User: Genecampaign Topic: Climate Change
Category: Impacts :: Glacier
Last updated: Aug 28 2018 20:36 IST RSS 2.0
 
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Trump test awaits NASA-ISRO's most expensive satellite 25.6.2017 Rediff: News
If all goes on well, the NISAR satellite will be launched in 2021 from India using the Geo-synchronous Satellite Launch Vehicle (GSLV).
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Impact of climate change on water resources in Uttarakhand 4.6.2017 TOI: Cities
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Canada's Saraswati: Massive river flowed into oblivion in just 4 days! 20.4.2017 DNA: Top News
It takes decades, or centuries even, for rivers to merely change their course. But one river in Canada vanished into thin air — quite literally — in only four days last year, with climate experts blaming a rapidly melting glacier in the river's headwaters for the abrupt disappearance. The Slims river was immense in scale and stretched to 150 m at its widest points. For hundreds of years, it carried melt water northwards from the Kaskawulsh glacier in the country's Yukon territory into the Kluane river, and then into the Yukon river towards the Bering Sea. But in what is believed to be the world's first-ever case of 'river piracy' — which denotes the flow of one river being suddenly diverted into another — the drainage gradient of the Slims river was tipped in favour of a second river, redirecting the melt water towards the Gulf of Alaska, and causing the Slims river to do its disappearing act. This, scientists say, is a worrying sign of how climate change could be changing the geography of the ...
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Isro sends 4 teams to Antarctica 22.3.2017 TOI: India
This year, four teams from ISRO—one team from Space Applications Centre, Ahmedabad and one team each from the National Remote Sensing Centre, Indian Institute of Remote Sensing, Dehradun and the Space Physics Laboratory(SPL), Thiruvananthapuram—are participating.
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Bengaluru woman plans to conquer South Pole 15.12.2016 TOI: Cities
A globetrotter driven by passion for photography, Priya Venkatesh’s joy knew no bounds when she conquered the polar region---Antarctic and the Arctic Circle in three years. The 42-year-old resident of Jayanagar is the first woman from Bengaluru to cross the Antarctic Circle.
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Pakistan to soon set up world's largest solar park 30.11.2016 Sify Finance
[Pakistan], Nov.30 (ANI): Pakistan will soon have the world's largest solar park of 1,000 megawatts, the country's Minister of Climate Change Zahid Hamid has said.
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We are going GAGA over these National Geographic photos 4.11.2016 Rediff: News
National Geographic has released a final selection of entries from the magazine's 2016 Nature Photographer of the Year contest and, as you might expect, they're breathtaking.
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Volcanic eruption of Mount Pinatubo helping to determine global mean sea level, say experts 29.8.2016 Sify Finance
[United States], Aug.29 (ANI): Scientists have disentangled the major role played by the volcanic eruption of Mount Pinatubo in determining the global mean sea level.
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Global warming making Siachen riskier for soldiers 14.8.2016 Rediff: News
The death of 10 soldiers earlier this year in an avalanche in the critical Sonam post, located close to the Line of Control with Pakistan, was due to global warming.
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‘Interface on Real Problems of Himalayan Region will Help in Proper Planning’: Anil Dave 11.8.2016 Govt of india: PIB
The Government has underlined the need for an interface on the real problems of the Himalayan region, as it will help in proper planning.
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Gangotri is melting but not at an alarming rate: Government 19.7.2016 TOI: India
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Watch: Pianist Ludovico Einaudi creates music amidst calving glacier in battle to save the Arctic 22.6.2016 DNA: Recent Columns
Ludovico Einaudi is best known for collaborating with esteemed filmmakers like Clint Eastwood, Darren Aronofsky, and Xavier Dolan, Ludovico Einaudi, this time decided to add a few more notes to raising the awareness for the preservation of the Arctic glaciers. In association with Greenpeace, Einaudi performed the musical piece known as the "Elegy for the Arctic" in the Arctic. A wooden stage was created to carry the musician and his piano in the chilling waters at Wahlenbergbreen glacier in Svalbard, Norway.  Einaudi's melancholic tune had the most fitting background as the icebergs could be heard crumbling and falling into the ocean. Climate change over the recent years have been a major concern for people all across the world as the polar icecaps have started melting at an exponential rate. This is Einaudi's attempt to bring some awareness to the problem knocking on the ...
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Global Warming: John Kerry sees looming climate catastrophe after Arctic visit 19.6.2016 DNA: Top News
Standing near Greenland's Jakobshavn glacier, the reputed source of the iceberg that sank the Titanic over a century ago, U.S Secretary of State John Kerry saw evidence of another looming catastrophe. Giant icebergs broken off from the glacier seemed to groan as they drifted behind him, signaling eventual rising oceans that scientists warn will submerge islands and populated coastal region. Briefed by researchers aboard a Royal Danish Navy patrol ship, Kerry appeared stunned by how fast the ice sheets are melting. He was struck by the more dire warnings he heard about the same process underway in more remote Antarctica. "This has been a significant eye-opener for me and I've spent 25 years or more engaged in this issue," Kerry said on the deck of the ship with Danish Foreign Minister Kristian Jensen during a two-day visit that ended late on Friday. Icebergs that broke off from the Jakobshavn Glacier are seen in the water below an aircraft on July 14, 2013 in Ilulissat, Greenland. Kerry made his first ...
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Water scarcity could shrink economies across the globe by 2050: World Bank 4.5.2016 DNA: Mumbai
Economies across large swathes of the globe could shrink dramatically by mid-century as fresh water grows scarce due to climate change, the World Bank reported on Tuesday. The Middle East could be hardest hit, with its gross domestic product slipping as much as 14% by 2050 unless measures are taken to reallocate water significantly, the Washington-based institution said in a report. Such measures include efficiency efforts and investment in technologies such as desalination and water recycling, it said. Global warming can cause extreme floods and droughts and can mean snowfall is replaced by rain, with higher evaporation rates, experts say. It also can reduce mountain snow pack that provides water, and the melting of inland glaciers can deplete the source of runoff, they say. Also, a rise in sea level can lead to saltwater contaminating groundwater. "When we look at any of the major impacts of climate change, they one way or the other come through water, whether it's drought, floods, storms, sea level ...
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Economies could shrink by mid-century due to scarce water - World Bank 4.5.2016 Sify Finance
By Sebastien Malo
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Ten years after 'hug a husky', what is David Cameron's green legacy? 20.4.2016 Guardian: Environment

A decade ago today, the Conservative leader visited the Arctic to witness the effects of climate change. But since coming to power, his government has dropped or watered down a succession of green policies

It is one of the most successful political reinventions ever. In just a few years as its new leader, David Cameron turned around the Tories’ toxic “nasty party” image - at least with enough voters to form a coalition government.

One of the most eye-catching moments came 10 years ago today with his “hug a husky” trip to the Arctic to highlight the impact of climate change. It was followed by Cameron’s commitment to lead the “greenest government ever”.

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Scientists fly glacial ice to south pole to unlock secrets of global warming 27.3.2016 The Guardian -- Front Page
High on Mont Blanc, huge ice cores are being extracted to help researchers study the alarming rate of glacial melt In a few weeks, researchers will begin work on a remarkable scientific project. They will drill deep into the Col du Dôme glacier on Mont Blanc and remove a 130 metre core of ice. Then they will fly it, in sections, by helicopter to a laboratory in Grenoble before shipping it to Antarctica. There the ice core will be placed in a specially constructed vault at the French-Italian Concordia research base, 1,000 miles from the south pole. The Col du Dôme ice will become the first of several dozen other cores, extracted from glaciers around the world, that will be added to the repository over the next few years. The idea of importing ice to the south pole may seem odd – the polar equivalent of taking coals to Newcastle – but the project has a very serious aim, researchers ...
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Bacteria could be speeding up the darkening of Greenland's ice 23.3.2016 The Guardian -- Front Page

Greenland’s ice is melting, and scientists have discovered a photosynthesising microbe they believe to be responsible for accelerating the process

A single species of bacteria could be about to accelerate the melting of Greenland. A photosynthesising microbe from a genus called Phormidesmis has been identified as the guilty party behind the darkening of Greenland.

It glues soot and dust together to form a grainy substance known as cryoconite. As the surface darkens, the Greenland ice becomes less reflective, more likely to absorb summer sunlight and more likely to melt.

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Mild winters, less snow on glaciers may spell trouble in summers for Uttarakhand, adjoining states 6.3.2016 TOI: Cities
The impact of this, according to experts of Wadia Institute of Hiamlaya Geology will be seen in the summers when the scarcity of water for hydro-electric projects in the state may give rise to a power crisis in Uttarakhand and possibly other adjoining ...
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Greenland ice melt putting global ocean circulation at risk 23.1.2016 Sify Finance
, Jan 23 (ANI): Due to melting ice caps caused by global warming, the world saw a rise in sea levels and now, a new study revealed that those glaciers in Greenland can also affect the global ocean
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