new buildings treat the mountains gently, while still looking great This year is the 150th anniversary of the conquest of the Alps’ last major peaks, including the Grandes Jorasses and the Matterhorn – the culmination of a five-year flurry of Alpine first ascents. While these feats are being celebrated throughout the winter in a number of fascinating exhibitions , particularly in the Chamonix valley, it perhaps sounds odd now to talk of “conquests” in relation to nature. We have – sadly – effectively conquered her, and are awaiting the blowback of climate change: mountains are crumbling at alarming rates, glaciers are receding , whole valleys are being cut off by landslides. But a new, gentle approach to the high mountains is in evidence in a range of recent buildings that give both expert climbers and the general public the chance to understand these changes without leaving a heavy ...
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Dalai Lama says strong action on climate change is a human responsibility 20.10.2015 Guardian: Environment

Tibetan Buddhist spiritual leader says humans causeed global warming so must now take action to protect fragile environments including Himalayan glaciers

The Dalai Lama on Tuesday urged strong global action to limit global warming and to protect fragile environments, including the Himalayan glaciers and Tibetan plateau.

Calling climate change a “problem which human beings created,” the 80-year-old Tibetan Buddhist spiritual leader said all of humanity was now responsible for taking action. But instead, he said, “we are relying on praying to God or to Buddha. Sometimes I feel this is very illogical.”

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World will pass crucial 2C global warming limit, experts warn 11.10.2015 The Guardian -- Front Page

Carbon pledges from 147 nations to Paris climate summit ‘are not enough to stop temperature rise’, experts conclude

Pledges by nations to cut carbon emissions will fall far short of those needed to prevent global temperatures rising by more than the crucial 2C by the end of the century. This is the stark conclusion of climate experts who have analysed submissions in the runup to the Paris climate talks later this year.

A rise of 2C is considered the most the Earth could tolerate without risking catastrophic changes to food production, sea levels, fishing, wildlife, deserts and water reserves. Even if rises are pegged at 2C, scientists say this will still destroy most coral reefs and glaciers and melt significant parts of the Greenland ice cap, bringing major rises in sea levels.

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